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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: April 18, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - April 18, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             Signs of the time (chapter once was parents were always worrying .bout th.ir yoUngsters running away from home to get married now they worry about them getting married and running back home Husband Wants To Share Church Punishment, P-5 THE ADA EVENING NEWS District Baseball Hits Second Round See Sports, Page 8 59TH YEAR NO. 31 ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 1962 12 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY BLAST WRECKS CHEMICAL PLANT Firemen play water hoses on the wreckage of the Ethylene oxide processing section of the Olin Mathieson Corp., at Bradenburgh, Ky., which exploded injuring more than 25 employes. (AP Rockefeller Gives GOP Policy Views Senate- House committee drafting a pro- posed statement of Republican principles gets the views of Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York today on major domestic and foreign policies. Rockefeller, touching bases with all available Republicans, is ex- pected to get a favorable recep- tion from the policy makers for his latest theme that Republicans are wasting time looking for lib- eral or conservative solutions to the nation's problems. He has been bearing down on the .note ;in what is-regarded as an effort to quiet conservative op- position not only to his re-election as governor of New York but his expected bid for the 1964 GOP presidential nomination. Rockefeller has been tagged as a liberal -in the minds of many of his party members. He told a Republican women's conference Tuesday, "People who go around wearing an arm band looking for a liberal solution or a conservative solution are mere- ly blinding themselves to the reali- ties of the situation. It is like the man who says 'Don't confuse me with the facts; my mind is made up.'" Despite this disclaimer of any label. Rockefeller's cure for some of the country's ills remains too liberal for some Republicans. A case in point is his espousal of a program for medical care for the elderly financed by Social Security taxes. Except for an op- tion for beneficiaries to choose cash, this parallels President Ken- nedy's plan, which a majority of GOP members of Congress op- pose. On the other hand. Rockefeller found substantial support among congressional Republicans for his earlier contention in Detroit that the Kennedy administration had not attacked basic economic prob- lems with sufficient vigor or un- derstanding. The Senate-House Republican group currently is working on the military-foreign affairs section of its proposed statement. Rockefel- ler is the first GOP state execu- tive to appear before it. OKLAHOMA Partly cloudy and mild this afternoon through Thursday; widely scattered thunderstorms Panhandle this and extreme south- west tonight; low tonight 45-55; high Thursday 75-83. FIVE-DAY FORECAST FOR OKLAHOMA For the period Thursday through Monday, temperatures in Oklahoma will average 2-5 de- grees below normal east portion to 2-6 degrees above normal west portion. Normal low 38 northwest to 58 southeast. Minor daily changes. Precipitation will average from little or none west to Vi inch cast portion occurring as scattered showers about the weekend. High temperature In Ada Tuesday was 67; low Tuesday night, 48; reading at 7 a. m. Wednesday, 48. Ada Churches Plan Special Holy Week, Easter Services Jovial Kennedy Cancels Charges Against Complaining Guardsman By WENONAH RUTHERFORD Special emphasis is given the Sunday ser'vies commemorating the resurrection of Christ by Christian Churches everywhere. Easter is the climatic point in the Lenten season and Holy Week and Ada churches, like churches throughout Christiandom, have planned services to reiterate the promise of Easter in song and word. Several local churches will lead up to the Easter messages with Maundy Thursday and Good Fri- day observances as well as Holy Saturday services. Special Day Easter is the one special day in the church calendar which does not vie so much with outside in- terests. New bonnets, colored eggs and family get-togethers, spring school vacation, it is true, are a part of the Easter festival but for the most part it is a day for wor- ship. Representative of the Easter services are; St. Joseph's Catholic Church will begin Holy Week services with high mass preceded by the Adoration and Vigil at the Tomb which will last until Friday at 8 p. m. Good Friday, All day Ado- ration and Vigil at the Tomb, p. m. Stations of the Cross, end- ing at 3 p. m. the moment of Christ's death, and 8 p. m. mass of the presanctified. Easter Sunday holy mass will be celebrated at 8 a. m. and munion at the First Presbyterian Church. The choir will sing at the services which will begin at p. m. Dr. Herbert Tays, pastor, will deliver the Easter Sunday sermon at a. m. St. Luke's Episcopal Church will observe Holy Communion at p. m. on Holy Thursday. Good Friday a three-hour service is scheduled from 12 noon until 3 p. m. Holy -Saturday the Holy President Also Orders Convicted Soldier Freed WASHINGTON Kennedy announced today that "in the spirit of Easter week" he has canceled court-martial proceedings against a National Guardsman who complained against the President's call-up of Re- servists. At a news conference carried to the nation over live TV and radio, Kennedy said that gripes by-a small num- ber of Reservists were more, misguided than anything else. So he said he got in touch with the secretary of the Army and arranged for dropping of the charges against Pfc. Larry D. Chidester.. 24, of Salt Lake City, who is stationed at Ft. Lewis, Wash. Kennedy also announced he was freeing Pfc. Berms Owen, 23, of Seadrift, Tex., a Reservist on duty at Ft. Polk La. Owen was found guilty on March 27 of a charge similar to that against Chidester. Owen was sen- tenced to six months hard' labor and ordered to for- feit a month pay while in the stockade. Chidester was accused of vio- lating the uniform code of mili- tary justice by encouraging fellow soldiers to sign a letter critical oi the President. Sent to Sen. Wallace F. Ben- nett, R-Utah, the letter asked; WASHINGTON JFK Stresses Good Will In Steel Fight U.S. Offers New Plan To Disarm AF Captain Gets 20-Year Prison Term WIESBADEN. Germany A court-martial today sentenced] U.S. Air Force Capt. Joseph P.j GENEVA United .States proposed a sweep- Kauffman to 20 years at hard la- ing world disarmament program today with a new en- forcement concept based on spot checks in the territories of the great powers. The detailed 35-page treaty draft was submitted to the 17-nation disarmament conference by U. S. Am- bor and dismissal from the serv- ice for having betrayed U.S. de- fense secrets to the East German intelligence service. The 43-year-old veteran of-World ;bassador Arthur H. Dean. ;'on TT Ino knroan War i whether Kennedy "liked expendi- tures of great proportions which he allocates freely or does he think the jobs left open by our callup will re-elect him on the basis of low unemployment." Kennedy's mood throughout the again at 10 a. m. The Rev. John' Baptismal services will begin at Bloms, 0. S. B., priest of the church, will be officiant. Confessions from 5 to p.m. will be heard on-Holy Saturday with. Blessing, making oi Baptismal Water, followed by the Mass of the Resurrection at p. m. Communion The First Methodist Church will p. m. and Easter Sunday Holy Communion will be at a. m., the children's service at a.-m. and Holy Communion again John F.-Ashby, ficiant. .Regular Services The Central Church of Christ, Southeast Church of Christ and observe Maundy Thursday with Trinity Baptist Church will ob- the communion service. Easter serve Easter'with regular serv. services are scheduled at and a. m. Rev. J. Glore Reneau, pastor, will deliver the sermons. The entire Holy- Thursday serv- ices will be devoted 'to the com- Talks On European Political Unity Stall PARIS by the six Common Market na- tions to extend West Eupropean economic unity into the political sphere have broken down over Belgian-Dutch demands that Britain join in the talks. The snag arose Tuesday as foreign ministers of the European Economic Community discussed setting, up a political authority to coordinate foreign policy and de- fense activities of West Germany, France, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The French, who acted as conference spokesmen, said Belgium's Paul-Henri Spaak and Joseph Luns of the Netherlands threw up the roadblock after all six ices. Trinity has set. Founder's Day May 20, when a special ob- servance is planned, Asbury 'Methodist Church will hold a communion service at p. m. Holy Thursday with both the children's and adult part in the Easter services. Rev. i David Parker Jr., pastor, will de- liver the sermons. The First Lutheran Church will observe Maundy Thursday with the Sacrament of the Altar at p. m. Good Friday "will fea- ture the Tencbrae service. Easter everything in the Holy Commun- ion will climax the Holy Week ministers had agreed that any plans for politicial asso- ciation should be submit- ted to London for comment. Britain, which is negotiating to join the economic union, suggest- ed last week that the time had come for. her to join in the poli- tical talks also. The West Ger- High school principals andjmans cold-shouldered the propos- couns-elors from 20 schools France reportedly feels the throughout the East Central State i same wav_ College district consulted Wednes- j day wiUi the college frshmcn who West German_ Italian Luxembourg ministers agreed .that Area High School Officials Meet With Students informants said th their were former students at schools. Purpose of the informal consul- tations, arranged for by East Cen- tral, was to provide both high school and college personnel with a basis for evaluating and improv- ing students preparation for col- lege life. The session began with a regis- tration coffee followed by a gen- eral session in the ballroom of the j a political accord should be signed 1 if Britain, after examining it; raised no objections. Spaak and Luns balked and demanded that the British be brought into the negotiations as an active partici- pant. Kennedy said today his adminis- tration has no ill will toward the steel industry as a result of the epic battle over a price increase, and intends to take no punitive action. In a far more conciliatory. War JI and the Korean War turned pale and saluted the eight- officer court after hearing the sentence. Pay Forfeited The sentence also included for- feit of ail pay and allowances. Life imprisonment is the maxi- mum sentence on the charge. The sentence will be automati- cally reviewed by higher Air Force authorities. Kauffman conferred briefly with his civilian attorney, George Lati- mer of Salt Lake City, Utah. Then I Air Force policemen took him to the Air Force stockade in Wies- baden. Spy Charges The court deliberated four hours Tuesday night before finding Kauffman guilty of giving East German intelligence agents infor- mation about U.S. bases in Green- news conference appeared to be mood than at this last week, Kennedy said the gov- his obvious anger a week ago over the steel price rise which he hammered down. He said there is no resi ill will between big steel and the govern- ment, and no intention to inflict punitive measures on any com- pany or industry. said he believes the steel-'.industry and the United States government are in agree- ment on far more issues than they are in. disagreement. The government's policy, he said, requires the cooperation of both industry and labor. But the government believes in maintaining free private enter- prise and free collective bar- gaining. ILwill continue, he said, to en- courage -wage settlements based on the increased productivity of industry, to prevent inflationary wage-price spirals. As if replying to contentions his administration is anti-business, he listed, numerous steps he said had been taken to aid business and predicted that industrial profits in the period just ahead will be "the highest in history." of needs of the steel industry for invest- ment capital to modernize plants scue of _ with the Rite of Confirmation for j jn response to a question about several adults and their future of the New York Fed- communion as a solemn part of era[ grand jury investigation of the program. .Larry Hall and steei industry, the President Geary Schwartz will serve as j that matter was in the hands acolytes. the jury which and would, of Songs Featured Special songs will highlight Oak j Avenue Baptist Church's obser-' vance. The Free Will Baptist' Church will begin Easter Sunday obser- vances with a 6 a. m. prayer serv- ice. The. morning worship is set for a. m. On other matters: DISARMAMENT Cumberland P r e s b y t e r i a -n not Ule President. Church will hold regular Easter services. The church will begin a revival April Forrester of the Children's Home, Denton, Tex., will be evangelist. First Church' of the Nazarene Easter Sunday will have a cantata "The First Easter." Kenneth1 Mc- Anally will conduct the cantata. Mrs. Frank Carriger and Mrs. Leo Massey. will sing a duet, Mrs. W. E. Dora Brinkley and La Don McAnally, "solo parts, Janet Norwood, Carolyn McAnally and Marie Chandler trio numbers, and Roy Spearman, Larry West, Douglas Brinkley and Gary Coop- ,m mere no m and ipmcnt_a major from tne three-day battle gave for jts short lived price hike The .Kennedy told'.'a.news in free enterprise and initiative, of ...industry, and labor. He stated .a determination to hold the government's role to the minimum necessary to protect the public interest. There'can be "no room on either side for hostility or vindic- he said: In .a formal statement at the outset of his session' with news- -said his tration harbors' no- ill will 'against any corporation; indus- try or segment :of the American economy. Kennedy said he recognizes steel's need to be able to com-, pete with foreign firms, to be able to grow in order to use idle ca- pacity. But he also said it is nec- essary to prevent an inflationary spiral, to foster free collective bargaining and price increases, with the least possible govern- mental interference. It was in'that connection that he spoke of the limits on the gov- ernment's role. .The chief executive wound up with 'a prediction that in the peri- od just ahead industrial profits will be "the highest in history." Kennedy's statement followed a meeting Tuesday night with Rog- e. M. Blough, chairman of the U.S. Steel Corp., which the White House described as- "cordial and useful.'1 Blough slipped in and out, just .course, continue to see whether any violation of antitrust laws or price-fixing statutes had occurred. Kennedy denied that he had. set the price of steel. What he did, he said, was to set the national before the steel com- panies. It was this, he said, plus competition, that set the price- Board Urges Postponement Of Primary OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) An attorney for the state Election Board urged a U. S. District court to .postpone the May 1 leg- islative primary election until land and personal information aie taken toward constjtu. I _ r _ other American officers. erations once to return to the courtroom for a rereading'of testi- mony of the key prosecution wit- ness, Guenther Maennel, 30, an East German intelligence officer who defected to the West in June 1961, and says he is now working for the United States.: Transferred. It was mostly on Maennel's.tes-. timony that the prosecution built the case against Kauffman.- The prosecution .said Kauffman was being transferred from- Son: dt-cstrom Air Base, .Greenland, to Castle Air Base, Calif., when he came to Germany on vacation in 1960 and traveled to Berlin. He entered East Berlin Sept. 29, 1960, and was picked up by East Ger- man secret agents. Data Given Maennel said, he was .one of1 these agents, and that they and a Soviet intelligence officer inter- rogated the American at a secret (Continued on Page Two) Byng Residents Vote Bonds For School Addition Byng school patrons voted over- whelmingly Tuesday in favor 'of a bond issue for construc- tion of a.new classroom and gym- nasium addition. The bond issue passed by a 133 to 0 margin in the election .held at Byng SchoolTuesday afternoon. Construction on'the project will start about .June 10, according to Superintendent J. E. Teaguc. The bond issue calls for con- struction of eight new .classrooms a complete revamping of the Dean said the new plan was based on the principle "that the nations of the world should seize a moment in time to stop the arms race, to-freeze the military situation as it then appears, and to shrink, it to zero, always keeping the relative military positions of the parties as near as possible to what it was at the begin- ning." Instead of starting the disarmament process with an inventory of national military which the Russians have always rejected as new American plan called, for spot checks in selected areas. These checks would be con- ducted on the sampling technique developed by big industrial corporations. The military forces and installations in any sample area would give international in- spectors a picture of the total. American officials said Soviet diplomats with whom they dis- cussed the sampling idea prior to introduction of the draft "seemed fascinated by it" but did not com- mit their government. The Americans felt the samp, ling procedure went a long way toward meeting Soviet objections against 'foreign inspectors, swarm- ing all -over Russia in the early stages of disarmament. Under .the American plan, the inspectors would .thoroughly in- vestigate- at time only one' of: many identical districts into which the territory of the big nations would be divided.' Each said would be free to choose any single district of the other with- out advance warning. From the arms and armed forces found in the chosen dis- trict, mathematicians would pro- ject an estimate of each state's tional reapportionment. The court interrupted its delib- The request came during argu- ments on a reapportionment suit filed by Harry Moss -vhich seeks as one objective to force voting for legislative candidates at large rather than by districts. John "Wagner, attorney for the board, said there was too little time between now and the May 1 primary to change-trie ballots to for legis- lative candidates. Instead; Wagner called on the court to postpone the election un- til action was taken on constitu- tional' reapportionment. .The court should act now "to protect the rights of the said Wagner. other words you are invit- ing us to restrain asked Judge A. P. Murrah, presiding judge of the special three military strength. court. Wagner answered in the affir- mative1. 'Wagner said that while the suit filed by Moss seeks to enjoin the board from holding the legislative primary, the board is a "reluctant defendant." "It is-pointless to hold elections until there is said Jack Hewett, Oklahoma City Republican member of the board. "We can still maintain this in the federal court." This was the position of the elec- tion board majority Hewett and chairman Clee Fitzgerald un- til it was ordered by the state Supreme Court to hold the elec- tions under present apportionment laws. Leo Winters, former board secretary, didn't go along with Fitzgerald Hewett in their contention present apportionment laws are not constitutional. Louie 'Geiser, the new board secretary, was not available for comment Tuesday night, but he was not believed to be in agree- (Contlnued on Page Two) Spaak reportedly told the_ min-1 er, make up a quartet. Sherrill isters that as long as Britain re- mains outside the Common Mar- ket, 'he will not sign a treaty on Student. Union Building at East association even if it con- Central. The high school sentatives then met individually with 'their former students. Sample topics discussed1 were whether the college freshmen felt they had been adequately pre- pared in advance for college life, whether they felt the high schools had helped them make the transi- tion, whether the advisers at the college seemed sufficiently in- formed on their individual needs, their opinions of the college's en- rollment, and extra-curricula programs. Following the individual discus- sions, the high school educators met with college officials at a noon luncheon to evaluate infor- mation obtained and discuss pos- sible improvements on both the high school and college levels. forms to Belgian views. The six ministers adjourned the conference without' issuing a com- munique or fixing.a date for their next meeting: They agreed, how- ever, to continue talks at the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- tion ministerial conference in Ath- ens May 3 or at one .of their' periodic sessions in Brussels on Common Market, affairs. The Belgian-Dutch, move'indicat- ed that the two lowland nations, which nave strong trade links with Britain, refuse to be submerged in a continental bloc 'dominated by President Charles de Gaulle's government or by a French-West German combine. Belgium and the Netherlands (Continued on Two) Chandler and Dilda Brinkley will sing as a duet team. Scene Reenacled The First Christian Church will observe Maundy Thursday with an elaborate service again this year. The reenactment of the'Last Sup- per in the Upper Room will be. portrayed with men of the church taking the roles-of the .disciples. They will be in authentic cos- tumes as painted by Leonardo Da Vinci in his famed painting of The- Last Supper. Rev.. Amos will be in the pulpit for the.Easter services. The newly redecorated sanctu--' ary is in readiness for the Easter season. Climaxing -the 'Holy Week services will be identical services before when he told Kennedy of dent opened the conference by It is scheduled to be complete Unlike the Soviet plan for total disarmament within four years, the U.S. plan contained no time limit for .its completion. The first two of its three main stages would last three years each. The step-by-step approach to world disarmament contained nu- merous safeguards including an elaborate international control or- ganization with ever widening powers. Each succeeding stage in the disarmament process would begin only when the. control organization "determines that the conditions specified in the treaty have been met." At the end of the final stage, world peace and security would be maintained by a United Na- tions peace' force so powerful (Continued on Page Two) Adans Organize Local Chapter Of Boys7 Club Some 22-23 Adans got together Tuesday night to organize the Ada Boys' Club, to .be affiliated with the Boys' Clubs .of America. Bob Coleman was .named chair- I man of a steering committee to complete the organization. Other committee heads are Pat Holman and Don Edelson, build- ings; Dean Wellington, publicity; Dr. Orange Welborn, "list" com- mittee, to list prospective cor- porate members or patrons; and Bob Macy, legal. "You can say -we're definitely going to have a Boys' Club in Coleman said. The'group plans another meet- ing next Tuesday at in the directors' room of the First Na- tional Bank to enlarge committees and to continue organizational work. THE LIVING COMMUNION The .elders and deaconj of tht First Chriitiin Church: will reproduce Leonardo da Easter. The first services will be Vinci'i painting of The Last Supper Thursday evening at in the sanctuary at '8 and1 will close at a. m. church school will .be'held, in all. (Continued on Paje Two) the newly remodelled.'sanctuary, Thirteenth-at Broad- way. "The; Last' Supper" a part of. the annual-Holy Week services at the First Christian Each evening the minister. Rev. Amos W. Myers, has led the congregation to a "Daily. Walk- With Week.. In -the Living Communion service. Thursday evening, the regular elders and deacons will reproduce in "stills" The Last'Supper even to the smallest detail.-, This was done in beautiful color last year and only two changes In personnel will be made this year. Costuming and accessories used by da Vinci are duplicated, closely. The.public is invited to share in this exceptional Maundy Thursday service. (NEWS Staff A budget seems to act Jike a- corset you take care of the. bulge in one place and it pops out. in Gen. Fea. "I   

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