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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - April 9, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             Today's happy news from the whooping crane family, brings to mind the young friend who once aspired to fame or infamy as "The Man Who Killed The Last Ot The Whooping Cranes Stonewall Leads Baseball Rating See Sports Page THE ADA EVENING NEWS Dodge City Still Relies Heavily On Cattle, P-5 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, APRIL 9, 1962 12 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Cuban Exiles Plan Negotiations To Reduce Ransom Set By Castro De Gaulle Wins Big Vote Of Confidence PARIS voters have' overwhelmingly ap- proved President Charles de Gaulle's peace pact with the Algerian nationalists. The Secret Army Organization, fighting to keep Algeria French, replied with more ter- rorist killings'and defiant proclamations printed in newspaper plants occupied at gunpoint. Sixty-five per cent of the voters in metro- politan France endorsed De Gaulle's Algerian policy Sunday in response to his plea for a public show of con- fidence Only 25 per cent of the registered voters failed to cast ballots, and 90 per cent of the valid ballots were cast in favor of the peace agreement. There was no voting in Algeria itself. European ex- officials are en- Communist con- Extremists Lack Favor With Parties WASHINGTON (AP) The prospect that ultraconservatives will influence the course of the major political parties in this fall's congressional elections ap- pears to be fading. Leaders of both parties, in fact, are busy posting keep-away signs against "zealous citizens who pro- fess to feel that some of the na- tion's highest trapped in a spiracy. The signs apply also to those among other things, want to abolish the income tax and to im- peach Chief Justice Earl Warren. Cold Shoulder This was demonstrated in the frosty reception Republicans and Democrats gave last week to former Maj. Gen. Edwin A. walk- er when he questioned the loyalty of Secretary of State Dean Rusk and others in testimony before a Senate Armed-Secvices subcom- mittee. Sen. Strom Thurmond, D-S.C., sparked the inquiry into al- leged muzzling of military men at which Walker appeared, made it clear several times he was not the general's state- No Show Sen. Barry Goldwater, R-Ariz., a spokesman for Republican con- servatives, didn't even turn up to hear Walker, as he could have done as a member of the parent Armed Services Committee. Walker's performance on the stand convinced most of the politicians who heard him that the former general is not likely to become an effective spokesman! endorsing ments. tremists there killed at least 26 persons and wounded 67. Commando bands raided, plants of the Oran Echo and Oran Re- publican in the west Algerian port city early today and forced Lions Aren't As Bar Visitors OMAHA, Neb. the shouted the bartender, "there's a lion out there." Committee Reports Favorable Reply To Bid For Audience MIAMI, Fla. exile negotiators .will, fly to Havana Tuesday in hopes of inducing Prime Minister Fidel Castro to reduce the million set as ransom for .their sons' and husbands captured at the Bay of Pigs. A spokesman for the Cuban Families Committee said Castro replied favorably Sunday night to a cable seek- licking Uie windshield. She was Carmen, the largest of The vice treasurer of the committee, Enrique Llaca, said the committee already, has raised million in ir of circus bonswwch had cash and pledges jn four months, to aid. the prisoners, escaped from a-truck at the edge I The prisoners, .'captured in the abortive mva- of the main Omaha business dis-' sion last April, were sentenced to 30 years imprisonment trict Saturday night. She had cuffed but not seriously injured a' pedestrian. Trapped Mollner had trapped her in thej entryway to the bar by driving! his cruiser onto the sidewalk to! block the exit. j Police with riot guns trained on the big cat formed a semi-! men at gunpoint to run off thou- circle around the entrance. They sands of copies of the papers labeled "Special Secret Army Edition." The rightist secret army was dealt a psychological setback, however, by the French people's thunderous endorsement of De Gaulle's Algerian policy even though it means the end of the once far-flung French empire. Incomplete returns from metro- politan France and Corsica were: yes no A total of ballots were in- valid. De Gaulle's supporters heralded the verdict as a ringing vote of confidence in all aspects of his four-year-old regime. Socialists and 'Communists, however, em- phasized they were backing only his Algerian policy. De Gaulle put before the voters a two-point proposal. One called for confirmation of the cease-fire signed with, the Algerian rebel command at Evian on March 19. The other asked for blank-check 01) Picks Coach For Basketball NORMAN Stevens, 38-year-old South Carolina basket- ball coach, accepted an offer to- _______v__... day to become Oklahoma coach. people must have been simple j After his acceptance, athletic idiots. They just Bud Wilkinson and the brought in dogs to hold back a crowd of 500 or more curious. "If that cat had taken off into the crowd it's hard to say what would, have said Sgt. Eugene Scarpino. "Some of those; People Locked In At the City Auditorium a block away the wrestling matches had just ended and nearly fans had started for the exits when word spread that the lions were free. I Athletic Council acted quickly senting a recommendation for Ste- vens' hiring to OU president George L. Cross. Cross in turn presented it to the Board of Regents who were ex- pected to give it routine approval. "We had to lock them in the. The new Sooner coach will ar- lobby until the' animals were j rive sometime this week to find said manager Charles (a home and visit area high school Mancuso. "It was a real panic." j players. Guy Gossing, Carmen's Belgian-! born trainer, arrived with a net land a chair. The shouting crowds powers to make Algeria an inde- pendent Moslem-ruled nation as everyone Algeri- ans favor independence in a self- determination referendum later this year. There was no serious organized campaign in France against Sun- day's referendum. But some com- plaints were heard about De Gaulle's linking special decree powers with approval of the peace accords ending the 7Vi-year North African rebellion. The big French Communist par- ty said in a statement: "It is clear that the (Communist) voters responded 'yes' only to peace and not to personal power (for De and barking .dogs made the lion more unruly. "Please, he pleaded. Paddywagon After almost an" hour Carmen finally was coaxed into a police paddywagon which had replaced Mollner's cruiser. Gossing was on the point of collapse. Meanwhile, a man had breath- lessly informed police: "I may be mistaken but' I think there's -a lion in the stairway' behind the Ace Bar." It turned out to be Diane, Carmen's missing companion. Her cage was brought from the truck and Gossing coaxed her hour and 45 minutes after the first lion alarm. Gossing speculated that two men trying to steal, something had accidentally released two of his 10 lions. for the far right. Sen. Leverett Saltonstall, R- Mass.. said he couldn't go along with Walker's charges. Sen. How- ard W. Cannon, D-Nev., said they weren't supported by the record. No Jnjury Sen. John M. 'Stennis, D-Miss.. head of the Senate group that heard Walker's testimony, said he no intention of calling for an inquiry into the records of per- sons accused by the former gen- eral of being soft on communism. Sen. Jacob K.. Javits, R-N.Y., used Walker's appearance to tee off against what he called the "radical right in the Democratic party." Walker is seeking the Democratic nomination for gov- ernor in Texas. His chances are regarded as poor. Javits said in a New York tele- (Continued on Page Two) With his resounding "yes" vote, De Gaulle may decide to call new legislative elections. A 12-man provisional executive dominated by Moslems already is preparing the ground in Algeria (Continued on Page Two) SPACE-AGE EXTRACTION NORFOLK, Va. (AP) Ronald Hackney, 12, used a modern method to get rid of a baby tooth. He tied a string to the tooth, the other end to a toy plastic "rocket, pulled the trigger and the tooth was in orbit. Stevens will introduce a style of play that will contrast widely with that employed by Doyle Parrack, departed Sooner coach and most of the other Big Eight coaches. Stevens' 1962 Gamecocks aver- aged 79' -points -per-.-game-with' quick breaking perpetual motion offense. despite the fact their tallest starter was Art Whil- esnant, 6 foot 3 center. Stevens hails from Indiana, fa- each pending payment of ransoms ranging from 000 to The unusual verdict came Sat- urday night'by a five-man mili- tary tribunal, Havana newspapers reported. The trials were closed to the American press. Prosecutor Jose Santiago had called for the severest penalties. The maximum penalty is death, but Castro had been reported wary of imposing it. Some exiles here believe the sentences and ransom provision resulted from the family commit- tee's offer to negotiate for the captives' release. A cable offer- ing to negotiate was sent Satur- day. The price for prisoners has more than tripled since Castro made his startling offer last May to swap the prisoners for 500 trac- tors. A committee of U.S. citizens or- ganized at that time to try to ar- range the trade. It was estimated that it would take up to mil- lion, to buy enough tractors or bulldozers to free the prisoners. The prisoners now may be re- leased one by one oh payment of ransoms or indemnities ranging 'from for a man in the usanks- to a-.-leador of the invasion. (In New York, the chairman of the International Rescue Commit- tee, Leo Cherne said his organ- ization would not negotiate with mdus for its speed and high scor-ithe Cuban government to ransom ing basketball. Stevens' South am the prisoners. Cherne compared the ransom finished in a fourth-place'tie over offer to that made by the Ger- the regular Atlantic Coast Con-; mans during World War fcrence campaign last season trucks for the lives of won for him ACC coach of the j Hungarian year honors. The families committee, which Stevens, a native of Warsaw, j took over efforts to free the cap- Ind., was graduated from Michi-; lives after the International Res- gan. State. jcue Group gave up ;the project, In" Columbia, South Carolina jtold Castro "the concrete offer we are .ready' to make you does not Churches Open Talks On Possible Merger WASHINGTON (AP) Repre-l The move was originally sentatives of four major Christian sparked on Dec. 4, 1960, in a denominations meet today to ex-1 sermon at San Francisco's Epis- plore prospects for merger, j copal Cathedral by the Presbyte- OKLAHOMA Partly cloudy i his- afternoon; considerable cloudiness tonight and Tuesday; a few thundershowers west por- tion late today and tonight and central and east portion Tues- day; warmer today and east and south tonight; low tonight 37 northwest to 55 southeast; high Tuesday 62-72. FIVE-DAY FORECAST FOR OKLAHOMA During the rest of this week temperatures will average 7 to 11 degrees below normal with minor day to day changes. Nor- mal highs 68-75. Normal lows 35 northwest to 50 southeast. Precipitation will average from near .10 extreme west to near 1.50 east occurring as showers about midweek. High, temperature in Ada Sun- day'was 59; low Sunday night, 45; reading at 7 a. m. Monday, 46. Involved in the first joint ses- sion of its scope 'looking toward a possible united Protestantism in America are four denominations with nearly 19 million members. They are: The Methodist Church, the na- tion's .largest Protestant body, with members. The Protestant Episcopal Church with members. The United Presbyterian Church with members. The United 'Church of Christ; a recent merger of Congregational Christian and Evangelical and Reformed Church, with members. No decisive actions are expect- ed at the initial two-day confer- ence, which plans only to organization and procedures for continuing negotiations. The opening get-together ap- peared likely to provide some clues as to just how much steam there is behind the historic pro- posal. Other denominations may be invited to join in future negotiat- ing sessions. The goal, if agreements can be reached, is establishment of a united church "truly catholic, tru- ly reformed, and truly evangeli- cal." rian' leader, the Rev. Dr. Eugene Carson Blake of Philadelphia. "Our separate he declared at the time, "present a tragically divided church to a tragically divided world." Last year, as he urged, govern- ing bodies of the United Presby- terian Church and the .Episcopal Church joined in issuing 'invita- tions for the talks to' the other two denominations. Merger of the four communions would bring together Christians retaining age-old creeds and tra- ditional liturgies, and those with more informal non-ritualistic cus- toms. However, the roots of all four groups intertwine back in the early days .of the. Protestant ref- ormation 450 years ago. Dr. Blake has estimated that even if good progress is made, it would take at least .10 years to form, the merger. With .the ex- ception of the Episcopal Church, the other three denominations are products of 'previous mergers themselves that have developed in this century in the momentum for fuller' Christian unity. Chairmen of the negotiating teams are: Methodist Bishop Glenn R. Phil- (Continued on Page Two) Athletic Director Marvin Bass said: "We are certainly sorry to see Bob go but we wish .him the best of luck and continued suc- Stevens overhauled South Caro- (Continued on Page Two) Accident Spree Boosts Ada Total For Month To 5 A weekend accident spree rais- ed Ada's smashup total to five for the month of April. Until the four weekend wrecks, the city had re: corded only one during- the first week of the month. It started at p. m. Satur- day at Main and Broadway where cars driven by Charles W. Hall, 19, Route 1, Roff, and Carl D. Tharp, 39, .118 West Eighteenth, collided at the Tharp forfeited bond after being charged with' failure to yield. Sunday afternoon produced the other- three wrecks. At p. m., cars operated'by Tony M; Illard, 17, Route 4, Ada, Joe Pearson, 72, 1109 North Johnston, crashed-at Eighth and Oak. Liliard was cited for failure to yield and forfeited a S10 bond. Steven Fraizier, 39, Houston, Tex., and Jerry M. Mahoney, 19, Semihole; collided at p. m. at the intersection of Tenth and Mississippi. Mahoney was charg- ed with following too closely. He forfeited bond. The last one came .at Seventh refer to tractors." Sentiment among Miami's 000 or more Cuban exiles did not appear unified. Antonio de Varona, a member of the Cuban Revolutionary Coun- cil, called the sentences political blackmail. "It is a verdict that could have been hatched only in mind of .a he said. One exile who asked not to be SHEARED entire right side .of this car driven by Carl Douglas Kretiinger, Rt. 1, Stonewall, was sheared off by the impact of iteel against concrete. Kretsinger hit the Springbrook bridge on SH 19 west of Ada Sunday morn- ing when a tire on his car apparently had a blowout. vehicle travelled about 160 feet after the tire blew our before it hit the Staff Whoopers Add Two To Population NEW ORLEANS, La. (API- Crip and Josephine are two bash- ful whooping cranes determined to do-something about preserving their nearly extinct species. Their fifth offspring cracked through its egg Sunday at Audu- bon Zoo to increase the world population of the rare bird to 48. Crip and Josephine are taking turns incubating a- .second egg, which zoo director George Doug- believes will- hatch .-by.. the eno" The two adult whooping cranes, who are so shy Douglass keeps them away from public view, hatched the first of' their species ever born in captivity four years ago. Since then, Crip and Jose- phine have produced two. other cranes, one 3-year-old and the other 1. The parents are the only whoopers to ever produce in cap- tivity. Josephine got off the nest and; helped-push her baby out of the! egg when the shell cracked. The rusty-colored baby crane is ibout the size of a newly; hatched chick. "It's a very healthy said Douglass, who put the baby under a 24-hour watch. "We are- hopeful it won't catch aspergelosis." He said there is no known cure for the lung fungus caused by an airborne germ. It doesn't affect domestic fowl and many wild birds, but Audubon.lost two-cranes from the disease in the past. named said, "Instead of spending! "We leave the incubation of the million to ransom them, let's use the money to buy arms. In any event, Castro won't last 30 years (the length of the sen- Expected to make the trip to Havana are Aly'aro Sanchez, eggs up to mother nature.but we are doing. everything possible to safeguard the Douglass' said. Asked about the sex of the new bird, Douglass replied; "We have not learned- how to determine that chairman of the families commit- even with adults." tee, Llaca, and two other com- mittee, Betan- court de Rodriguez' and Ernesto Freyre. Sen. Homer E. Capehart, R- Ind., said at Indianapolis that the sentencing is "strictly 100 per {Continued on Page Two) CONFERENCE SET WASHINGTON Kennedy will hold a-news confer- ence Wednesday at p. m. It will be broadcast live if the networks request permission, the White House announced today. Look For Stellar Bits By Losers By JAMES BACON AP Movie-Television Writer HOLLYWOOD (AP) Tonight is Oscar night in movieland and you'll see some of-the year's" beat .especially by nominees i front runners. all or most of the H races for which it is nominated. "Judgment at also with 11 nominations, and "The with 9, also are who will still be'smiling after .the other, guy's name is called. and Townsend at p. m. In-'i It's Hollywood's big .show, so big that-it has to be held 10 miles volved 'were Jackie Lee Medlock, 22, 220 East Twelfth, and Faye Galbert, East Fifth. Gal- bert was fined ?20 for failure -to yield .and driving without.-a license. In- other 'weekend ing charges, were filed against Ray 20, Melvin Stephen White, 16, and Steven D. Gregory. Hatton pleaded not guilty and the latter two, forfeited bonds in- Municipal Court. Edward Brown, 22, was fined; for assault and battery in -the only non-traffic case. away in Santa .Monica's Civic Au- ditorium. Just about everybody will be there but Liz Taylor, who is busy.in Rome.' Post'time is p.m.. Eastern Standard Time.- ABC. radio and television, will :cover. the event. Armed forces radio- will short- wave it to the. world. Televiewers will see clips from the nominated films. As. the magic hour -nears, only' the movie. "West .Story" seems a shoo in. The-smart mon- ey picks .the big musical to win Then there are "Guns of Nav- "Fanny." Producers of the former, if they lose, can cry all '.he way to the bank. It's the year's big moneymaker. It-, a "West'Side Story" band- wagon j oils as. predicted, then Natalie. Wood, its star, may win best.actress was nominated for another. picture ;in. Sophia Loren gave what many felt was a far. .superior crit- ics called it the 'best- since Gar- bo. She could easily be' the first actress winner in the 34-year-old awards who spoke a.foreign -lan- in her Crash On Springbrook Bridge Critically Injures Stonewall Man A 22-year-old .Stonewall man suffered crjtical injuries early Sunday morning when his car smashed into a bridge two and a half miles west of Ada. In critical condition in an Oklahoma City hospital is Carl Douglas Kretsinger, 22, Route 1, Stonewall. Kretsinger crashed into the Springbrook Meadow bridge on SH 19 about a. m. Sunday.. He was 'driving alone. He was taken by Ada ambulance into Valley View Hospital and given emergency treatment for severe-head injuries and'body abrasions. A hospital spokesman said he'suffered' a possible fractured skull. After' treatment at Valley -View -Kretsinger was'rushed by-ambulance to Okla- City's St. Anthony's Hospital. He was listed in "critical" condition there early Monday' morning. Highway Patrol Trooper, H.'T. Gay, who investigated the acci- dent, said Kretsinger was'-travel- ing east toward Ada when he hit the Springbrook Meadow bridge. Gay said Kretsinger's car appar- ently had a blowout on the right front tire about 160 feet from the bridge. The ground on the right side the highway approaching the bridge was cut deeply by the rim of the wheel and indications are that Kretsinger had fought to bring the car back onto the high- way. The right front fender struct the bridge and sheared that side (Continued on Page Two) Condemnation Suits Occupy District Court Condemnation suits are still being tried this week in District Court. The State Highway Department vs. H. R. Cooper, et al., was scheduled to go to the jury some- time Monday. Next will be a similar case against J. W. Munsell, et al: Another case likely to be tried before the civil docket closes is W. H. Cordell vs. Lewis Kowena, a damage suit. A disposition and arraignment docket is scheduled to open Tues- day. All the cases are criminal. Included on the disposition docket are: State vs. Jimmy Davis, grand larceny. State vs. Hagen "Bob" Green- wood, bogus check. State vs. B. A. Peltier, bogus check. State- vs. Willie 0. Lemons, bo- gus check. State vs. Ambrose C. Cully, forgery in the second degree. State vs. Louie Whitaker, for- gery in the second degree. -State vs. M. M. Davis, bogus check. State vs. Alvin K. 'Lott, et al., burglary in. the second degree. State vs. Wayne Watchous, for- gery in the second degree. Japanese Protest Nuclear Testing TOKYO Japan claims in the event of today the U.S. announcement loss by Japanese fishermen. establishment of a nuclear note claimed establishment zone around British-owned a danger zone over a wide area mas Island in the Pacific. the central Pacific by the U.S.' United States has announced Energy Commission is intends to conduct nuclear to the principle of free- in the atmosphere this of the open sea. A protest- note handed officials feel proper estab- Embassy Counsellor John of a danger zone and year at the Foreign Office of vessels and air- pressed deep regret at the is standard international announcement. procedure.. The protest also said Japan Atomic Energy Commission serves the right to claim 4 warned ships and planes pensation from the. United remain clear of a rectangular for any damages or losses 600 by 800 miles surrounding ing from establishment of Christmas Island and danger American atoll of Johnston Is- in the mid-Pacific. WASHINGTON Kennedy announced last month the United States indicated today that Japan's resume atmospheric nu- test 'over establishment of a tests at the end of April un- clear test zone around the Soviet Union signed a Island in the .Pacific would ban treaty providing for ef- turned down. Only a sudden change -of inspections before that time. by the Soviet Union, leading to nuclear test ban treaty with inspection, could alter this, Woman Wins cials indicated. In Lottery Word of the Japanese i handed the U.S. Embassy, in. Italy (AP) Liliana kyo did -not surprise Bicchieri, 22, wife of a worker, today won The action was believed to on a 5-cent ticket in Italy's a two-fold purpose. It Agnano Lottery. Japan's traditional opposition' money .will be all hers. any form of nuclear testing has no tax on winnings in laid the groundwork for state lotteries. Its Big Show The other distaff competition gang leader of "West Side potent. Geraldine Page, the is the favorite. ican. is up for previously unknown Chakir- and Piper Laurie, will have rugged jostling with mer, flower-eating starlet, big Montgomery Clift "The and Audrey and Jackie Glea- a threat, for fast at George C. Scott The men's, race for top actor Peter Falk ('.'Pocketful -of even closer. It's between are the other male milian the Nazi nominees: lawyer of "Judgment- at' In the. feminine: supporting race; 'and Paul .Newman, Rita Moreno Side pool shark of. "The Hustler." versus Judy Garland But- ..and there at plenty of them among the Judy is the sentimental choice emy's has the sentiment vote also has ites Spencer Tracy Merkel and and'Charles Boyer Fay. Bainter Chil- and Lotto Lenya of the Spring. of Mrs. is Stuart -Whitman, -the sex or it will -be a great ate of "The complete with, bbsomy- star- In the supporting marching pickets and big George Chakiris, the Puerto" Suburbanite: meals a day, a roof over my head, two cars, a boat, a power mower and a'contented wife T- why shouldn't I. be in Gen. Fea.   

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