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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 16, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 16, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             You've heard about the proverbial one-armed paperhanger with the itch. But for real downright busy and unlivable with, try working in rhe office with a sports editor who has 4 area basketball tourneys going simultaneously. Educators Hold E. C. Session On Test Program, P-10 THE ADA EVENING NEWS District Tourneys Approach Showdown See Sports Page 58TH YEAR NO. 290 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1962 10 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Allied Military Planes Back Up Protests On German Air Corridors West Attempts To Halt Red Of Allied BERLIN sources said Western mili- tary airmen, backing up a protest to Moscow, flew to isolated Berlin today in a corridor whose lower levels the Soviet Union wants reserved for its own .planes. The weather was -bad. This time the Hamburg-Berlin corridor, northern- Bob Kennedy's Remark On WarAngers Texans By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Said Kennedy: "I would say J indoctrination, said of Kennedy's most Of three such links, was involved. It runs across; Kennedy's comment that the U.S.- Attornev General Robert F.ithat as far as the war with THE VILLAIN RELENTS "Kissing Rock Lane" is the icene of concilation betwttn Mr. McDuff (Benny Johnson) and Miss Pinkerton (Barbara Shelly) in this scene from Ada High School's production of "Swinging High." The mosical will presented tonight and Saturday night at Ada High. It's joint tffort of the A.H.S. choral music drama and band departments. Mr. McDuff is a stuffy school principal who makes it hard on students (particularly their extracur- ricular activities) until he relents under the influence of Miss Pinkerton. Curtain time for the all-student produc- tion is p.m. (NEWS Staff Professor Sficks To His New Life V ROCKFORD. 111. Exit- Dr. Carl Vernon" Holmberg, asso- ciate professor in forest chemis- try at Syracuse University, mar- ried and father of three children. Hansen, SI.90 an hour factory worker living alone in a hotel. That transformation was the decision today of a 45-year-old man who has been identified as a.college professor who dropped out of sight nearly seven years ago. Unmasked Hansen was unmasked as Holm-' berg" Wednesday by a routine check of fingerprints after he was arrested for a traffic violation. A review of events since he dis- appeared from Syracuse Univer- sity, May 11, 1955, showed: For Cuban Charge Goes A II U C LJ On U. N. Scrap Heap UNITED NATIpNS, N. Y. Cuba's charge that WASHINGTON (AP) Jacque- the United States is plotting to invade her shores wound j line Kennedy's visit to India and up on the U, N. scrap heap today after the General will take her to teeming sembly's main political committee roundly defeated aj Communist resolution supporting Fidel Castro's claims.' The rejected both key paragraphs of the resolution by Czechoslovakia and Romania calling on the United States halt alleged interference in Cuba's internal affairs. Defeat of the resolution was seen .as a triumph'for the United States, which had labeled the 11-day debate a Red propaganda show staged to detract attention from "'the action of the Organiza- Still Another Candidate Enters Race With the two operative sections-lowing alon knocked out. the committee Dignitaries i honor her. man, Mario Amadeo of Argon- The professor's wife. By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS divorced him two years ago be- lieving he was dead or never would return. She moved to Cali- fornia with their three now 18; Lee, 11, and Richard, 9. Last year, she married Gordon Babcock, a consulting electronics engineer. The family lives Menlo Park, Calif. Only Memory The professor said the last thing he remembers about his present life is a car lift a motor- ist gave him from Elgin, Jll., to Rockford some time in 1955. "He took -a job as a pigment grinder in a paint factory and, records show, in November, 1959 married Mabel Ostling, 42. They are separated. The professor made it clear at a news conference Thursday that he doesn't want to return now io his old station in life. State Treasurer William A. Burkhart announced today he will seek the Democratic nomination for governor. He'is the ninth to enter the race. Burkhart. 37, indicated earlier cities, fabled palaces of the maha- rajas and the adventure-filled Khyber Pass amid the high Him- alayas. She will be treated to color, pomp, and oriental ceremony, spending virtually 'the entire month of March abroad. Little Privacy The venture will not be exactly (he private and personal sightsee- tion of American States ex- visit Mrs. Kennedy first cnvi- eluding Cuba from the in- sioncd, especially with a corps of ter-American system. reporters and photographers fol- ili to t the schedule apparently tina, declared the whole not have room for some of tion defeated, the famous cultural sites which As a result, no further balloting i art-loving Mrs, Kennedy might is necde_d on the issue. The Gen- eral Assembly, which is expected to meet Monday, will probably just note that the resolution was killed in committee. he intended to run. He said he will Sovlct Delegate Valerian A. conduct an inexpensive campaign. I zLorm' who fought hard for He said he will contend money management can give the: state a better program without i voting more taxes. committee after the vote that it proved many delegates did not [believe in adhering to the princi- Four years ago he defeated vet- eran A.'S. J. Shaw for treasurer, an office in which Burkhart can- not succeed himself under the state Constitution. He said his campaign expenses in that race totaled Meantime, stale Republican chairman Henry Bellmon says the entry of a second candidate for the GOP nomination for governor assures a hard-fought battle and pies of the U.N. Charter calling for non-intervention in the affairs of sovereign stales. Zorin said that the United States by its vote had given clear have been expected to -see. Not On Schedule When Mrs. Kennedy first post- poned her visit from November to January, the. White House said she did so then to arrange for a Communist territory to Berlin from the area of the British zone. After two days of buzzing tactics, however, the MIGs may have taken the day- off. There were no reports of sightings of the Soviet' fighters. Gale-force winds and driving rain lashed Berlin. The temperature was about 40 degrees. At least one U. S. military plane was reported to have made the flight from Hamburg. Commercial planes kept regular schedules. They gen- erally fly above the alti-f tude the Soviets set for the lower-level operations. j There was no immediate report of anyincident. The Western Big Three was re- ported ready to send fighter pa- trols into the corridors unless So- viet MIGs stop buzzinp Allied mil- itary and civilian traffic. The Soviet pressure tactics, which began Feb. 7, were dis- closed by Allied spokesman a week ago. The United States. Britain and France balked at what they called illegal attempts to reserve parts of the corridors at specified hours for exclusive use by Soviet Army Extends Duty Tours In Viet Nam SAIGON, South Viet Nam !AP) of duty in South Viet Nam for certain U.S. Army personnel serving in helicopter units have been extended to IB months from six, an informed source said to- day. Technically, the men involved had been here on temporary duty for a period of six months. The extension reported probably ap- plies only to .key personnel in hel- icopter companies, such as the pilots themselves. The informant emphasized that a lengthened term would not ap- ply to most of the estimated U.S. servicemen now in South Viet Nam. About _ three-quarters of the. servicemen here are assigned 'on lin-Hamburg lane up to feet .temporary duty, presumably- to caused concern in Western diplo- avojd advertising the United The Soviets were reminded that four-power agreements call for each plane to be scheduled sep- arately. Soviet officials main- tained their right to make block reservations merely by notifying the West about them at the Berlin air control center. The Soviet claim to an exclusive -Ight today to flights in the Ber- threw off Mexican rule in 1836, and resisted when the U.S. sent troops into a disputed region be- tween the Nucces River and the Rio Grande. "Unjustified" The Mexican War-was brought up by a student at Jakarta, In- donesia, during Kennedy's visit. The student mentioned the war in connection with the Dutch-In- donesian dispute over West New matic quarters, coming as it did on the heels of the Western pro- test to Moscow. States military buildup to the three-nation control commission, I charged with reporting violations Diplomatic sources in London ,'0[ the 1954 Geneva truce agree- said privately continuing Soviet air harassment tactics could en- danger the prospects for negotia- tions on disarmament opening in Geneva March 14 and even sum- mit talks sought by Premier Khrushchev. A spokesman of the Soviet Em- bassy in East Berlin said: "We will continue1 to request the use of the corridors in the way we have been, doing as long as we feel it is necessary." Emphasizing a point that the more leisurely trip that would in- j West does not challenge, so long elude the famous caves of Ajanta as the rules are followed, he said and Ellora. rock-carved tcmplesi the Russians have just as much dating back to the 4th century, lavishly decorated with frescoes and classed among the great glories of Indian art. They are not now on her schedule. right there as anyone else. The British ambassador. Sir Christopher Steel, whose RAF transport was buzzed in the cen- ter 'corridor Wednesday, flew evidence thai it intended to set-, ington about March 1, fly to Rome tlv- its differences with Cuba then to India's capital. New force. The committee voted 50 against and only H for the paragraph which would have ,had the as- sembly appeal to the Mrs. Kennedy. 32, who is to Bonn in the same com- ing her own way, will !cave Wash-: dor today without incident. "For the time being, it is al- greater strength in the party. most imperative that I remain Bellmon, the first to announce what I he said. "There as a GOP candidate, sent a wire seems no necessity of digging to Rep. John N. (Happy) Camp of Delhi, to start her "semi-official" 'isit. During 17 days in the vast sub- the as- continent of India she will go to United seven far north as My- States "to put an end. to the in-'. Washington spring- tcrfcrence" in the internal af- as a GOP candidate, sent a wircj (Continued on Page Two) time for 95-degrce heat. (Continued on Page Two) The Soviets were accused of playing a "reckless and danger- ment, That agreement ended the Indo- china war. Technically, only 685 foreign military personnel were to be stationed permanently n South Viet Nam under the agreement, and similar restrictions were placed on foreign forces in North Viet Nam. Mexican War of 1846-48 was un- justified has touched off a war of Texan rebuttal the strongest. This1 was a campaign which won territory from the Rio Grande to the Pacific for the United States. Mexico opposed U.S. annexation-of Texas, which the impression that he disap- Mexico, although there might -be some from Texas who disagree. I would say we were unjustified. I don't think that this is a very bright page in American history." "Heroic Fight" Commented Gov. Price Daniel ol Texas: "I cannot believe that he (Kennedy) intended to leave proved of the heroic fight for freedom and liberty which was made by Texans in 1836 (year of the Alamo and Texas independ- ence) and the subsequent annex- ation agreement and defense thereof by the United States." Daniel noted that eight Mexi statement: "Devastating and un- pardonable." Disagreement David Donald, a history pro- fessor at Princeton, and a Pulit- zer Prize winner in mid-19th cen- tury American history, com- mented that. 25 years ago, most U.S. historians would have agreed with Kennedy, but not now. The diary of President Polk, Donald added, has been discov- ered and there has been better research into internal Mexican affairs. Donald said the war was "made almost inevitable" by American expansion and the fact that Mexicans wouldn't negotiate cans died fighting on the Ameri-'long-standing differences such can-side of the Alamo Former Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, a native Texan who quit I the Army in a dispute over troop I as claims by U.S. citizens vs. Mexico, and boundary disputes. Col. John Bakeless. who was un (Continued on Page Two) Tuesday s Next Earliest Date For New Attempt At Orbit Flight CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) United States' effort to rocket an astronaut around the world is now off until next Tues- the of bad weather in the Atlantic re- covery areas. And Marine Lt. Col. John H. Glenn Jr. will still be the astro- naut despite the 'procession of might have cracked the confidence of the aver- age man. Glenn has shown no signs of tension that might affect his per- formance and there ls.no basis for considering his replacement. Dr. William Douglas, personal physician to the astronauts, said today. 1 "I'm as close to this man as I to my Douglas said, "and I couldn't let my brother fly if I thought he would be in danger. If ,1 detected anything U. S. Cardinal Dies In, Hospital In Rome VATICAN CITY death of Aloisuis Cardi- nal Muench, the third cardinal to die within 10 days, heightened expectations today that Pope John XXIII The'united States decision last! wil1 soon call a consistory to" replenish the College of wrong, I would take immediate action." Douglas reiterated that Glenn has complete confidence in the program, is an experienced test pilot and used to such delays. This was the 10th postponement since the .flight was originally scheduled Dec. 20. The further delay nounced at a.m.. Eastern Standard Time today at a special weather briefing by the National Aeronautics and Space Adminis- tration. In addition, the NASA spokes- man said the entire countdown for both the. Atlas booster and the space capsule would be recycled. This means that all systems in both the missile and the capsule will be checked all over again from top to bottom despite the previous exhaustive checks. Because certain electronic parts in' both the missile and capsule lhad been activated for test pur- December to increase its forces Cardinals. here substantially above the Ge-j Vatican sources said the Pope may raise the college's poses in the previous checks, they neva limit came only after accu- membership to a new all time high before Easter to [will have to be replaced to insure sations that Communist North bulwark it for the heavy work of the Roman Catholic j performance. Viet Nam had flagrantly violated (church's Ecumenical. Council opening here Oct. 11. Further, there is a strong !ike- truce terms for years, allowing .a i Cardinal Muench, 72, a Wisconsin-born former bishop i llhood that th.e .att'tude. buildup of Soviet and Communist; Chinese forces there. Since the United Slates decision to increase forces here, the num- ber of servicemen and quantities and types of military .equipment have been that is, made secret or confidential or re- stricted information. Teodosio .Clemente Cardinal ous" game by Allied officials; the tour here for helicopter per- who admitted they were puzzled sonnel also was classified. Information on the extension of de Gouveia, Archbishop of Lour- by the Soviet harassment, The helicopters arc in use daily. U.S. officials in Washington ex- transporting Vietnamese troops pressed fear that a battle. The pilots and gun- situation could develop rapidly if.ners on helicopters. U.S. Army the Soviets keep up their air an-j men, are under the same orders (Continutd on Page Two) (Continued on Page Two) back to uncover a life 1 knowjwaukomis, welcoming the legisla-. enco Marques, died last week. The three deaths reduced the number :of cardinals to 77. eight below the high established by Pope John. Vatican sources -said the ex- pected consistory might be called ing apportionment acts, to create 10 or 12 new princes of, In a new seekjng a re. TUnro a I en has noon _ _i_i._ r-_______ Board Offers New Petition On Elections OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) The Oklahoma .Election Board declar- ed again today it cannot hold state legislative elections under exist- to Fargo, N. D., and the only American cardinal j in the Vatican Curia, died in Rome's Salvador Mundi Hosoital Thursday night. Italian-born Gaelano Cardinal Cicognani, also a member of the Vatican Curia, and Portuguese- nothing about." No Interest In California, the former Mrs. Holmberg said: "I have' no fur- tor as another Republican Candi- date, i Bellmon said -as a result ofj Camp's decision, his own cam- interest in Dr. Holmberg. activities will be stepped up tin nnnnnnfinn UMth him rlm-irtrr A nr-tl in have no connection with him, ei-- Page Two) during March and April in heav- ily Republican counties. Camp said a day earlier that he was starting immediately to campaign for the GOP nomination. On another political front, state Sen. Roy Grantham of Ponca City .announced Thursday he will seek OKLAHOMA-Clcar to partly.] cloudy night; this aftcrnon and to- iucreasing cloudiness Saturday; no important tem- perature changes; low tonight .10 northeast to K south; high Saturday 52 northeast to 68 fouthwest. High temperature in Ada Thursday was 58; low Thursday night, 30; reading at a. m. Friday, 33. OKLAHOMA FIVE-DAY FORECAST OKLAHOMA Saturday through Wednesday tempera- tures will average 4-9 degrees above normal with minor daily changes. Normal maximum 53- Normal minimum 15 north- west to 18 southeast. Little or no precipitation central and west, up to .JJ of an inch extreme cast as showers early in the week. And a lively Democratic pri- mary contest seemed to shape up for state senator in Cleveland and McClain counties. Winston Ra- (Continutd on Page Two) Thunder-birds Show Off Skills At Drill Tonight The Thunderbirds will strut their stuff tonight at the local armory at their annual federal inspection. The local unit, Company C, iBG. isoth inf., invites .the pub- lic, to attend the colorful inspec- tion. Lt. Charles Todd is com- pany commander of the unit. Young men who are interested in joining the 45th Division unit are especially invited to attend the inspection. The drill starts at1 [7 p. Tn. COMPLETE TRIANGLE: The Frisco railroad deeded three-acre (quart plot of land to Ada's Chamber of Com- merce Friday, completing in full an 11-acre potential indus- trial location for Ada. Above, G. C. Mayhye, Ada .attorney who volunteered his services in the transaction, receives the deed from Orville T. 'Loyd, Frisco traffic representative, Okmulgee. To the right of Mayhue is David E. Egertson, assistant district sales manager for Frisco, Tuln. At ex- treme left.is Howard Thompson, of the Ada Industrial Development-Corporation. The tract is located in the center'of an eight-acre triangle -of 'land Seeded to the city two years ago by Haxel-Atlas. The south 'corner. of the triangle is the intersection of the OCA and. A and Frisco'tracks. square foot acreage ii bounded on the front by the Frisco tracks, making .it an even more desirable industrial lite. Other advantages of.the site are availability of ro'adi, sewer systems and water. (NEWS Staff the church, Thece also has been speculation that Pope John might increase the college's member- ship to 100. The- death of Cardinal Muench reduced the number of American cardinals to'five: Richard James Cardinal Cushing, archbishop of Boston; James Francis Cardinal Mclntyre, archbishop of Los An- geles; Albert Gregory Cardinal Meyer, archbishop' of Chicago; Joseph Cardinal Ritter. archbishop of St. Louis: and Francis Cardinal Spellman, archbishop of New York. Cardinal Muench had suffered from Parkinson's disease for sev- eral years. Last week complica- tions set in. He appeared to rally for a time and last Friday re- ceived an unexpected visit .-from the Pope. But Thursday his con- dition turned grave. He died hearing of a state Supreme Court order that it 'hold the elections, the board declared the order .was "ambiguous in that it does not explain how a legislative act which does not comply with' the Constitution can be constitution- al." In previous opinions the court has said the House and Senate apportionment acts do not follow the Constitution but has refused to declare them invalid. Last Tuesday, the court for second time ordered the board to hold legislative elections this year un- der existing apportionment acts but gave the board until noon next Monday to file a petition for re- hearing. The board petition declared that until the question of the constitu- tionality of %the apportionment acts is answered clearly, -the jets, will have to be re- placed. These jets were loaded jtwo days ago, and the gas has a tendency to corrode the escape valves, which Glenn would use to maintain his position relative to the horizon while on his flight. Glenn was once more awakened by his physician. Dr. William Douglas, and advised of the pro- longed "scrub." That was at a.m. Douglas quoted Glenn, 40. ax "I guess it was lo be expected. We, all knew the weather .was marginal." The postponement was ordered by the Project Mercury Opera- tions Director, Walter C. Wil- liams, after another midnight briefing by his weather specialists who had compiled reports from weather planes and ships sta- tioned in the "splashdown" areas. The announcement said simply: "Weather conditions preclude a launch attempt this .morning." shortly after receiving a special court opinion "simply toys with blessing from the Pope and the j words." (Continued or Page Two) Camp Fire Girls Add To Heart Fund A final count of the proceeds of the Heart Fund tag day last last sacrament of the church. Death was attributed to a circu- latory cardiac collapse. The cardinal's three sisters from Milwaukee. Mary Herrick, Miss Teresa Muench and Dorothy Olt, and his personal secretary, the Rev. Raymond Lessard of the Fargo diocese, were with him atj the end. Cardinal Muench was ordained in 1913 and was named bishop of Fargo in 1935. The Late Pope Pius Xlf sent him to Germany in 1946 and gave him the personal rank (Continued on Two) collected Bob Steiner. fund'drive chairman-announced today. ;A bowling tournament for the benefit the drive, is currently in progress, Steiner noted. The next scheduled event will be dance at the college-Feb. 24. There followed a report of rough seas in the emergency landing areas around Bermuda. The winds are reported to be about 18 miles an hour. Beside the continuing bad weather downrange from here, a cold front moving down from the North was pushing a layer of broken clouds over .the launching area at this space center. This cloudy condition was ex- pected to last through the week- end. It was such a cloud cover (Continued on Page Two) The little boy .approached his father who was standing by the edge of ,a cliff admiring the scen- ery. He said, "Mama says it isn't safe here and you're either to come away or else give me the picnic Gen. Fea. Corp.)   

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