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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: April 10, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - April 10, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             At this time of year, hardly anything can match the smugness of the man who has just battled his Form 1040 through to a finish and dropped it into the mail. Especially if he's talking to somebody who's still battling------- Confidence Of Entire Era Sank With Titanic, P-5 THE ADA EVENING NEWS E. C. Baseballers Beat Texas Team See Sports Page 59TH YEAR NO. 24 ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1D62 10 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Officials Agree On Location Of U.S. Lab Here By W. D. LITTLE JR. Local citizens and representatives of the Department of Health. Education, and Welfare agreed Monday after- noon on the exact location for the Southwestern Regional Water Pollution Field Laboratory. C J Arcilcsi, chief of the Facilities Planning Staff of the Public Health Service, arrived from Washington, D C to take a final look at the tract of land south of the city. The area is owned by the Sciences and Natural Resources Foundation of Oklahoma, a non-profit organ- ization to encourage the development of a research 'The area accepted by the government officials lies in the south central part of the area. It is a rectangular area 800 feet by 900 feet, enclosing slightly more than 16 seres The land was donated to the federal government. The cost will have to be borne by the foundation, which will eventually launch a membership drive to accumulate funds for development of the center and retirement of indebtedness. The foundation owns 312 acres ibout two miles south of the city. t lies on the east side of an extension of Mississippi Avenue, popularly known as the "Brick Plant Road." The land accepted i. UOUulS Of 'Fireflies' WASHINGTON orbital flight were flecks of paint from his space capsule. for construction of the mil- lion laboratory runs to a shelf high above the valley basin be- low. It affords a magnificent j view of the panorama stretching U.S., Britain Give Reds Final Warning On Nuclear Test Ban Cubans Treaf Allies Call On Soviets To Alter Stand On Inspections Sailors Well WASHINGTON United States and Britain gave the Soviet Union an apparently final warning to- day that unless there is agreement on an enforceable nuclear, test ban the new U.S. test series scheduled to start late this month will have to go forward. In a joint statement released at the White House, the two governments called on the Soviets to reconsider Fla. party home from Cuba with talcs in agreeable contrast to those told by some Americans falling into forward! al1 the wav to tne Fitts Field' last "week by'some officials of the! Upon final approval by the de- National Aeronautics and Space i partment's legal advisers the ideed will be executed, finally ownership of the Adminislration. But Glenn disagreed night and said, "We will have to wait for more information on the next flight." Explorers Award building were on hand to view the site. J. Harold Short, of the firm of Coston, Frankfurt Short, Oklahoma City, expressed ad- miration for the natural beauty of the site. Hudgins. Thompson, Ball As- sociates. Oklahoma City, is cur- 'rcntly developing engineering studies and a master plan of the area for future development. Joe Hargis, engineer with the firm, spent the afternoon with field party locating topographical fea- tures and mapping the exact lo- cation desired by the Division of Water Supply and Pollution Con- trol. James Thompson, president of the board of trustees of the foun- dation. and G. C. Mayhue Jr.. secretary, assisted this final agreement on location. Other members of the board and the Ada Chamber of Commerce were in the party. The laboratory, first of those authorized by the first session of Kobert E. Peary, discoverer of this Congress, plans to employ the North Pole. Others were Adm, i initially 150 people, half or more Glenn addressed an audience of at the National Guard armory where America's space Columbus received the Hubbard emblem won by only a Score of the century's foremost explorers. Glenn's cilation-.reads: "For-ex- traordinary contributions to scien- tific knowledge of the world and beyond as a pioneer in exploring the ocean of space." Dr. Melville Bell Grosvenor, president and editor of the Na- tional Geographic Society, ranked Glenn's achievement "with those of the great explorers who have gone before Ma- Few Wearers Vice President Lyndon B. John- son presented the for Gardiner Greene Hubbard, first president of the National Geographic Society. It has been awarded to only 20 other men since it was struck in 1906. The first winner was Adm. Two members of the architec- tural firm that will design the WHAT'S UNDER A KILT? That's the question these four nosy characters are trying to answer. They're members of the cast of "The Hasty the spring production of the East Central drama department. The man in kilts is "La- portrayed by Jerry Hickey. The curious fellows are Mike Niemczyk (on bed at Gary Fulton (under Leslie McGalliard (on bed at right) and Larry Muehlhausen (behind "The Hasty Heart" will be presented Wednesday, Thursday and Friday nights in the E. C. audito- rium. All the characters pictured above are soldiers in an army hospital in Burma. "Lachie" is a recalcitrant Scot and his kilts are the object of much curiosity. (NEWS Staff their position on the inspection issue and to accept the i the hands of Fidel Castro's men. principle of international verification. _ j The seven men-lreasurc-hunt- "If they will do the statement said, 'there Castro put them up 3t still time to reach agreement." The declaration then continued: "But if there is no change in the present Soviet position, the gov- ernments of United States and the United Kingdom must conclude that their efforts to obtain a work- able treaty to ban nuclear tests are not now successful, and the test series scheduled for the latter part of this month will have to go forward." President Kennedy and British Richard E. Byrd, Charles Lind- bergh and Sir Edmund Hillary, conqucrer of Mt. Everest. Glenn gave an account of his flight and showed the official color film of the "Friendship 7's" voyage. He also brought up the theory of the paint .flecks. "Open Items" At a symposium last Friday on Glenn's flight, Dr. John A. O'Kccfe, assistant chief of NASA's (Continued on Page Two) Site Shifts For Political Speaking Date The second political speaking of them scientists. The research U. S. Officials Weigh Factors Involved In Cuban Ransom Offer WASHINGTON (API-Reports from Cuba indicated today that the Castro regime has 50.000 po- litical prisoners crowded into Cu: ban jails. This was one of the considera- tions listed by U.S. officials in discussions by Washington author- ities from President Kennedy down on Prime Minister Fidel Castro's offer to free the 1.179 Cuban invasion captives for million. The invaders who unsuccessful- ly attempted to topple. .Castro_j year-.ago were Cuban refugees wlio haH' considerable U.S. support short of direct combat participa- tion. It was pointed uut lo newsmen here that the fate of other prison- ers, who also contested Castro and in some cases may have suf- fered more than the invaders, OU Experts Check Ada's Fossil Tree i Ada's fossil tree, located at the should be considered too. It cd of wintersmjth been estimated that Castro jailed !had a ]e of disUnguished vis. persons in the wake of the jtors the weekend Storms Blow Wind, Rain Across State By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Thunderstorms some contain- ing strong wind and across much of Oklahoma today. The Grady County sheriff's of- prcference to forwarding another reportecj strong bowled direct appeal to Soviet Premier j over some bams and small build. Khrushchev. Some U.S. officials ings tod of Chickasha said the time is considered too Prime Minister Harold Macmillan chose the joint statement tech- nique for stating their position, in and also to the west between late for the personal commumca- j Chickasha and Verden. No in- method. The statement was not present- ed as a Kennedy-Macmillan dec- laration but as one from the two governments. The 600-word statement .re- icvasion. American officials said the Washington discussions have not resulted in the setting of any hard and fast U.S. policy on the inva- sion prisoners. Two general con- clusions did emerge. 1. The U.S. government con- demns ?s .barbaric Castro's ran- som offer and docs not want ;o get into any deal with him in- volving a swap of money for human lives. 2. For humanitarian reasons, the U.S. government has no ob- jection to voluntary actions by persons seeking on their own re- 'West Side Story Takes Top Honors HOLLYWOOD Sophia Loren, stern-faced Maximilian Schell and splashy "West Side Story" go into the records as top winners of the 34th annual commiuec of of Academy Awards. But a sensational bit of gate-crashing jnvasjon prisoners The lease of some or lives. all of the cap- The government has interposed no barrier to the trip to Havana j Here to take a iook at the ancient monster were Dr. Car] C. Branson, director of the Oklaho- ma Geological Survey, and Dr. L. R. Wilson, paleontologist. Both men are on the faculty of the Uni- versity of Oklahoma. The scientists were here as guests of H. J. Huddlcston, park commissioner, P. S. Karr. park superintendent, and B. G. Ander- son, Ada "rock hound." Anderson reports that the two were pretty e.xcilod about the old fossil, which they said is the largest such specimen found any- where in the Pennsylvania forma- tion. "I asked them-how old it wa.s." ijtti I 1'ji LU uiu it iu LU v cilia j -i. today by a delegation erson says and toy it juries were.reported. At Verden, the roof of the 2- story Masonic Hall was lifted, the Farmers Gin elevator damaged and glass shattered in a drug store. viewed the latest round of U.S.- British negotiations with Russia on a treaty to ban further testing of nuclear weapons. --The-.negotiations began at Gene- va 'a 'month ago when Secretary of State Dean Husk met Soviet For- eign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko at the opening of the 17-nation disarmament conference. A few days before the confer- ence opened Kennedy had an- nounced that unless a dependable ban on testing could be negotiated (Continued on Two) stole the show. ihopcs to ncgllatc with Castro. was better than 250 million I years." At the time the tree fell, then, was estimated j ture, winner of a near-record 10 Oscars. New York'siered no legal impcdimc would begin! stan Berman retains his title as "world champion money to Cuba, j tu ILL institution will work closely with! Italy's Miss Loren is best actress. Vienna's Schell IS ]n preliminary checking, Amcr-lthe omy bvlns 'f1101 vertebrates I best actor. Hollywood's "West Side Story" is best authorities also have uncov-' short-legged am- dimwit to P AnQErson continues. even Fc" In strcam This was during the carbonifer- ous age, the time when the world's great deposits of coal were formed of the primeval jungle growth, The reason the tree is a fossil now instead- of a j Originally, it that construction ______ __ about .Jan. 1, 1963, but it is hoped crasher now that the time can be moved up somewhat. Site development may begin earlier. Reds Match Military Aid Given Laos VIENTIANE, Laos Soviet Union is still matching military aid the United States gives the conservative govern- has been switched from Gaar Corner to Vanoss tonight. The candidates will follow their regular speaking schedule at Van- oss. Conflicts with other activities at Gaar Corner caused the change in sites. With rain clouds threatening, there is a possibility the weather at Vanoss will be wet tonight. If so. the speaking will be held in side the school building. Jt is scheduled to start at plies to the divided kingdom's pro-Communist and neutralist forces. This reporter last week visited the headquarters in the Plaine des Jarres of neutralist Prince Sou- OKLAHOMA Considerable cloudiness this afternoon through Wednesday; scattered showers and thunderstorms this afternoon and tonight and cen- tral and east portions Wednes- day; a little warmer east por- tion this afternoon and tonight; cooler west and north Wednes- day; low tonight 45 northwest to 60 southeast; high Wednesday 55-70. High temperature in Ada Mon- day was 63; low Monday night, S3; reading at 7 a. m. Tuesday, 54. though from a foreign policy folks back home. Berman, 35, a cabbie who has made a career out of! standpoint Washington wants to penetrating the impenetrable, stalked onto the stage cut down on Castro s fore.gn ex- in mid-telecast at Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, pre- Cuban, refugees currently sented astonished emcee Bob Hope with an ersatz Oscar, and stalked the film famous and a nation of onlookers flabber- gasted. The handsome Schell won for his role as the defender of Nazi war criminals in "Judgment at the top despite the handicap of starting in the shadow of his famous sister, actress Maria Schell. The voluptuous brunette Miss Loren won her Oscar in absentia for playing the earthy war refu- gee in the Italian production, "Two a rags- to-riches tale that began on the streets of Rome. Hers is the first Oscar to a role played in a lan- vanna Phouma and his half-broth- guage other than English. er. Prince Souphanouvong. thej It was the first time since 1939. leader of the pro-Communist Pa-1 when Britishers Vivien Leigh and thet Lao. During a four-hour period at the area's main airstrip, six Soviet Robert Donat triumphed, that two foreigners have come out on top. "West Side a musical NY Teachers Delay Start Of Strike NEW YORK strike of public school teachers scheduled to begin today was postponed for at least a day in a stormy session of the United Federation of Teach- ers' delegate assembly. The assembly, meeting.- until 3 a.m., voted to reject terms 'of a strike postponement proposal of- fered by the city and to hold a full membership meeting at 4 p.m. today to determine a'Course of action. Charles Cogen, union president, ban Families of tli Committee flew from Miami to Havana today, al- though they have no assurance they will be able to meet with Castro. Three of the four made a similar trip last August. They were unable to see Castro and fi- nally left after a month in Cuba. The committee has said it hasi million in cash and pledges with which to begin negotiations for freedom of the prisoners. to fall in a stream of mineral- bearing water. As Anderson explains the pro- cess, minerals from the water were deposited along the lines of the cellular structure of the wood. Then the wood itself rotted away, leaving a perfect replica of itself in stone. More Study Even in a preliminary examina- (Continued on Page Two) Lines Form For Annual Spring Fight Dogs and chickens vs.' flow- ers and gardens the an- nual spring battle has al- ready begun in Ada. City police chief Homer Gosnell said Tuesday com- plaints have already begun to flow into headquarters about dogs and chickens destroying flower beds and gardens in Ada. Gosnell said the" police have instituted a drive to round up all unlicensed dogs as a first preventive measure. And, he warns 'dog owners that even licensed animals may be picked up on com- plaints. In order to avoid trouble, it is suggested chicken owners keep a close watch on their fowl to prevent destruction of flower beds and gardens. It helps- make for better community relations, too. High winds blew out some plate glass windows in Anadarko and a drive-in movie screen was knocked over.' Hail accompanied the straight winds. One-half inch size hail has been reported, the Weather Bureau said in forecasting more thunder- storms. The activity will end in the east Wednesday morning. Heavy rain accompanied some thunderstorms. Maximum 'temperatures today will vary from 67 to 84 while lows tonight will be from 45 northwest to 65 southeast. The overnight.low of 41 at Gage came after a day time high of 67, also at Gage. a reef. a swank hotel and treated them as honored guests. Cuban author- ities also offered to try salvaging the Americans' equipment which went down with their 42-foot mo- torboat near a reef off Baracoa, eastern Cuba. "Butterflies" "I had butterflies in my stom- ach" about landing on Cuban soil, said Frsd Dickson Jr., 33. when he and his companions flew to Miami from Havana Monday. The shipwrecked party's first contact with revolutionary Cuba was not reassuring. They were arrested.as soon as they swam ashore by soldiers who thought they might be anti-Castro invad- ers. Welcomed As soon as they convinced the Cubans they were bona-fide mari- ners in distress they were wel- comed, the skin divers said. "We were shipwrecked sailors and our treatment was Dickson said. "I would say it was good." With Dickson, a former Ocean City, N.J., resident, were the ex- pedition's leader, Gordon S. Pat- ton, 62, of Ocean City, Md.; Bernie Nistad of Brooklyn, N.Y.. Mike Freeman, 37, John E. John- ston, 21, and Joe Campbell, 20, all of Washington, D.C., and John Sterry, 28. of Brewster, N.Y. Reef Struck They said they were heading for Jamaican waters to explore a sunken hulk when their boat Lightning was blamed at Tulsa for at least three fires as a thun- derstorm moved over the area at mid-morning. One fire killed a dog and caused damage to a house. Police Report No Accidents Monday No traffic accidents were re- corded in Ada Monday. The toll for April stands at five; Four motorists faced charges in Municipal Court Tuesday morn- ing. Charged with speeding were Reuben C. Wilson, 28; Catherine Lawrence, 34; and Wilmer H. Schwartz, 32. Jimmy W. Jones, 19, pleaded not guilty to reckless driving charges. Ada Woman Faces Bogus Check Charge Patricia Dunlap, Ada, was charged in County Court Monday with obtaining property by means of a bogus-check. She pleaded not guilty. A bond of was set. On The Offensive J T 1- L UlllUH pi UJlVlCtlU, two-engme transports landed. version of Romeo and Juliet se said the action put off any walkout At least 48 cases of small arms; among ..lejuyemle street gangs of; of the 40000 public schoo] and ammunition were unloaded from each of four planes. The other two discharged bags of sugar. A Laotian standing nearby said the planes had flown in from Hanoi, capital of Communist North Viet Nam. He said nine planes of that type regularly brought in supplies from Hanoi. Two single engine transport planes were loaded with supplies for pro-Communist and neutralist front-line troops. They took off, returned half an hour later and loaded again. Each plane made three sorties. A double-decker helicopter with New York, fell just one Oscar short of equaling the, record of 11 set by "Ben-Hur" in 1959. Itsj teachers until Wednesday morning at the earliest. sweep included supoort awards i, Such -a walkout could affect up for George Chakiris and Rita to one million of the city s pupils. Viet Nam Clears Out Pockets Of Communists Moreno, costume design, film editing, scoring of a musical, sound, color cinematography, art and set decoration. The show was plodding dully along, seeming especially tame after last year's dramatic-win by Elizabeth Berman strode on stage in the midst of a presentation by Vince Edwards, television's Dr. Ben Casey, and Shelley Winters. Berman grabbed a pint-sized a Soviet pilot.at the controls dis- Oscar -and held it up and said, charged cargo ranging from food! "This is Bob Hope's Oscar for the to petrol barrels and arms. It big broadcast of 1938. To the (Continutd on Paflt Two) I (Continued on Page Two) The union's negotiating team had agreed Monday night to the city proposal, which included an agreement on wages and working conditions the negotiators had worked out with the Board of Education. But when Cogen appeared be- fore the delegate assembly at.St. Nicholas Arena after midnight to plead for ratification of Lhe agree- ment, he -was- greeted' with cries of "strike, strike." "Cogen -told the 700' assembly members that about million is now available for salary raises (Continued on Page Two) SAIGON, South Viet Nam CAP) Viet Nam, on the offen- sive, has begun the job of hacking apart great pockets of Communist resistance dotting the country. During the past month, the gov- ernment, supported by U.S. ad- visers, equipment and transporta- tion, has been hurling forces of up to regimental strength deep into strongholds of the Viet Cong guerrillas. The Communists are fighting back, and casualties on both sides 'have sometimes 'reached in a week. war is appar- Improving intelligence facilities have helped. So has the new mo- bility U.S. helicopters are giving Vietnamese troops. "The Vietnamese Communists have invented a .kind of .war that may be 'unique in one U.S. official said. "Merely to call it a guerrilla war does not fully describe it. They are careful to and destroy only the things they feel vital lo their cause, leaving the countryside superficially at peace." Estimates of Viet Cong strength enUy moving toward a showdown and location depend partly on the end could be years: definition. The regular, full-time away. 'guerrillas are frequently shifted. A key. problem is finding the Intelligence estimates of total Viet Cong in large enough groups .numerical strength vary widely, to make massive operations fruit-i but' well-informed U.S. observers ful. Certain sections, are the Viet Cong probably has wholly dominated by the Viet j to hard-core'fighters Cong, but even-in'them the many additional part-time lem of finding large units is acute. supporters. Most of their strength is con- The principal town, Ca Mau, and centrated in the southern third of the country, particularly in five large pockets. One of the most stubborn begins, about 35 miles north of Saigon. This heavily for- ested zone is virtually free of gov- ernment control. It by the Viet Cong as a liberated area. Another stronghold is the marshy region comprising sever- al provinces along the Cambodian frontier. The Viet Cong apparently is paying.no attention to the Cam- bodian border. It flees acrossi the line whenever pursued. Govern- ment forces and aircraft have oc- casionally crossed by accident, adding tension between neutralist Cambodia and its pro-Western neighbor. The largest Communist strong- hold in the south is at the tip. of the wilderness of jun- gle, mud flats and waterways. a few fortified villages are fairly free from Communist infiltration. Most of the countryside is secure- ly in Communist hands. In the north, there are two mountainous .pockets inland from the China Sea where heavy ar- tillery bombardments, frequent, mopping-up operations and air strikes have failed to drive out the Viet Cong. While most of the country is nominally under government con- trol, the Viet Cong moves freely in large marginal areas. The jungle- covered mountains of central Viet Nam are believed to serve as an important infiltration route for Communist cadres moving in from Laos. Virtually the ''entire 900-mile frontier joining South Viet Nam to Laps and Cambodia is believed to be infiltrated at least part-of the time.' "We came ashore at a very re- mote place." Nistad said. "It took us quite a while to reach civiliza- tion.'! Baracoa is on the north coast of Cuba, more than 50 miles from the U.S. naval base at Guantan- amo Bay The skin divers' motor boat, Pisces, had been cruising through bad weather toward the Windward Passage en route u> Jamaica. The men's return to the United States was handled through the Swiss Embassy, which acts as intermediary between the United States and Cuba since diplomatic relations between the two coun- tries were severed. Scouts Kick Off Cleanup Drive In Ada Saturday Saturday, Cub Scouts will be canvassing Ada with "Keep America Beautiful" pamphlets and litterbags, B. Huddle- ston, Litterbug chairman. Coun- cil of Ada Garden Clubs, advises. "This is the kickoff for the of- fical 'clean-up paint-up' week which will begin April she added. Citizens are again urged to have all litter packed in boxes for the clean-up crews at usual garbage points. Tuesday at 1 p.m. approximate- ly 25 women, all members of the Council of Ada Garden Clubs, met at Mrs. Huddleston's home to rubber stamp grocery sacks of the following merchants with Lit- terbug slogans: Dicus Mart, demons Unimart, Dutch's Shop- ping Mart, Safeway Grocery and Drug. These will be dis- tributed by the merchants. Miss Martha Mote, County Home Demonstration agent, is urging Home Demonstration Club members in Pontotoc County to make this clean-up countywide. The biggest difference between men. and boys is the cost of their Gen. Fea. Corp.)   

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