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Ada Evening News: Thursday, February 1, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 1, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             And then there's the one about the ardent Ada swain who reported regretfully that he'd had to break off with his girl because she was always using those nasty four-letter words. Like "don't" and "stop" and "quit'' Big Tournament Opens At E. C. See Sports Page THE ADA EVENING NEWS Ruling Party In Italy Swings Toward Left, P-3 58TH YEAR NO. 277 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1962 16 Pages. 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY New Welfare Proposals Shift Emphasis From 'Relief Checks' To Rehabilitation President Sends Congress Special Message On Plans WASHINGTON Kennedy called to- day for a expansion of permanent federal welfare outlays, with a shift in emphasis from doling out "relief checks" to the rebuilding of wrecked lives and careers. The remedies "will not come cheaply but in the long run they will save Kennedy said in a special message to 'Congress. He urged permanent extension of the one-year pro- gram to aid dependent children of the jobless, more spending on rehabilitation work, increased grants for child welfare, added funds for the day care of children of working mothers and .re- moval or reduction of resi- dence requirements for re- lief. The President slapped at dras- tic local efforts to slash relief rolls, without directiy naming the instance which has stirred nation- al controversy, that of Newburgh, N.Y. The message said: "Communi- ties which whatever to save mon- ey through ruthless and arbitrary cutbacks in their welfare rolls have found their efforts to'little root problem re- avail. The mained." By contrast, Kennedy communities which have said, the rehabilitative road" for relief OUT OF THE PAST Nighttime travelers along SH 3 near Stonewall in recent weeks might have felt they'd been transported twenty or thirty years into the when ail was oil and th'e feverish excitement of the search for black gold gripped the 'whole area. Now, of course, what with allowables and taxes, an oil well ij, just another hole in the ..._ ________ ground. This night photo shows the lighted rig on the Number One Higdon, a mile iclients have fared better: "Fami- of Stonewall, now down to about Uocated on land owned by Mrs. Dewey I ijes have been restored to self- Higdon, the well is being drilled by Fred Schonwald and Others, Oklahoma City, with rcijance ant] rolls have Don Clawson Drilling Co., Ada, doing the work. It's reported the well will be plugged and abandoned immediately. Like we said, the fun's gone out of the oil business. (NEWS Staff Republicans Seek Vrges _ j Discipline lo Increase rands For WASHINGTON party faithful will dine tonight, listen to top GOP brass help wipe out the parly deficit. The 17 fund raising dinners will be the Republicans' first big rallies of the new congressional elec- tion year in which they hope to cut deeply into Demo- cratic majorities in the House and Senate. Party lead- ers have said this won't be easy. Sen. Thurston B. iMorton, R-Ky.1, former GOP national chairman, pointed to two weak spots in party armor Wednesday in a speech before a Toung Republicans Aide Defends Censoring Of Military Talks WASHINGTON G. Sylvester, assistant secretary of defense-, testified today that the censoring of military men's speeches makes the United States a tougher foe for communism. His statement was prepared for a Senate subcommittee investigat- ing charges that the censoring has btcn too drastic, often softening "Inational leadership confer- ence in a suburban Virginia motel. First, he said, the Republicans lack a strong organization in the anti-Communist statements mililarv officers. by OKLAHOMA CITY Oklahoma City lawyers asked the state Supreme Court Wednesday to discipline or publicly reprimand attorneys involved in an "overt plan to coerce the court into ex- ceeding its constitutional powers." Leon S. Mirsh, James C. Har- kin and Paul Johanning filed a friend of the court brief which claimed the court is the victim of a hoax perpetrated by persons wanting to change apportionment reliance, been reduced." This approach can be furthered, he said, if Congress will enact broad revisions of the rules under which the Department of Health, Education and Welfare makes federal aid grants to match state welfare outlays. The special message, said by officials to be the first in history devoted solely to welfare'" prob- lems, will be followed by two more messages on programs ad- ministered by the department- health care for the aged under Social Security and federal aid to education. The program outlined today would represent the most sweep- ing overhaul of federal relief techniques since the aid program Cartwrights Play Version Of 'Chicken7 Kennedy Gefs In Some New Political Licks WASHINGTON (AP) Presi- dent Kennedy has uncorked some new political punches that seem aimed at keeping his Republican and Democratic critics off bal- With Young Republicans holding a leadership conference here and J party members staging a series 'of dinners across the country to- night. Kennedy observed Wedncs- jday at his news conference that he doesn't know "who is giving the leadership direction but I am sure that they will have a varied President Sets Probe Of U.S. Stockpiling Program program. Jabs At Critics The President also jabbed at j Republicans and Democrats who OKLAHOMA CITY   tllcy contended tion himself, said unless the board's lawsuits 'are ridicu- makes a strong showing in this j lous and should bo dismissed he- year's congressional elections, the callse of frivolity." Republican nomination for presi-1 M'rsh previously represented a dent will have little meaning in majority of the state Senate in a- Sylvester didn't mention a l" puted order from Secretary of De- 1 ls fcnse Robert S. McNamara f 'hc standard bearer ,n 1964 The recommendation for disci- lense UOUCTL o. iui-i.. i bidding Pentagon personnel to tell IMorton snld' lf wc don l make! apparently was aimed at two HtUmmTtten who censored.galns ln 1962> wc re have board-Clee the subcommittee who censored any particular speech. Sen. Strom Thurmond, D-S.C., whose denuncietions of censoring forced the inquiry, said President Kennedy should step in and veto McNamara's order. Sylvester said one reason the texts of speeches are censored in advance is to "insure that this country speaks not from the weak- ness of contradictory voices but from the strength of one." "Our review as a matter of first priority seeks to deny sensitive information to an vester said. Syl- "Secondly we review for con- flict with policy. But the reviewer must also try to protect against expressions which unwittingly might provide the unscrupulous Communist propaganda machine with material to be used against us, thus producing confusion among our allies and suspicion among the uncommitted nations." He termed the censoring a pro- tection for military men who, (Continutd on Page Two) to hunt for somebody to run for president." President Kennedy said at his (Continued on Pane Two) gerald, chairman, and Herbert .F.. Hcwett. Republican their attorneys, Bob Blackstock of (Continued on Page Two) Ike Calls On U. S. To 'Glorify Hard Work' OKLAHOMA Fair through Friday; cooler tonight; low to- night 27-37; high Friday 66-73. High temperature in Ada Wednesday was 70: low Wednes- day night, 48; reading at 7 a.m. Thursday, 48. LOS ANGELES (API-Former President Dwight D, Eisenhower has called on Americans to "re- pudiate feather-bedding and to jlorify hard work at all levels." Addressing more than per- sons at a Chamber of Commerce Banquet Wednesday night, he de- clared: "Wherever malingering m formed. Today we are not lack- ing in specific indications that we are drifting toward a feather-bed the unemployed. Enacted as an emergency recession measure last year, it is due to expire June 30. Increasing the federal share from one-half to three-fourths of the costs of rehabilitation, and so- cial services, without changing the dollar-for-dollar matching of states' outlays for routine cleri- cal and administrative work. This would cost the Treasury perhaps million. Boosting the ceiling on federal grants for child wel- fare services to million in fis- (Continued or Two) Italy Formally Charges Pilot With Spying Italy (API-Italy tonight formally charged Bulgarian air force Lt. Milusc Solakov with po- litical and military espionage. An investigating judge_ in this southeastern Italian city issued an arrest warrant against the 22- year-old flier, who crash landed Jan, 20 after flying his camera- equipped MIGJ7 jet twice over a secret North Atlantic Treaty Or- ganization missile base. Two national police officers should be concerned with all the any group or class if condoned- pracUces and frcnds jn fields whether in management, scientist may put prescnt affluence above or progress is destined to be slow. "Adequate leisure is not only desirable, it is healtny for mind as well as body, but unwarranted idleness in any part of the popu- lation cannot fail, corresponding- ly. to slow up the rate of growth." Eisenhower said the public grew suspicious of "make-work" both public and private the depression years ol the 1930s. "In saying he continued, I read the formal charge to .Sola- "I am not referring merely to kov in the infirmary of Bari's civ- the make-work ruics adopted byj'l Jail- He has been recovering some unions; rather I think wc; there from his crash injuries, con- cussion, and fractures of the left arm and collarbone. He had tried to give the impres- sion that he was a'defector but his government contended he landed in Italy after becoming lost in bad weather while on a training flight over Bulgaria. Trial for espionage under Ital- ian law must 'be before a civil court, where the maximum penal, ty on conviction is -15 years im- prisonment. Surprise Less than two hours later Wil- burn came roaring out behind him, to the surprise of just about ev- erybody. Wilburn, 67, is a member of the Corporation Commission and was re-elected to a second 6-year term just 15 months ago. Buck is in something of a bind since his term as senator expires this year and it would be difficult for him to get back onto the small- er track. Me First Former Sen. Virgil Mccllock. Ada, and Rep. Al Nichols, Wewo- ka, have announced for Cart- wright's Senate seat. Because he got in first and be- cause Wilburn was just're-elecled. Buck believes his brother should pull out. don't to." he said. "But it's not fair for both of us to-run." Wilburn has different ideas. He has ordered campaign cards and he said his race "is very definite." Longtime Yearning "I'd rather be lieutenant gover- nor than be governor." he said. Wilburn said he established the (Continued on Pagt Two) from attacks leveled by Reps. H, R, Gross. R-Iowa, and Bruce Alger. R-Tex. Gross said that because of his scheduled visit lo Moscow Salin- ger had "emerged as the new sec- retary of state." Alger called Salinger a "young and inexperi- enced White House publicity man." Moving On There were always some people, the President replied, who thought that Americans were always young and inexperienced and for- eigners always able and tough negotiators. He got a laugh when ho added: taken by President Arturo Fron- dizi's government. They reported- ly served him with an ultimatum demanding a diplomatic break with Fide! Castro's regime and support of the next steps in the OAS Council to isolate Cuba from the inter-American family. Informants in Buenos Aires said that the leaders of the three armed forces also demanded that Frondi'ii fire Foreign Minister Miguel Angel Caracno, who ab- stained on the key vote at Punla' either Washington or Moscow, he1 fire." He said the United States through Cuba and labeled Marx- ist-Leninism "incompatible with ,the inter-American system." Kennedy said no significant progress has been made in U.S. efforts to settle the Berlin dispute with the Soviet Union but support- ed the forthcoming trip of his press secretary, Pierre Salinger; to the Soviet Union. "We hope that as communica- tions improve." he said, "that problems which cause tension and danger to the world will lessen." As for the strategic stockpile, he called the present supply enor- mous beyond necessity, "a ques- tionable burden on public funds and in addition a potential source of excessive and unconscionable profits." Kennedy said he did not mean to imply the discovery of any wrongdoing at this stage. But he said the cloak of secrecy that was originally applied to conceal shortages from an enemy has now. become "an invitation to mismanagement." Kennedy had this to say on oth- er subjects: Soviet has been evidence of a joint desire to agree on Laos but as yet no sig- nificant progress on Berlin. With- out a breakthrough, there would be no point to his visiting Mos- cow. He. said Ambassador Llew- ellyn Thompson would continue probing for a break in the im- passe. Latin sat- isfaction at the "vigorous decla- ration against Communist pene- tration of this hemisphere" by foreign ministers of the Organiza- tion of American States in Punta del Este, Uruguay. Southeast "earn- est hope" for an end to renewed fighting in Laos, otherwise ex- tended negotiations to establish a JFfCteaves Door Open Jo Red Visit WASHINGTON (API-President Kennedy today held open the pos- sibility of a visit to the Soviet Union if he can make "significant breakthroughs" in his developing drive to improve U.S.-Soviet re- lations. A visit under present conditions of cold war tension probably j neutral and independent govern- [ould not be considered useful by ment "could go up in smoke and del Este on the expulsion of Cuba i believes, but "we are making ev- from the OAS. In Brazil and Mexico, the two other major powers in the "soft- six" bloc, reaction was mixed cry effort we can to bring an easing of tensions." has increased its aid to South Viet Nam to sustain that country against Communist-backed "sub- The President discussed U.S.- terranean war." Soviet relations with newsmen with some expressions of anxiety Wednesday in a conference at- over the outcome of the confer- tended by Alexei Adzhubei, editor of the Soviet government news- paper Izvestia and son-in-law of Some observers in Mexico feared the 20-nation condemnation of Cuban communism wouid spur "Also, as I saw in the press, it leftist agitation in that country, said that Mr. Salinger's main, Brazilian newspapers were over- function was to increase my i whelmingly in favor of the con- standing in the Gallup Poll. Hav-'demnation of Cuban communism ing done that, he is now differed on Brazil's refusal to support expulsion of Havana from1 hemispheric councils. There was a general expecta- tion of leftist pressure against the 13 Latin-American governments which joined the United States in Presbyterian Church Holds Training Series The First Presbyterian Church is holding officers' training course. -To run four weeks, the Premier Khrushchev. Kennedy warmly welcomed Ad- zhubei to the meeting but pulled no punches in denouncing Com- munist international activities, particularly in Cuba and South- east Asia. Kennedy expressed "satisfac- tion" at the action taken by the inter-American foreign ministers conference at Punta del Este, Uruguay, in denouncing Cuban communism. voting the expulsion move. It was; in talking about Southeast Asia, widely believed that the Caslroist-: he said the United States has in- first in the series was held Sun- 1 Communist combine would step creased its help, to the govern- day. The remaining three will be up harassment of those govern-! ment ol South Viet Nam to help held on consecutive Sundays. Dr. ments both for revenge and to Herbert C. Tays, pastor, is con- exploit the continental nervous- ducting the course. Church officers meet at 2 p. m. at the church. The course is de- signed to familiarize' officers and workers of their duties in the church program. ness resulting from the 10 days of dispute. The conference wound up (Continued on Two) it maintain its position against the "subterranean war" which is sup- ported and directed by Soviet- backed Communist North Viet Nam. needed accomplishment that may diminish incentive, stifle competition and, in the. name of security, lessen opportunity." Eisenhower interrupted a win- ter vacation at Palm Desert, 130 miles southeast of here, for a two-day visit to Los Angeles. He is scheduled to meet with Repub- lican workers today and to ad- 'dress a private din- elies of goods and services led to inefficiency and to neglect otjover lhe and warned that itrue productivity in work per-j (Continmd on Two) ner tonight. i The investigating judge acted In his Chamber of Commerce soon ,aft'r Kalian Police turned over to him their full findings in the case, presumably including results of a study -of. film taken from the Bulgarian plane's aerial cameras. the The President also expressed i hope that Communist and pro-U.S. forces in neighboring' Laos will refrain from renewing hostilities lest hopes for a peaceful settle- ment "go up in smoke and fire." Adzhubei lunched at the White Urban Repub- lican charges that he played pol- itics in announcing he would name a Negro, housing adminis- trator Robert C. Weaver, to head a proposed cabinet-level depart- ment of urban affairs. (Continued on Page Two) Ada Drivers Start New Year On Wrong Note Ada got off on the wrong foot in 1962. January ended Wednesday with 27 traffic accidents inside the city limts, five more than in the same month of '61. The last mishap involved a car driven by Mary E. Shipman, 76, 414 West Fourteenth, and a pick- up truck driven by Tom Agee. 25. 400 West Main. They collided at a.m. at Tenth and Ren- nie. Shipman was charged with fail- ure to yield and Agee with driv- ing without a license. Both were fined In-other Muncipal Court cases. House and spent several hours! with Kennedy and Pierre Salin-j a fine ger, press secretary, on Tuesday, j jor drjvjng a license and Afterward Sahnger announced he clarcnce 57 was cha rf would visit Moscow m the spring with speeding to talk about improving commum-, speeding charges were also filed CUBA ABSTAINS Cuban Pritidtnt Oivaldo Dorticoi ibitiinj at to Inttr- American Fortign Ministtrt at Punta dtl Uruguay, in favor of a rtio- lutlon calling for in American nations. won unanimous vott of 20 nations sitting in judgment on Cuba. Voting in favor art Nicaragua'i ambas- sador to Organization of American statis Stvilla Sacasa, left, holding hii country's namt aloft, and Paraguay's Foreign Minister Raul Putor, right. (AP Wirtphoto.vil Radio from Punta dtl cations. "We hope that as communica- tions improve, .that problems which cause tension and danger to the world will lessen." Kenne- dy told the news conference. He said that actual negotiations on big East-West disputes such as Berlin "are being conduct- eo by Ambassador (Llewellyn) Thompson" and that Thompson would have another in his current series of meetings with Foreign Minister Andrei A, Gromyko to- day. This will be the third meet- ing'in a series described by Ken- nedy as "so-called probes with re- gard to the matter of Berlin." Asked under what conditions he would accept an invitation to visit the Soviet Union, Kennedy re- (Continutd an Two) I against James Thomas, 41. William D. Duty, 48, forfeited S60 bond on charges of reckless driving, driving while intoxicated and transporting an open bottle of liquor; Robert Gene Maloy, 18. forfeited bond on charges of speeding.. Lecturers skould remember that the capacity of the mind to ab- sorb is limited to what the seat can Gen. Fea Corp.)   

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