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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 2, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 2, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             This Is the season of statistics, so we'll pass this one along. Our private researcher tells us a person will exert himself 176 times as much to put something in an empty stomach as in an empty head E. C. Tigers Play At Home Tonight See Sports Page THE ADA EVENING NEWS Russians Send New Ambassador to Washington, P-3 58TH YEAR NO. 251 ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 1962 10 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Kennedy Slates Top-Level Talks On U. S. Policy PALM BEACH, Fla. Kennedy today called in Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson and top defense officials for a preliminary survey of problems bound up in Army organization. Kennedy asked Secretary of Defense Robert S. Mc- Namara, Deputy Secretary Roswell L. Gilpatric and Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor, his personal military adviser, to meet with him in the home where 'the First Family is vaca- tioning. Kennedy will confer with the same group Wednes- day. ;upplemented by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, on what press secretary Pierre Salinger described as "the opera- "-----------------tional and strategic outlook U. S., Soviet Aides Begin Berlin Talks MOSCOW Ambassa- dor Llewellyn Thompson and So- viet Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko conferred 2Vi hours to- day on Berlin. It was the first step in a new attempt to reach a basis agreeable to both sides for nego- tiations about the divided city. Emerging from the Foreign Min-, istiy, Thompson declined "to say the "SMS defense budget J c 1 ic. 1 In tnl-fi mnro how the meeting went. He told Western newsmen he definitely plans to see Gromyko again on the subject of Berlin, but he does not expect these prelim- inary meetings to last long. If a profitable foundation is found, the next step is to be a for- eign ministers' conference. Radio Moscow and the Soviet news agency Tass made no imme- diate mention of the day's devel- for 1962." Salinger declined to elaborate t when asked if today's session con- jcerned possible early release of I Reservists called to active duty last year in the armed forces buildup prompted by the Berlin crisis. The pattern set for Wednesday suggested the President and the country's defense leaders will sur- vey all phases of U.S. capacity to counter threats to free world se- curity, from Berlin to Southeast Asia. Salinger had said earlier the meetings would not relate direct- which is to take up more SMASHUP: Two cars mtt nlmojt dirictly on Mondiy afternoon on SH 12 louth of Latta. In the foreground is i ear driven by Sam D. Goins, Tulia. In the background, a wrtcker rcmovti a car driven by Gary W. Brewitir, Latta, from tht highway. Four peoplt nojpitalind following tht craih. (NEWS Staff Attempt To Touch Off Revolt Against Portugal Boss Fails Crash Near Ada Injures Four People Four people were hospitalized Dutch Declare Willingness To Negotiate Future Of Indonesia THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) after a grinding two-car Dutch government an- south of Ada on SH 12 Monday nouncel today its willingness to afternoon. i discuss the future of West New (Guinea Indonesia without opment. After reporting to the U.S. State Department in Washington, Thompson telephoned the British, French and West Gorman ambas- sadors and filled them, in on the results of his talk with Gromyko. He plans to have a further con- ference with.therlhrje.at his em- bassy Wednesday. The Thompson-Gromyko talk took place on the seventh floor ot the Foreign Ministry, a spired skyscraper on Smolensk Square. The table contained nothing to eat or drink. Thompson took Kempton Jen- kins, embassy secretary specializ- ing in German affairs, to thc meeting. Gromyko was accompa- nied by Ivan I. Ilyichev, a Soviet Foreign" Ministry official who was formerly ambassador to East Ger- many. Thompson said he would fill in the British and French ambassa- dors here about the conference. He did not mention the West Ger- man ambassador, but it is as- sumed that he will give him a briefing too. President Kennedy has instruct- ed Thompson to probe the Soviet position pn the Berlin issue to see if there is a profitable basis for formal talks. Kennedy and British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan had agreed to have the U.S. ambas- sador handle the1' preliminary round for both Britain and the United States. There is a possi bility that British Ambassador age was reported at any of the ._..._. t j I VJUUICa wJLii .iiiuuntoiu wn than half of Kennedy's anticipated j In the most serious condmon >Sjsetti conditions beforehand. S92-billion or more suendine oro- Mrs. Sam D. Com, 56. mlsa. A! S92-billion or more spending pro- gram for the year. Neither, he said, were they called to make a decision on Premier Jan de Quay read the .r 11 iT- -j iieinim jdii ue icuu uic spokesman at Valley View said; declaration in the cho in nnnr rnnnilmn V _ _ she was in "poor" condition. Also in the hospital were Sam whether the United States should p. Coin, 58, Tulsa: Sandy Miller, resume nuclear testing in the al-jig. Ada. and Buddy Don Blake, mosphere. Johnson and McNamara 'Will spend the night at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wrights- man, while Gilpatric and Taylor stay at the estate of Mrs. Robert P.. Young, widow of the late rail- road magnate and financier. Both homes are just down the beach from that of Mr. and Mrs. C. Michael Paul, where the Ken- nedysjave been staying. Gen. Frederick H. Smith Jr., vice chief of staff, will represent the Air Force in place of Gen. Curtis E. LeMay, who is ill. The President put off a meeting with John A. Mi-Cone, head of the Central Intelligence Agency, until Sunday after he returns to Wash- ington. The entire Kennedy family was heartened by word that the head of the clan, Joseph P. Kennedy, 7i. is making such improvement from his stroke that he was able (Continued on Page Two) Firemen Check On Four Calls Ada firemen answered four calls Monday and Tuesday, in- cluding fighting a grass fire in the 1200 block North Oak at a.m. today that was reportedly set by some boys going past in an automobile. Fire Chief Dudley Young said the other calls included two auto alarms and a call to the Nolan Dyer residence one mile south of 16, Route 1, Ada. All of them were said to be in "fair" condition. Gary W. Brewster. 21, 1515 Lat- ta Road, was the driver of one of the cars, Eddy Blake, 20, was a passenger in Brewster's car, along with Sandy Miller and Bud- dy Blake. Neither Eddy Blake nor Brewster was hospitalized. Coin was moving north on SH 12, approximately IV: miles south of Ada; His: wife 'was" the" only passenger in.his car. They were reportedly returning to Tulsa after attending a funeral for Coins' sister in Gainesville, Tex. Brewster was identified as the driver of the other car, traveling south. Trooper Spike Mitchell investi- gated the accident. The two cars met almost head- on, the left front of Brewster's vehicle smashing into the righ: front of the Coin's car. The for- ward sections of both cars were smashed by the terrible impact. There were apparently no eye witnesses to the accident. But holiday traffic was heavy and help was summoned almost im- ambulances lower house of Parliament at the start of debate on West New Guinea, las': remnant of Holland's East Indies colonial empire which Indonesia has threatened to invade. President Sukarno Monday pro- sped to the accident. Authorities said the crash took place shortly after 4 p.m. It was the worst accident recorded in thc Ada area during the long holiday weekend. Motorists In State Set Grisly Record By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Two persons have died on Okla- homa roads during the new year, the latest victim dying in a truck wreck near Carrier in Garfield County. During the New Year's holiday period 19 persons were killed in traffic mishaps. A year ago at the same time there was only one highway fatal- ity. The latest victim was Bert Fos- ter Daugherty. 64, Helena. The Highway Patrol said Daugherty was a passenger in a pickup truck driven by Homer Little, Enid, that overturned when a tire blew out Oklahoma 38. Little was not hurt but another passenger, Emma Higgenbottom, 70, Aline, was hos- pitalized with chest injuries. For the year just ended, it was another near record with 701 traf- claimed the disputed territory a province of Indonesia and ordered a special military command set up to direct the invasion if he orders it. De Quay, said the Netherlands is willing to enter into negotia- tions without making self-deter- mination of New Guinea's Papuan population a prerequisite. Previ- ously the Dutch had said they would negotiate only if the Pap- uans were assured the right of self-determination. The Labor party opposition had Snowstorm Moves Into New England By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Bitter cold weather moved into the northeast sector of the nation today after a storm .dumped up to a foot of snow in parts of Vir- ginia and Tennessee before it whirled into New England. A 12-hour snow storm spread a 6-inch carpet on the resort city of Atlantic City, N.J., coating the boardwalk and area highways with ice. Only one-half inch of snow was reported 40 miles been pressing the government to Government Hunts Rebels After Attack On Barracks BEJA, Portugal hunt was on today for political associates of a rebel leader who tried unsuccess- fully to seize a military barracks and touch off a revolu- tion against Premier Antonio Salazar's government. Capt. Joao Maria Paulo Varela Gomes, 37, an army officer turned politician, lay near.death in the Beja( hospital. Manuel Serra. a former Roman Catholic youth Ada finished with the saf- leader who authorities said shared leadership of the up-lest traffic record the past rising with Gomes, was captured while heading for the dacaae- Spanish border with four heavily armed companions. In the 12 months ot si, only Between 40 and 50 persons, most of them workers, apparently were in the band that engaged Salazar's troops in a three-hour gun battle Monday at the barracks Adans End Year With Safe Score Katangan willingness to relinquish j iry and then to negotiate' LOSS the territory for some autonomy for the Pap- uans. Foreign Minister Subandrio ofj Indonesia 'recently said Indonesia j might consider giving West New. LEOPOLDVILLE, the Congo Guinea "a great measure of President Moise tonomy Tshombe has conceded the loss of Dutch New Guinea the north Katanga stronghold of square miles of jungles, moun- 1 Kongolo to troops of the central tains and swamps and the scene Congolese government but claims of some of World War II's hard- his forces have beaten off Congo- est fighting-has been claimed by lese attacks at Kapona, south of Indonesia ever rince it won inde- pendence from the Dutch in 1949.: Tshombe charged at a news con- ,The Dutch say the Papuans inference Monday in Elisabethville j the disputed territory have no that Congolese troops ad- demand that the rebels surrender 'ethnic relationship to the Indo-jvancing on Kongolo had murdered They shot him down. He died of the 3rd Infantry regi- ment. Officials at first an- nounced all had been killed or captured. But so far the government has announced only one rebel killed, two wounded and 20 others cap- tured. It appeared some might still be at large, although the reb- el casualties were believed to have been much higher than the government said. Most notable casualty on the government side was Lt Col Jaime Filipe da Fonseca, under- secretary for war who. rushed to the southern 'city of Beja from Lisbon. He ordered the govern- ment forces to hold their fire and then walked in'.o the barracks to 313 traffic accidents were record- ed inside the city limits ex- actly 40 fewer than 1960's total. December added a flo-jrish to the record as only 19 smashups were recorded, compared to 33 in the same month of '60. The best traffic safety months last year were January, February and December, generally con- sidered to be the most dangerous times of the year due to bad weather conditions and increased traffic loads. But, due to more stern enforce- ment of speed limits and a gen- eral awareness of the enforce- ment, tlie accident rate was de- creased. No deaths resulted from acci- dents in '61. In fact, the city- has chalked up 479 days without a traffic fatality. inland. Low Readings Colder weather spread into up- state New York and.northern New England. Watertown, N.Y., record- ed Massena Oneonta and Albany I above. In northern New England readings hovered around zero.. nesians and are only beginning [hundreds of civilians and burned to learn self-government under Dutch tutelage. villages. He claimed that the Congolese 'Sukarno "gave no hint, of con-i abandoned heavy equipment and ......fled in the'face of the strong Ka- ciliation' after a' meeting-awith'-'his military advisers at Bogor Pal- ace. Asked by reporters what was discussed, he shook 'a clenched fist and said: "We discussed this." Then he issued an order declar- ing that Dutch New Guinea is now the Indonesian province of West Irian, the Indonesian name for the disputed territory. The or- der also said the province is to have a papuan governor, a move apparently aimed at Dutch public opinion and educated Papuans. tangan resistance at Kapona. The secessionist leader said both sides suffered heavy casualties there, asserting that most Katangan cas- ualties involved civilians. Tshombe also declared that he has rejected an order by Co.igo President Joseph Kasavubu that later in the hospital. The government tightened se- curity precautions by placing all police and military units in a "state of prevention." There was: no general alert, but-a huge Lis- bon rally' scheduled for Wednes- day night was canceled, officially In the county, the record was also better. In 1961, three traffic fatalities occurred in Pontotoc I County, compared. to seven in 1960. Although no specific count is available, accidents in the coun- ty were also reduced. Attorney" Pat Holman said the decrease in accidents and deaths in the county can be attributed to tire efforts of High- the Katanga Assembly convene Wednesday in Kamina under U.N. protection. He said he had informed the U.N. Command in Elisabethville that the order for the Assembly Gen. Abdul Haris Nasution, sc-> meet and ratify Tshombe's Ki in mourning for Da Fonseca. way Patrol troopers H. T. Gay Salazar was'to have addressed'and sfike Mitchell who worked the rally to outline the new county radar unit policy for 1962 following a curtail speeders in the area. of painful and embarrassing set- uThe following is a summary of backs ranging from thc seizure of; the traffic accidents in Ada the the liner Santa Maria on the highjPf5' '1'1'eer >'cars- ?h.owjng the seas to the Indian seizure, of Goa.jst3ady dachne 59. The ill-fated uprising began inj j the sleepy New Year's morning. said the rebels curity minister and army chief of staff, said in a New Year's statement that the army is ready to invade New Guinea "disregard- ing risk ot starvation, the' risk of hardship, even the risk of death." The storm that moved over j Military experts say Sukarno by southern New England ended in j the end of the year will be able the westera sections about dawn.' to send a naval flotilla against OVERSEAS MOVE fic fatalities on state roads-just Early thc mornjng, the Dutch military headquarters I two under the record 703 deaths Mass., measured 8 inches of snow, i at Biak, while jet bombers and :in 1957, WASHINGTON (AP) About! The first fatality of the new year additional U.S. soldiers Lewis Bell, 45, who was re- two infantry battle groups will to Wichita Falls, Tex., _ tona unity agreement with Pre- mier Cyrille Adoula was con- 1 the guardpost at the bar. smashed into thc officers- mier Cyrie Aoua was con- 1 lcrs and overcame- the drowsy trary and in direct violation of the ,mcn_ Two ior officers managed Congo constitution and an abuse c to anothel. ;nt of power." Tshombe has summoned the as-; ajarm scmbly to meet in Elisabethville j tomorrow to discuss the Kitona' agreement. But he said he was no longer sure the meeting would be; held on schedule. i in the barracks and sounded the Boston had 2 inches and Provi- j paratroops would handle Hollan- that _ Bashi tribesmen Firemen Fight The U.N. Command announced j Gf3SS FlfC in Kivu Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. 0_ct. Nov. Dec. dcnce, R.I., had. 4. Alaska Warms Fairbanks, warmed up j position. idia. Amphibious landings at other, Province had killed at least 12 of j A fire .threatend several homes i towns would encounter scant op-itheir trlbal enemies while trying in the Hammond Heights Addition 'to elect a new chief. he the Ahloso Y at Monday be-1 flown to Germany in mid-January, j where he wuiked after visiting his! lo 2 .degrees above zero today Sukarno has ample ground i A U-N- spokesman said a Ma- si- cause of burning trash. No dam- informed sources report. (wife in Enid during the holidays; from _2s a day earlier. Thermal, forces 40.000 troops hardened layan psifol halted the bloodshed Frank Roberts may also take a hand. three. The car alarms were at If the Thompson-Gromyko Monday in the 1100 block are successful, the next step is! East Beverly, to a truck driven by expected to be a foreign minis-' Glen Neimeyer, 628 North Beard, battle groups will be drawn from Also involved in the move will' Four other deaths were report- be Air Force planes and their ed Monday but they were counted crews. They will come from sev-' in the 1961 traffic toll because they eral bases around the country. involved accidents before the It was understood that the two! si art of the new year. ters' conference to determine the land at a.m. Tuesday to the future of Berlin. 1100 East Main to a car driven by Thompson's, last round of talks, Mrs. George Miller. Ada. (Continued on Page Two) Driver's Uninjured In One-Car Accident An attempt to dodge an on- coming car resulted in a one-car accident Monday, one-half mile south of Ada on Highway 99. Investigating Highway Patrol the 4th Infantry Division, a regu- lar Army outfit based at Ft. Lew- is; Wash. officer. Spike Mitchell, said Rev. President Studies Bid For New Tax Power They were: Da'vid Faulconer, 15, Manitou. Wanda Ann Blue, 16, Pawhuska. Linda Sue Gould, 16, Pawhuska. Judith Ann Gould, 18, Pawhuska. Bell was killed wiien his car and ione driven by Thomas Glass, 51, Oklahoma City, collided about 6 p. m. Monday on U. S. 81. two i day i Calif., recorded 78 degrees Mon- day. Many schools in Virginia, Ten- nessee and Maryland" were or- dered closed because of the snow. Traffic was slowed and driving conditions were hazardous in many parts of the snow and rain belt.' Fool Deep There was a' foot of snow in southwest Virginia and in moun- tain areas of Tennessee. Six to 8 inches of snow covered the WASH1NGTON Ken- nedy administration is reported to U. D. Chambers, Ripley. Tenn.. be seriously considering asking flipped his car over once and' Congress to give the President au- into a ditch when he tried toithority to increase or reduce, in- avoid a car approaching in his come tax rates as a hedge against lane of traffic. Chambers was i inflation or recession. not injured. OKLAHOMA Generally fair east and north, increasing cloudiness southwest this after- noon and tonight; considerable cloudiness south, clear to partly cloudy north Wednesday; a little warmer east (his after- noon and Wednesday: not quite so cold southeast tonight; low tonight 25-32; Ugh Wednesday 52-62. High temperature in Aila Mon- day was 48: low Monday night, 29: reading at 7 a.m. Tuesday, 30. The proposal, sources said Mon- day, may be presented in one of President Kennedy's major mes- sages to Congress this month. Presumably it would be apart from the White House's tax re- vision Behind the plan is the knowl- edge that getting tax legislation through Congress is often a di awn-out business. The inform- ants said that by thc time a tax bill has been written, put through hearings, passed and signed, a recession could skid into a" depression. There is strong and traditional resistance to any executive en- croachment on Congress' taxing power. But administration aides reportedly have worked out a formula they think might be ac- ceptable. Although details were withheld, the plan was said to provide for presidential authority to cut the basic 20 per cent tax rate to pos- sibly 15 per cent for a limited period for six the cut subject to congressional veto. Many economists have urged that device on grounds the gov- ernment needs a more potent r 1 t. i1U Ul 3UUW WJVCl 13 U LUC, miles north of Addmgton-near the. d in southern Virginia, with Texas border. Bell and four airmen riding in his car, Harry Myers; 20, Richard Simmons, 18, William Yarbrough, 18, and Wendel Myers 18, were thrown out by the impact. The airmen, all stationed at Shep- pard Air Force Base at Wichita Falls.' received minor injuries. Glass was'not'hurt. Faulconer died Monday in a Ho- bart. hospital of injuries received Sunday when the pickup truck he was driving' collided with a car in which Jerry L: 22, and his wife, Eieta, 19, of Frederick, were killed. 'The crash occurred available. On the other hand, a tax in- crease could help brake any se- rious inflationary climb that might rocket toward a boom and bust. Treasury Department techni- cians and the President's Council of Economic Advisers were said to have reached substantial agree- ment on what ups and downs of key economic indicators might be used as the trigger for presiden- tial action to order a temporary increase or reduction of the tax rate. now on a Tillman County road about nine miles east of -Manitou: Miss Blue, died Monday in ..a crash which. killed .the other two Pawhuska girls Sunday night about five miles north of Paw- huska. They, were passengers in, a. pickup truck driven by Hal Pratt, 19, Pawhuska. Tha vehicle ran out of control and .hit .the-side of 'a; 60.'', Pratt .was critically hurt. The Highway Patrol said the deaths over the holiday period; which officially began at '6 p. m: (Continued en 4 in Richmond and 3 .to 5 inches in areas east of Richmond: Schools in 24 counties and 3 cities were closed. In addition to the 12 inches of snow, in mountain areas in Ten- nessee, 1 to 4 inches was. on the ground in the extreme eastern sections. Schools were ordered closed, in Johnson City and four counties: Schools Close Some schools were closed in the eastern hah1 of Maryland, hit by a 5-inch. snowfall. Nearly four, inches of snow fell in parts of lower Delaware, including Dover, the state capital, Georgetown and Bridgeville, Snowfalls in Georgia ranged from., nine, inches in mountain areas to 4 to 7 inches in nbrlhern areas. Rain And Fog More' 'than six inches of snow hit'Atlantic'City, N.J., during'the night .but. smaller amounts .'we're and south of the Atlantic Ocean resort. Snowfalls measured 4 to'..8, inches in..western. sections of the iCarolinas. fell, 'along coastal..areas, -'with i forces 40.000 troops hardened fighting rebels in the North Ce- lebes and experienced sol- diers seapower is the major question. The navy recently announced it will buy cruisers, submarines and destroyers from Yugoslavia and Poland. Indonesia also expects additions; National Association for the Ad- shortly-after 1 p.m. Tuesday. The fire was started when burn- ing trash ignited dead grass at but that reports from the patrol ;ihe resjdence Of Lillie Austin, indicated the death toll may ac- j 2704 North Townsend. tually be much higher. I The [lamcs spread through the dried grass and weeds, moving mainly to the north, and burned a large area between homes facing south on Townsend and those fronting on North Broadway. VICTORY PREDICTED NEW YORK (AP) Roy, Wil- I kins, 'executive-' secretary of the to its MIC jet fighter squadrons! vancement of Colored People, pre- One small barn and several and more than two dozen jet! diets victory for'the cause of ra-1 smaller outbuildings were ignited jet bombers later this year under an arms agreement "with Moscow. Hercules transports' from the United States are being used to train paratroops, and U.S. land- ing craft have been added to the navy. victory cial equality. "I think we're going to win." Wilkihs said Monday night, "be- cause of the. helpers we have, be- cause the American people are essentially fair, and because the Negro has faith in himself." jby the flames and destroyed. homes in the area were damaged. A sizeable group of homeowners were out with garden hoses sprinkling futilely at the flames when units from the Ada Fire Department sped to the scene. New Dominican. President Pledges Control Of Military SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic Donnelly, president-to-be of the new Domin- ican Council of State, promised Dominicans freedom.of assembly warned the armed'forces against interference in the affairs of the new anti-Trujillo government. Donnelly, named to succeed President Joaquin Balaguer as head of the ruling-body, declared at the swearing-in of the seven- man council that freedom to neet and discuss all issues would -be observed "because truth can be achieved only through conscien- tious and dispassionate discus- ion.'.' He 'asserted that the council, which assumca all legislative and (Continutd an Pigi Two) 'executive powers until installation of an elected government early in 1963, wished to emphasize "our decided endeavor to maintain un- alterable" the armed forces' non- political status. The military, he said, must re- strict its activities "to the defense of the independence and integrity of the republic, to maintain, order and respect for the rights, of man." Maj. Gen. Pedro 'Rodriguez Echavarria, chief of the armed forces, who has vowed to support council, stood behind Donnelly as he spoke. Rodriguez Echavar- ria led a military move which crushed-a coup planned-by. Tru- jillo diehards last October and paved the way for the expulsion of the family of the late Gener- alissimo Rafael Trujillo. 'Sworn.-in as vice president of thi council, 'Donnelly will take over from Balaguer when the lat- ter resigns, possibly within the week. Balaguer drew up the plan for an interim government and promised to quit when the Or- ganization' of American .States lifts its economic and diplomatic sanctions against the Dominican Republic. Following lukewarm approval of the council plan by opposition fac- tions, President Kennedy an- nounced that the 'United States fa- vored lifting the sanctions im- posed against the old Trujillo re- gime for' plotting to assassinate (Continued on TV o) Ada Traffic Accidents 1959 1960 1961 ........32 43 22 ..34 34 ..34 ..32 ..30 ..31 .26 ..34 ..29 ..43 38 38 23 29 35 21 26 18 18 31 33 19 40 24 28 28 31 20 27 20 35 19 Totals ...........386 353 313 County Man Attempts To Take Own Life A 52-year-old Pontotoc County man was in fair condition at Val- ley View Hospital Tuesday morn- ing after what sheriff's deputies said was an attempt to take his own life. The man, who lives about three miles northwest of Gaar Corner community, was rushed to the hospital about 1 p.m. Monday. Officers quoted his wife as say- ing he drank almost a half bottle of strychnine in a fit of depres- sion. Undersheriff Jack Eden said the man is facing a prison term after a conviction in Pottawatomie County. Eden said the man was convicted of killing a man at St. Louis, Okla., in July of 1960 and was out on bond at the time of the alleged- suicide attempt. A FEET-ON-DESK MAN? BRADFORD, Pa. (AP) Boot- black Freddie Allen has one cus- tomer who insists on having: the soles of his shoes shined. A female battle-abe said to her lawyer, "And you might warn my husband that, if he misses a single alimony payment, I'll re- possess Gen. Fea. Corp.)   

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