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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 2, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 2, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             Grantet it's always a little shocking to go against tradition it still seems any sleepy-headed animal dumb enough to be scared of his own shadow sure can't be trusted much as a weather forecaster E.G. Tournament Hits Round Two See Sports Page THE ADA EVENING NEWS Church Schedules Talks On Mental Health, Page 2 58TH YEAR NO. 278 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1962 8 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 Cl Cash, Criticism Of Demos Flow At GOP Rallies WASHINGTON across the nation poured out cash for the party till Thursday night along with cries that Democrats are grabbing for more power with "profligate spending" and "political fakery." And the GOP faithful heard what some of them thought sounded like a political war whoop, not so much for 1962 as for 1964, from Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York. The Republicans spent the evening at 17 party get- togethers in 17 cities, tied together for an hour by closed circuit television. This was the warm-up and kick-off Ike Gives Fighting Pep Talk LOS ANGELES (AP) "It is heart which wins wars, said Dwight D. Eisenhower, "whether on the battlefields or in peace." He stood before a crowded hall Thursday night for what was sup- posed to be a brief warmup talk turned it into a ringing plea for fighting heart among his fel- low Republicans. "It is heart which keeps us said the fonner presi- dent, "without ever admitting de- feat." Off-Thc-Cuff Ike was the main speaker on x cross-country telecast studded with names of top Republicans. But the national TV audience did not hear the off-the-cuff pep talk ]ke delivered earlier to a throng estimated by GOP sources at persons. He stretched the three-minute greeting into seven minutes, much of it more spirited than his TV delivery. The audience at the "We Miss Ike" rally ch'ccred a full three minutes when he finished. Little Gaps Eisenhower told the gathering that the GOP should fight to cut down the percentage of the Demo- cratic edge even in areas where Republicans know they can't win. "We had a paper-thin defeat in said Eisenhower. "Still, it was a defeat. Any one of 100 things happening differently could have brought us victory. What we have is the job of plugging all the little gaps." Fighting Spirit It takes fighting spirit to do this said worked up to a real pitch. He added: "You yourself are more important than the dollars that you give, if along with the dollars you give yourself." The rally at Olympic Audito- rium wasn't primarily a fund rais- ing affair (although the hat, fig- uratively speaking, was for the congressional elec tion campaign of 1962. The oratory at the parties fol- i lowed the usual political pattern 'of swinging away at the opposi- tion, upholding the GOP cause 'with professions of confidence, land holding up the party as the I great hope of the nation for gel- Iting sound, sensible, responsible 1 government. This was the other side of the record the Democrats played on Jan. first anniversary of the New Frontier when they staged a fund-raising banquet that drew people to Washington from over the country. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower paced the parade of Republican speakers. It was the former presi- dent who accused the Democrats of profligate spending and "living on a flood of I.O.U.'s." He and other GOP oratorial talent said the opposition is reaching for a more powerful central government and controls. Eisenhower urged the Republi- cans to discard such tags as "liberal" and to get together, to start working hard and in unity. "With a nation and a world at he said, "let's roll up our sleeves and get It was Rockefeller, trying for another term as governor this! year and perhaps for the White House in 1964, who set off the heaviest blasts at President Ken- nedy and his administration. Rockefeller accused Kennedy of political fakery in the way the President handled a proposal lo establish a federal department of urban affairs and to install hous- ing administrator Robert C. Weav- er as the first Negro in the Cab- inet. Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizo- na, a favorite of the conservatives for a shot at the presidency, got in his licks. He contended that U.S. Seeks Allied Support Of Cuban Isolation Policy HEADING FOR HIGH GROUND A farmsr near Lawrence, Kansas, pulls his family through flood waters of the Kansas River toward high ground. The family was one of several who were forced to flee their lowland when ice floes caused the river to spill over the land. (AP V Alas! Alack! Groundhog Sees Shadow-More Winter's Due QUARRYVILLE, Pa. emerged, saw his shad- Two groundhogs, considered theiow reflected on the snow and official legendary weather proph- ets, emerged from their holes to- day and saw their shadows, sig- nifying six more weeks of winter. went back into his hole. Attired in tall hats and long white night shirts, the members of the two groundhog clubs started Rubbing a long winter's hiber- out before dawn for the woods nation from his eyes, Punxsutawn-! and valleys seeking out the leg- ey Phil was the first to emerge' endary weather prophet, in Punxsutawney. At a.m., he; They carried divining rods and shuffled dutifully from his gadgets. part of thcjr an- gery, squinted and spied his shad-1 ow decorating frozen Gobbler's Knob. He scampered back to his cozy burrow. The Quarryville groundhog saw its shadow at a.m., accord- ing to Robert W. Herr, chairman of the Slumbering Lodge of Groundhogs here. Herr said Dr. Carl Mctzger. keeper of the field, was on watch on Crow Foot at the time the nual Feb. 2 caper. As legend has it, if the little beast sees his shadow, it is a sign of more winter, and back he'll scamper into his hole. If there is no shadow he'll stay m the open, signifying an early spring. The Quarryville and Punxsu- tawney groundhogs are generally regarded as'the official weather (Continued on Page Two) Tax Experts Offer Tip: Just Relax Congo Chief Arrives For Speech To U. N. NEW YORK Cyrille Adoula of the Con- Stockpile Probe's Up To JFK WASHINGTON (AP) -Congress 'looked to President Kennedy lo- day to pave the way for an in- vestigation of the nation's war- emergency stockpile by formally removing the lid of secrecy from its contents. The President already has said "the cold facts on this matter must be open to the public" and suggested that a Senate subcom- mittee, headed by Sen. Stuart Symington, D-Mo., undertake the inquiry. Symington interpreted Kcn- tjiuuncLa uui LIU; i groundhog saw its shadow a s remarks at Wednesday s ago. Zoo Keeper Stuart Borden I "ef said the animal wasn't trying lo Jrom White House for be smart or to jump the gun. He his subcommittee to have a good explained that it had three skunks ilook 8olnS on- prophets but. the Philadelphia as underground roommates and came up for air. "We have always been, told be- fore these item's could not be de- But the premature forecast of j classified." Symington said at a the Philadelphia woodchuck was not what irritated Robert Herr, chairman of the Slumbering; Lodge of Groundhogs' board of' governors here and Sam Light, president of the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club in the western part of the state. What irritated Ihem was an an- nouncement by the National Geo- graphic Society that men of sci- ence had reported the groundhog a lazy creature who. if left un- news conference of his own. But, a few hours before Syming. ton met reporters. Sen. Harry F. Byrd. got into the act. He said his joint committee on nones- sential government expenditures would study the S7.7-billion accu- mulation of metals, minerals and tools. Byrd said he had written to Kennedy, asking him to issue an executive order declassifying items in the stockpile to the "maximum limit consistent with disturbed, would sleep national interest." through its biggest day in the warm confines of his earth-lined burrow. Herr called that libelous. lie quoted' Dr. David E. Davis of Pennsylvania Stale University as proving "our hero comes out of hibernation in the first few days of on the sec- go was flying to New York today to assure the U. N. Davis-was on hand here. He figured the groundhog may be helpful in his study of kidney diseases. Another biology professor. Dr. Robert M. Chute of Lincoln Uni- versity, didn't care whether the groundhog saw his shadow or not. assembly that his government and the U. N. Congo com- mand are ending the secession of Katanga Province as quickly as possible. The Congo's premier was scheduled to speak to the assembly at U. N. headquarters here this afternoon. He was expected to tell the 104-nation group that further __.....______ U. N. debate on the Congo at this time would only hinder He just wanted groundhogs-dead efforts to extend his gov------------------------------------- ernment's control over his vast, unruly African coun- try. The U.N. Security Council met briefly Tuesday in response to a I Soviet charge that Katanga Prcsi-' 'dent Moise Tshombe had not end- led his province's defiance of the NEW YORK couple government and expelled drinks, an entertaining mystery ;white mercenaries employed in story-and even the wife-could army, as demanded by the be a big help when you face up Ul CtLlvciY wu r f' That part of the evening camej'o 'hat pesky chore of figuring later, when a gathering of the wealthier GOP faithful paid a ticket to attend a dinner and reception for Eisenhower at a downtown hotel. An official said S3 tickets were sold. Long Day It was a long day for Eisen- hower, who interrupted a vacation on the California desert for a visit to Los Angeles for the GOP rally. His wife, Mamie, accompa- nied him. But there was no lack of en- thusiasm on Ike's part as the old chant, "We like rose in the stadium. "There has been no loss of my Eisenhower said in his warmup talk. "If there is any way I can help to make clear- to any individual or to a great understanding of the importance of what sound, pro- gressive government means, and what we can do to support it- then that is what I wish to do." your income tax this year. At least that's some ,of the ad- by the Internal Rev. enue Service to help reduce the mounting number of taxpayers who make simple mistakes in arithmetic on their returns. "After you make out your form, put it aside, take a rest, go to the movies, or have a couple of suggested an official of the New York Regional Commis- sioner's Office of the IRS. "Then, after a day or two, go bac'. and check the figures. If everyone did this, we could cut the simple arithmetic errors by 75 per he estimated. "In most cases a taxpayer re- checking his figures immediately after putting them down will make the same error all over the revenue man ex- plained. How does the little woman come keeping the kids OKLAHOMA Fair through Saturday, a little warmer enst tonight: low tonight 30s; high Saturday 66-72. "Well, a wife can also help by checking the figures on the re- the Internal Revenue Serv- ice man suggested. "That pro- vides an independent check of the mathematics, and you don't have to show your figures to someone outside the family." Ada's highest reading Thurs- day was 70 with the tempera- ture dropping to 34 overnight. The reading at 7 a. ra. today FIVE-DAY FORECAST FOR OKLAHOMA Temperatures Saturday through Wednesday will aver- age 4-7 degrees above normal with minor daily changes. Nor- mal highs 48-57. Normal lows 22 northwest to 34 southeast. Little or no precipitation is likely. addition and are turning up creasing numbers, the I found. In the year ended 1961, some 2.5 million taxpayers made errors in arithmetic on their federal returns. That was up 24 per cent from the previous year. 1 Increased mathematical verifi- cation of returns through elec- tronic aids is one reason more mistakes are popping up, the serv- ice believes. Also, ,more returns are being filed, which means that more taxpayers are making them up for the first time. "Not all the errors are in favof (Continued on Pigt Two) council. Despite Soviet objections, the council set no date to resume defer- ence to Adoula's cabled protest that debate now would only rock the boat. Rockefeller's Wife Arrives In Nevada RENO, Nev. Mrs. Nelson A. Rockefeller has arrived in ,to Gob: divorce capital-apparently to end s keeP the'r v'g'' or alive. He had offered each for the first five he gets. for the next 10 and 50 cents for each one thereafter. He'll study the animals lo determine the effect of hibernation on their intestinal parasites. Herr vowed he'd give Chute none of Quarryville's. Back 'in Punxsutawney Light her 31-year marriage to New York's governor in a quick and; quiet way. I iPhil. the hole of Punxsutawney "We're the official Light insists, "the rest are phonies. They separated in New (he Russians now are daim. several months ago. Mrs. Rockefeller's attorney, Wil- (Continued on Pagt Two) jliam K. Woodburn of Reno, would I not confirm that she came to Ne- vada for a divorce. "She's here in he said after her arrival Thursday night. Woodburn, a former Democratic national committeeman, has han- idlcd many divorce cases but is not generally known as a divorce: specialist. i Six weeks' residence in Nevada' March Trial's Expected For Bulgarian Pilot BARI, Italy Bulgar- ian pilot whose camera-equipped jet crashed in Italy after making two passes over a secret missile ;a judge on many ing they've had the groundhog for Kennedy, Rusk Confer On Action Against Red Regime WASHINGTON United States was expected today to direct prompt and urgent appeals to its NATOI allies and other Allied countries to cooperate with the! newly adopted inter-American policy of isolating Cuba. The U. S. government itself is reported ready to make more extensive use of its naval forces in an effort toi ___ __ _ ___ cut off Cuban arms shipment to subversive groups- converged on Paris today other Latin-American countries. President Kennedy and Secretary of State Dean Rusk also are looking into the possibility'of slapping a total i throw President Charles de Gaulle embargo on U. S. trade with Cuba, one effect of reports of an imminent peace would be to deny Cuba a source of income amounting 'Pact for Algeria persisted, to about million a year at the present rate of trade, j Wllh In .connection with the possible abolition of all trade; Paris Arms To Prevent Uprising PARIS (AP) French army inks converged on Paris today to forestall any' attempt by the right-wing Secret Army to over- "irow President Charles de Gaulle reports of an imminent peace Jet for Algeria persisted. With mounted machine guns. the capital to give ar- support to riot police an uprising by the rightist under- ground, mark. j Crucial Report The possibility of some move! De Gaulle will address the na- by Cuban Prime Minister Fidel tion by radio and television Mon- with Cuba, Rusk charged Thursday at a news that Cuba was using American .dollars to promote sub- against the lhreat 'version in other countries. He didn't explain the re- Argentina Recalls Aide From Cuba today recalled Ambassador Julio Amoedo from Cuba, the Foreign Ministry an-! Three huge aircraft carrier, the nounced. i Enterprise, Forrestal and Constel- The step had been expected as Cation, are cruising in the Carib- President Arturo Frondizi sought j bean and could be deployed speed- Castro against the U.S. Naval :Base at Guantanamo is also un- der careful watch here, it was learned. In event of- serious harassment. U.S. dependents at the big base would be brought home. to appease military critics of his soft line toward the Fidel Castro regime in Cuba at the recent in- ter-American foreign ministers' conference. Recalling the ambassador does not constitute a diplomatic break, but morning newspapers here had suggested that the crisis between the president and the nation's ily in the Guantanamo area if necessarv. Officials discount the chance of a Castro decision to attack Guan- jtanamo directly since that would involve open conflict with the United States. But a battalion of Marines is said to be in the vicin- ity of the base in case trouble brings a need for reinforcements. Sen. A. Willis Robertson. D-Va., chipped in with a statement that the Joint Senate-House Committee on Defense Production, which he heads, has-been inquiring regular- ly into the stockpile situation. The Symington and Byrd groups also have been actively investi- gating the stockpile over the past few years. All three groups have been .under the handicap of not _ being able to stir-up public inter-.year, stemmed from Argentina's est since much of the information j refusal at the inter-American con- made available by the govern-1 ference earlier this week to vote j with the U.S.-supported majority 'to oust the Castro regime from Officers File Six Cases In Ada JP Courts Six cases were filed in Ada's two JP courts Thursday. leading military men was nearingi More could quickly be flown in an end. They predicted a gradual CamP Lejeune, N.C. break in relations with Cuba. ......T However, many officers were reported still demanding mediate complete break which the Rusk was received by Kennedy in an unusual White House wel day night in what shaped up as a crucial statement on the long secret negotiations with the Alger- ian Nationalist Liberation Front to end the seven-year rebellion. French public opinion was be- ing prepared for a deal with the rebels to carry out De Gaulle's policy of putting Algeria on tht path to independence. Signatures Well-informed diplomatic sourc- es the agreement already had been drafted and needed only the formal signatures of both sides. France's allies reportedly have been notified that the De Gaulle regime seriously fears an attempt- ed coup by the right-wing extrem- ists either in France or or in both the peace accord is announced. Easily Crushed There were reports that some back to Washington Thursday meaiaie compieo: w r, f Mn- nation's military leadership de- ,n manded in an ultimatum to the president Thursday night. The latest crisis for Frondizi's government, now in its fourth ment has been classified. !the Organization iStates. of American Published reports said the serv- ice chiefs had threatened to resign unless Frondizi swings his foreign policy to the right, breaks with Cuba and fires Foreign Minister Miguel Angel Carcona and other officials responsible for putting Speeding charges were lodged i Argentina in the go-slow bloc at against William V. Moore inter-American conference at Route 4; Ada: John Wesley del Este, Uruguay, vin, Winnsboro. Tex.: and Jimmy; However. emerged Oliver Winfrey. Oklahoma City, i from the late night meeting with Joe Arthur Cecil. Route 2, Ato- cited for driving on the' left side of the road in a marked Frondizi and the military chiefs and gave the impressio.i that the government had won a breathing i spell. John H. Beasley. Ada. was! He indicated was not plan- coming ceremony when he flew j French. officials hoped to provoke thg Secref'Arrhy into an uprising in advance of a peace announce- ment on the theory that a prema- ture putsch would be easier to least in metropolitan France. Security forces also were rein- forced in hotbeds of rightist ter- in Uruguay. Kennedy praised the results of Rusk's diplomacy at Punte del Este and said the over-all result was that the inter-American sys- tem had been strengthened and "communism isolated" in Western Hemisphere. thejrorism in Algeria. Two hundred crack assault commandos moved Then, at liis news conference, into Algiers Thursday to reinforce Rusk refuted any idea of a troops already put on charged with improper stopping on a roadway. 500 years. Why, that's nonsense, j Public drunkenness charges They don't even know what a j were filed against Jack Cornish, groundhog is." Ada. ning lo resign and to'.d Ml- bste that tencd to me with 'lis- ps ticnce" when he explained the Ar- gentine stand. split among hemisphere nations over Cuba. He pointed particular- ly to unanimous adoption of a resolution declaring Cuba under the Marxist-Leninist leadership of Castro "incompatible" with the American system. Acknowledging that there were six abstenlions on a resolution to exclude the Castro government from parlicipalion in the inter- American system. Rusk said that the abstaining governments were bothered by legal and technical questions and did not disagree on the principle of Cuba's unfilness to be in the inter-American sys- tem. Rusk will review the Punta del meeting in a radio-television to the nation tonight at 7 All m r (Continued on Two) is required for filing suit for vorce, which may be granted by! base is expected lo go on trial in March on charges of political Adultery is the only ground for divorce in New York state, and and military espionage. Lt. Milusc many New Yorkers establish res- Solakovof the Bulgarian air force :icierlcc jn other states to obtain faces a sentence of 15-24 years ;divorccs on different grounds, imprisonment. Rockefeller was in DCS Moines, Formal charges of for a Republican dinner were served on the flier Thurs- Thursday night at about the time day in the Ban jail's dispensary ;his arrived in Rcno. where he is recovering from thei The governor's press secretary, concussion and fractures of the; Robert L. McManus, said the gov- left collarbone he would have no comment now or later on his wife's move. fered in the crash. Serving of the warrant automat- ically set in motion a pre-trial in- vestigation. Acting as a one-man grand jury, the investigating judge has the power to order ac- _, _ ered this unlikely. They said Sola- v v. will go on trial in March before a court com- posed of two judges and a jury of six. 'The Bulgarian legation in Rome reiterated the Communist government's contention that Sol- akov had lost his way on a train- ing flight. But it said a legal ex- perl would be assigned to his de- fense once the legation receives formal notification of the accusa- tion. Under Italian law, Solakov can be assisted in .his legal defense only by Italian lawyers. Mrs. Rockefeller was accompa- nied by her widowed sister, Mrs. Philip Wallis of Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. a fashionable suburb of Philadel- phia. Mrs. Rockefeller flew from New York lo San Francisco. Woodburn met her at San Fran- cisco and' drove her on a 300-mile trip here because fog made air travel impossible. Neither Rockefeller, 53, nor his wife, 54, has given any public hint of the cause of the breakup of their marriage. They had five children and eight grandchildren. Their as announced by a! family spokesman last Nov. 17. Two days later they were struck MOVING AHEAD: Work it again und.r wiy on 25 of tht Clor Boggy Lull.. bv traeedv Their son rolling thii wttk ifter somt dtlay caused by li locitid on Mirhap] aV reoorted missin" D- R- Clifford land, ont milt touth on. mil. eaft of Lul.. It is one of first of b.gun'on wittr- cnaei, a, was repor.eo. missin0, 2g 2? County. Thtr, lr. -53 totil sit.s- plinntd for th. w.t.rsh.d (Continutd on Pagt Two) i 'Clifford's land will includt six icrts of ptrmtntnt wittr ind i flood pool. (NEWS Stiff emergency footing. Rebels Meet The Algerian rebel cabinet was meeting today in Tunis, reported- ly to take up the projected peace accord before putting it before a special session of the National Revolutionary sort of rebel Tripoli with- in the next two weeks. Approval by the French Parlia- ment is not necessary. In a ref- erendum in 1961 the French vot- ers gave De Gaulle a free hand on Algerian policy. Agreement Diplomatic sources said the draft agreement would provide: A transitional period of six months during which Algeria (Continutd on Two) Use Of Names In NEWS Ad Was Not Authorized In Thursday's edition of The Ada Evening News, an advertise- ment was carried which contained three names of well-known local residents. These three men are Pat Ray Jr., LeRoy McDonald and Irl Rhynes. These men did not give permis- sion for the use of their names in any advertisement. I The advertisement was inserted in the NEWS by Lewis Watson, local attorney, who is in strong opposition to right-to-work legis- lation. The three men have, in fact, been working with others to se- cure the necessary signatures on petitions to bring the matter to a vote of the people. The NEWS regrets any inconven- ience or embarassment caused these three gentlemen by the un- authorized use of their names. The pressure of public opinion is like the pressure of the atmos- phere. You can't see it, but all the same it is 16-pounds to the square inch. (Copr. Gen. Fea. Corp.)   

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