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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: May 11, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - May 11, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             CIVIL DEFENSE IN ACTION The Ada Civil Def.nse unit out in night as a mock alert was centered at East Central State College. Approximately workers rushed to the college where the Thursday processing casualties eight minutes later. The whole op.ration, :from disaster scene to Second from right, the hallolf the ,90 C D hospital for the 40 victims, required one hour and 30 minutes. In .the. photos, the Civil clear out the mangled "casualties. At right, a student who suffered minor Defense men are in action. At left, Bowie. Ballard and other subdue.a "victim" ...ear o interviewed .and tagged by a C. D. All the "eaiualties" were-pledges from the 1 TT....... -1 have hit Fentem p. m. The Civil Defense rescue m c-aS wT and.medical unit was set up and some steam pipes in the annex building whare he .was supposedly tossed by the -high alert. (NEWS Staff Injuns, Palefaces Bury The Hatchet In Georgia, Page 5 THE ADA EVENING NEWS Ada Elks Relays Set For Saturday See Sports'Page 59TH YEAR NO. 51 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, MAY 11, 19G2 12 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Kennedy Moves To Aid Business HOT SPRINGS, Va. (API-The Kennedy administration made a major move today toward better relations with business by an- nouncing that liberalization of tax depreciation write-offs will be or- dered soon. Unofficial estimates set the 1962 tax savings at about billion for big and little businessmen. The announcement was made at a singularly appropriate the Business Council, an organi- zation of major industrialists headed by Chairman Roger M. Blough.of U.S. Steel Corp., Presi- dent Kennedy's chief antagonist in the April steel-price tussle. Big Steel rolled back its price in- creases under pressures from Kennedy. Secretary of the Treasury Doug- las Dillon sent the word that the revision is now in its final stages He said the-write-offs will be or- dered into effect late next month or in July at the latest. Dillon, detained in Washington by congressional hearings, was unable to attend today's opening session of the Business Council's spring meeting. Undersecretary Henry H. Fowler read Dillon's speech at the closed-door session after giving copies .to newsmen. His words dispelled 'suspicions voiced in some quarters that there would be only .a token'liberaliza- Conservatives Suffer Setback LONDON Minister MacMillan's govern- ment was shaken today as.Liberals and Laborites wal- loped Conservatives in local elections that often reflect the national political trend. The Conservatives conceded a setback as the opposi- tion seized control of municipal councils in 36 towns The Tories lost a net of 516 PairOfAdans Seek Parole At MeAlester seats .in 428 boroughs in England and Wales. The campaign was fought al- most entirely on domestic particularly the Macrriillan' gov- ernment's new restraints on wages and dividends and-the un- .certainties over Britain's.prospec- Two prison inmates from Ada I live entry into the Common'Mar- will be among those who will be ket. considered for paroles May 21-22 at the state prison in McAlester. inmates whose death sentences were commuted to life (including one from Ada) will be included when the 37 prisoners put their cases before the state Parden and Parole Board. Alva Floyd Moore, Ada, is again seeking a parole. He was sentenc- ed to death in the electric chair in 1941 .for the slaying of Alf Hard- age, local service station operator. However, his death sentence was later commuted to ,life inprison ment by a higher court. Hardage killed on May 1, 1941. Tilhnan Jamison, also of Ada, will seek a parole. He was sen- tenced to 40 years in the state prison for the murder cf Horace Edmondson in the 300 block of East Fifth street on Sept. Edward Lewis and ..Isom ..Wil- liams, both of Atoka -County, will go before the board. They -were given death sentences for the kill- ing of W. A. Wallace in Atoka. Their death sentences were later commuted.-' Visitors See Platt Park Platt National Park, Sulphur, recorded visitors 'and 371 campers during the week of April 29-May 5, Supt. Johnwill Fans has announced. Totals for the year are now and respec- tively. to partly cloudy and warm this after- noon, tonight and low tonight 58-68; high Saturday 88- 88. High temperature in Ada Thursday was 88; .low Thursday night, 65; reading at 7 m. Friday, 69. The swing against .the Conser- vatives in voting Thursday almost wiped-out the gain of--700..seats the Tories picked up' in' local -elec- tions over the last three years; The Laborile 'Daily Mirror called it "disaster for .the Tories." The Conservative .Daily Mail took a slightly softer line: VTories tot With results from boroughs the results showed the Conservatives gained 13 seats, lost gained lost 75: Liberals gained'. 339, lost 12; independents gained: 53, lost 122. .In-addition, the Conservatives gained 2 newly created bor 12, Liberals 1. (Continued on Page Two) Artists Plan Show, Sale On Weekend. Approximately 15.- members of the Ada Artists Association-will exhibit .works .in the- annual-, out- door show-which will be hel'd'in the. parking lot of- the, .Oklahoma State Motor The artists' the 'exhibit, cludes about 75 works''of art, at 8 a. rn. An3 Sunday, the exhibit will be moved to'the Horace Mann Audi torium, where it may be viewed beginning'at 2 p. .m. At ,3 p. m: the Association will hold its sec ond annual auction.' The gains from the sale of art works go directly to the student scholarship, fund, set up last year Ada -Artists. .'Every semester :his "scholarship goes to a deserv ing art student .at East Central State the art the only fund available :or this scholarship. This -auction -.has -some line works. Ada and area folk are. invited to. brouse. at the outdoor and. indoor and to re- main "tor sale that the prospect of faster depreciation was being used merely as bait to induce business- men to support the other key ele- ments of. the. administration'-s tax bill providing a tax credit for investment made in modernization, Together, Dillon has declared, the twin tax measures will give U.S.' industry a better tax break than' their long-envied foreign competitors.. And, he has said. they should'stimulate the .kind .of plant' improvements that can bring American .exporters closer to cost-equality in world markets. Any business, which has'been able. to. .prove ,to .'the Internal' Revenue, depre- ciable life' of shorter than -those'Tset forth in the new guidelines' will' be per- mitted to use the shorter period of he said. And as long as a company's depreciation reserves do not be- come- inordinately would be an' indication that old equipment is not being replaced as depreciation rate will not .be-subject to'chal- lenge at any time., "A company usingi the new schedule -will' not "be questioned for a-long period Fowler said, even if-its depreciation re- serve grows large. The revenue service will act when, after a period of years; it appears that equipment is not' being, replaced as rapidly, as the company claims. The :council, -iawait- ed expected. optimistic, forecasts by industry's'own'- economists of strongly rising business activity through', 1962. The findings, were, made for the council by a panel of, a dozen in-, dustry experts. They-.will be re- ported to the council.Saturday-by Charles G.; Mortimer; board chairman, of General.floods; Inc., and head of the council's commit- tee on the domestic economy. The, forecasts, .were ,reported without; fanfare lasUweekrto- the President's Council of Economic Advisers .in -Washington, which concurs in the optimism; but sus- pects', and production may go even .Higher than the in- dustry estimates.' Mortimer; -it" was learned, will pass these conclusions. on to the council.1 "headed by Roger M. board, chairman of U.S. Steel Corp.: Production this.year will hit 'a total and will (Continued on Page Two) Accident Breaks Up Big Rally A car-pedestrian accident in Stonewall last night 'interrupted a'political rally and sent'a Gl- year-old .nightwalchman to Valley View Hospital with a fractured knee. Charlie Anderson, nightwatch- man at Stonewall, was reported in poor condition .by hospital authorities'.this morning. The accident occurred about 8 p. m. on Stonewall's Main' Street where a political speaking was in progress. The meeting had been, called by Allen G. for the. Democratic nomination .forj state, senator. Other, county can-1 didates 'for various.-offices, -invit- ed to -the ;meeting had already 'Just as' Nichols, began his own the accident' occurred. An- derson was ta'ken-'to Valley View, and Nichols cancelled his talk Nichols announced this'morning that he had rescheduled the Stonewall1 meeting (one .of a series being held'throughput the district) for.Saturday, p.m: A meeting' originally scheduled for Fittstown Saturday.has 'been postponed. The date will be an- nounced 'Anderson was hit by a car driv- en by .James Wendell Scott, 30, of 124V4'East Highway Patrol. Trooper Spike Mitchell, who investigated .the ac- cident; said 'Anderson was walk irig ;nqrth across" the street when he was hit'. He said Anderson-ap- parently see the: car which was 'travelling west toward Ada. The' left front bumper of Scoffs car struck Anderson. Mitchell1 said 88 feet of skid marks were'' left by Scott's car. U.S. May Plunge Into Laos Military Crisis Two Bond Issues Set For Voters -KONAWA (Special) .Koriawa City Council has.voted to..present a-bond issue to citizens, for ap- proval. Tuesday, May 29, for the purpose of .water, system. Proposed improvement to the 'STUDY VIET NAM PROBLEMS Secretary.. of Dtfenie Robert McNamara, in- civilian clothes, :tbur es, .and members of his party .chat with a villager while -on inspection of strategic South' Viet Nam -defense posts-in'the -area of Niha Trang; north- east cf Saigon. Mn the visiting group are. Gen. Lyman chairman U. S. joint chiefs ofi staffs-Arthur. Sylvester, rear, assistant .secretary -of: defense for.public Mc- Namara; and Ma Gen. Nguyen Khanh, Vietnamese army chief, 'of .staff. (AP President Confers With Advisers In View Of Situation WASHINGTON S. leaders were reported today to be considering more forceful.action to prevent Laos from'falling to pro-Communist forces if. the spread- ing military, crisis cannot be brought quickly under con- trol. President Kennedy-and-his chief-diplomatic and mili- tary -adviser's were, events1 so iarVin-the renewed and Kennedy met-with his advisers at the White House late Thursday' and further Spacecraft Missed Moon D talks, were.held at the: State Department.' The" White'House understood to have included-, an assistant' secretary .of W. Gen. George H: Decker, "-Army chief of staff; Roger1- Hillsm'an, State Depart- ment intelligence and a guerrilla' warfare expert; and Mc- George Bundy, presidential assist- ant for security affairs. The new "crisis began'develop- ing with'a recent'buildup of. pro- Western- government forces.' and Communist-support Pathet .Lao forces in and'around the .govern- ment-stronghold of Nam Tha. The Keds captured..'' Nam Tha last Sunday. The government forces, fled and have 'been' in retreat ever'- since. In the view one [of the most' serious aspects of the engagement.was a-display by the government. troops; of-reluctance to fight, Without a. strong base'of mili- tary resistance "against Red ad- vances, 'the .whole country would soon be jeopardized. would the.. political.; United States has been..pursuing in an effort- to establish a perm- .-PASADENA, Calif. was no one.ithere to .watch; early April 26, when U.S. spacecraft Konawa water system is estimat-'Ranger 4 -came .cruising around ed to cost .Voters will1 be j the edge of a' bright half. moon. asked to approve; .another bond j. American, scientists; said it fell; issue of'there on the -moon's .hidden back the.City.Hall.rat'the same 'time: .into the lunar; crust The.-reconstruction of 'the City. by.gravity. And-'no'pne'disputed damaged lorha- Thursday: do of 1961, is. being rebuilt, .money' 'construc- tion Iimiled..to-insurance received for Paula Lan'drith -will serve as. president of .the; Ada'High School; Student Council next year. -She was: elected .in an all-school- vote this week. wasii ,he-.otherr candidate, for the- post. Miss Landnth is a daughter of and Mrs.'.Paul Laridrith. -Her; rather is physical educaton in structor and basketball coJch at Ada-High: In the same elecbon Carl Em mons was elected vice'president 3hyllis Warmack as secretary and f itephame Savage as treasurer t The officers will attend the state t and national conventions this year All -will be seniors next school4 .erm; Other members of the council will be elected in the fall 1 t. PAULA LANDRITH .Then, Soviet .Premier :Khrush- chev- declared .that._no had hit. the-moon.- He; offered' no. scientific, facts to back up. his '-the taunting comment that.the..Soviet marker on the is" getting lonesome, up there, waiting for an American.companion. '_ replied1 scientists at Pasadena's 'Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who built Ranger 4 and. tracked it. to its lunar" ren- have .-.been if was rial) receiver', it passed..; the .worldls-- expert: Ada Chalks LJp 6th AAqy A collision :al Main and-Broad- way became -'Ada's'.sixth' 'traffic, accident-of May Thursday; morn-. ing. Cars''driven by Rudy 53, -Ada; and Lorcan L. Martin, Calvin, met.at'the intersectiony Nelson 'was cliarged, -with1, .failofe( to yield .right-of-way.: He: pleaded not guilty. two- be- fore- Municipal way Friday morning..James Leon MartinV charged--with1 public iand.-jAlberJ: Leon was cited" for '.driv- dezvous: ''We- bit the they Observers noted, that there was no one on the moon when the Red lunik., .made.. '.its 1959 landing, Although Hungarian astrono- mers, a dust cloud and two British astronomers said they saw a pinpoint of'light 'which" "could craft had-really gotten there. U.S., scientists have similar ra- dio data.to back -up.'their state- ment that .Ranger made it to.the moon, too. JPL chief, William Pickering couldn't be more certain.. about Ranger's fate. "Oil''April-'26, ".at -4 '.was, -tracked by the Goldstpne. (Calif., space-, sig- a" which convinced the .he the-space-i.s'aid.Thursday.'. Gets To CORPUS CHRISTI; Tex. "It plain mean; fancy Agoing; to Texas by way of .weary. Char- lie Wood; who made three Atlantic crossings, do .the .work.of .one. They' Kitty-i Cazas'sis-f-bu'L-only after, fly- ing-back to they., boarded; the in t New ted -States; '.he Airport Charlie; pulled; put tickets :and''hahded'.themi the" --em-; the ain about -an hour "whenifriendJy aisle: "Where you flying, reply, and Charlie turned to'his Wife.; "He -mean's some JitfleiLondon. in Marie 62; ex- plained "Some spot we haven't heard. of..'yet." ;._ Charlie 'fished put v- 'instead tickets''- for ra Texas -'proffered" tick- six They. who; lled the 'called the welll'.ihaye'J you he. t-. At- lantic. anent, compromise peace. The policy calls for the formation of a. 'coalition -government; under neutralist control, headed-by neu- tralist Prince. Souvanna. Phouma. The United .charged that the Red; assault of Nam Tha constituted a breach of the..year- old cease-fire: The United States and .Britain asked; to''use-its of pro-Communist -and.-Sou- vanna Phouma "called .on 'pro- Communist ..Spuph'anou- yong to pull'-Red.troops' Back 'to the .'-original cease-fire line.. :Kennedy decided about 'a year ago.against employing U.S. forces in Laos. The- United States 'has employed limited. forces'. for: training, i and combat support purposes iff South Viet Nam where ;the. .pro-Western governnient-'troopsi.'af e 'considere'd to be vigorous anti-Communist fighters.; 'o present it was learned, has 'caused. Kennedy 'to order- a .new' look- at .the whole r. 'The conference Thursday '-broke up .only .hours, before: the Laos goyernment.bpublicly.Oahnounc'e'd new gains by" pro-Communist force's.'-' A .defense; ministry.; spokesman said smashed to Rouei the Mekong-jRiver .which, forms :tlie bprdetiWitf; Thai- -officials _said Jis --serious-? 'fo'r now loos Troops Flee Across Sigm Border Laos al Laotian troops were reported ileeing across the Mekong River. into .friendly Thailand, today, .as pro-Communist" forces seized Hou- ei Sai more .than ;.100 miles be- yond "the cease-fire The Red rebels drove forward to capture the. government outpost on the Mekong: border and com- plete r. their occupation of. the whole -in .defi- ance of, -a-demand- -from 'their neutralist ally Prince Souvanna their offensive. .The shattering year-old truce-raised'growing, concern in the.-U.S.. government, which has been pressuring -Prince Boun Oum's. anti-Communist Vientiane regime- to come to -terms with the neutralists' .and Red-lining Prince Souphanouyong form..a. na- tional -unity 'government. Officials of the Kennedy admin: istration. still'held-hopes the pro- Communist Pathet Lao forces would be checked. But informants in Washington 'said some U. S. forces. conceivably could become involved '.'in if.' the Reds try to'overrun the whole of the jungle kingdom. The Vientiane defense ministry the pro-Communist forces moved into Houei Sai today after overrunning- government.' troops-, fighting '-a-rear' guard action .Wednesday. American'-, military .sources said government" troops were crossing the; river into Thailand Thursday, ht.-'but'-added, know exactly what happened then." Royal army units had fought a five-hour' battle, with the.- on- rushing .Pathet at .Tha Fai, 20 miles north-of. Houei but failed, de- fense v. Reports reaching Vientiane in- dicated ment the'' was a fighL. .The Pathet Lao, backed and acmedfby.-tbe North on Two) ..Sign -in -a 'restaurant: "Reduc- ing? Try our, Glamour Gal Plate with very ".little dressing." (Copr. Gen. Fea.   

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