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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 8, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 8, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             We note from recent press dispatches that Premier Khrushchev has had a bout of the flu. The Russians are great on claiming a "first'' in everything. Wonder if they invented the common cofd? Widow Of Senator Bridges Considers Political Fling P-3 THE ADA EVENING NEWS Ada Cougars Drop To Second Place In Cage Rankings...Spts 58TH YEAR NO. 256 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, JAN.UARY 8, 1962 8 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Rancher's Drive To Market Smacks Of The Old West WINNER, S. D. swirling snowstorm that brewed a temporary feed crisis for Don Hight's cattle drive turned out to have its helpful side. "It'll cover all the winter wheat we have to travel Hight said as he readied his Herefords "I for the final 17 miles of a 65-mile walk to a cattle auc- tion house at Winner. Hight's trucks from his West- over ranch got stalled in the snow for a time but he was able to buy hay from a rancher and the trucks pulled in Sunday with' a concentrated protein feed for Ihc animals. Much of the remaining distance j is in more settled country than I the cattle range where the ani- WASHINGTON (AP) Gov. I mals grazed before heading to Edmund G. Brown of California market, said today Richard M. Nixon "is ngt joining the fight against the ultra right-wing, although these Brown Blasts Nixon Pres. Kennedy, General Clay See 'Eye To Eye' On Hot Berlin Question LI CM. "I TL I Report Allays Fears 0 New Strike Throttles ,n The u. s. Positi Big Cities In Algiers ALGIERS   and-nm attacks soon in West New Guinea, which Indonesia has claimed ever since the nation gained independence from the Netherlands in 1949. In a speech at the fishing vil- lage of Bonthian, Sukarno told a crowd Indonesia will invade the territory unless the Dutch hand is to be followed Tuesday by a get-together of the President with his own party's leaders. Kennedy was expected to bear down heavily today on his plans for a balanced budget, increased defense spending and his recom- mendations for a broad new for- eign trade program. The all-democratic meeting Tuesday is likely lo be devoted to the more controversial items which the administration hopes to develop as major political issues this congressional election year. These include the bitterly dis- Trial Molotov and other prominent figures under Stalin were on trial by the party, and expulsion gen- erally had been expected. He was early Sunday by his wife who had j never seen in public after his re- been away from the home over-1 turn Nov. 12 and the press con- night. Fire Marshal F. C. Wagner said a stove burner apparently ignit- ed gas fumes and Capers was as- phyxiated. He estimated damage to the house at tinued to denounce him, Khrushchev was asked about on his front door we did not. Sunday, p.m. Woman called Ada P.D. said some- body comes into her house late at night, cooks and cats and makes lots of noise Molotov only two weeks ago and knows who it she thinks she one of her helped in rescue work. it -over and "we don't care about j puted health care program fi- world opinion'." under the Social Security However, he said his policy has, System, and a variety of educa- dling'Of possible crisis situations and we have reached full agree- ment on the policy to be followed during these months. "This meeting is one more way Moslems; and 40 Europeans and blocks. The bus remained in West Ber- in which Mr. Rusk. General Clay lin less than half an hour and j and I can keep in the closest be for- .the support of the Communist, Metal workers used acetylino! Asian and African world. "Two billion people support us." he said. told reporters the party machin- former room renters said she ery was dealing _with the case. doesn't wanl to identify person or file charges just'wants to "scare" person we agreed to drive by oflen. High temperature in Ada Sun- day was 47: low Sunday night, 32; reading at 7 a.m. Monday, 34. FIVE-DAY FORECAST FOR OKLAHOMA Temperatures will average 7-13 degrees below normal. Nor- mal high 44 north to 57 south. Normal low 19 north'to 32 south. Turning colder until mid week. Small day to day changes there- after. Precipitation will aver- age MO to 'A inch west to inch or less cast portion occur- ring as occasional light snow through Wednesday. OKLAHOMA Cold wave cold wave tonight, much colder tonight and Tues- day: cloudy this afternoon and tonight becoming partly cloudy Tuesday afternoon: occasional snow northwest this afternoon and west portion tonight with j accumulations 2-4 inches; a few snow flurries elsewhere tonight; low tonight 3-10 northwest and 15-30 southeast; Tuesday 20-30. A Foreign Office spokesman said he knew nothing of the status of the party trial. "Molotov has never been re- j moved from his post on the atom- lie energy agency and has now returned to he said. The spokesman said Molotov left Saturday. That would mean he should arrive in Vienna some time today, traveling by train. No Word The Austrian Embassy said Molotov had not applied for an Austrian visa but that one issued in Vienna might still be valid. It was the first time that any- thing like this had happened in the Soviet Union. Normally when a Soviet leader has been-faced with such serious accusations he is not allowed to leave the coun- try. Diplomats and others had ex- pected Molotov and other associ- ates would suffer degradation after the attack in the party congress last October, Molotov had attempted lo fight back against the charges by send- ing a letter to members of the Central Committee just before thc congress opened last Oct. 15. The letter was not published in full although extracts were read. But speaker after speaker at the congress accused him and his confederates of responsibility for CContinutd on Pigt Two) torches to cut inlo the tangled masses of coaches, 'which were reported to have carried about 500 passengers. Fifty doctors toiled over the casualties. Watch dogs were used to guard piles of luggage. One of the trains was an' ex- press en route from the northern "How many people support Hol- Carrier At one point, Sukarno said he had learned the Dutch plan to send the aircraft carrier Karel Doorman to New Guinea waters. She can handle 35 war- planes. tion measures left over from 19G1 legislative wars. Democratic congressional lead- ers have made it clear they expect a big furor over the re- ciprocal trade bill. They predict a satisfactory measure will be passed. They are scratching their heads over what they expect lo be the biggest problems of the 1962 ses- health care bill and the Moslems and 70 Europeans. Fugitive French Gen. Raoul Salan is leading the European re- volt in the troubled French North African territory against both De Gaulle and the Algerians. from the Secret the weekend stole a score of machineguns and (Continued on Page Two) Ada Drivers Hold Good Record In '62 cation of the purpose of the in'having him as the senior The unusually large number in Berlin." officers aboard led to speculation; Salinger was asked if he state- the Russians might have been seeking only lo confuse or em- barrass the Americans at Check- point Charlie on Friedrichstrasse. A U.S. combat company sta- tioned in Berlin returned across the East German autobahn with- out hindrance days of training in West Germany. West Berlin Mayor Willy Brandt contended in a radio broadcast that the wall dividing Berlin "is beginning to work against those who built il" because of the ad- verse impression it makes on for- eign visitors. Neues Deutschland. the East ment meant Clay was fully satis- fied with the situation regarding authority for the U.S. military commander. Salinger replied that Clay had read the President's (Continued on Page Two) Tulsan Dies, Becomes First Traffic Death Dutch lown of Leeuwarden to1 Nine foreign 'ambassadors, in- grade and high school grant Rotterdam. The other was a u-s- Ambassador Howard muter train headed in the oppo- (Continucd on Two) unninq. a Out! P. Jones, were in Sukarno's party, The president turned to them and said: "I want you to tell your governments we arc hot afraid of A check indicates the voles are not available care legislation in an editorial today advised Gen. Aria motorists are behaving j Lucius Clay, President Kennedy's themselves in 1962 so far. j personal representative in Berlin, A Tulsa man. reportedly return- _ ing home from his hister's fti- German Communist partv in an editorial todav advised Gen. nera1' diefl earlv Sunda-v from The city accidsnt total remains at three as no smashups have oc- curred since Thursday of lasl week. Only one traffic case was filed Sunday. Jim Green, 72. Route 4. Ada, was picked up at Scenic Drive and Pine Street. Ha was charged with driving while intoxicated alld rcckless driving. He forfeited i out of the bond !n Court. Two non-traffic cases were! handled in Municipal Court. Turn- er Berry, 70, and Milburn "Buck" Thomas, 50, were cited for public drunkenness. They were lined S20 DEADLINE JANUARY 15 ANNUAL NEWS BARGAIN OFFER Enclosed find.........for a year's'subscription to The Ada Evening News. (Name) (Address) Previous Subscriber New Subscriber (Please Check One) By Mail in Oklahoma 5.95 By Mail Outside Oklahoma 11.95 By Carrier in Ada .....'...............14.30 Advantage of Special Bargain Rattil Ways and Means Committee, its the Karel Doorman. What can she first congressional hurdle, do to stop us? If, during one dark night, thousands of tiny fishing public school grant bill passed the to go back to private business. The paper accused Clay of in- citing the U.S. commandant in (Continued on Two) Fresh Arctic Blast Heads For Oklahoma By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Light snow began falling in cen- tral and northwest Oklahoma this morning as Uie state was alerted; for a new cold wave, expected lo j recuperate juries received in an auto crash near Ada on New Year's Day to become the county's first traffic victim of 1962. Sam D. Goines, 53, died at a.m., Sunday, at Valley View Hospital. Goines, his wife, and two others, were injured in a two-car collision on New Year's day on SH 12, one and a half miles south of Ada. Driver of the other automobile was Gary Don Brewster. 21, Ada. Initial reports following the ac- cident indicated that Mrs. Goines, 56, a passenger in her husband's car was in the most serious con- dition. She, however, is evidently and has, in fact, been to a Tulsa hospital to arrive tonight. The state had a brief break in the wintry spell Sunday with tern- Goines and his wife were travel- ling north on SH 12. reportedly re- turning to Tulsa. Brewster, with peratures climbing well above passengers was travelling Fi-iiii-rlnfT ___ OnfSiirtH (1-1 I freezing warm enough to melt most'of the snow and-ice in Fri- day's storm from streets and high- ways. High temperatures Sunday ranged from 38 degrees at Tulsa to 51 at Ardmore. Overnight lows were from 25 at Guymon and McAlester to 32 at south. Highway Patrol officer. Spike Mitchell, who investigated the ac- cident, said Breweter's car ap- peared to be across the center line when the crash occured. Brewster was not injured, but two passengers, Sandy Miller, 16, Ft. Sfll. Oklahoma City and Clin-; Ada, and Buddy Don ton. Only precipitation Sunday and I Sunday night was in the form of a few snow flurries in the east and SEA TEST FOR LARGEST U.S. BUILT MERCHANT SHIP Her 45 tanki filled with water to simulate a full cargo, the 940-foot tanker Manhattan, largest merchant ves- sel ever built in this country, undergoes sea trials in Massachusetts Bay. Built at the Beth- lehem Shipyards in Quincy, Mass., the vessel has a cargo capacity of 38 million gallons "of oil. She is due to be christened Jan, 10 in 'shipboard Ada, were admitted to the hos- pital. Blake has since been re- leased. Miss Miller is listed in "good" condition. traces of rain in the west. Forecasters said temperatures would be turning sharply colder in the northwest late today with a cold wave over the state tonight and much colder weather Tues- day. Occasional light snow was fore- cast for the northwest tonightwith a few snow flurries in the rest of the state, ending Tuesday.! Some people are easily enter- Strong northerly winds were ex- i tained. All you have to do is sit pected to accompany the .new I down and listen to blast of cold air. jGen. Fea. Corp.)   

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