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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 21, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 21, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             What was that old song about "The Lady in We see red shoes, red stockings in posters all over town and we understand a group of local belles will appear In bright red hose of these days Modern Technique Speeds Search At Salvage Yard, P-ll THE ADA EVENING NEWS Lawton Defeats Cougars, 61-53 See Sports Page ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 21, 1962 32 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY PROJECT: Thii is a sketch showing appearance of the man of the building commiMee. He said bids would be taken projected new Masonic Lodqe. to be located on a tract near in possibly 60 days The but ding will be erected on 300 by the Arlington Nai.rene ChGrch on Arlington Boulevard, at 166-foot tract. Virgil Allen ,s Worshipful Master of the Ada the .astern limits of the city. Herb Karschnik is the chair- Lodge. Ray James is the designer of the handsome structure. Rampaging Congo Troops Add Deaths LEOPOLDVILLE. the Congo troops .once loyal to Antoine Gizenga were re- ported Saturday to have killed five more Europeans in eastern provinces as the pro-Communist leader returned to Leopoldville under U.N. guard to face possible trial. The latest killings by the lead- erless troops were reported by re- liable sources at Shangugu' in the neighboring trust .territory of Ru- anda-Urundi to have taken' place' Monday at Kindu in Kivu Prov- ince. The informants said the nation- ality and identity of 'the' victims known, but that they un- derstood U.N. representatives at Bukavu, the Kivu capital, had confirmed the report The report attributed the killings to soldiers under the former command of a Gizenga aide. Col. Alphonse Pa- kassa. Pakassa returned to Stan- leyville, capital of the former pro- Communist regime of Gizenga Friday, and was arrested. It was at Kindu that troops un- der Pakassa's command mutinied last November and butchered 13 Itslian U.N. airmen. Some of the same troops are believed to have been responsible for the reported machine-gun slaying and mutila- tion of 19 Roman Catholic mis- sionaries at Kongolo in northern Katanga Province on Jan. 1. Yet another Catholic mission station, at Sola, 15 miles north of Kongolo, appeared to have been overrun by the maurauding sol- diers. A U.N. aerial survey of (Continued on Page Two) With- Heavy Snows By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A blizzard blasted most of the West Saturday, heavy snows temporarily closing transcontinental U. S. high- ways 40 and 50 at a number of places from Utah to Cali- fornia's Sierra Nevada. Gradually clearing weather was in prospect for Sunday. Bitter cold gripped the northern half of the nation, temperatures dipping to as much as 36 below zero in Minnesota. Record sub-zero marks were recorded in some cities. Treacherous pavement, gale-force winds and low isibility caused traffic deaths and property damage from Canada to central California. Motorists in some mountain areas were v Nations Divide On Measures Against Cuba PUNTA-DEL ESTE, Uruguay American delegates to the Punta del Este conference Saturday night made an implied threat to pull out 'of the Organiza- tion of American States unless strong measures' are taken against Cuba Prime Minister Fi- del Castro's regime.' The conference opens Monday, with the governments of the West- ern Hemisphere deeply divided on what action to take to prevent the spread of communism from Cuba. The delegation landed Saturday night at Montevideo's airport and was greeted by a crowd of about mostly teen- OKLAHOMA Considerable cloudiness through Sunday night. Occasional light snow north and occasional tight freezing drizzle or very light snow south, changing to occa- sional rain and slcct. Occasional snow or sleet north anil occa- sional showers southeast Sun- day night. Not so cold but turn- ing colder west and north Sun- day night. High 24-38. Ada's highest reading Satur- day was 25 degrees, after an overnight low of 5. The reading 5 p. m. Friday was 24. President Osvaldo Dorticos. was given a 21-gun salute as a visiting head of state.' After Dorticos re- Hits. West Reversal Ot County Candidates Get Set For Fast Shifts In Political Lineup ___ _ _ mm Conviction SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Dave Beck, predecessor of James R. Hffa 'as Teamsters Union boss, won a reversal Saturday of his conviction of evading more than in federal income taxes. He had been sentenced to five years in prispn and fined released on bond pending outcome of his appeal. The U.S. Court of Appeals re- manded the case to District Court for a new trial but upheld Beck's conviction on charges of filing false lax returns for his union, For that he .got five years m prison and a fine. In Seattle, Beck "hailed the re- A 30-inch snowfall forced post-' mation on the union's return ponement of a professional ski charges, would be appealed to the meet at the Sugar Bowl near Nor- den, Calif. Winds there reached 70 miles per hour. The storm began losing its punch by mid-day Saturday but snow flurries persisted in many The storm front, moving rapid- ly from the northwest, hit Salt Lake City shortly before accompanied, oddly, by light- ning. Visibility dropped to a half block within minutes. Gale winds smashed British Co- lumbia Friday, ripping roofs from buildings and shattering windows at Victoria, B.C. The storm skirted much of Washington State Saturday, but it was cold and windy. Drifts up. to 6 feet deep were being cleared in northwest Washington. California, Oregon, Nevada and Utah bore the brunt of the sud- den storm. In Northern California sections of U.S. 40 were closed a while in the Sierra, with traffic U.S. Supreme Court. "I never took a nickel from anyone in my Beck asserted. At issue in the reversal was the taxability of embezzled funds as income. The appeals court decision pointed out that Beck's income in- cluded "an amazing series of em- bezzlement." In 1945. the appeals court had decided embezzled funds were not taxable. This was reversed by the U.S. Supreme Court May 15, 19G1 in the case of Eugene C. James, a Chicago union official. The high court ruled that embezzled money is taxable. But Beck was convicted two years Feb. 19, 1959 so the James ruling could not apply in his case. Saturday, in Washington, B.C., a spokesman for the Justice De- partment said the appeals court decision reversing Beck's convic- viewed an honor guard of L'ru-; backed up for miles on both sides tion on income tax evasion guayan troops, the delegation left1 of Donner charges "reflects the position by car for Punta del Este. j The Utah Highway Patrol halt- taken by the Department of Jus- .ed westbound traffic on U.S. tice." The spokesman added, "We and 50 at Grantsville, some 30, will have to study the decision, be- Police took strict security meas- ures and set up checkpoints on roads leading to this luxurious resort, They were protecting the Castro preparing to intercept 300 pro-Castro workers and students making a slow march along the 80-mile route from Montevideo' to the confer- ence scene for the purpose of staging an anti-Yankee demon- stration. .The U.S. delegation, headed by Secretary of State Dean Rusk, is Cartwright Makes Big News By Quitting Race For Senate By ERNEST THOMPSON Remember the old game of "musical That just about sizes up the Pontotoc County political situation at this stage with still another couple of months remaining before the spring primary elections." Here's the setup on the state and local scene in a nut- shell: the lieutenant governor will run for governor the state senator from Pontotoc and Seminole counties will run for lieutenant governor his brother, a mem- ber of the Corporation Commission, will seek the same job the county attorney here may try to become the county judge or district judge the assistant county attorney may run for the senate or for county attorney a former state senator will seek to regain his old job a Seminole County representative is certain to go after the senate post a Pontotoc County representa- tive may also go after the Democrats Rally Around President WASHINGTON (AP) Demo- crats rallied strong around President Kennedy Saturday night! at an inaugural anniversary ner aimed at uniting the party I behind his "New Frontier" pro-; gram. j As a not inconsiderable side benefit from the star-studded a-platc senate vacancy and nine men want to become county commissioner next j Tuesday. The big news last week was the withdrawal of Sen. Buck Cart- wright from the race to succeed himself as senator and his entry into the big-time political arena as a candidate for lieutenant gov- ernor. Touchy Spot Immediately, one man leaped into tlu breach and several others are considering the move. Cartwright now finds himself embroiled in a touchy situation. His brother, Wiiburn Cartwright, now a member of the Corporation Commission, has entered the race for lieutenant governor. Others, such as Leo Winters, secretary of the state election board, are also in the running since George Nigh stepped out of the way to toss his hat into the gubernatorial ring. Sen. Cart-wright' has probably gone too far now to withdraw and run for his present office. Even, before he withdrew. Al Nichols, representative from We- woka, announced for the office. Then, state Virgil senator Wedlock, former from Lawrence. storm, 'but only minor damage was reported. Driving rains hit miles west of Salt Lake City. jfore determining whether to seek Chains were required in most mountain areas from there west- ward. In Las Vegas, in southern Ne- vada, high winds kicked up a dust publicly announced he intends tc seek his old post. Medlock said his entry into Ihc race is not the result of rece.it developments, i.e., Cartwrignt's withdrawal. Ex-Senator "I've been thinking about mak- ing the race and 1 decided ten days ago to be a the former senator said. Medlock served three terms in the House of Representatives and two terms in the Senate. Also mentioned widely as a pos- sible candidate is Francis May- hue. Ada attorney, who is cur- (Continued on Page Two) Democrats Set Precinct Meets On February 9 Faithful Democrats are remind- ed that precinct Friday, Feb. DR. FREEMAN McKEE New President Takes Over At Murray State TISHOMINGO (Staff) social studies. He received his Ada Slates Big Doins In Politics Big doin's are scheduled this week on the Ada political scene. i Aside from Tuesday's special I county commission election two big events come back-to-back Tues I day Wednesday. The first one is Tuesday night when Raymond Gary, former gov- ernor and candidate again this :year. will speak to the annual j meeting of the Oklahoma High- way 99 Association. Second Show Then, Wednesday night, Gary will reappear here and he will be accompanied by almost the entire cast of the upcoming gubernato- rial election. They scheduled to be here for a special March of Dimes benefit dinner. Both events will be held at East Central's Student Union Ballroom. The Tuesday program will be centered around a discussion of highways by Gary. He will talk about his proposed one-half bil- lion dollar, seven-year highway program which he claims is possi- tf ,i i j I liJllWliJ Ji i i in o" iji.wi-" affair, the party expected, Freeman McKee vestcrday assum-! master's and ST. his duties as president of Mur- both in educ j P. f i iju mi) uuutsa da um. AIAUI apply against a de icrt of about h [ad C1 million IVrtm fno 1QW1 nrocinpn. Dr. Charles Gracy. Grady resigned recently to ac- cept the presidency of Oklahoma College for Women at Chickasha. McKee comes to Murray from Panhandle Goodwell million from the 1960 presides tial campaign. Democrats of all from Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson and Cabinet officials down to rank-and-file members who got seats' at discount .prices Columbia Armory to whoop it up for a President who party Chair- man John M. Bailey acclaimed as the most popular ever. Former President Harry S. Tru- man, who once raised the ques- tion whether Kennedy was mature enough to be chief executive, was on hand to say he was proud of the man entering his second year of office as "a wise, brilliant and vigorous Truman struck one of the key- notes of the evening with a plea for party backing of the Presi- dent's request for broad authority j to negotiate tariff reductions in dealing with the European Com-j mon Market. He tried to calm some domestic fears. "Our President will make sure that the European Common Mar- ket does not exclude our exports." he said. "We are entitled to have no barriers raised against us in Europe." Bailey characterized the over- (Continued on Page Two) Valley View Hospital Plans Jan. 30 Meet Valley View Hospital has issued of] struction. doctor's degrees, educational administra- tion, from Oklahoma State Uni- versity, the master's in 1941 and the doctor's in 1956. In 1942 he joined the Army Air Corps and served until 1946. From ble without increases in taxes or cutting expenditures in other agencies. Officials Attend Several members of the Okla- homa Highway Commission will be on hand, plus other officials of the 99 Association. The local 1946 until 1948 he was athletic di-j Chamber of Commerce Highway rector at Panhandle A M. where he served .as .dean..of..inn lo.Texhoma.as .super: iintendent of-schools-in--1948, re- Rocky, He was graduated from handle in 1933 with a B.S.jll. Committee will act as the host group for the 'meeting. Tickets for the event will be on sale until Monday noon at Bry- an's Corner Drug, Gwin's Drug and Bayless Drug: i He is married and has two! Approximately 300 tickets have Pan- daughters. Kerry, 16, and Kathy, i already gone to out-of-town _ peo- The new president has a solid turning to Panhandle in 1952, Oklahoma background. He grew again as athletic director. In 1957 up. he says, in Washita County, atjhe became dean of instruction. of the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice from 1953 t ngs would be held at regular expected to arrive Sunday and go j rain was measured overnight. (Continued on Page Two) i (Continued on Page Two) ifornia lowlands and up to a foot'funds. of snow blanketed mountain "We areas. At York Mountain near j Paso Robles, Calif., 5.1 inches of we conclude it -becomes necessary The decision written bv Justice Bi" Masse.v- secrecy of theipjtal operates as a non-profit cor- Tne decision, o> Justice crs applies to those who have donated to the hospital. The meeting has been scheduled for 4 p. m, on Jan. 30 in the Chinese Room, second floor of the Aldridge Hotel. Election of directors and an- nual report are the principal items of business. David 0, Howe is president of the board. Celeste K. Kemler is administra- tor of thre hospital. lo 195G, said the jury failed 10 make clear how much of the Southern Cal-j evaded taxes .was on embezzled cannot read the jury's the decision read, "and j polling sites. J. I. Jones, county chairmen, urged that all interested Demo- crats make an effort to attend these precinct meetings and par- ticipate in party business at the precinct level. Precinct officials who will be lo reverse the conviction of Beck (Continued on Page Two) selected are chairman, co- chairman and secretary-treasur- er. One Eight Sets File At Meet SULPHUR (Staff Filing meeting of the Ada one Independent candidate for Chest, Inc., will be vacancy on the board of Monday night in the Aldridgey commissioners created by The meeting time has been death of J. E. Moore will at 7 p. m. Murray County to hold two public is invited to attend cial elections, election board annual meeting. Reports, retary Bill Heath noted awards, and the election The primary election Is set eight new directors appear on Jan. 30. The general run-off agenda for the meeting. be .March a second of The lone Independent in new board of directors only race is R. M. "Red" follow. In this session, tire Eight Democrats also filed will elect the officers the office during the filing period which ended Friday. They 1952 of their own number. Tom O'Dell has served as presi- Clarence Moore. Robert L. during 1961. ler, Bob Shepard, Harley McCray. Floyd Stephens. Ralph Make Dry Burl Hamby and Lester To Ada Home pie, according to Leon Biddy, ticket chairman. Opening Event The dinner and program are scheduled to start at 7 p.m. The March of Dimes affair will be the first big political get-togeth- er of the season in Oklahoma. Francis Mayhue. local attorney and chairman of the March of Dimes campaign, says practically all the candidates for governor, announced or pending, will be here. Included are Democrats. George Miskovsky, W. P. "Bill" Atkinson, Preston Moore, Tommy Dee Fra- ser, George Nigh and Raymond Gary. Henry Bellmon, the proba- ble Republican candidate, is also expected to be on hand. Full Slate Aside from those candidates, other state officers and potential candidates will be here for the event, Mayhue notes. Lee West. Ada attorney and currently professor of law at O.U., will be the emcee for the M.O.D. affair. Tickets are on sale at Bryan's Prescription Center, Cloth- iers and Brvan's Corner Drug. n j Friday afternoon to the residence; Longtime Kesident Of w. E. Hancock, 712 West six- Of Coalqate Dies teenth- chicf Dudley Youns said 3 Hancock was engaged in connect-! COALGATE (Special) ing a new bathroom heater with- Starksey Davis, longtime resident out turning off the gas when the of Coaigate and widely known in gas caught fire from the nearby that area, died while visiting in hot water tank. Gallup, N. M. The body is being A little damage was done to the returned to Coaigate. Cooper Fu- bathroom. Young reported, but neral Home will announce funeral the fire had been put out by the .arrangements. time the fire truck arrived. credit card has created another American first instant debt. (Copr. Gen. Fea. Corp.' Astronaut Prepares For Earth-Girdling Flight Into Outer Space CAPE CANAVERAL. Fla. (AP) United States will try to rocket astronaut John H. Glenn Jr.. on an earth-girdling, mile journey through the lifeless blue-black of space next week, perhaps Wednesday. Basically, the purpose of the bullet-like flight atop a pound thrust Atlas missile is this: To add to mankind's meager fund of space knowledge in order lo determine whether earthlings ultimately can.travel safely to the moon and beyond. To find out what happens to a man in space. Glenn on his flight will do certain exercises, eat and! spin himself about to see what happens to his sense of balance. Everything that man can do to the success of the flight and Glenn's safety has been done.' Even now an armada of men aboard 24 ships, including three aircraft carriers, is being deployed around the world to keep track of the red-haired, quick- smiling Glenn on'his flight, and to rescue him when necessary. In making the trip the balding, 40-year-old Marine lieutenlant colonel will follow .a flight .path that is planned to take him three times around the world at alti- tudes varying from 100 to -150 miles. Glenn will pass at miles an hour through a fantastic realm in which an unprotected man fac- ing the sun could bake as in a slow oven at 248 degrees fahren- heit, while the flesh on his back- side froze and. became as -brittle and breakable as glass at minus 157. degrees. Glenn's great speed will keep him in orbit over the.4% hours of the projected flight. The prin- ciple is that of centrifugal force, balancing the tug of ...gravity, ..the same principle kids use to keep I a rock swinging at the end of a' string. The balance of centrifugal force and gravity is what makes Glenn weightless. If all goes as planned, Glenn will pass the sunshine of Launch Pad 14 to the blue-black of space in minutes. At lift-off he will experience a force 7te times that of gavity and thus weigh for a moment 7Vj times his normal 165 pounds. Glenn will be able to see the earth through a small window and with' a periscope. The stars will appear as dis- tant.' round orbs minus the' twin- kle they seem to have from earth, a twinkle caused by the diffusion of light through the dusty atmosphere. As matters now stand, Glenn will be launched on his historic journey sometime...between a.m., The National Aeronautics and Space Administration cautioned, however, that the trip might be postponed on a day-to-day basis pounds upon return lo earth. As it travels along the space- ship will automatically jettison certain equipment that is no longer needed. by weather or the merest hint of; The whole malfunctions. spacecraft and escape The flight' is timed to give the j stands 93-feet tall on the launch recovery forces at sea three hours! pad and weighs 125 tons fully of daylight if needed-in which to'fueled with, liquid oxygen and search for Glenn and his space; kerosene, capsule .after his return to earth.; The escape tower itself is 16 If all goes as planned, Glenn will: feet high. In event of a malfunc- land about 300'miles southeast of tion on the night at anytime be- here in the waters off Grand Turkitween blastoff an'd'g'oing.into earth Island in the Bahamas. orbit over Bermuda, an automatic Glenn is due to climb into his-sensing device fires a' rocket in bell-shaped space craft atop the. the tower. Atlas missile sometime just be-; Immediately, the spaceship fore dawn. NASA officials said: with its passenger is pulled up Glenn named his ship the "Friendship 7." This space capsule stands feet a c r o s s the base. At lift-off it weighs pounds, pounds while in-orbit and and away from the big booster and then a' parachute lets the. cap- sule return gently to earth. As the spsce capsule gets safely under way, the escape tower js cast off. As he circles the earth, Glenn's progress will be monitored by 13 tracking stations stretching across the Atlantic, Africa, tiie Indian Ocean, Australia, the Pacific and the United States, Canada and Mexico. Some' 500 technicians man these stations. Aboard the capsule, Glenn will have calories of and mixed vegetables similar to the stuff babies toothpaste tubes. He'll also-have six pounds of water. In addition, he will have some quick-energy s'ugar tablets. Air pressure inside the cabin will'be "maintained at six pounds per square, sea level it is 15 tluit Glenn should have no trouble breathing. Glenn will travel strapped to a contoured couch made of a spe- cial crushable honeycomb materi- al -bonded to a -Fiberglas- shell lined with rubber padding. .-Attached to .bis- body will.be medical sensors to register pulse, respiration, body temperature and heart action. Throughout the flight Glenn will be able to communicate with the tracking stations by radio. Glenn will be almost surrounded by 100 lights, fuses, controls, switches and dis- plays which tell him what is going on and where he is. A 16-mm camera will take con- tinuous pictures of the control consoles and another will register Glenn's reactions. Through his periscope he will have a 360-dcgree view of the horizon and he can adjust the view through the lens to inspect an area of earth as small as 80 miles in diameter or as large as miles in diameter. The flight can be terminated by Glenn or from the ground at any time. If he.makes only one orbit, he will land. 500 miles east of Bermuda. After two orbits he will hatch 'and be raised by a cable into the helicopter overhead. If he has to make an emergency exit, Glenn can leave by trigger- ing the explosive bolts holding the come down 500 miles south of Bermuda. If Glenn makes. the planned j. three orbits of the earth he will' hatch. At the same time a begin his re-entry into the raft be launched. He also phere preparatory to landing a small life jacket attached he rears the western coasfof his space suit that can be in- United States. By firing braking -rockets, the speed of the space craft will be reduced and the force of gravity will: pull him earthward. His descent will be radar- tracked by the recovery ship in the area. As soon as'he touches water frogmen from hovering helicopters will leap into, the sea to attach a huge rubber flated by a gas device. Once aboard the recovery ship. Glenn, will undergo a preliminary physical examination and then oe flown to one of the nearby islands for a more complete check. Glenn will be the third Ameri- can to enter space and the first to orbit the earth. He was preceded into space last year by astronauts Alan B. Shepard and Virgil I. Grissom. something like an I Two Russians. Yuri Gagarin the capsule to prevent it from and Gherman Titov, last year sinking in' case it springs a leak. At this point Glenn .will leave came the first men in history to orbit the earth. Gagarin went the capsule through-a side or top I around once and Titoy 17 times.   

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