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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 9, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 9, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             A 10-year-old boy recently checked out a book on penguins from a library in a neighboring city. When book was returned, scribbled on the fly iheet was the complaint: "This book tells more about penguins than I want to Cougars Finally Come Back Home, See Sports Page THE ADA EVENING NEWS Freedom Rides Brought More Than Violence, P-8 58TH YEAR NO. 284 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1962 8 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Democrats Schedule Meetings Party Members Open First Phase Of '62 Campaign i Democrats of Pontotoc County congregate tonight at 53 voting places to begin the first' operation of the upcoming election campaign. The precinct meetings will begin at They're a prelude to next I county central committee meet-' ing at which officers for the Democratic Party will be chosen for the coming year. Also at the, rnnntv mcctinp dpleeatcs to the I UNDER ORDERS Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara confers with Willis Law- right, chief Pentagon censor, before being called upon to testify before a Senate state convention mil be chosen, on of speeches of military officers. Under orders of President More Trouble Threatens After Wild Night Of Rioting In Paris Officers Chosen The main item on the agenda at the precinct meetings tonight will be the selection of precinct chairmen and other officers and delegates to the county meeting. Jesse. Frisco 'and Lawrence pre- cinct organizations are now de- funct. All three have been dropped as voting precincts. J. I.' Jones is currently serving as county chairman. He urges all interested Democrats to partici- pate in the "grass roots" meetings tonight at the precinct level. Meeting Places The following is a list of the pre- cinct chairmen and the polling places where the meetings will be held tonight. Kennedy, McNamora refused to let Lawrence identify the men who altered the speeches. Later Sen. John Stennis, D-Miss., chairman of the subcommittee, upheld the executive plea forbidding identification of the censors. (AP __________________ One-Hour Strike's Called To Protest Police Methods PARIS one-hour strike, in protest at the po- lice methods in a wild riot in which eight persons were and hundreds injured, stalled much of Paris busi- es and industry today. Workers were called out by Communist, Socialist and Jinan Catholic unions after Thursday night's bloody .ashes in which demonstrators were killed and 'injured .1 protesting government failure to suppress terrorism jy the right-wing Secret Army Organization. Communists accused police of "unbelievable savagery" in the three hours of street fighting. Today's strike was the first of a series of strikes and U.S., British Disagree On Nuclear Testing Decision WASHINGTON7 IAP) Union makes to the joint Harold Macmillan, in speak- full agreement on the basic is- sues, the United States and Brit- ain appeared today to differ in their approaches to a final de- t- i cision on atmospheric testing of Wl-Pl Dr. Sam A. McKeel. f courthouse. i nuclear weapons by the West. i- u ;nl Whether the apparent differ- W1-P2 Julius Hanson. wjl] ]ead agreement probably depends on ithe kind of response the Soviet East Thirteenth. W1-P3 Mrs. Claudia Braly, Hayes School. W1-P4 Mrs. G. C. Hayhue Jr., Prince-Alston. W1-P5 J. N. King, 800 East Thirteenth. W1-P6 G. G. Folger, Presby- terian Church. W2-P1 Bert Rose, Service Chevrolet. W2-P2 Leslie B. Younger, Wil- lard School. W2-P3 Orville Woods, 514 East Ninth. British proposal for an East-West foreign ministers meeting at Gen- ing to Parliament Thursday, ex- pressed he hope that circum- eva next month in connection stances might develop in such a demonstrations that are ex- pected. Actress Brigitte Bardot; her I husband, movie director Roger jVadim: and many students joined in the strike. Miss Bardot met with movie technicians at a studio !near Paris and heard union lead- ers speak against the secret army. City and suburban buses halted, and the Paris subway and subur- ban train service was affected. Interior Minister Roger Frey charged that the Communists provoked the bloodshed and de- clared: "Those people wanted with the opening of an IB-nation; way that "we may be able Rareiy have such well- agree further tests may be organized bands of rioters al- disarmamcnt conference. U.S. officials said President Kennedy feels the final decision on testing must be made inde- pendently of the Soviet reaction. By contrast, British Prime Min- II S. Studies Several Sites For New Tests WASHINGTON Island may be only postponed. I tacked the security forces." He said that should the pro- The Communists, backed by oth- posal for high-level East-West talks "lead to any great result, er left-wing parties and non- Algerians Recall Days Under Nazis ALGIERS (AP) French set- tlers in Algeria who lived through the Nazi occupation of France say they feel right at home- in Algeria today. Algeria's Moslem majority looks to the expected caase-fire in the Algerian war as the preface to their country's independence. Most of the European settlers view an agreement with the Na- tionalist rebels as a sellout. And SECURITY MEASURE IN ALGIERS A civilian stands with out-strttchcd armt at a Frtnch policeman searches him in troubled Algiers. In the background mother policeman is ibout to open tht door of an auto to do some searching. (AP Wirephoto via Radio from Communist trade unions, retail-1 they now look on the underground the whole political and military ated with [hrcat t0 can a Army Organization as situation would be during the funerais Macmillan's words reflected night.s viclims. hopeful, if not optimistic attitude which is not shared by Washing- of' Frenchmen once looked with similar fervor to the wartime re- i one of several places where the United States will ex-'to make such secret preparations; ton officials. At a news conference Wednes- day Kennedy said the Soviet Un- ion, having prepared in secret for its extensive nuclear tests last fall, could not be trusted not Inju'red. The non-Communist Socialist splinter party led by former Pre- mier Pierre Mcndes-France de- Argentina Breaks Off i Romney Fasts As oreuKb WIT n i i with Castro Decision Pondered Stance movement for ultimate BUENOS AIRES liberation. "Occupation" Police reinforcements moved into the heart of Buenos mandcd the resignation of Paris' As the European settlers see Thursday night to Michigan. r. _ __. _ _, _ tr L DETROIT Romney American Motors Corp. president, fasted and prayed today as he pondered whether to seek the Republican nomination for gover- W2.P4 _ L. D. Kite, Fire Station OH'new air tests. plode nuclear weapons if President Kennedy decides again Statements Thursday by Mac- No. Two. W2-P5 Homer Bellew, 612 i tors. Among them: This possibility was suggested today by several and Kennedy showed a complete agreement on the funda- North Crownpoint Drive. 1. Announcement by the U. S. and British governments W3-P1 Frank Barrett. 231 that preparations should be made, "in various places" jn atmosphcre. madeTo W3-P2 Howard Cope, Glen- School. W3-P3 T. J. Jared, I r v i n g j School. I W3-P4 No Chairman, 707 West Seventh. W4-P1 Frank D i c u s. City Hall. W4-P2 Lester Lanier, Ada High School. W4-P3 Duard C, Willoughby, Washington School. W4-P4 E. E. Welch, Free Will Baptist Church. W4-P5 Billy R. Bryan, 1230 South Highschool. Ahloso Charles Blr-jikenship, Blankenship Store. Allen (North) J. I. Jones, City Hall. Allen (South) Guy Pegg, first door south of bank. for possible testing. The agreement on U. S. use Scientists Mourn Death Of Dolphin The joint statement released'by ,Jie White House said both gov- jland and British use of un- ernmenls agrGed that because of derground test facilities forjihe recent massive Soviet tests low-yield devices in the-the West would be justified "in police Chief Maurice Papon is a country under hostile the dismissal of Frey. The party j occupation and the "occupying claimed many of its members power" is of their own people and ere .among the injured, legally their own government. In While the mobs of leftists private conversations, they corn- United States. 2. The time required for install- ing test facilities at Christmas to- gether with what weapon techni- cians consider the urgency of re- jsuming testing. This may compel WASHINGTON (AP) Nolly's atmospheric tests even before surged through the streets bat- tling police, terrorists of the anti- De Gaulle Secret Army Organiza- tion set off a dozen or more plas- tic bombs in scattered sections of the capital. As usual the bombers got away. Communist party offices and he White House said_both wcre attacked. ''One bomb badly damaged the Paris office of the Soviel news agency Tass in a building owned by the Soviet Embassy. A woman worker al one publishing firm was pro-Castro outbursts against Ar- gentina's diplomatic break with Cuba but the Argentine public ap- peared undisturbed. President Arturo Frondizi took justif making such further series of nu- clear tests as may be necessary for purely military reasons." Also, the British government agreed to make available to the United States facilities for test- ing Christmas Island, a big mid- dead. And Navy scientists are i Christmas Island can be made Pacific atoll. grieving- the loss of one of the ready. i The joint statement then an- world's most unusual "school-i Any opcn air tesls at tnc N7e. jnounced that Kennedy and Mac- hefty dolphin with a high I.Q. She was a potentially valuable Navy property. The Great Strides S-fool. 180-pounder had retarded children. Nolly's death from natural been making great strides in the Bebee James A. D u n c a educational field under a civilian (Continued on Pag. Two) tcacller W0rks with Campfire Girls Aid Heart Fund Tag Day for the Heart Fund will be Saturday. Campfire Girls, under the direction of Mrs. Merle D. Martin, executive director, have agreed to aid the Heart Fund by working in the business dis- trict this coming Saturday morn- ing. Mrs. Willard Rhynes and her causes came to light today when a reporter sought further informa- tion after reading a story about her in a publication of the Office of Naval Research. The Careful Study story related that vnda proving grounds almost cer- tainly would be limited to millan had proposed to Soviet Premier Khrushchev that the dis- detonations of something less than armament conference meting at megaton force. Inhabited areas' March 14 be opened by loreign ministers and that the foreign ministers of the two West- ern powers and the Soviet Union meet in advance. There was a hint of a possible future summit meeting i[ the dis- armament talks make progress. When the foreign ministers would have to be considered in connection with failout and the brilliance of light created by ther- monuclear explosions. The Eniwetok-Bikin; lest area in the Marshall Islands group- used for the big weapon tests un- til :he moratorium began in 1958 out of the picture for future use. Kennedy notes that the Mnr- shalls are a trusteeship and thai the United States is "anxious to maintain the spirit as well as Ihe last.letter of the trustee agreement." spring, the Naval Ordnance Tost; {Continued on p Two) Ot-.itlrtv, PUIrtrt I ftl'n v sixth-grade girls from Hayes School will participate Saturday morning and Mrs. J. N. Krauter's and Mrs. Glen Neimeyers' Camp- fire girls from St. Joseph School will work from 1 to 4 p.m. Mrs. Howard Easl and her Campfire girls from Hayes School will serve as allernates. Station. China Lake, Ca'.if., com- missioned Marineland of the Pa-1 cific at Palos Verdes to catch and pare the government in Paris with Vichy and turn on President Charles de Gaulle the same ar- gument wartime Gaulh'sts used against Pierre Laval. With the same resentful bitter- ness, the Europeans of Algiers despise French authorities as "traitors" who have joined hands with an enemy to work France's downfall. De Gaulle now plays the role of Marshal Philippe Petain and deserves the same fate for the same reasons, they assert. Sullen Scorn Workers' organizations, and In the local lexicon, police of- trade unions rained down protests ficers actively fighting the secret againsl the police suppression of army are the hated "barbouze" the demonstration. Romney plans to announce his decision Saturday morn- ing. Intimate friends disclosed late Thursday, that Rom- ney had begun a 24-hour fast. They said' he made a practice of fasting before making any important deci- security precautions after bowing sion jn personal and business affairs. to his staunchl anti-Communist to his staunchly anti-Communist injured. or the "Gaullist ranked The club-swinging police the Vichy "milice" (special fered heavy casualties in the fu-j police) who once acted as tools i Contacted in Lansing where he was attending the con- hcmn stitutional- convention as a delegate, Romney confirmed ispheric isolation of that Commu- nist dictatorship. Guards were strengthened in front of the U.S. Embassy and other American agencies. Argentina's break with Havana left only five of the 20 other American republics on formal speaking terms with the Caslro regime. There were reports Uiat he was fasting. He said he would return to his Bloom- field Hills home outside Detroit later "to seek guid- ance beyond that of man." Romney is president of the De- troit Stake (diocese) of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His title is equivalent j to bishop. The auto executive said he like- Uruguay might soon join in the My would make a definite decision on whether to seek the 1 nomination for governor, but would not announce it until Satur- rious fighting as they charged re- peatedly to break up the mobs. A communique said 184 policemen were injured, 10 seriously. Authorities said they could give no idea of the number of rioters injured but there probably were several hundred. Among the dead was Jean-Pi- erre Bernard, Communist secre- tary of the 15th district of Paris. First reports indicated at least three women and a 15-year-old dicating favor or disfavor. The next move on this point is up Khrushchev. Khedda to install himself' here, and Ihey almost dare Paris to try to install a provisional European- Moslem executive in any of the Algiers public buildings. Elusive Terror De Gaulle's government, having "ui paper Humanite that the police'battled the Moslem rebels to a LIU tv, iv meeting proposal was presented boy wcre to Soviet Foreign Minister An-; The intcrior minisll.y _said an f, i the dead spparently were crushed the British and U.S. jn lhe lt denied a Gromyko made no response m-1 ch b h Communist news- i I inn i Thrtt for Hitler's police stale. The Europeans here go about j Slaying at the Argentine Em- Iheir daily chores with an air in Havana are Manuel Car- sullen scorn for the Paris author-' dinal Arteaga y Betancourt, Ro- ilies. "There are two people who can never come to Gaulle and Ben one after an-[ quarantine of Cuba. And a report today that Argentina had asked Switzer- GOP land not Brazil, the logical would represent it in Havana day morning. touched off speculation that Brazil Romney has indicated he would also might break relations as president and board chairman of AMC if he decided to run, but would keep his shares of stock in the corporation. Romney, 54, has been active po- litically the last two years or so as head of his nonpartisan Citi- zens for Michigan. Castro. .man Catholic archbishop of Ha- vana, and 32 refugees from the Castro regime. A foreign ministry spokesman Shot, Stab Wounds Kill Duncan Man DUNCAN (API Kelsie C. Beauchamp Jr., a Duncan attor- ney who had considered running for the state legislature, was shot and stabbed to death at his home near here Thursday night. Officers said Beauchamp, about 40. was apparently waylaid just after he drove up to the garage adjacent to his home and stepped out of his auto. He was shot once just below the ribs with a .38 caliber pistol and ___............ Citizens for Michigan, stab wounds in the side other of the Europeans says. They said the cardinal has been invited I a leadership chosen from labor j and forehead, said police who re- vow that they will never permit; to come to Argentina. He added' and business and other fields, rebel Premier Ben Youssef Ben that any country that takes (Continued on Page Two) (Continued on Two) charge of Argentine affairs in Cuba would give the refugees pro- tection. Frondizi. 53, gave in grudging- ly after the chiefs of the army, navy and air force served him jn ultimatum demanding a complete was instrumental in Michigan's decision to hold its current con- stitutional convention. Until he ran for a delegate post in the convention from his home Oakland County. Homney had aligned himself with neither party. Convention delegates were chos- break with Castro and his cohorts, i en by party and Romney chose (Continued on Page Two) (Continued on Page Two) OKLAHOMA Clear to partly cloudy and mild this aft- ernoon through Saturday; low tonight 28 north to 40 south; high Saturday 65-75. High temperature in Ada Thursday -was 71; low Thursday night, 40: reading at 7 a. m. Friday, 42. train a dolphin. The Navy is in-; terested in creatures like dolphins] and bats because it is believed that study of their ingenious sys- tems of navigating and commu- nicating might help in the devel- opment of electronic devices use- ful to the military services. A dolphin was caught and given the name monicker derived from the first three let- ters of the naval station's name. Help Enlisted Tom Lang, an official of the station, enlisted the help of his More Of The 'Iceberg' Is Revealed U.S. Pushes New Strategy In South Viet Nam EDITOR'S NOTE What's S. McNamara during re- new anti-guerrilla strategy conferences in Honolulu with pushed by the United States in South Viet Nam? Why the admin- istration's reluctance to talk abo.ut stepped-up U.S. assistance? What roles are American money and men playing in the troubled area? Fred S. Hoffman, Associated FIVE-DAY FORECAST FOR OKLAHOMA Temperatures will average 7- 10 degrees above normal. Nor- mal high 51 north to 62 south. Normal low 23 north to 43 south. Warm except for brief cooling irend first of week. Precipita- tion will average from little or none in the west portion to 'A Inch extreme east portion oc- curring as rain showers about first of week. (Continued on Page Two) i Press military affairs writer who covered Gen. Taylor's mission to Saigon, provides a comprehensive wrapup of the current situation. Police Report Peaceful Day On Ada Streets The good follows the bad on Ada's traffic scene. Wednesday was a hectic day with three but Thurs- day was peaceful with no acci- dents recorded and only one traf- fic violation charged. A, V. Luekey, 29, was charged with speeding and driving without a license. Two other cases were filed in Municipal Court. Solomon McGee. 54, and Burley Huddleston, 53, were fiiwd for (public drunkenness, By FRED S. HOFFMAN AP Military Affairs Writer WASHINGTON (AP) The United States is pushing a new strategy in South Viet Nam aimed at clearing Communist guerrillas from one area at a time rather than Irying to mop 'up the whole country al once. The inlenlion is lo moke max- imum use of manpower and equipment instead of spreading the resources thin, said informed sources. They are optimistic the plan will work. The idea reportedly was ad- vanced by Secretary of Defense U.S. military leaders and diplo- matic officials brought in from South Viet Nam. According lo Ihe lalest informa- tion available here, the Commu- nist build-up in South Viet Nam is continuing with an unstemmed stream of guerrillas coming.from North Viet Nam by way of Laos. Guerrilla strength has been esti- mated at close to 20.000. Like the proverbial iceberg, most of Hie greatly increased U.S. American authorities are hope-l Taylor's on-the-spot study of the] 1. American officials want to ful U.S. fighting men won't be South Vietnamese .crisis was fol- Ihe big boosl in arms, training aid, transportation, communications and other sup- port will enable the South Vietna- mese army to root out tiie Com- munists by itself. With American money, the South Vietnamese army is being increased to more than a year ago. If the use of U.S. combat troops becomes imperative lo preserve South Viet Nam's independence, effort to save South Viet Nam the new.Jimtary Assistance Com- mand could form a base for di-. reeling such an operalion. below the surface here, at least Gen. Paul D. Harkins, named to from communism has remained officiallv. head the new command, undoubt- More of the iceberg came intoledly carries with him to Saigon view Thursday when the Penta- gon announced creation of a ma- Ijor new U.S. military command in Saigon under a four-star gen-' The new command, Pentagon officials said, will direct U.S. heli- copter missions and other opera- tions by U.S. military men in sup- port of the South Vietnamese army, navy, and air force. a clear idea of what Kennedy wants done. Harkins conferred with the President at Palm Beach some time ago, it was learned. lowed by a sharp increase in U.S. military and economic aid, a steady inflow of American mili- tary men and agreement by President Ngo Dinh Diem to un- dertake reforms designed to strengthen his people's will, to re- sist the Communists. The United States has seemed inconsistent in its policy on pub- licity about the U.S. effort in Viet Nam. On occasion, the White House avoid tile appearance that they are pulling the strings. This is in- tended in part to prevent ruffling South Vietnamese feelings and to thwart Communist propaganda seeking to picture Saigon as a puppet of the United Stales. .2. It puts on the Communists the burden of proving their charg- es the United States is mounting a huge military build-up in Soulh Viet Nam .in violation of'Ihe 1954 armistice agreement parlilioning Ihe country inlo Communist and has spotlighted that effort-as on halves. Dec. 15 when it made public a letter from Kennedy to Diem The eight-year-old agreement permits foreign military advisers in South Viet Nam and pledging measures "to help the bars bringing in any new. military republic of Viet Nam lo protect its people and lo preserve its in- dependence." But at the same time, officials here have, refused to give specific gear except for replacements.' The United States will admit to only the 685 figure. But the total ported signs of a scuffle in his driveway. Stephens County Atty. Clinton Dennis said Mrs. Beauchamp said she heard arguments after her husband arrived home and while he was slill in the yard. And po- lice Chief Virgil Zachary said the victim's wife who alerted po- lice also said she heard three shots fired. Beauchamp got inside the house before he died. The couple lived with their 2Vi- year-old son about IVz miles west of Duncan. There have been no arrests. An autopsy was to be performed today in Oklahoma City. Beauchamp staled recently he jwas considering running for the scale so far. American Special Forces, ex- perts in training native fighters to operate as guerrillas, are work- ing in South Viet Nam. A special center for schooling Vietnamese volunteers in these techniques is known to be functioning. U.S. officials prefer not lo talk about reports that some U.S. Navy minesweepers are patrolling off the Vietnamese coast. These officials do acknowledge thai U.S. Navy men are helping the small South Vietnamese navy to become more efficient in inter- cepting Communist junkloads of men and supplies coming down by sea from Ihe North and to Harkins..57, a-native of Boston: information on the amount It is expected to rise of American military men now in pursue Red guerrillas on the South Viet Nam is believed to be country's many-rivers and canals. who has been second in com- j type of military aid. mand of Army forces in the -Administration refusal .to talk cific area, is understood to be details of -the stepped-up close friend of Gen.' Maxwell D. U.S. assistance or about efforts to Taylor, Kennedy's personal mili- tary adviser. bring about reforms in Viet Nam is grounded in two reasons; as high as within Ihe scope of the present effort. Some secrecy is imposed for obvious security reasons. U.S. Air Force men have come on the scene in sizable numbers to show the Vietnamese how to get the most out of the heli- copters, reconnaissance planes. Thus, few will. then j transports and fighter-type craft only guardedly about reported i being funneled into .the country.. running for Congress. County Attorney Clinton Dennis said Beauchamp was about 40- years old and had practiced law in Duncan for the past six or sev- en years. "He had a general law practice, said Dennis. "If he had any spe- ciality it was in workmen's com- pensalion. Mosl of his practice was those cases." Dennis said Beauchamp was lieutenant Commander in the Na- val Reserve. An average man is one- who isn't so good as his wife thinks he is before she marries him, and not so bad as she thinks he is afterward. (Copr. Gen. Fea. Corp.)   

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