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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: April 20, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - April 20, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             Jerome Beatty reports several new brands of chewing gum will go on the market soon. Included are: Vehemmt (for angry Detriment (guaranteed to ruin teeth and Eschewing gum (for people who don't like Tulsa Takes First In Tourney See Sports Page THE ADA EVENING NEWS GOP Sharply Raps Kennedy For Steel Action, P-2 59TH YEAR NO. 33 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 1962 12 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Police Clamp Lid On Georgia City After Boy Dies In Racial Violence DO-IT-YOURSELF Atoki'i do-it-yourself City Hall remod- eling project, now ibout at the one-third mark, continues to roll along. The city found itielf with some in its kick set to work to renovate and add to the building, using regular city employes to do the job. Thus, when bad weather kept the street department off the streets, it would go to work in City Hall. The interior part of the.project has been completed; the council room, courtroom, and of- fices of the city manager and police chief all nicely paneled and slick-looking, like the city clerk's office shown above. That's Wanda Sparks, city clerk, at the far end, Peggy Gar- side, deputy, in the foreground. With spent so far, according to City Manager Curtis Sprouse, the next step is to build an addition behind the building to house the fire- men's lounge and two new jail cells. Work has just begun on this phase Final step will be to put a new alum- inum front on the building and point up .the brickwork. Sprouse won't even guess.at a completion date. Depends on how much time the city workers can spare for the ]ob, he says. (NEWS Staff White Youth Is Shot While Driving in Negro Section AUGUSTA, Ga. clamped a tight security lid on this east Georgia city today after the fatal shoot- ing of one white teen-ager and the wounding of another in a predominantly Negro section. Seventeen persons, including 14 teen-agers, both white and Negro, were arrested. Extra-duty policemen, seeking to stem a four-day tide of racial disorder, round- ed up carloads of youths "carrying knives, clubs and iron I pipes. The slaying victim was Leslie Lee Luttes, 16. He was. killed Thursday night by a pistol bullet under the -left eye and was peppered'in the back of the head-by a shot- gun charge, Luttes was sitting beside George Lewis, 15, driver of a car in which three youths were riding. 'Lewis was wounded by the shotgun fire. Eddie Gay, 16, on the back seat, escaped injury. Police said they found an air- rifle and a sack of rocks in the car, owned by Gay's father. Gay said he and. his companions were going to a golf course and lost their way. The shots came without warning; he Argentina's Tug-Of-War Continues BUENOS AIRES, Argentina tug-of-war be 'tween anti-Peronist military lead ers and .constitution-minded poli- ticians continued today with Pres: ident.Jose. Maria..Guido caught in the middle. Guido was reported still reluc- tant to go along with the mili- tary's anti-Peronist demands un less the measures are approvet by Congress. He reportedly sough assui-ances from leaders of the dominant Intransigent Radical party that Congress would endorse any moves the military might force him to make. It appeared doubtful that th( Intransigent Radicals of deposet President Arturo Frondizi would give .such assurances. Other fac- tions in Congress were openly conferring with the Peronists in an effort to stave off the military A meeting between Guido anc the military bosses scheduled for early today was called off ai the last moment. A presidential spokesman said Guido had asked that it be postponed until later in the day because he was suf- fering from the flu and fatigue brought on by two virtually sleep- less nights of crisis conferences. The armed forces chiefs are de- manding that Guido issue presi- dential decrees to (1) Ban politi- cal activity by Peronists and oth- er elements the military consid- ers subversive, (2) Nullify the March 18 election results in which the Peronists scored sweeping victories (3) End the current emergency session of Congress and (4) Call new elections for president and vice president. Backed by the Communists who already are banned from po- litical activity the Peronists (Continued on Page Two) OKLAHOMA Partly cloudy, warm and windy this afternoon; partly cloudy tonight, a few thunderstorms and cooler north- west portion; partly cloudy Sat- urday, widely scattered after- noon thunderstorms central and east west and north; low tonight 48 north- west to 65 south; high Saturday 72 northwest to.90 southeast. High temperature in Ada Thursday was 84; low Thursday night, 62: reading at 7 a. m. Friday, 63. FIVE-DAY FORECAST FOE OKLAHOMA During Saturday through Wednesday temperatures will average 4-8 degrees above nor- mal. Turning cooler- weekend; warmer first of week and turn- ing cooler again midweek. Nor- mal highs 70s. Normal lows 40 northwest to 54 southeast. Rain- fall will average .33 inch or less west to .50 to. one inch east occurring as showers or thun- derstorms weekend and again about midweek. said, and the other two boys slumped in the seat. Gay drove to. a funeral home where an ambulance took the wounded boys to a hospital. Luttes already was dead. Detec- tive E. F. Beasley said Lewis, suf- fered shotgun.wounds of the face, neck and hands. Shortly after the shooting. May- or Millard Beckum made a tele- vision appeal for calmness and pledged ,full police resources to maintain order. There were numerous arrests during the night, but Police Lt. M. C. Watkins said none were in connection with the shooting. Among those arrested were two Negro men and, a Negro 'woman who were in a car which con- V" shotgun. They were booked on a charge of late hours and having said. a weapon, Watkins Seven white youths and five Ne- groes were arrested during the night and earlier in the day on various charges; mostly loitering and carrying weapons. Some of the white youths had been cruising through Negro areas where there had been reports of windows broken by rocks and dented automobile fenders, Wat- kins said. "They were driving around the Negro neighborhoods with iron pipesand rocks in their French Nab Leader Of Secret Army ALGIERS (AP) Fugitive House Record Depends On Viewpoint WASHINGTON the House of Representatives' record for the first 100 days: of 1962 was splendid or. infinitesimal was a matter of partisan disa- greement today. With the House officially on a 10-ilay Easter Sen- ate will remain in leaders appraised the accomplish- ments of the election year session since it started last January. 'They arrived at extremely dif- ferent conclusions. 'Splendid' "A splendid record of substan- tial accomplishment" said the new Democratic high command of Speaker John W. McCormack of Massachusetts and Majority Leader Carl .Albert of Oklahoma. "Compared to what the admin- istration asked for in 24 messages ex-Gen. of Congress, an infinitesimal part terrorist Secret Army Organiza- tion, was arrested today in the heart of Algiers, French officials announced. Salan, a 62-year-old army vet-ioff for has been said Republican 'Leader Charles 'A. Halleck of Indiana, adding that the country "is probably better eran who has seen.service in vir- tually all' corners of the world was sentenced to death in absen- tia as leader of the abortive Record Reviewed McCormack, who succeeded the late Sam Rayburn of Texas as speaker last January, with Troops Reinforced When reports-spread that Salan was captured, heavy troop rein- forcements were concentrated around Reghaia, an air base near Hocher-..-Noir..-Iieadquarters..-. Salan already was- aboard a when the announcement.. was' made, the spokesman said. A government official said Sa- lan was taken when riot troops and police sealed off a small sec- tion in downtown Algiers and launched a search of cars, build- ings and passersby.' Police sources hinted Salan was picked up in an apartment during a search for a clandestine radio transmitter. He refused to admit his identity, but was identified by several former colleagues, includ- ing .Gen. Charles until two days ago supreme command- er of French military forces in Watkins said of the white boys Algeria. who were arrested. Some informants said Salan's (Continued on Page Two) putsch .of the Algiers generals last Albert in a statement printed in April. His colleague, ex-Gen. Congressional Record. mond Jouhaud, also was given the I During the first 100 days of this death sentence, 'session, they said, Congress as a j whole has enacted 33 public laws and the House itself has passed 21 bills "of national significance." Six annual appropriations bills also have been passed by the House, putting it "well ahead of the normal they said. Big. Bills- bills that have become Jaw include measures increasing the Defense Dept. Orders Reserves Integrated WASHINGTON Pent- some Reserve is, one agon has directed that all-Negro and -all-white Reserve units be in- tegrated as rapidly as is consist- ent with military effectiveness. The move was aimed at tighten- ing compliance with a 14-year-old order. The directive, it disclosed to- day, does not apply to the Na- tional Guard which the Defense Department said is an organiza- tion of volunteers under the com- mand of the respective governors. Clash Avoided While sidestepping. possible clash with Southern governors and Southern congressmen, the Defense Department -indicated it loped to make progress in guard integration through and persuasion. Officials said 10 consultation states still maintain segregated National Guard units. The list was not available immediately. The Reserve integration action was ordered by Re-swell L, Gil- >atric, deputy secretary of de- 'ense, in an April 3 memorandum to the Army, Navy and Air Force. Compliance Gilpatric said it is aimed at as- suring compliance with a 1948 executive order by then President Truman banning .racial segrega- ion in the armed forces. A high official said the regular Army, Navy, Air F.orce and Ma- rine been_integrated jut" is: some question whether it has been done fully and effectively in the Reserve ele- ments of these services. Another official indicated there has been token integration .in or two Negroes filtered in with an otherwise all-white outfit. Federal Control Unlike the National Guard, the Reserves are totally under federal control. Gilpatric directed two specific steps-and called for an initial ac- tion report by-May 1. The two steps: 1. "The identification of all-Ne- gro and all-white Reserve units, and initiation of action to inte- grate them as rapidly as is. con- sistent with military effective- ness." Review -2. "An over-all review of assignment of Negroes to Re- serve units to determine if a dis- proportionate number are .as- signed to pools. Where this is found to be so, positive measures should be taken consistent with the military requirements and the skills of the Red States He'll Walk Out On Talks GENEVA Deputy Foreign Minister Valerian A. Zor- in threatened today to walk out of the 17-nation general disarma- ment conference if the United States conducts atmospheric nu- clear, weapons tests in .the Pacific in the next week or so. He made the comment to news- men after' a Good' Friday session of the disarmament .conference. "In the'conference room itself Zorin said the'-American- tests would bring about an. extremely tense international atmosphere. U.S. Ambassador Arthur H. Dean made it clear the United s tests .undoubtedly will '-be i held because of what he called the unyielding Soviet attitude.- Dean said-the Soviet Union appears to have-killed any chance .for a.'quick agreement on an internationally enforced nuclear weapons test ban. Officers Turn Youth Over To U. S. Marshal A Baltimore, boy was j turned U. S. Marshal Bill iBroadrick here Friday. morning. The boy, Richard Wright, 15, was -being held here as a suspect in the burglary of the -Pickett Grocery, west of Ada. The burg- lary occurred' Wednesday night. Officers said the boy was driv- ing a car stolen from Baltimore. He was arrainged by the .U. S. commissioner at Sulphur oh charges of violating the Dyer Act (transporting a stolen automo- bile across' a state Broadrick transferred Wright to Muskogee 'Friday morning where he. .will be held until his i'trial comes up. more Negroes to" specific Reserve units." fused' a Russian call -for an unpo- liced moratorium on tests. The Russians remained adamant The Pentagon second-in-com-j agajnst .international inspection mand told the services the.propor- tion of Negroes-'assigned'to units, in relation to .their.total.'strength in the reserves will' serve as a guide for measuring progress. Reports Gilpatric said -the initial report May 1 should be followed by a series of four quarterly progress reports. .Defense officials said they do not have specific information or whether any all-Negro (Continutd all- and control.1 United States, Dean said, "has. -learned its lesson with re- gard to a voluntary, unpoliced' moratoriumvwhich: can. be .broken at will by the Soviet Union on any pretext it wishes to dream up." The .Big Three haggled again about, the' Then, though Zoriri had indicat- ed-Thursday he might try to force continued -sessions, over the ;weefc- end, the conference" recessed for Army Suspends Major For Talk WASHINGTON Daughters of the Ameri- can Revolution asked a congressional investigation today of the Army's suspension of Maj. Archibald E. Roberts, but Sen. Strem Thurmond, D-S. C., said he favored leaving the investigation to the Army at this time. Thurmond, who has been battling for" months against what he called Pentagon muzzling' of military officers, said he thought an Army investigation was appropriate if Roberts had in fact questioned the loyalty of Mayor Sam Yorty of Los Angeles and Asst. Secretary of. State G. Mennen Williams. "I will await the Army's investigation report before passing any judgment on this Thurmond said. .Roberts, in an off-the-cuff speech to the DAR .Thurs- day, said Yorty once was described to the House Com- mittee on Un-American Activities as one member of a Communist faction in the California Legislature. He de- AF Selects 8 Possible Astronauts WASHINGTON Air Force today selected .eight sea- soned test pilots for special train- ing that may equip some of them for flights to the moon. The Air Force offi- cers and one.from the start an eight-month course June 18 at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. They form tie second group to take the course' there. Five -offi- cers were graduated last Dec. 15. A spokesman said the new group of proven graduate en- quite a bit more national debt limit, providing a background than the .seven orig- manpower retraining and devel-'inal astronauts in the man-in- opment program, tightening en. forcement provisions of the union welfare and pension fund report- space- program. The National Aeronautics and Space- Administration said earlier ing law, and doubling the size week it will pick five or 10 wife and daughter were arrested with him and that several meni picked up in the same building were being questioned. Stiffer Action Capture of the 62-year-old for- mer general who vowed to keep Algeria French came as the French government sharply stepped up action here against his secret army. There, were' reports Salan had been captured early' in today's search but that he refused to ad- mit his identity and riot police officers who arrested him were not sure themselves it was Salan. Unofficial Rumors reports, 'leaked out that Salan had been taken, but 'it was not. until several hours. later that the. Rocher Noir headquar- ters of .the" French-Moslem provi- sional- executive disclosed the ar- rest.' There'were rumo.-s Salan had (Continued on Page Two) the Peace Corps. Passed by the House but not yet acted on by the Senate are bills dealing with military con- struction, revenue law 'revision and postal rate increases.' Passage of the tax revision bill probably, was the biggest victory of the year to date for the new McCormack Albert The manpower retraining, measure was a compromise mainly along Republican lines. Killed By House Killed by. .the House was the President's. proposal to create a' new department of urban affairs and housing. This was the- leader- ship's major legislative defeat., Abandoned by the House high command because of -Rules Com- mittee opposition '.is a Senate- passed measure calling for fed- eral aid to secondary schools. Bottled up in .'the same commit- tee .but' likely to be revived are bills providing .for federal aid for higher education. The -.leaders did not enumerate the big bills that lie ahead when the Easter holiday ends. .In this category, are measures dealing with tariff tax cutting and antirecession powers for the. President, unemployment youth .employment, pay raises, for federal employes, farm programs, 'emergency tax (Continued on Two) more astronauts for later space flights. The. Air Force spokesman said members of the new course, with additional end up in the follow-up astronaut group. The eight are: Navy It. Cmdr.' Lloyd N. Hoover Wilbraham, Air Force captains Albert H. Crews Jr., Al- exandria, La.; Charles C. Bock Jr.. Seattle, Wash.; William T. Twinting, Chicago; Robert W. Smith, Washington, D.C.; Robert H. Air Force' Majs. Donald. M. Sorlie, Fargo, N.D., and Byron F. Knolle, Houston, Tex. All are vol.. drawn from a pool of about 50. Each holds' a degree in engi neering, in one of the physical sciences, or mathematics, and is a graduate.of one of the service test pilot schools. The Air Force said the course at Edwards is designed to train space-oriented pilots for future aerospace projects, such as the X15, the Dyna Soar manned-space glider, and follow-up aerospace vehicles.' Graduates of the school are not earmarked for. specific assign- ments, the Air Force said, but will form a pool of 'highly skilled men able to take over as space "pilots, engineers or managers of aero- space projects. scribed Williams, former governor of Michigan, as aaving leftist leanings. The Army suspended Roberts Thursday night, promptly after learing reports of his speech to the DAR. Applauded He is now under orders not to ave his post. Ft. Lee, Va. The DAR delegates applauded vigorously as they, passed the res- olution which requested Congress "to investigate this arbitrary ex- ercise of power." The resolution .cited the provi- sions of freedom of speech in the Constitution and said the Army of the United -States. of America' had "summarily suspended Maj. Rob- erts from performance of his du- ties in retaliation for an unre- leased 'speech" delivered before the DAR.Thursday. Walker Aide said 'that thereby there had been "penalized 'an informed and respected member of the military who quoted .from established rec- ords in an attempt to warn the society of the dangers of Commu- nist penetration into this country." Roberts, 46, is a former aide to ex-Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker who was relieved of his command in Germany last year on a find- ing that he had made derogatory public statements about prominent Americans. Yortyissued a statement in Los Angeles saying the charge was Policies In Transition West Fears Russia Moving Closer To China ridiculous. He said it mightily the Communist serves objec- WASHINGTON Some highly -'placed. U.S. officials are becoming -concerned over, signs that. Soviet 'Premier Khrushchev, is" hardening his policies toward the West and moving back into a closer relationship with Red China. !This concern, is; still speculative: It arises out of a-careful analysis by diplomatic experts during the past week of an intensely personal letter, which seems to- reflect in- dignation that Khrushchev'-sent to British Prime Minister1 Harold MacmQlan. The feeling is .reinforced by a knowledge that .Red China is in difficult economic circumstances, due to. the failure of -Peiping's Great. Leap Forward -program? Chinese officials admitted the! failure .within' the past week. -This is taken to .mean that in addition to reorganizing its ..development program, 'China has an urgent- need assistance which': other Communist bloc-counties. leaders see -the-sit- uation, any intensification.of. the long-time Soviet-Chinese 'dispute can-be expected .to produce So- viet maneuvers. for an improve- ment in relations, with the West. Conversely, an. accommodation between' Peiping and which -now seems to be in Pei- ping's1 temporary may produce a -toughening of .Soviet policies- toward the Allies.'' Officials .said speculation 'that Khrushchev is hardening his at- is so far offset by--other evidence that points.in a contrary "direction.' found -chiefly in the recent drop over Berlin and- in ..the continuing of--the talks- with -the UnitedxStates ,-about a jBerlin- set- tlement. The1 first talk of .the-.pres- ent 'be- tween Secretary. ..oLjState Dean Dobrynin; another meeting is ex- pected .to-be.-held brynin gets further instructions from, the-Kremlin. President Kennedy developed at his ;news conference Wednesday the uncertainly which'-is'-'..-felt throughout .the .administration here, about whether "the Berlin lull wilhhc-ld. He recognized that- "the temperature, has 'been'.'lowered.'" But he said this1 is a very'danger- 'ous area which could blow up'any About, the only conviction .pres- ently-.held .by -.American [leaders with .respect pol- icies'isithat they "seem to be state of-transition; This .to'.the .Sino-Soviet situation as well as tto reports; of. It is also -..related -W' ure, to. move. powers their forces West''-.Berlin -'arid.-.1 their lean are prepared to negotiate on a variety of related issues. The .uncertainty-of future East- West relations has generated keen interest here in two' events due next week. The' Supreme Soviet, Russia's scheduled to meet Monday. -and! Western of- ficials expect a.' "major policy speech in, the following days. The United'States is expected. weap- ons tests in the dur- ing the week and the way in which, Russia reacts! -should- give further indications of Khrush- chev's For there-' is some thought in official: quarters here that ;Khrushchev- may have gen- erated the-lull in create- an op- portunity 'for- stirring, up crisis C there -on ground; that the hew U.S.'test series 'has ere'-' (Continued on-Pigt live" by causing confusion which aids 'subversives. Williams is traveling in Africa and was unavailable for comment. Thursday night, Roberts got word from his commander at'FL Lee, Va., Col. John B. Hines, that he "has been suspended from per- formance of military duty, pend- ing further investigation of state- ments made in a public speech in Washington." No Orders Roberts said he had not been under orders to submit his speech for Pentagon clearance. And he told a reporter "an investigation to me means that they will hear both sides. I hope that we will have the truth. I've made my position clear." He added has been said that Sen.'Stenhis' investigation of mili- tary muzzling is one of the last surviving freedom forums in America. I hope to prove Sen. John Stennis, D-Miss., is chairman'of the Armed Services subcommittee which is investigat- .ing charge's that the Pentagon and the 'State Department have si- lenced outspoken anti-Communist military men.' Walker appeared before the Stennis group earlier this month and fired a broadside of charges against several gov- ernment officials. Off-The-Cuff Roberts-delivered.'his off-the- cuff talk to the DAR after the text of his originally planned ad- dress was denied clearance by the Pentagon.'It was to have'dealt with the "pro-blue" troop'informa- tion program which Roberts says he drafted for Gen. Walker. The program, was. used when, Walker 'commanded' the '24th''In- -in Germany. Sto- ries publication called "Over- (Continucd on Two) Sign in'a gift shop: "For the man- who has everything .a cafendar- to him when the-payments are due." (Copr. Gen.-Fea.   

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