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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: May 10, 1962 - Page 1

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Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - May 10, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             Couple of Ada street sweepers were wishing for snow like they have But they decided it would! be too mbch all, who want, to shovel snow in the >at weW been Having Here lately? Doc's Patients Have To Listen On Radio, Page 3 Ada Vaulter Clears 13-7 At Stillwater See Sports, Page 9 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1962' 18 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY; 10 CENTS SUNDAY Kennedy Urges Laos Talks Be Speeded; Phouma Orders Withdrawal Of Troops SPRINGTIME IN THE ROCKIES Springtime in the Rockies can be rugged. The snow eat a snow vehicle pictured on the Cottonwood Pass' in Colorado, 'almost slipped down a steep incline as the vehicle labored atop snowdrifts 25 feet in depth A 50-mile-an-hour wind lashed the .mountainside as an expedition of men made the 32-mile trek over pass near Buena Vista. It wai a typical early spring day in the high country. ___________' ABC Directors Job Looks Safe OKLAHOMA CITY uor Director Roy Parham's job may be safe but a big turnover is expected at the Capitol next year. Either of, the Democratic runoff candidates for governor Ray- mond Gary or W. P. Bill Atkinson be expected to .make sweeping changes in the J. How- ard Edmondson administration. And, of course, if Henry Bell- jnon should become Oklahoma's first Republican governor he as-' suredly would uproot many Dem- ocratic .appointees who have been at the Capitol, for. Edmondson's administration was behind Lt. Gov. George Nigh and, if he had won, many undoubtedly would have remained at the Cap- itol. Nigh now is throwing his sup- port to Atkinson. But there is lit- tle evidence that administration officials could or would swing be- hind the Midwest City builder in an.effort to hold onto their jobs after, next January. Last Friday at a candidate fo rum held by 'the Oklahoma City Press Club Atkinson said if elect ed he would replace Parham as director of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board. This statement aroused mem bers of the ABC Board. It also aroused some residents of Okfus kee County where Parham once served as county attorney. One.hoard member.immediate- ly dug out fieS at the pleasure of the board not the governor. ,He 'also verified that ABC Board members are remov- able, only for a gover- nor cannot fire them unless neg- lect of duty or wrongdoing is shown. -He said the five board members Old, New Prayers Honor Gilcrease TULSA handful of cornmeal, a symbolic ar- row and a Christian prayer sent the spirit of 72-year- old millionaire Thomas Gilcrease on its way to another world. Gilcrease, who turned from the oil business to collect- ing examples of Indian civilization and culture, was hon- -----------------ored in modern and ancieril funeral rites: Wednesday. He died Sunday at his home Good Roads Group Plans Tulsa Meet Adans interested in highway building have a chance to attend a meeting in Tulsa May 26 to or- ganize an Oklahoma Good Roads Association.. Ted Savage, manager of the Ada Chamber of Commerce, said a limited number of tickets are available at his office for anyone interested in attending the meet- ing, which will be held at the Tulsa Fairgrounds. "This is a very important meet, Savage added, "every state that has organized- such .a Good Roads Association has benefited greatly." Key speaker at-the banquet and meeting will be James T. Blair, former governor of Missouri. A representative of-the Texas Good Roads Association also-will give a talk-on that'state's'organization, which is'.serving as a model for the Oklahoma association. Members of the Oklahoma del- egation to Congress.- and state senators and representatives are receiving special'invitations to the meeting. to partly cloudy and warm, through Fit- widely scattered late'after- noon and evening thundershow- ers west; low tonight 58-68; high Friday 88-96. High temperature In Ada Wednesday was 89; low Wedncs-, day night, 66; reading at 7 a.m. Thursday, 70. here. The prayer was delivered by the Rev. Guy C. Tetrick, a. retired minister and friend of Gilcrease. The'Indian ceremony was per- formed by ;the Delight Makers of the Acoma Pueblo .Tribe, led by Wolf-Robe Hunt, on the grounds of the Indian museum founded by Gilcrease. The ceremony: began with Hunt leading six other Indians in full ritual dress into an en- closed area near the bier.' They saluted the casket and chanted a the last ar- row. The shrill music of a flute bless- ed the sacred cornmeal in ;a bas- ket held, by the orily.'..woman in the group. -.-Each ,of- .the' six 'men took a handful of' of food for the, 'its- jour- ney, and stood Hunt's signal, they-released-the'meal into the wind. Hunt took With cry, he signaled the chiefs of the four directions that, the-spirit soon pointed 'the arrow' north, east -and'-south. setting the ar- row. "_ "The arrow's- flight' symbolizes re spirit's" Hunt said later. "Its sharp 'point-.will protect the spirit on its travel." The four directions'in -which'the arrow -'was'pointed' Four .mountains-of, life youth, -'middle, age' 'android age. Gilcrease': was "Hunt '-to perform '.-ithe j moved1' his collection, of Indian art and artifacts' into the museum on :his: estate" in 1949. years later.he turned.over :he the milb'on col- lection and a 13-acre tract to 'Tul- appear to be solidly behind Par- ham. It is understood Atkinson had not fully checked -into the situa- tion when he made the statement and-has since "modified his post Neutralist Denounces Violations VIENTIANE, Laps (AP) Prince-Souvanna Phouma 'has or- dered "pro-Communist Prince Sou; phanouvong- to .withdraw his Path- it Lao' troops, from-Nam Tha and Muong Sing 16 behind the'original cease-fire'line; informed diplomat' ic sources-said today.' 'The the neutral- ist leader sent a. cable from France '-to'1 Souphanouvong, his half-brother and ally, denouncing the "seizure of the two govern- ment outposts' in northwest Laos as a''violation of "the year-old cease-fire. Souvanna, the Soviet and Amer- ican choice to head a-neutralist regime in the jungle kingdom, re- portedly also' cabled -his. acting premier, at rebel headquarters' at' Kh'ang Kay to-arrange for the withdraw, al of the pro-Communist troops. Souvanna' left for. Paris, five weeks ago to stay, until June for 'medical treatment., and .the wedding of ai daughter. He told French newsmen Wednesday .night he was prepared to return to Laos tion. The word "is that he does not put on a'spir- ited fight to oust the ABC Board and its director; An incoming .governor probably could win such-a.fight, if. he want- ed to go far enough in throwing the power' 'of -his ;officerinto Hhe fray. But. -Atkinson' apparently doesjnot HeTand .Gary both are personal and political drys but both have said they., do not. plan' to revive a prohibition movement. Dry leaders' have .been some- what unhappy-with the board over its policy on advertising of liquor, operation'of private clubs-and liq- uor stores in hotel lobbies. Changes are. expected-'next Jan- uary in the Planning and Resourc- es Board; Highway Commission, Board of Affairs-and1 many boards and commissions'which are not so often in the limelight.' Ralph .Venamon, head of the crime bureau, and Warden Robert Raines of the state penitentiary both were appointed by Edmqnd- son and their jobs are, some men backing the candidates. Leland- Gourley; commissioner of the state Insurance Fund, has feuded periodically in -the -past four years with the Gary group. He was considered in the. Nigh camp during the first primary. changes could be.expected on the Turnpike Authority' and it is possible, some1 will- be'madenn" the Budget Office. any time right-wing Prince.' .regime Boun Oum's formally ne -pudgci yuice. i Several Edmondson men already wconclus.vely.- quests resumption-of'.talk's'on for- mation 'of a coalition .government of conservatives and neutralists. Souphanouvong's pro-Commu- nist rebels also were reported ready rto. return .to unity talks; Gen. Phpumi. deputy premier .and. strongman of ;the royal Laotian despitel the Pathet- .Lao he'- still' was: -ready, 'to negotiate.' But he demanded that; Souvanna first surances that he is truly'neutral. ..'Before his France, Souvanna publicly pledged that his neutralist and pro-Communist troops would not-.attack unless they were1 "themselves-attacked. He told French newsmen that he believed :Nam Tha. .Vwas .not at-, tacked' deliberately" al government forces, in trying, to. jreak the rebel siege of the-pro- vincial capital pro- voked the assault, last weekend, Souvanna-has the support-of. the United States, the .Soviet Union and" other big powers .'at'the'-iV nation Geneva conference. on Boun Oum 'and Phoumi have balked at-joining -a -govern; meht ;under Spuvanna; .contending he is not strong enough to pre- vent the .pro-Communists from leading'Laps into 'the. Red 'orbit. President Kennedy told his news conference in Washington- Wednes- day that' the1 rebel 'were "a-.clear--.breach, of. the-.cease-; But he'said can..be expected as i long', as the political talks drag on Civil Defense Calls Meeting are at the Capitol after January. The political..appointee, whose (Continued on Troopers Warn Of Boat Light Law vAttention-all-boat .Valley...View go on the-highway with your trail-1 and rescue .end er and boat until signal lights'arejambulance. Three sections .of the local Civil Defense_ unit have set an impor- for '-O These -sections are, the" field Lengthened Negotiations Are Hazard To Peace, He Tells News Conference WASHINGTON Kennedy says the unity talks' in Laos must be speeded .along before" the sputtering cease-fire explodes into a more hazardous situation. He told his news conference Wednesday that the pro- Communist rebels had clearly breached the cease-fire agreement Sunday by storming a stronghold-of the royal Laotian government and-the United States has expressed its concern to the Soviet Union. But, he added, negotiations-between.the'royalists, Communists and neutralists toward formation of a neu- tral government' must go on. "I agree it is. a very hazardous course but introducing American forces which is the other., one- let's not think there'is some great third, a haz- SMASHED Ada policemen are pictured investigated tht ing Clemoni'.Thrif-T-Wife Grocery. The'officeri (left to right) Patrolman Cheiley Guinn, Detective Sgt. Jamet Branam and Lt. Leiter Hokit. They're, looking at the safe burglars-pried open to tike approximately Wednesday niaht. Stiff ._____________ Work Begins On Newest Turnpike By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Gov. J. Howard Edmondson broke ground-today :for-the start of- :work< OP.- .Oklahoma's: newest continue to fight for-'still another toll road in the. state. The Oklahoma governor and other state officials'took part in the .first of three' ceremonies scheduled day along ;he. route of the 'southwestern turnpike.' The million, road will west to near the Texas border.. Edmondson pointed out he will no'longer'be'in-.office when .the turnpike, '.'-Oklahoma's'. third- toll andr-promised -he-told the attending, the groundbreaking .ceremonies lame continue to fight .for the southeast turnpike hope to. see it started before- the .end of, the Thefe.'has been.considerable op- position to'.the'.proposed.toll road extend from Oklahoma City south- through .southeastern' Oklahoma. Safecrackers Get At Grocery -safe at demons' Thrif-T-Wise Grocery was cracked, late Wednesday night and burglars' got away .with The store, located" at entered through "one of fhe. front doorways.-.-Police" said the door 2 Area Schools Plan Graduation Exercises Today high, schools, Va'moosa and Wapanucka, .are .jumping.jthe graduation '-gun, with' commence- ment exercises scheduled.tonight.- Both are 'set" for -8 'p.m. the auditoriums -of the respective Vamoosa's commencement .-ad- dress1'-will be. by Casper Duffer, librarian 'at' East Central State installed..on .Valedictorian is .two _UT__ f TTnlilr- All .members sections aldine.Mackey and Camilla'.Holik: Vamoosa" is .'.'graduating'ay-class troopers H. T, are asked to p.m..'.' Varna Gay and Spike Mitchell made note" in" thV'conference'.'' room, at th'ejof 14.'. Gay and Spike Mitchell made note' Thursday, of- a-new by the last state'legislature. law -requires that-'signal, lights be-, installed .and operable on'all motor: vehicles ior combina-' tion' 'of vehicles'. 'Tha't 'includes is to drill.; 1 May and. June .are big months here and CD- tio'nal' training''session "fo'r these speaker will.. be Dr. tral's'dean of instruction. are'; J_o Ella-Reed th'e'.'elas's. was forced1 with some sort of :heavy'toql.. '.The safe- was. located 'near the front large- supermarket. It was dragged''to the rear of the mean task since it. weighed from 600 .to 800 pounds. _The: safe was..not "blown'.'., but was pried open" and its: contents looted.'It'appeared that at. least two lice .'.said it had1 all of1 a professional, job.- Dan store -owner, in- dicated was', taken, in; cash, and "checks. 'The store closes-at19 p.m.. The first .of the southwestern turnpike ceremonies took place, at theiNewcaslle Bridge 'at .the .south- west edge of Oklahoma City. Aft- Edmondson 'handed the shov. el-'.to. Mrs.1 .Roy.'rPlu'mlee. -She'.and own: the property 'on Oklahoma City in- terchange for the road .'will be built; "Mrs. told m-.; that she had lived in -this one place for 32 Edmondson "and it is never pleasant to displace any- one. But she told.me. that she and her husband did-no't.f'eel-lhat they, as individuals, could stand in the way of progress. They are-pre- paring to move and have already made arrangements ardous he said. He urged all three sides in restive royal- ists, Communists and avowed neu- resume their1 form an-independent government.. The longer the negotiations drag on, he said, "the more hazardous the situation becomes." Kennedy .caiied' for prompt ac- tion to halt'the sh'ooting: in Laos during a news conference which took him over a diversified from savings and loan; associa- tions to the conference tables''.of Europe. The President said savings-and loan associations have misin- formed the public .about an ministration by the House: but; in' trouble iri.'the on divi- dends and interest: ..He with er spadefuPof 'a" statement 'cbnteno'ing'-defe'at ,'of the measure .would ..benefit-' "only :those" whose 'evasion of 'present taxes is costing every 'taxpayer dearly." 'Kennedy'1 estimated- evasion on dividends and interest amounts to million a year in taxes. He said he wanted--to 'set1 the record straight, because-mail'com- ing, to the White House- and1 Sen- that'a great num- ber of people have 'been badly misinformed." Moving into' international wa'- tcrs, Kennedy declared the United States would" continue talks with hour. jClemons-said hot .by, th'ieves in ;approxi- mately'four years." was at 'Carnegie .proj- fm'thf 'reports to. work-'at'that- hour lish their filling station business." the Soviet" Union in pursuit of, a Other ceremonies'marking, the start of work on the1 road were to' be1 held at Lawton and at. Wichita' Falls, Tex., where .the Oklahoma toll road will connect with a Texas freeway. Some 50 .persons .were'.to'join in the .ceremonies' at cluding Oklahoma Turnpike Au- (Continued on Two) Rotqrians Slate Carnegie Course Ada Rotarians are sponsoring a. Dale Carnegie' 'Course here. The "course begins May. 17 at p.' m. in Roomv423 of the Educa- tion Building, on the EC -campus. the, course'.is :Jib' .associate-spon- sor of the "Oklahoma .Leadership Institute. Those'., enrolling'. will meet, weekly .'each for 14 different', Don McCourtney... of the .Ada' Rotary. Cltib'.. and: Burl programv chairman- -and ect .Harris class' would be held- to '44 .Rotarians receive foK their parti- cipation 'be used to further. develop the "'club's in Winters'mith'Park. settlement .iBerlin. He mini- differences' with Chanc'el- lor-'Konrad Adenauer'.-; West Ger- man government' over makeup' of a proposed international author- ity to supervise access1 to Berlin, a suggestion offered toward negotiations.'But; he protested that leaks and public "debate of bar- gaining alternatives make it "very, difficult to carry oh 'any negotiations with the S o v i c t -TSie United States bears the ma- jor burden, Kennedy said, and has the .right to explore1 possibilities of improving the 'Berlin atmos- phere. Recalling Winston Church- ill's dictum that. "It- is-better-to than-to Ken- nedy said: "We-shall'.continue .to.jaw, jaw and see if we .can produce a use- ful result." The -.President- dealt -this way with other inquiries: Businessmen thought .'a :salty comment his father once had 'made 'to him about 'businessmen had .merit' the night Steel an- nounced; its increase'.; But the comment, which1 he repeated. :that night, had'to'-do only-with' meh, he'said the'steer men: "That's past. Now we are (Continued on Pige Two) SUSPENDED WASHINGTON (AP) The Agriculture .'ley-; ied a. penalty against Bil-- he duction operations: '.'But "officials were no t. too conf idenCtodayj.they could make-the 'assessment- The West is under; .fraud'- indictment-jiwas! penalized for 'producing- Reeves County, farmer, men- partment tioned frequently the Bil-'. cured illegally-fromifarmers.'dis- lie 'Sol Estei has', been, suspended! as coun- celed and there would be nothing j indicted ..Estes for 'fraud., in con- more ".'thief department could-- j nection with chattel mortgages1 he 'about jt'.i.rai.'v.V: was1; charged with' sellingfon non- existent -ferdlizer" tanks. And, ;a officials -.'emphasized'' .that ;cohffdv.efsial'Fcotton.'r-- operations 'gating1- "he ".rreceived :-fa- vored treatment1 from Department ;and r.fo 'thc- vored- department official Vas' resign, -an-. other.'has- been -fired third- Story ,-Should; ,-the farmer committee could" .goes" is under V 'v' reports 'tliat r: personn'e'r'int-'thevde'paitment'.who; from.loss on-upwards of mil-, lion- .worth of .surplus grain he stored in his warehouses. was assessed on federal .plantuig allot-; ments which he said' he from owners of the allotments. by taken jof. Ajriculture ;Or- i__J 1 Rl by uj d1... J Cen.' Kennedyiifavered. 2 Americans Are Injured In Viet Nam SAIGON, .South Viet Nam (AP) Americans were injured by Communist fire and.four helicop- ters were hit in military opera- tions -in...South :Viet Nam on Wednesday, .and today. The-copilot, of'.a helicopter was wounded while-on. a support mis- sion-.- for ..South .Vietnamese sol- diers about 250. miles north Saigon. The pilot landed safely and the copilot was evacuated by air to a. field-hospital.at Nha-Trang, Defense Secretary McNamara visited which- U.S. Robert S. today. The wounded man underwent surgery :ahd was .reported com- fortable..1 His Jname was withheld. He is with' the .8th Helicopter Co.. 'U.S.1 helicopters, in another airlift-.'of "attacking 'the-southern rilla resis'tance'-Wednesday. JU. Charles Wimmler of-'Cleve- land, when shield. Three helicopters were 'hit by the. fire and one was forced to land when its-oil tank was punc- tured. Repairs were made, and the' craft -got :away. minor cuts a bullet shattered' a wind-' Treasurer Says He Won't Sell Tax Property There will be. no resale of tax delinquent property. in Pontotoc County this year. Virgil county treasurer. made the announcement Thurs- .day. Each year, property that has as many as four years "of unpaid taxes is sold 'by 'the county. But, one small lot at Francis is the' only property in the entire county which qualifies for resale this year. ihan'put" the county to the- expense of- selling we will carry if- until-- next Hunt said. -1952', 24- tracts will be up -for unless the delinquent.taxes are In 1963, the total rises to 34. Many counties in this area of Oklahoma have hundreds of acres for sale each year. Hunt "pinpointed the', reason for this county's' low total. try to keep .'all owners in- formed of their tax- delinquency and we send -personal letters" to them'' 'and the' .mortgage holders if there-are 'this county usable pr'ppertyjthanj.mpst'of.-.the rrri "words, "the property values- here are- greater, jn most cases', and property'qwnlrs areJess likely to let the -taxes -slide." Fall Qyer, Log Causes Bad "Cut ..Timmy, son of .Kev. and Mrs. Elwin Haseltines, Fittstown, suf- fered a painful, ,but not serious injury, Saturday.when he fell over a log and as a result bit his ton- gue a gash in'his chin. Bo.th bled, profusely as'ieaU cuts do but Monday found him feeling fine. Tirhmy was-playing, at the Alexander place when'the acci- dent'occurred; polling' stories" gather no' sen-   

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