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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: December 26, 1946 - Page 1

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Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 26, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Tricycles and roller skates are definitely who was out in any part of Ada Wednesday couldn't help but see that Santa had replenished his scarce supply of these favorites. Average Net Nov. Paid Circulation 8607 Member: Audit Bureau ol Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 214 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1946 10 Pages FIVE CENTS THE COPY This Goes On Records As Spending Year Americans Put Bil- lion on Line for Goods, Ser- vices for New High Mark By CHARLES MOLONY WASHINGTON, Dec. 26. Americans spent a record for goods and scrvic s this, year, or an average of more than S900 for every man, woman and chiid in the country. The commerce department's of- fice of business economics which came up with this estimate today said the total is over last year's previous record. Thus 1946 shoppers have been spending around for every SI they spent last year and for every SI spent during the peak pre-war year of 1941. Prices, Volume Up Both higher depart- ment figured them up 10 per cent over 1945 and more than 40 per cent above a bigger volume of actual sales played parts in building up the new rec- ord, the department said. Spending on non-durable goods clothing, tobacco, gaso- line and the to in 1946, or more than above the 1945 total. The outlay for durable furniture, household appliances, automobiles, jewelrv and the like estimated at 000, 80 per cent up from a year ago and 50 per cent more than in 1941. Could Have Gone Higher Furthermore spending on dur- ables would have gone 000.000 higher if automobiles had been turned out in quantity, the department estimated. As it was, however, more went into auto purchases tnan in 1945. Spending for services such as housing, medical care and recre- ation increased more than 10 per cent over 1945 to a total of for domestic up more than 10 per cent more money this year than last President Joins Up At Soda Fountain HOUSE OF COMMONS KISES: The steels k el e t o.n of Great. Britain's new House of Commons rises near ruins of the old one, destroyed by German bombs in. 1940. Outline ofrold House can be discerned through the girders on exposed wall in background. After being in court more than four years and haying been in court three times for a total of 35 days, the case of Mack Flem- ing vs. Sinclair-Prairie Oil com- pany and Kenneth R. Elliott was settled last week. A jury returned a verdict in favor of Fleming .and in turn the court awarded Fleming in damages. The case itself started in Sep- tember, 1942, but parts, of it date back to 1935 when .flood waters did considerable damage t.o the banks of the Canadian -river where the stream wa- the boun-; dary line between two pieces of property. One piece of property was owned by th_- oil company and the other was owned .by Flem- ing. CJourt records show that the oil  water in his car. He was c-n route from Tulsa. to spend Christmas with his parents, Mr. find Mrs. C. H. Kite, 810 West Eighth. Escaping with cuts and bruises, Kite was taken to Scminole for emergency Ircol.ment nncl was later released and brought lo his parents home here. Manager of a 'eaning estab- lishment in Tulsa, Kite left there tibout 12 and the accident hap- pened at 5 o'clock. He had gone to sleep at the wheel when the mishap occurred. Ventriloquism is thought to have been practiced by the Jews during their captivity in Egypt, when a mystic voice was heard during the worship of Osiris. five years later. It was the contention of Flem- ing and his attorneys 'that the action of the oil company caused the river to damage the Fleming property. When the case was in court two times previously, hung juries kept the case 'going.' Thex first time it was in'court 11 days, .the second time required 14 days and the third and final time required 10-days. bar. Mr. Crawford is temporari- ly in Muskogee and is a former mayor of Ada. Born In Mississippi Judge Bolen was born at Pon- totoc, Mississippi, on Aug. 31 1871, and was therefore 75 years old. He was graduated from one of the outstanding law schools of his and moved to Center, Indian Territory, in 1896, and began the of law. When the Frisco railroad was built through here and Ada gave promise of supplanting Center as a court center, he moved to the new town. Judge Bolen married Miss Catherine Sugg in 1902, and they soon established their home at 130'East Seventeenth, where they lived unt.il his death. Notcti As Attorney, judge Few men have made a more lasting'record in the courts and political circles of the latter days of territorial government and the new.state than did the brilliant lawyer and judge. When Carl- ton Weaver went to.the state con- stitutional convention from this district, he gave Mr. Bolen the honor qf naming the county he expected to carve out of the ter- ritory with Ada as the county seat. Mr. Bolen chpse the na'me of his native county in Missis- sippi, and so this county became Pontotoc. There were three outstanding law firms 'in .the state specializ- (Continued on 2-no. 3) Truck, far Tags On Sale Now for '47- And What Tags! Those 1947 truck and automo- bile license tags are on sale at the local tag office above the Cor- ner Drug store.. If you cringed wh- i you paid for your 'identification' plate for your car last year, well, get a firm grip on your self because there 'isn't much reduction this year. Instead of getting a full plate to the money paid out, the car owner receives only a small pellow piece of tin aout three inches square to be placed over the 194 is on the old plate. Those old plates way be some- what weatherbeaten and a new one .night look better on the'old car, but the state didn't loo1., at that engle w.hen it was decided to just change the year instead of the plate. The purchaser will.not have in opportunity plate' num- bers if an old' plate is available on the old car., That' "something new'1 that bean added is so unnoticeable that a few are already in u in Ada, -but few people knew that they would take the place of new Seaweeds have no roots in a .general sense, only holdfasts or anchors. They absorb air, water, and salts essential to their growth through the surface of their fronds. r Ada Evening News Annual Bargain Offer CLIP and MAIL TODAY Ada Evening News, Ada, Oklahoma Gentlemen: Attached find or mdney order) for which enter my subscription to the Ada Eve- ning News to be delivered as indicated below. BY CARRIER OR MAIL v By carrier in Ada, or by mail anywhere OUTSIDE Pontotoc and adjoining counties. Per Year Name Street Number or R.F.D, State OFFER EXPIRES JANUARY 15, 1947 Santa Also Wears P. Observer Here' Notes, Too, That He Uses Auto Instead Of Sleigh By A BELIEVER And all the time I thought Santa Claus came down the chimney! Just by coincidence, I was com- ing home.a little late Christmas eve night, and as I passed a house, I saw a figure stealthily creeping out from his dark house. He went directly to his automobile, which was parked out front, and filled his arms with packages. It must have .been Santa, be- cause it was midnight of Christ- mas eve; but why was he wear- ing those funny'colored pajamas? I always .thought he wore a red suit trimmed in white1 ermine. And' why .were his packages in a 'car? Where was his sleigh? Passing it off as a joke, I continued homeward. But across the street I saw another dark figqre. He was going to the ahead there was ano- ther and another, most, of them dressed in pajamas. When I finally reached home, I still had not decided just what this was all about. There .was no strangely dressed Santa Claus coming from my house. Then I happened to father was working night. Could that be the answer? Sen. Thomas Comes To Defense 01 Bilbo on Contracts 3. __ ,.___ Senator Bilbo an as- sociate said today, is prepared to raise some "embarrassing" ques- tions if his colleagues' seek to make an issue .of his dealings with war contractors. Senator, Elmer Thomas (D-Ok- la) told reporters that Bilbo has had "a bunch of people" inves- tigating other senators' connec- tions with contractors, and is prepared to parry questions directed against him with "a rec- ord of what other people have done." The senate war investigating committee is weighing a subcom- mittee's report- on Bilbo's rela- tions with a group of Mississippi contractors .in the early days of the nation's defense program. While the report has not been made public, the public hearing went into stories of favors done for the Mississippi senator by men he aided in obtaining multi- million dollar air field contracts. Bilbo himself has denied any wrong-doing. Forsecs Long Debate "There will be a long debate if they try to make him stand aside the day congress Thomas declared. "It may be an embarrassing issue for some, but it won't .b'e me, because I made it a cam-, .paign issue in my own state. I left nothing undone for Oklaho- ma contractors that I could do." The Oklahoman is a member of another senate committee which recently delved into Bil- bo's actions. That, group was the special campaign investigating commit- tee which held1 a series -of open, hearings at Jackson, into charges that Bilbo had intimidat- ed negro voters. Although it has not yet reported. Thomas, said he heard nothing in the hearings which would cause him to be- lieve Bilbo should not be seat- ed. Problem Common To Others "I've been in too many cam- Thomas said. "The Bilbo problem is a common problem to 11 or 12 southern states, and on this problem they'll stand together. "If Bilbo were unseated by the senate, it is my considered opin- ion that he would be reelected by Mississippians withou-t oppo- sition." Thomas said that if the com- mittee directed criticism against Bilbo for trying to persuade negroes from ypting, it would really be criticizing Mississippi and, the south generally rather than the senator himself." ,ij____ FIND BODY OF WEST OF LONE WOLF "HOBART, okia., Dec. W. P. Dugan reported the body of Lawrence Sanders, 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett Sanders, who 'lives near Lone Wolf, was found yesterday on State Highway 9 four miles west of Lone Wolf. Dugaa said there was no evi- dence Sanders had been hit by an automobile and he added he be- lieved the boy iwas shot. A hole was found in. the boy's head but Dugan said he was not sure whether it was made by a bulleti Many Killed In Crashes Three Chinese Airliners On Way to Shanghai Party Crack Up, 62 Dead SHANGHAI, Dec. 28, Three Chinese airliners, loaded with more than 100.persons an- ticipating gay Christmas -parties here, cracked up in the fog- blanketed Shanghai area last night, killing or injuring 85 per- sons. One American pilot was killed and another injured. A fourth transport was miss- ing and feared lost with at least 10 persons aboard. Yesterday was the blackest in China's civilian aviation history. The American owned Shangai Evening Post Mercury report- ed 62 passengers and crewmen were killed and 19 were injured, some so critically they may not survive. A Chinese woman was killed and her three children were in- jured when one of the transports crashed into her farm home near Woosung. Shanghai papers earlier had reported 76 were killed aboard the three planes, but revised their figures downward. Two were Americans The Post Mercury said two of the victims were Capt. J. M. Greenwood, who was killed, and R. B. Preus, injured seriously. Their home addresses were not given. Greenwood and Preus were piloting two of the crashed planes, both owned by the Chinese National Aviation Corp. the country's leading airline. It employs many Americans as pilots. The third plane was owned by the Central Air Trans- port Corp., also a Chinese com- pany. Ariotfier American. William H. Byrne, of Cookville, Tenn., wing flight surgeon of the U. S. air transport command's Tokyo headquarters, nearly lost his life in a hero's role. He went into the burning fuselage of one of the planes in search of survivors. Overcome by fumes, he was pulled to safety by another American officer, who was not identified. All three of the crashed planes were from Chungking, loaded with passengers planning a Christmas night in Shanghai. Eight Planes Turned Back Twelve planes from various Chinese cities arrived over Shanghai late yesterday after- noon and last night but th8 thick fog prevented their landing, Eight turned back. The three that crashed had circled until their gasoline tanks were virtual- ly .empty, then were forced to try to make a landing. Continued bad weather caused cancellation of all commercial air departures from Shanghai today. Because of the heavy fog, only one of 13 commercial planes that arrived over'Shanghai yesterday and last night was able to land. Francis J. Michiels, an Americaq pilot, safely brought down a CNAC transport with the aid of radar at the U. S. army's. Kiag- wan airfield on the northern out- skirts of Shainghai. Eight the other 12 were turned back. The three thnt crashed had circled until their gasoline was virtually exhausted, then were forced to try to land. Blame Is Placed The press, shocked by the tri- ple disaster, demanded a strict official investigation and blamed the crashes on: judgment in permit- ting the planes to fly to Shanghai when the weather was below minimum flying requirements, and facilities at Lunghwa airdrome, Shanghai's only commercial airfield, vhere the communications system is 15 years old and there are no mark- er beacons on the airstrip. Greenwood's death was partic- ulary tragic. His wife and child are en route to Shanghai from the United States. If they loarn of his death, it will be from the ship's radio. Continued bad weather forced cancellation of all commercial air departures from Shanghai today, ------------K------------ Christmas Day Mild All Over Oklahoma Christmas day was mild all over Oklahoma with Guymon's 69 degrees the highest reported to the .weather bureau. But no max- imum Wednesday was lower than the 58 recorded at Elk City and Enid. No precipitation was reported. Christmas night's low for the state was the 32 degrees at Guy- mon. In McAlester and Oklahoma City the overnight minimum was 45 degrees. We're hopefully waiting for that good eye-opener for business few drops of pricei. i f, Report Claims 17 Labor Unions Are Controlled by Reds Emphasises Possibility of General Strike to Gain Ends, Says Library of Congress Haven for Foreign Minded Americans; That Fifth Column Moscow-Directed Truman Back To Capital Visits Home on Christmas Day, Returns to Face Ma- jor Legislative Problems By ERNEST B. VACCARO INDEPENDENCE, Mo., Dec. 26. President Truman roun- ded out a brief holiday visit with the home folks today before re- turning to Washington to face labor and other legislative prob- lems unusual magnitude. Three separate messages, on legislative, financial and econom- ic deals, posed a task which his associate said would require most of the period remaining before the Republican-controlled con- gress gets under way early next month. Mr. Truman said he would pay a final visit to his mother, 94- year-old Mrs. Martha E. Trumun, at Grandvicw, before Inking off in the presidential C-54 plane, the "Sacred about 3 p. m. He flew into Jackson county yesterday for a round of Christ- a big turkey dinner shortly aftor noon at his home at 219 North Delaware street. There, he had dinner with his mother, his wife and his daugh ter, Margaret, his brother, J. Viv- ian Truman, and the Wallaces, his wife's, people. The president kept close to home on Christmas Day except for an hour's visit to the nearby home of Colonel Mize Peters, an old friend whom he has visited regularly on Christinas for 25 years. Mr, Truman, already at work on the all-important state of the nation message which he will de- liver to the new congress, decid- ed' to return to Washington im- mediately. He still has under considera- tion the administration's course during thij next two years on the subject of labor legislation. Some of his associates are urg- ing sweeping revisions of the Wagner labor relations act, while others are suggesting that he leave the problem of definitive legislation up to the Republican majority in the new congress. A final decision probably will grow out of conferences with cabinet and other officials next week. In addition to his state of the union message, the president will submit to the congress messages on the new budget as well as on employment based on a yet-ln-be delivered confidential report of his new conomic advisory coun- cil. Ada Firemen Kept Busy Five Days Answer 20 Fire Calls, One For Resuscitator And One for Oxyg motor Ada firemen hnve answered 20 fires in the last five days ;md most of them were grass fires, according to recprds at the fire station. A total of 13 grass fires were extinguished by the department, one resuscitator call and one ox- yginator calls were made in ad- dition to a garbage fire, and fires at a laundry, a bakery, trash fire and a chicken house. The department made three runs Christmas day. Lobby Fire Came From Curiosity ABILENE, Kas., Dec. 26, A fire in the lobby of the Lamer hotel here was attributed today to a woman's curiosity ns to whether a cotton-covered Christ- mas tree would burn. Witnesses said the woman, walking by the huge artificial tree Christmas eve, touched a match to a limb. In a few onds the entire tree was aflame. The woman fainted. The fire was extinguished with chemicals before it spread to furniture, but burned a hole in an expensive rug and scorched the ceiling. All lobby fixtures were sprayed with the chemicals. By WILLIAM F. ARUftGAST WASHINGTON. Dec. 26, i.Pi- Ernie Adamson, chief counsel for the house committee on un- American activities, says there is a "conspiracy" afoot to foment revolution in this country, through a general strike or oth- erwise. The matter is dealt with in a formal report which Adamson has given the committee. The document summarizes informa- tion assembled by his staff dur- ing 194G. Although printed by the gov- ernment printing office, the re- port has not yet been approved formally by the committee. Besides referring to the revo- lution the report (a) contains critical references to representatives of foreign gov- ernment'; allnchod to the United Nations, (b) claims that 17 im- portant labor unions arc control- led by Communists and (c) the library of congress a "haven for aliens and foreign-minded Americans." Danger Called Real Of the general findings, Adam- son wrote: "This committee cannot em- phasize loo strongly lo the housi? and to the country the danger from this fifth column within our gates which follows with blind obedience the dictates of Moscow. They must be recognized for what they agents of a foreign government arid, enemies of our American system." "In the opinion! of the commit- Adamson continued, "the most serious penetration has been within the labor movement, where the Communists dominate 17 vital unions of the ClO-unions so vital that' our very national security is dependent upon them." During the last six months, Adamson reported, the commit- tee has found that "numerous representatives of foreign nations who are attached to the United Nations have been attending meetings sponsored by the Com- munist fronts in the United States and addressing the audi- ences upon matters affecting the United Nations. Asks for Formal Protest "However, in every instance, these United Nations representa- tives are presenting one sided opinions directed in favor of the Russian foreign policy and the nations which they -hemselves represent." Adamson recommended that the state department protest against such activities. Excerpts from the report in- clude these observations by the a 11 o r n e y-invostigator for the committee: 1. Many persons accepted for employment in the reorganized legislative reference department of the library of congress "have had extensive associations with agencies or societies who h.ivc .shown inclination to change economy, if not the constitution, of the United States." "Masked" as Political T vrly 2. "The committee feels that a careful examination of the facts justifies the association that the Communist parly of the United States is a foreign inspired con- spiracy masked as u political party, x x x The Communists ronlizo (hat the Communist plan (if crcnlinR unemployment in the United Stales is the only medium through which they possibly Rain control of the United Statos through a victory at the ballot box." (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) TH' PESSIMIST BT Hob 3m, Who recollects when you used t' walk on a little spilled sugar on th' kitchen floor? Th' average humorist has about th' same sour puss as 
                            

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