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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: May 24, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - May 24, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             m.y b. of bu, ,KS, rain ,K, in May .nd i. w.. M rf HI it going to-be like in Ada when the dry season gets here in Carpenter Has Quite A Story; Page 3, Section 2 Dick Donovan Leads Tribe With Victory Number Eight, Sports 59TH YEAR NO. 62 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1962 16 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY CARPENTER APPEARS Craft Overshoots Mark, Planes Spot Astronaut In Raft CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) Astronaut Malcolm Scott Carpenter successfully orbited the' earth three times today and then after a harrowing 35 minutes when it was not known whether he had survived the re- entry he was sighted sitting in a life raft in the At- lantic Ocean. A Navy P2V Neptune bomber Hashed the word that Carpenter apparently was all right after spotting him in the raft some 135 miles northeast of Puerto Rico. Floating nearby was the Aurora 7 spacecraft which had carried him three times around the globe in 4 hours and 56 minutes at miles an hour. The capsule overshot its intended landing area by 200 miles and Carpenter apparently decided to leave it and wait out recovery in the one-man inflatable life raft which he carried aboard the POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS The Ada Fire Department and Frisco railroad officials j faced a potentially dangerouf situation Wednesday noon when a tank load of yellow phos- j phorous gas caught flame at port as a train load of can passed through Ada The car j detached from tht rtst of tht convoy and left on a sidetrack east of the cement plant Fire Chief Dudley Young said Thursday morning that a Frisco employee kept watch over tht car overnight. The port has been packed with wet sand to avoid spread of flames. The gas highly explosive when in contact with an-. Young said bolts were on th. port to prevent from reaching the gas. He said the car would be transported to it. destination The wet sandbags will be left on the port of the tank. (NEWS Staff ___________ Astronaut Glenn Is No.1 Dad NEW YORK man ac- caosule. The Neptune reported it was circling the raft and said that Carpenter was "sitting upward." There was no .immediate report on his condition, but the plane said he appeared to be okay. When the Navy plane first re- ported sighting the 37-year-old Navy lieutenant commander in the sea. an obviously relieved and happy Lt. Col. 'John A. PLENTY FOR ALL The kids at Francis School can up the drinking fountain with ajsurtnce, since Francii residents have quit watering their gardens. The city coun- cil voted restrictions on uie after school found itself without water one day last Sinei then the been flowing freely at tne school. (NcWS Titan Missile Rrobers Question Blows Up In iAf. Engine Test j WltneSS6S CHICO, Calif. (AP> -A Titan 1 WASHINGTON (AP) Senate investigators disclosed missile was destroyed in a blast today their agents have questioned more than per- today as its silo exploded at jn the widening Billie Sol Estes Case. sT ob Mercury spokesman, reported to r npWKimp.n: missile complex near Chico. Twenty-four persons were trcat- ,ed for smoke inhalation, the Air Force announced. There were no fatalities. The other two missiles and si- los in the complex escaped dam- age, as did the control center, the announcement stated. The explosion occurred as con- tractors were running a test be- fore turning the base over to the Air Force. The Air Force spokesman de- clined to say what caused the blast or to comment on whether it resulted while test fueling of the Titan missile was under way. The blast was felt in Chico. eight miles south of the nearly completed Titan base. The missile installation has not yet been placed in operation. Hail Storm Hits County, Little Damage Seen Scattered hail hit the county And, said the. informant, many, many more will be questioned before the Senate Investigations subcommit- tee is ready to start its hearings into whether .Washington influence helped Estes build his rickety business empire. The report came after President Kennedy related at a news con- ference Wednesday that the FBI has moved into the investigation of the mysterious death of Henry Marshall, a Texas farm official. Victim's Body Vanishes In Plane's Ruins UNIONVILLE. Mo. body was still missing today in shot to death a year ago checking into Estes' dealings above the earth today was honored for doing a good job on it. Marine Lt. Col. John H. Glenn Jr. was named the nation's "Father of the Year." Although Glenn, as the first American to orbit this planet, has been as far away from his family as any man ever has been, he was rated tops as a family man by the Nationl Father's Day Committee. It also praised his courageous performance in his orbital flight last Feb. 20, and "his modesty in insisting" that 'the "honors "heaped upon him belong to the space program itself and not to him personally." The committee cited Glenn's "rare gifts of intellect, charm and daring" and called him "Ameri- ca's newest hero in its quest for peace and universal freedom." He and his wife, Anna Margaret, have two children, the fatal crash of a Continental >gram- cneCKing mio uuannya 1, under the government cotton pro-.John David, 14, and Carolyn Ann, last night, but little damage was thunderstorm turbulence as it reported. The heaviest hail apparently came in the northern part of the county. At the H. D. Richardson place just south of the Canadian, stones "almost as big as base- balls" were reported. Richardson. 76, said they were the largest he had ever seen. Bill Koller. Byng, said scatter- ed hailstones about as big as golfballs fell in that area. Paul Myers, who lives near the television" station, reported two "hail-falls" about an hour apart. The first, at 7 p.m.. lasted about 10 minutes, with stones about one- quarter inch in diameter. The sec- ond fall, about 8 o'clock, lasted for five or six minutes, Myers said. These stones were in the golfball size. West of Ada. at Center, Bob Austell reported a "sprinkling" of hail, but nothing out of the ordinary. Farther west and south, in the Hart community, Mrs. C, A. Christian said the stones were "a lot bigger than golfballs." The town of Francis, plagued by drouth and a short water sup- ply, escaped the hail but did man- age to get a shower of rain. Har- old Chaffin said gauges in various parts of town recorded from .65 to one inch of rainfall. Weather activity apparently skipped Ada itself entirely. Threat- ening skies dripped only .07 inch of rain. No hail was reported in the city. neared Kansas City on its flight from Chicago. Officials hoped that the taped flight record, salvaged from what was left of the main fuselage and sent to Kansas City, would afford some clue. Federal Aviation Administrator Najeeb Halaby said there was not a shred of evidence that the air- liner had collided with a small plane or had been ripped apart by a bomb. He also said there was nothing to show that it may have been caught in a tornado. The only person who might have been able to tell what had hap- pened died in a hospital soon after he was removed alive. He was one of the 37 passengers, a A man doesn't have to be a bigamist to have one wife too many. (Copr. Gen. Fea. Corp.) Airlines jet plane. The other 44 bodies were in an improvised morgue here. Search for the missing, uniden- tified victim and for the cause of the accident that tore the big plane apart in the air over south- ern Iowa continued with teams of The FBI declined to comment! 13. In ceremonies at the Waldorf Astoria comittee also jgories to nine other persons, in-! j eluding: "A Navy P2V Neptune has re- ported sighting the spacecraft floating in the landing area. Along side it was a life raft, and sitting in it was a gentleman named Carpenter." An Air Force air rescue service plane reached the area at p.m. (EST) and prepared to drop two para-medics into the water to assist Carpenter if necessary. Meanwhile, two twin jet helicop- ters were dispatched from the air- craft -carrier- Intrepid, -which-was stationed in the intended drop zone 200 miles away. The Virgin Islands Coast Guard said Carpenter had no apparent problems. "He waved as the plane parsed the Coast Guard said. Carpenter performed his triple circuit of the globe in a masterful display of cool courage. Rapid fuel consumption in his Aurora 7 spaceship caused great concern during his second orbit. But after consultation with the Drinking Water Flows But Gardens Wither At Francis By W. L. KNICKMEYER FRANCIS (Staff) drink- ing fountains at Francis School are running again. But the garden hoses aren't. The city council voted last week, after the school found it- self without water, to restrict use of water to "domestic" pur- poses. The ban on garden, lawn coming in hot and'thirsty after a ball game, found the school water fountains dry as a bone. Milk, ready to hand for a mid- afternoon break, was served out to the kids instead of water, Mrs. Henson says. After that they were sent home early. Next morning, according to Mrs. Henson, the school bus driver reported seeing a num- nadian River bottom was ruled unsafe by the Health Depart- ment. The new wells tested out at about 30 gallons per minute. Councilman Ernest Matthews notes that this is normally plen- ty of water for Francis. The pinch came only because over- use for irrigating purposes. 1 Actually, Matthews points out, the wells are still producing ably at times, beginning in the afternoon and continuing until about midnight. A tour of the town by a NEWS reporter showed most gardens standing up to the drouth fairly well. Even the H. D: Canadas (one of the hilltopper who haven't watered their gar- dens at all-this year, report that it's not suffering badly as yet. poses. The ban on garden, lawn drjver rcp0rted seeing a num- the wells are still producing its not suffering badly as yet. and livestock watering was. ber around town where enough, water for the. town. But though "it's about to burn up vio-'' dfin running full with the extra drain onjthe.-sys- if we don't-get a rain." entry into what normally would be a local police case, Last June, when Marshall waSj Actor Robert Morse, "Stage found dead, shot five times, his death was written off as suicide. I But under the pressure of the ern Iowa continued witii teams 011DUL unum me federal investigators on hand. his body The million Boeing 707 plane left a trail of wreckage for 60 miles Tuesday night before its main fuselage plummeted into a Missouri farm. The plane had been advised of Japanese-born engineer. All eight crew members, including four hostesses, died in the crash. Seven of the victims nave not iu auiit yet been identified, including one thg Estes case< with poijtjcai con. of the hostesses and the one whose body has not been found. ___ exhumed Tuesday for an autopsy in Franklin, Tex. Later the county medical examinter told county grand jurors his preliminary find- ing was murder. The examiner, Dr. J. A. Jachimczyk, was expected lo make his final report today. The FBI also had no comment on the case of Howard Pratt, 31. Chicago-office manager of Com-; mercial Solvents Corp., found i dead in his car Wednesday of car- bon monoxide poisoning. The com- pany's financial relations with Estes, who bought great quantities of liquid fertilizer from the chemi- cal firm, are under investigation. The Senate subcommittee, head- ed by Sen. John L. McClellan, D- Ark., said it had no evidence of any link between Estes and Pratt, but would look into the death be- cause of a cryptic note found in Pi-alt's car which said in part "the burden of guilt is on my shoulders." Investigators said they doubted Pratt had any connection with A House subcommittee headed by Rep. L. H. Fountain, D-N.C., plans to start hearings Monday on (Continued on Page Two) Father of the Year': entertainer Arthur Godfrey, "Radio Father of the actors E. G. Marshall and Robert Reed, "TV Father and Son of the attorney Louis Nizer. "Literary Father of the Year." Actress Olivia de Havilland, "Woman of the boxing champion Gene Fullmer, "Sports Father of the conductor and composer Meredith Willson, (Continued on Page Two) -BULLETIN- Official figures in Tuesday's runoff election were released to- day. Members of the 45th Divi- sion remain on duty guarding the vault in the Pontotoc County Election Board's office and no definite word has been received on when they will be relieved. This word will come presum- ably when a firm decision on a recount is announced. Official figures for this coun- ty are: Gary, 5499; Atkinson, 3794; Winters, 5491; Cartwright, 2800; Ncsbitt, 4670; Brett, 3032; Shaw, 4280; Flanagan, 2419; WII see no reason.why he shouldn't continue into the third orbit. But we emphasize that he limit his automatic fuel consump- tion." from the control center at Cape Canaveral to the tracking station at Point ArgueUo, Calif., for re- lay to Carpenter when he passed overhead. If a decision had been made Jerome Rosenberg sun-en bring him down after two orbits, his reverse rockets would have 2941; Hughes, 3C99; Quest. 400, yes, 4636; no, 405, yes, 2040; no, 5657. ter, 4276; Rigsby, 4603; Smith, 4378; Griffin, 4981; Jones, 1926, and Austell, 1327. lato'rs: cutting off their' water a fee for re- storing it. Mrs. Ina Henson, Francis, principal, reports that since no- tice of the restriction was pub- lished last Friday the school has had an uninterrupted flow of water when needed. The council action came short- ly after the Francis students. garden hoses were running full blast on kitchen gardens and flower beds. Later that day, 'council mem- bers toured the town and found the same thing. That night they met formally to vote the restric- tion into effect. The Francis water supply from wells drilled about two years ago. after the former system of open wells in'the Ca- with the extra drain onjthe.-sys- tem the pumps couldn't build up enough pressure to get the wa- ter up to the school. The school building is located on a hill at the southwest edge of town. Only the school and a few jiearby houses on the high ground were affected by the shortage, though residents of lower areas report their water pressure has dropped consider- if we don't-get a rain.1" Sunday night, when Ada got nearly a half inch of rain, Fran- cis recorded only a trace. But the Francis gardens will appar- ently just have to take their chances with the weather. At any rate, since _the restriction was people have stopped watering. "I guess they felt sorry for us up Mrs. Henson says. Third Murder Suspect Gives Up In Office Of New York Newspaper Laotians Say U.S. Demands NosavanQuit was an order sent! NEW YORK Wednesday night to under heavy guard to aj VIENTIANE. Laos center't Cape their hands on three ex-con- New York Daily News in iu Ma, .Brooklyn police of reported to- victs accused of the holdup- murders of two city detectives in Brooklyn. The one who hid out the longest hattan headquarters. Notified by the News, Assistant homicide charge shortly before Police booked Rosenberg on a day that the United States has Chief Inspector Raymond V. Mar tin picked -up Rosenberg in the editorial department and had him been fired over Point Arguello and he would have' descended gradually over the United States to a landing in .the Atlantic 500 miles south of Bermuda. Officials detected fast consump- Loudspeakers Blare At Fleeing Chinese dawn, after he had been ques- tioned through the night and ear- ly morning and viewed by wit- nesses of last Friday's holdup. Detectives said he said he is in- nocent. Rosenberg's surrender de- scribed in a copyright story in the five days and a few hours after the murders, and demanded Gen. Phoumi Nosavan, strongman of the pro-Western Vi- entiane regime, resign his Cabinet posts. Phoumi. vice premier of Prince Boun Oum's government, controls the royal armed forces as defense and interior minister. The Kenne- dy administration blames him for blocking negotiations to set up'ia coalition government in Laos un- der neutralist Prince Souvanna on Rosenberg's 25th birthday. tion of the fuel shortly after the i assistant secretary of state, beaiuu was uuuci woj. _ j 11 waj summoned the Laotian ambassa- that day the alleged Wasnington and told him m accused of staging the .._.., conserve the valuable hydrogen China lo stay home and help (sources said they had nothing to the United States has no more peroxide which is used to control the altitude of the craft. Apparently he did not hear the original order, which came from the Canary Island tracking sta- tion, and it had to be repeated by grow needed food. But Red earlier Hong Kong i .11 Jt I (Uli der guards reportedly made no attempt to stop the 'flow of refu- gees to Hong Kong. About succeeded in getting press reports that Red 'guards had commanded the waiting mobs to turn back and fired warning shots when their orders went un- heeded. two posts in Australia, Muchea across the frontier into this Brit-! Tne jjong Kong government ex- and Woomera. As he crossed crown colony before dawn.I Pacific toward the .west coast of j Sources in the border area said the United States, Mercury offi- all but about 500 were rounded up by British police and army patrols. They were rushed to a detention c'amp for return to Red uuan, yle umtea states, Mercury om- liams, 3357; Key, 5262; Briscoe, dals checkj. with Carpenter 2941! Hnffhps 3C99: Quest. 400. i.._l on the status of his fuel. Should Carpenter use up all his )40; no, 5657. fucj hg have no way Of Ford. 5183; Nichols, 3827; Hcs- controlling the altitude. This would be particularly dangerous China. Reports from the sealed-off bor- der area.-said the Communist (Continued on Page Two) loudspeaker broadcasts to throngs pressed appreciation for the inter- est and concern shown by the United States for Hong Kong's problem. A government spokesman voiced the appreciation after reports that President Kennedy had cleared the.. way for between and refugees to be admitted to the United Stales. holdup of a tobacco com- pany with Rosenberg, was caught in a motel in a Chicago suburb. The next day. the man accused of driving a car which was to have been used in a getaway sur- rendered in Norwich, Conn. The Daily News said Rosen- berg, "desperate on the fifth day after the contacted his father, Louis, 56. When the father turned to the News for .advice, he was told: "Have him turn himself in. It's (Continued on Page Two) Oklahoma Sweats Out Official Vote Count By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS W. P. Bill Atkinson maintained a slim, but dwindled, lead over J Raymond Gary for the Democrat- ic nomination for governor as both men awaited official tabula- tions 'while 'national guardsmen stood watch over ballot boxes. In a race where every vote now appears crucial, Atkinson had on- ly a 486-vote margin after adjust- ments late Wednesday gave him a net gain of 12 votes in Pontotoc County and Gary a net gain of 81 votes in Haskell County. Complete unofficial results in BILL ATKINSON Tuesday's primary runoff now give Atkinson votes to 543 for Gary. Official Election Board tabula- tions are not expected before Sat- urday and if these confirm the eyelash victory for Atkinson, Gary is expected to .ask for 'a recount in at least a few of'the state's 77 counties. Gary, a former 'governor who sought an unprecedented second "I am asking the attorneys to watch and advise me in order to make a'decision before the dead- said Gary. "I have had a number of supporters to encour- age me to ask for a recount in a. number of .the larger counties, Tulsa, They'have vot- ing machines in Tulsa but they can make mistakes' in tabulating the vote." Saturday noon is the sought an unprecedented second term, said Wednesday he hasn't; "u definitely decided on a recount, al- definitely__________ thought he is giving it some thought and has named an old friend and associate, James C. Hamil, to head a committee of attorneys. have never been very high on ing'.- for a 'recount it seldom changes anything." received congratula- tions and said: "I. am waiting to see what the j But Edmondson said his action official returns show. I hope and expect them to show I am the nominee. If they don't, then 'we will decide our next move." Gary said if the official tabula- tion shows him 'the loser by less than votes he might ask .for a recount "because when it is that close there .are possibilities .of mistakes." Gov. J. Howard Edmondson or- dered state Highway Patrol troop-, ers, 'and later national guardsmen to' relieve them, to .stand watch over ballots in each countyto pre- vent "any chance that they, might be .tampered.with. "certainly is not to be taken as a- reflection on any official" but he just wanted to assure that no boxes 'were disturbed if there is to a recount. It was the- first time in the state's-history that the National Guard 'has been called out to watch ballot boxes in all counties, a guard spokesman said. It also was the closest governor's race. A cash deposit of per coun- ty is required of the petitioner for-' a except- when fraud is alleged it :per county. (Continytd on Two) f confidence in Phoumi. Harriman reportedly said Phou- mi must quit the government 01 the United States will be obliged to reconsider its aid to the Vien- tiane regime. The Laotian officials charged Harriman. with -interference in Laos internal affairs. They charged Harriman's stand was prompted by a personal quar- rel he had with Phoumi when the American diplomat came to Vien- tiane in March to urge Bourn Oum, to join in coalition talks with Sou- vanna Phouma and pro-Commu- nist Price Souphanouvong. Reports from Washington previ- ously said President Kennedy is backing the move to curtail Phou- mi's by getting him to yield his Cabinet posts and confine himself to purely military matters. Prince Souvanna Phouma, head- ing home from France to set up talks with the two other (Continued on Two) RAYMOND GARY High temperature In Ada Wedneiday was 91; low Wednes- day night, 65; reading at 7 a.m. Thursday, 67.   

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