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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: April 5, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - April 5, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             Oklahoma's infamous inferiority complex is taking a beating. Newest joke at O. U. you hear about the Oklahoman who moved to Nope. "Raised the I. Q. of both states 50 per cent." Rain Halts Play In Moss Tourney See Sports Page THE ADA EVENING NEWS Designer Comes To Defense Of First Lady, P-5 59TH YEAR NO. 20 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 1962 1.6 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Ex-General Names Rusk As Link In SecrerControl Apparatus' President Sends Transportation Plan To Congress WASHINGTON Kennedy proposed a million handout to traffic-strangled cities today and dangled hopes of eventual bargain rates before the nation's air, rail and bus travelers. Kennedy bundled up his ideas in a transportation message and sent it, off to Congress. He ignored former President Dwight D, Eisenhower's recommendation for creation of a government depart- ment of transportation. The million would be only a first installment, spread over three years, to be given to public agencies They would put up some partially matching funds and use the combined federal-local money for "the Walker Continues Charges In Senate Probe Testimony WASHINGTON A. Walker, former Army major general, testified today that he regards- Secretary of State Dean Rusk as a link with a mysterious secret apparatus bent 'on a "sell-out" of this country. Walker also named Walt Whitman Rostow, a top State Department planner, as influential in a secret "control t apparatus" which the ex-general said always followed: "the soft line of 'communism." Walker named these two in response to questions by Sen, E. L. Bartlett. D-Alask'a. Bartlett was pursuing details on Walker's general that Chinese ana neeaea expansion of public mass rtcxwo 0 1 rt 1 c-MENT Edwin A. Walker, former Army major general, reads a prepared statement Set Up the traveling public and for bulk grain, coal and farm and fishery products, testifying before a special Senate Armed Forces Subcommittee in Washington. Purge recommended that Congress end minimum rates prescribed under federal regulation. said he "was a scapegoat of an .unwritten policy of .collaboration and coilu-sion with the international TOKYO (AP) passengers on what conspiracy." (AP leadership today castigated get lower rates in time bers of the Chinese spelled out. But federal Party who it said have become bureaucratic, insolent and said they hoped for some "bargain rates to attract people away from cars" as well as E v, The unusually sharp denunciation may be the prelude to a action to prevent price Run purge of the Chinese party of more than 12 million rate and mass transit recommendations, and a string Trouble The purged may become were parts of a boys for the present chaotic attack on The "Ev dition of Chinese problems Charlie" leadership team is which has created hunger and "are burdening our its troubles with Republi- rest on the system, in. Congress .threatening to The attack -was published .in the progress and security off in different directions on official Peiping People's we major issues. midway through an general, Kennedy spoke Minority Leader Everett meeting of the National reliance on Dirksen of Illinois and House Congress the Chinese and for what he Leader Charles A. Hal- nists' rubber-stamp far reaching of Indiana face some chal- "There are the paper said, "who have become steeped in bureaucracy, exhibit feelings in federal reforms designed to downgrade regulating and subsidizing and make from bucking members who ordinarily would be satisfied with their conservative course. insolence and self-satisfaction, "fit, -lean and progressive get realities, estrange themselves from the masses and do not competition and Dirksen's difficulties center to discuss things with the masses." The .paper said that party members today exercise leadership during a period of great gravity and thus have heavier duties than in the last year, delayed this year, the transportation message was the last of a series Kennedy planned to offer to the present Congress in amplification of his program for the a compromise proposal to authorize President Kennedy to provide up to S100 million in financing for the United Nations. The challenge to Halleck came from an unusual source his own party's national chairman. Rep. The editorial said many new members of the party lack experience in revolutionary struggle and have not been educated in Marxism and Leninism. Both discord in Congress and outside. But Kennedy nevertheless urged Congress to get started as soon as possible. The recommendation for consulting Halleck, Miller has tried to drum up. support for a GOP substitute for the administration's plan to link medical and new party members must, during the present period, undergo re-education, it from minimum rate regulation for carriers of bulk commodities and. farm for the elderly to the Social Security system. Halleck thus far Has given no sign he is willing "It has become an products, Kennedy buy the substitute. task for us to understand the importance of solidrying the party's political, ideological and organizational phases, strengthening the party's ideological it get at the most critical and controversial problems of all in the area of unneeded regulatory curbs. For airline passenger traffic, Kennedy said it might be a good idea to start on1 a Dirksen, who usually supports the administration on major foreign policy action, believed he had quieted most Republican opposition to Kennedy's request for The last big overhaul of on Paac Two) Chinese Communist Psrty took place in 1958 following the of Mao Tze-tung's freedom of pression policy, called "let s flowers bloom, let 100 schools thought contend." For one s ling month critics of and of Mao, had their public VP? W charge Wednesday shadowy forces hand in hand with communism are eating at the American way of life. For seven hours in the witness chair of a Senate Armed Services subcommittee. Walker had blazed away Wednesday at government officials from President Kennedy on down and contended the na- tion was following a policy of "no-win and retreat, from vic- SMOKE BiLLOWS FROM WAREHOUSE FIRE Huge billows of smoke clouded the sky at Baltimore as firefighters battled to confine a multi-alarm blaze in a feed warehouse. The fire started inside the structure and the lack of air caused the large amount of smoke. (AP; Title-Seekers Prepare For Ada Pageant Tomorrow's the big day for 12 j WASHINGTON purported to show that Douglas'for producing various components HS SCekinff tllfi MiSS Ada tltlC, rtA., A nft Pn VinuA A IVr- m-sifitr- nn V7 'nf H-m VJl-n Officials Of Aircraft Firm Deny Excess Profits On Nike Contracts girls seeking the Miss Ada title, with its attached hopes of going on to take the Miss Oklahoma crown and then on to Atlantic He contended too that he had City for the Miss America com- been summarily removed frorc and defamed be- .petition. The local phase of the nation- cause 0( his "hard hitting line1 wide search for the 1962 wearer agajnst communism the America title cul- Walker resigned from the Army minates in a pageant beginning at and colTu- with a bitter blast at-his j 8 p.m. Friday in the East Central superiors after being removed! auditorium, from .command of an Army divi- The 12 girls entered in the Miss sion in Germany and admonished! Ada contest will already have a ifor making derogatory statements j publicly about prominent Ameri- ans. He is a resident of Texas and big day behind them by the time the main event begins. In addi- tion to rehearsals and last minute preparations, a style show also is seeking the Democratic norni- has been scheduled during the nation for governor of the state. The subcommittee called him as a witness in its inquiry into charges by Sen. Strom .Thur- mond, D-S.C., that military lead- afternoon by the Jaycee Janes. It will be held at 2 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the First Meth- odist Church. The Junior Chamber of Com- competition' and Lloyd Jack, ers wanting to speak out against imerce is sponsoring the Miss Ada r a I T I n 1, r] communism, have been censored and muzzled. WherPWalk'er returned" to the" witness criair today, Barlett asked what the former general meant Wednesday. when he said, "It is ___________ ed April 1, 376.persons.-have.died eha'irrnlZ'reports thaUnreresTm' city in Wisconsin jtrafiic with. five "per' cent of Jack i'running' reported more than 300 Then they were subjected to ruth less persecution as "rightists." In recent months the Chinese Reds have made plain that the "great ieap crash program to make China a world industrial been' shelved because of agriculture failures. Mao's agricultural pro- gram of rural communes, group- ing millions of peasants into com- munized colonies, has been drastically modified because the peasants didn't produce in the communes, (Continued on Page Two) OKLAHOMA Mostly cloudy and cool this afternoon, occa- sional showers east portion; considerable cloudiness and cool- er tonight; Friday partly cloudy west, considerable cloudiness east, a little warmer most sec- tions; low tonight 38-48; high Friday generally in 60s. High temperature In Ada "Wednesday was 54; low Wednes- day night, 46; reading at 7 a.m. Thursday, 46. Rainfall during the 24-hour period ending at 7 jun. Thursday, .81 inch. tickets had been sold by Thurs- day morning with many- more expected to attend. ___ A previous winner of the Miss antCommunist" leadership" by aj Oklahoma title. Miss Kaye Creed r AT E'nTs] inUn limn tn irtCft uplll kn division commander." What did "real control appara- tus Bartlett asked. Walker replied that the "real control apparatus could be identi- fied by its efforts and what it is doing." He said the soft-line on commu- nism had let the Communists take over Cuba and part of Korea and spread into the Congo. Walker said this apparatus accomplished its propaganda through the United Nations, add- ing: "The United Nations is the nearest thing to the Tower of Ba- bel that's ever been built." Walker said the effort was "to sell out pur traditions, our consti- tution, our. sovereignty, our inde- pendence." Bartlett told Walker that if the (Continued on Page Two) Kennedy Accepts Invitation To Make Brazil Trip WASHINGTON President Joao Goulart has prom- ised his government will make of Enid, who won in I960, will be here for the various plan- ned in connection with the com- petition. Among special appear- ances she. has scheduled is a singing performance at an Ada High School assembly at a.m. Friday. The girls competing in the Miss (Continued on Page Two) Police Report First Accident Of New Month The first accident of April oc- curred in Ada at p. m. Wednesday. Cars driven by Thomas J. Mc- Knight, 56, 1020 South Stockton, Ada, and Elwood Byron Moore, 75, Kingston, collided at the in- the Douglas Aircraft Co. have bitterly denied they reaped ex- cessive profits from the Army on Nike missile contracts. Donald W. Douglas Jr., the company's president, accused j Aircraft's profits on 17-Nike con-1 of the Nike missile system. tracts in 1952-61 totaled mil- j lion but that subcontractors did most of the work. Robert E. Dunne, staff investi- aides 'of a Seriate Invest.gat.ons t ivalent to subcommittee Wednesday-of the mpulatmg figures to picture, prof- fa D [g Qwn fa its'as too high. b "The.numbers are accurate, but! Dunne said the profits, figures nobody puts1 their numbers togeth-! against the work done er that Douglas said in j and its subcontractors'combined, challenging documents' prepared would be 7.6 per cent on'the- 17 by the subcommittee staff. These j contracts totaling ?952.-74 million Seat Beits Spell Difference In. Death struck, the curb and a. door swung open. She bounced helplessly to the 'concrete. Cause of death: fractured., skull.- .On a country road, a Wiscon- sin traffic patrol squad car Douglas, armed with stacks of charts and flanked at the witness table by a half dozen subordi- nates, called manipulation this which 'arithmetical borders on- economic frivolity a gross dis- tortion." He said the contracts actually totaled1 million, "and our profit from' those sales before fed- eral income taxes 'approximated million, a rate of less than 3.2 per cent of sales." Income taxes took more than half of. that profit, he added. Douglas said he had no apolo- gies to make for the company's work or its profits as the chief under Western in developing the subcontractor Electric Co. antiaircraft'missile ;system; Douglas-officials take the stand again today, the third day of hearmgs. intp7 whafsubcommittee L. rArk.v'ha'S'called'''p'rbfit" pyramid- state's 'passenger automobiles ing by missile contractors. eauipped with seat belts, only one Dunne -testified he- didn't-.know of'the 376 accident-victims-dur-: of-much the Douglas company ing the period, according to State Motor Vehicle "Department' files, was wearing a seat belt is not complete any extravagant 311J L 1 L 1 V ilhfuwu. buj. shrieked after a fugitive at'speeds! "The record close to 100 miles-an hour. An- j dtl t other car blundered out of a side j f road, the patrol car slanted off j the struck a utility spun through a field and back onto the highway, upside down and a tot; in and local traffic officers does not provide space for reporting whether a car is equipped with belts and whether they were in "'But after passage of the crawled out, finished his tour of; duty in another car. Those are various newspaper' and radio ler car. the Wisconsin Radio.TV Asso_ life and death were very close j and wisconsin Asso. together. Only a seat belt sepa-1 rated them. The woman had none, and died. The officer was belted in 'and lived. That summarizes the record of the past six months, since Wiscon- sin became the first of the 50 states to require seat belts in new automobiles.. "I am proud to have signed the bill into Gaylord-Nel- lersection of Sixteenth, and Mis-1 son says simply. "It-can save sissippi. 'McKnight was charged with failure to yield. He pleaded not .guilty. Four speeding cases were filed in Municipal Court Thursday morning. Cited for speeding were Glenella J. Laura M. Martin, 37; Gordon W. Christy, 24; and Ruth E. Varnadore, 20. Odie L. Carnes, 62, was charged with driving while intoxicated and driving without a license. The latter charge _ was also filed Sick, Sick, Sick fair compensation lor expropriat- ed utility-properties. And, President Kennedy has Willie Morris. 37. cepted an invitation to visit Brazil sometime'this'year. Those were' the two major de- velopments in two days of talks between the ''heads of state. Goulart left for New York to- day. The Brazilian president made his pledge of fair'Compensation in joint communique issued many -hundreds of lives in the coming years and prevent thou- sands .of serious injuries." Since the act requires belt in- stallation only, in new cars, it has given authorities, an test of the safety, fac- tor worked out previously in lim- ited surveys. The state has -passen- ger cars registered. Some 1962 models have been sold since the.law went into effect.last OCT tober. During the six months end- ciated Press Association, an or- ganization of .AP-member news- paper a cam- paign to include such information in news stories of fatal accidents. The motor vehicle department was flooded, in the first days of the law, with complaints from new car customers. Hardly any passenger cars were equipped with the-safety-belts before -last and few dealers had any experience with installations. Prices ranged up to for the required pah's of belts in the front seat. But the combination of compe- tition and increasing demands have "changed that. Most belts still are- dealer-installed but the going price for utility belts of ap- proved style now-probably is un- der ,for two. pairs. Garages and filling station operators -are (Continued on Page Two) had :to earn" "profits it charged the government for work farmed out to its subcontractors. Douglas paid Congress Attacks Army Plan Opponents Prepare Battle On Propose I To Break Up Units WASHINGTON men opened -fire today on the Army's controversial plan to break up eight battle-starred Na- itional Guard and Reserve infan- try divisions. Meanwhile, the Army braced for a salvo 'of objections from another of some of the 21 states affected. Rep. Durward G. Hall, R-Mo., predicted the plan would touch off a major battle in congress. He said it was another example of the administration's "flaunting the will of the Congress." Rep. James E. Van Zandt, R-Pa., said "they've tried to do this before and we stopped them." Van Zandt says he feels sure this will happen again.' Reorganization Rep. Melvin R. R-Wis., said .he hoped Congress would be able to prevent the action, which the 'Army announced late Wednes- day as part of a major reorgani- zation scheme .designed' to build a trim, trained and ready to fight Reserve and Guard. The plan contemplates reorgan- izing much of the .manpower in the four Guard and four Reserve divisions into eight more flexible brigades- of between and men1'each. Many units now part of the divisions would be as- signed to support the regular Army, if needed. Although the Army avoided the term officers ac- knowledged that would be the practical effect. All that would be left would be their headquarters, which .would' supervise certain training and .support: operations. Long Histories The eight- with histories, dating -back1 to the revo- many battle. streamers: Division .of Nebras- ka 35th of Kansas and Missouri; 43rd: -of Connecticut, Rhode-Island.'and. Vermont; 41st of Florida and: South Carolina. Dunne.said Douglas paid its M hn subcontractors their costs plus a I Massachusetts: of Pennsylvania, id and Delaware; 94th of 95th of Arizona, C-L iu jj j -ii- profit.-then added on Montana_ utah Washing. doUars of profits for itself before ton Nevada'.. losrd-of lowf. submitting the bills to Western Electric. He said Western Elec- tric, in turn, added on more mil- lions as profit .to itself, with the Army paying the total bill. McClellan said he "was reserv- ing judgment but added it seemed there were too many "middle getting profits at the tax- payers' expense. District Court Juries Clear Away Two Cases Two cases were settled Wednes- day as the current civil docket of District Court neared an end. In the case of Buford Myers, et. ux., vs. F. P. Lanahan, .the jury found for .the plaintiffs in two causes of. action. A total of was. awarded for damages. State of Oklahoma, ex rel. De- partment of Highways vs. Roger Blake was also decided. It was a condemnation suit and the jurors set the defendant's recovery at S6.000. Thursday morning, another con- demnation proceeding. State -vs. Robert E. Cowling, et. begun. YOUTH WITH HEARING INVENTION Pat Bellaire, High School junior, shows his device thit may revolutionize .the hearing-aid induitry. Flanagan, who eallj hii invention.the neurophone, claims it transmits sound, by radio impulses direct to the brain, by- passing the ear. He said it consists of two iniulated'elec-j trodes which fit over the temples. (AP Wednesday. There have been protests in this country'over seizure recently in Brazil of' a 'subsidiary of the American-owned International Tel- ephone-Si Telegraph Corp. -and the attempted expropriation of a Ca- nadian telephone' firm's subsidi- ary Hollywood Offers Grab Bag Of News HOLLYWOOD mar- riages, sick celebrities and a healthy bundle of hot ice figured day of Hollywood news involving names like Judy Gar- land, Zsa' Zsa 'Gaborv Ann Miller and the dancing'Princess Maru- sia. Items: Miss confirmed j acute infectious hepatitis. Per- sons who. have had close contact during filming of the television series "Route 66" are receiving inoculations. Among them'" is'actress Joanna Moore, who made 'love scenes .with Ma- haris -last week.-- Maharis.-is in.-a Santa-Monica hospital and is allowed no visi- tors. He probably won't "go' back i T l 1 l_ I LUIS, -TIC UlUUdUlV WU Although ttie communique did; Wednesday that she and her work.for a month. tain conditions .of' security which will, permit private capital to per- form its vital role" in Brazilian economic development. No date was-set for Kennedy's visit to White House press secretary Pierre -Salinger announced -that Mrs." Kennedy planned to accompany the- Presi- dent. Brazilian sources 'said August has been tentatively fixed as the not go into these instances it of 10, years, Sid Luft, are clared Goulart- intends 'to-main- separated again. But she said she contemplates no'legal. action. The actress-singer, 38; has twice ac- tions against.Luft, .her. ihird hus- band. She did not explain this separation. The" couple has two 'children. Miss 'Garland was married pre- viously to conductor David :Rose: and director Vincerite_ MinelJi. Luft formerly was married to" ac- tress.'Lynn" Bari.1'.. .Actor George 28, 'has Film -Producer. Jerry- Wald 'came-out of operating room of a Hollywood hospital Wednes- about Uie same "time a Su-; perior Court jury-was deciding-a suit brought against him. by -Publisher Jaik jRosenstein of'the. magazine Holly- wood Close-Up. Doctors-and. jurors both, returned verdicts in-Wald's favor. -A hospital spokesman said'Wald; Police-.and FBI agents say they emerged from his lower spinal recovered most of worth., of jewelry -taken-, fronrthe home' of Pr'ineess- weekend While she was giving a twist'.party 'at .her- nightclub, .the Peppermint .West.. Officers ..said, they- that- Robert Conti, 32, 'was' involved :in the theft. They said they''Stopped, his'car in'HolIy- wood: Wednesday .and'found-, about of .the stolen jewelry in a'bag on-the front "seat.. Po- wasn't operation in -excellent.' condition. The 'jury claim for damages. The publisher said Wald -ma'de slanderous re-- marks about Actor Bradford', Dillman, who .played.the-title-'role in the 'film "St. Francis'of vorced. Grounds: mental-cruelty. ignored" said Mrs. never should have gotten mar- Dillman, 31, was ordered to pay a month in alimony and monthly for support of the couple's two children. has asked Superior. Court to -declare her the legal wife of -oil millionaire -Ar- thur-Cameron. But she-doesn't want-to live with him.-She wants a decree of separate maintenance, and more million. Miss said--Cameron told her.'he "was worth mil- lion and -tricked her. into, marry- ing' him. in'. Mexico; said, .'he repudiated. the -marriage, telling. her in 'a telegram. he waa terminating-their "engagement." She asked million for. dam- age million ..for. mortification and indignities ''to million in. punitive of m his own little fair showed me no-affection. He said he'wanted to be'a bachelor and (Continued on Two) ton Minnesota and Wisconsin. Priority Units At the same time, the Army plans a six-division force of pri- ority National Guard divisions that would be ticketed for early call-up in an emergency to back up the 16-regular Army divisions: These first-ranked outfits would be kept at 75 to 80 per cent of their ..authorized strength, which will total about when their structure is .revamped. Most of them now number only about men. On Active Duty The Army did not name the pri- ority but they are ex- pected to 'include the 26th Infan- try of Massachusetts, the 28th In- fantry of Pennsylvania, the 32nd Infantry of 'Wisconsin and the 49th .Armored of Texas. The 32nd and 49th now are on active duty and are the best trained .and equipped of all the Guard divisions. The 26th and 28th were picked 'last fall as the next to be called if needed in the Berlin crisis. They have been built to nearly 100 per cent of strength and have'been outfitted with much new equipment. If the plan goes through, it will reduce the Guard divisions to 23 and Reserve divisions to six. Question There was some.question as.to whether Congress could block the reorganization, since it could be achieved '-within authorized man- power -limits. The Kennedy administration has proposed cutting total paid drill strength in'the Guard and Reserve by to a new total of These cuts would not come out of the eight divisions but out of some units. Army officials -hoped to- split the cuts on a four-three ratio, with the Guard taking the heav- iest reductions. The aim is to -do away with such: nondivisional' outfits as anti- aircraft gun batteries made-obso- (Continutd on Page Two) A 'business is too big when it takes a week for gossip to go from one end of the.office to the Gen. Fea.   

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