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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: December 22, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 22, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Matching eagerness of youngsters counting off weeks, then days, then hours until Christmas was the son of Adans who'd figured out the number of seconds until he got home for holidays. Average Net Nov. Paid Circulation 8607 Mnnlirr; Audit Iliurati Clmil.illmi THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 211 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1946 28 Pages FIVE CENTS THE COPY Santa Claus' Sack Filling Up Rapidly as Christmas Hearing Christmas Thoughts Turn Today to Story of Christchild And His Birth, Observed in Music and.Message Santa Claus' sack was filling rapidly near its' capacious top here Saturday and two more days of shopping will have everything ready for the day of days of the entire year. Orphanage Party Monday Happy Occasion For Jaycees, Children Has Been Arranged Children of the Baptist Orph- ans home, north of Ada, will be their annual Christmas party Monday evening by the Ada Junior Chamber of Com- merce. A present will be given to each child by the Jaycees, in addition to an all-round Christ- mas party. Rex Morrison, superintendent of schools, will present a magic show for the kids. Morrison has been a skilled magician for a number of years, and is a fav- orite with his Monday night audi- ence. The party will start at the orphange at o'clock Monday evening with the Jaycees leaving I holid-iv tori, Convention Hal.1 at 7. I visUingi oj; parcels, all of the mysterious activities that precede Christmas Day, will keep the feeling of Christmas mounting here for the But between now and Wednes- day there arc many things be- sides shopping that will contri- bute to the already general Christmas spirit among residents of this arm. Chrislchild'.s Story Retold Today in Sunday School and church services the Story the Christchild .will bo told and re- told reverently, while songs of the Christian world rc.ioicing at the Christmastide will ring from large church and small. And tonight special messages in music, in the form of canta- tas, invite the music lover to sev- eral Ada churches. Holidaying Begun Holidaying has really begun first for public school and college students, now for some others who will have a week away from customary duties. Christmas Day, pPcourse, will be a general holiday with the wheels of industry and business and government slowed to an absolute minimum. The Ada News will join in celebrating the occasion with the employes on Trice Broadrick, president of the Jaycees, reminds all Jaycees who have drawn a name and have not turned in their present, to do so before noon Monday. The present is to be turned in to Jim Webb's office, 108 E. Main, with the name clearly writ- ten on it. Broadrick urges none to forget, because none of the children must be left out. Firemen of (ily Hold Their Annual Banquet Past Week Thirtieth Annual Affair Enjoyed by Firefighters And Guests More than 50 men were guests Friday night at tho annual Fire- man's Banquet that was held in the dining room of the Ada fire station. It was the 30th annual affair for the group. Fire Chief Ed Halsey, who has attended all 30 banquets as a member of the group, said that the fire department today tries to live up to a slogan that was carried by- the department when it was organized. "On the jump nnd ready to go to do any service for humanity" was the slogan and object of the parly-dav fire department. The slogan is a reality only to those who know how the department operates. TonstmastiT Dudley Young made the event a gala affair his witty remarks. >'our of the five ritv council- men nnd the city manager were present for the banquet, Mayor Frank Spencer ooinu'iitulntet] the department for it.1; fine work and H. ,7. Huddlcslon said. "This is the finest fire department of tiny in our class." Councilman Vcrnon, Roberts remarked that the spirit of the department has been kept far above tho average through the years. "The type of men em- ployed as firemen are efficient an asset to the communi- ty." said Councilman Joe Hens- lev There are 22 nc-live members of the Ada fire department and roost of them were present for thp annual feed. The menu was highlighted with venison nnd the table were lad- en with cood to cut. The meal in its entirely was prepar- ed by Die refreshment committee of the department. Dickey Resigns As Hospital Manager OKLAHOMA CITY, Dec. 21. R. Dickey, business manager of tho University T'itnl. Crippled Children's hospi- tal and University of Oklahoma school of medicine, resigned to- day effective Jan. 1. Dirkey said he would accept a position as administrator of the San Jacinto Memorial hospital near Houston, Tex. Dr. George L. Cross, Universi- ty of Oklahoma president, said he would recommend William L. Jesse. Dickey's assistant, be ap- pointed to succeed him. Dickev has been with the hos- pital since 1027 and has held his present position since 1935. At the great salt mine at Salnic, Romania, more than tons of rock salt arc mined annually. next three days. And over and through it all the Christmas lights sparkle gai- ly, evergreens bring their beauty to home and store, wlffio the shoppers and clerks exchange cheerful remarks in the happiest atmosphere of mutual courtesy and feeling known since before the strain of war years. K Wrong Number For Santa Frets Woman RICHMOND, Va., Dec. 21, said Mrs. R. L, Crone rather wearily, "doesn't live here anymore." She'd said the same thing sev- eral hundred times over her telephone to expectant kiddies who wanted to get in a persona] word with St. Nick before chim- ney-climbing time. Mrs. Crone got caught in her Christmas crisis when a depart- ment store launched a call-up Santa Claus -stunt yesterday in a big newspaper acl. The ad list- ed the number to call and n bat- tery of Santa Clauses stood by at 11 radio station to receive them. But it listed Mrs. Crone's tele- phone number instead ot the sta- tion's. By ads and announcements the store sought to stem tin; calls to Mrs. Crone, but tin; .success of the campaign was que.stionabli.'. Mrs. Crone me but hello. No Santa Claus doesn't live she didn't mind but .sin; would like to have time to get a little last minute Christina.'! Pardon, me. No I'm sorry Santa Clans doesn't live here" jiliop A YEAR AGO TAL CRAWFORD, who'd'spent most of his life no idea he would be spending Christmas of 1946 sev- eral thousand miles from home, but that's what has developed. For he is one of three judges of Military Tribunal No. 1, organized in the American Occupation Zone of Germany arid designated to preside at the trial of 23 German doctors and scientists involved m concentration camp The doctors' trial opened in the Nucrnbevg Palace of Justice Dec. 9, in the same room where Gocring andi his co-defendants were tried. Judge Crawford was for 10 years county judge of Pontotoc county and would have completed 12 years as district jiidge but for his resignation this fall to go to Germany with the war crimes division. Crawford is shown above as hejiears evidence presented.in the case of the German doctors. Faces Christmas With Lighter Heart After 31-Year Struggle To Repay Bank Losses CHICAGO, Dec. Roti, a former bank president, today faced Christmas with a- light heart after a 31-year struggle to pay in bank losses to although he was under no legal obligation to dp so. Roti, who has been a. lay or in Sacred Heart Seminary at _ Mary C. Jinks Taken by Death Popular Former Resident, Byng Teacher, Church Worker Dies Suddenly vrupiry Mai'y Jinks, 21, further daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Grady 'Jinks, 814 East Thirteenth, died at a local hospital early Saturday suburban Melrose Park for the past eight years, was head of the Western Savings .Bank in Chicago when four gunmen robbed the bank of on Feb. 7, 1915. Although the Joss wns cover- ed by insurance, business fell off drastically and the bank was forced to close about three weeks later. Liquidation brought de- positors about 35 cents on the dollar. A subsequent bankruptcy action relieved Roti ot liability. Got Sluiiei! In Today, Roti recalled "I had lit- tle to do urtcr tho failure, and I went to a quarry whore I saw jioino of my customers swinging heavy their Jiving by hard physical' toil. 1 Quake And Six Tidal Waves Spread Death, Devastation Over Vast Region Of Japan Jesse Bonds, Allen, Dies Funeral Monday for Attor- ney Residing in Pontotoc County Since 1920 Jesse S. Bonds, 59, attorney who had his home in Al- len since became suddenly ill Thursday afternoon and died Friday morning about in a hospital at Holdenville. The funeral will be held Mon- day afternoon at 2 from the chapel Home, of the Allen Funeral Rev. W. G. Beasley of- knew then lOHHl.'M. 1 must repay their Holi had a family oil six chil- dren, and, until .1025, he wns un- able to set aside any of his in- come for depositors, but when his two KOMS nnd four daughters be- came partly solf-suppbi'tinff, he nfternoon during preparations for an operation. Funeral arrangements will be announced Inter, Miss Jinks', who was a degree graduate of East Central Sin to college last spring, wus tenoning m Byng high school. She became seriously ill early Saturday and her. death came suddenly nnd unexpectedly. Miss Jinks wns born lit Hick- ory.) The furnlly moved to Ado about: five years ago. (heck Up on Six Balloons in Wood SEATTLE, Doc. 21, Air rescue authorities from Mc- Chord field today were investi- gating six balloons, found in the woods above Knumclaw, west of Mt. Rainier, on the chance they might be clues to tho Marine corps transport piano, missing with 32 men since Dee. 10. Marino corps officials at San Diego, whence Ihc'planc! was .fly- ing lo Seattle whim it disappear- ed in bad weather, informed army authorities the transport was not known to have carried such equipment. Ranger Molvin McCullough, who reported the find, said five of the balloons were pink nnd one was gray. All but one was deflated when the cluster was found. Blown up, they have a diameter of about three feet. Meanwhile the navy center- ed its search in the region cast of Toledo, Wash., with planes standing by at the Sand Point Naval Air Station in ca.se. new clues can be run down .from the air. paying' 'deposltora i'rom" I Kci' be" felt not only corning.'! of his small retail meal; i family and friends but at the First Baptist church, where she was one of the most valued business. Paying first those 'in greatest ncutl, Hot! continued t6 compen- sate his former customers from hm income wan .incruimurl by returns from real oslalo in- vestment) financed by wale of his suburban Oi.ik Park home. Trncjntf SO Others Today, approximately 200 cus- tomers hiivo boon repaid and the balance of JH on hand'Tor another 50 whom Koti, now- (i.'i, JK tracing through bnp- lismnj, marriage, .school and oth- er records, "Although it gives me person- til satisfaction to huvo all of my financial responsibilities lifted, e.'ipcM.'ially at thin Chnstmao sea- Kol.i said, "I' cannot claim any credit. Our Lord granted mo fa-mnoss in my good intentions, and the children and I were in- struments in his hands." ficiating; burial in Allen ceme- tery. Honorary p.allbearers will be members of the legal bar associa- tions of Pontotoc and Hughes counties. Born In Arkansas Mr. Bonds was'born in Arkan- sas in 1887. He was married in 1906 to Miss .Mamie Russell at Lamar, AMc. The family moved later to Holdenville, staying ihere 12 years, then to Oklahoma City .for a and then to Al- in. In 1912 he was graduated from Cumberland Law School at Le- janon, Tenn. Although he nev- er held public office, he was ac- ive in politics and also engaged n oil transactions in addition to lis practice of law. All four of his sons, and his son-in-law served in uniform during War II, and all of them :aw overseas service. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. ilamie Bonds; two daughters, Mrs. of Weatherford and Jp. Ann Bonds of "the home; our sons, Russell of Fresno, "lalif.; Herman of Hartford, 'onn., Jesse, Jr., of Gainesville, 'la., and Clifford Bonds of Al- en; two brothers, Jiles Bonds t Upper. Lake. Calif., and George Bonds of Richmond, Calif.; two ;randdaughters. Judy and Gail 3onds, Hartford. Snow-Sleef-Rain Cause Traffic Jams On Eastern Seaboard By The Asuadatod Fritsu Snow, sleet, rain and fog thut tied up transportation in many Sections of the country provided the traditional setting for win- ter's arrival at; u. m. (LST) today However, the forecast of above normal temperatures the next few dnyn loHHcncd prospects for a white Christmas in most areas. Hain 'or snow fell yesterday Talmadge Is Death Victim Georgia Governor-Elect Hot Fight For Place Already Developing By ROMNEY WHEELER ATLANTA, Dec. gene Talmadge, 62, one of from the Great Lakes area to eastern New York and sleet or snow caused serious traffic jams in several eastern seaboard cities. Georgia's most colorful public figures, died today, scarcely three weeks before he would have been inaugurated for a fourth time as .governor. The- red-gallused advocate of "white who made 272 speeches against doctors' or- ders in a bitter democratic pri- mary last summer, succumbed at 7 a.m. An attending physician said Talmadge was aware since Tuesday that he was dying, and voiced anxiety concerning the political .future ctf Georgia after his death. Governor Ellis Arnall ordered the state capitol closed today and Monday, and said Talmadge's body; would lie in state irom 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday in the capito] rotunda. As an expression of of- ficial respect, Arnall said he and elected statehouse officers would attend the funeral at 2 p.m. Mon- day at Talmadge's farm home on Sugar Creek, near McRne, Ga. Succession Battle Looms A physician who asked that his name be withheld attributed Tal- rnadge's death to cirrhosis of the liver and hemolytiv jaundice complications, superinduced by stomach hemorrhages which be- gan last October 3. The death of the governor-elect drew lines for an unprecedented legal and political battle of suc- cession. Authoritative sources said Ar- nall, who ousted Talmadge from office four years ago, would re- fuse to vacate as'governor until conflicting views on constitution- al requirements are resolved. Ar- nall was ineligible to succeed himself, but the constitution pro- vides he shall serve until his suc- cessor "is chosen and qualified." Legal sources said this could mean a four-year holdover, until the quadrennial election 01! a gov- ernor in 1950. Arnall, himself, snid discussion ot who would be next governor wns "highly inappropriate tit this firvin i May Have Been One of Most Violent Quakes in Earth's History; Hundreds Known Dead and Many Hard-Hit Areas Still Isolated; No Americans Known To Be Among Casualties By RUSSELL BRINES TOKYO, Sunday, Dec. One of the most vio- lent earthquakes in history, followed by six tidal waves, left a wake of death and ruin today over more than square miles of southern Japan, with the toll climbing by Japanese count to 592 dead. With some of the hardest-hit areas still isolated, death or damage were reported from points within 80 miles of Tokyo to the western shores of Honshu and as far south as Kyushu, southernmost home island. time. 'I'ltlinndgc Son Suggested Fred Hand, scheduled to be- come speaker of the next Georgia house of representatives, advo- cntcd n spccin] election, "the sooner, the better." But sources high in Tnlmndgo councils foro- ci.ist the legislature would elect Herman Tnlmndgc, son nnri oam- pnlgn manager of the. late. govcr- JWEATHERJ Oklahoma: Fair Sunday, in- creasing cloudiness Monday; lit- ile change in temperature. Shopping Days To Christmas Tulsa U. Receives Veteran's Estate Former Student Had Named School as Bene- ficiary on Insurance Policy TULSA, Okla.. Dec. 21. Dr. C. I. Pontius, president, to- day announced the University of Tulsa has received a vet- erans administration check as the result of a former student's nam- ing the school as beneficiary in his national service life insux-ance policy. Dr. Pontius identified the for- mer student as the late Captain Howard W. Merkcl of Marion, la., who loft the university to. join the air corps a_nd was listed as missing in action over New Guinea on July 10, 1943. The war department last January changed his Status to "killed in action." Captnin Merkol, who previous- ly attended Cornell college and Iowa State college, was a stu- dent in the Tulsa university's downtown division from 1939 to 1940. i rmd.loved of the younger leaders: I Icy Poor having been active in Y.W.A., y and poor Training Union, teacher in Sun- clay School, busy in Baptist Stu- dent Union program and a mem- bor'of tho choir. Surviving are the parents and l.wo sisters, Johnny Jinks and Willcnn Jinks of Ada. visibility jior-clect, Talmadge associates said if Ar- nall refused to surrender his of- fice to Herman "the legislature would impeach him and appoint enough s c r g o n n t o-ut-nrms to throw him out of the capitol." California, 12lh in population Gold is the best conductor of j in 1010, became 3rd by J044, but heat, and is second to copper as for tops in nuto repair see Sin- a conductor of electricity. I nett-Mcadcrs. 2-22-11 Kyodo news agency put toll at 592 dead, 403' injured seriously and. houses and buildings destroyed as the earth's upheaval yesterday rocked and flooded scores of cities and towns. U, S. army estimates put the minimum death toll at 422, but they did not include the Waka- yama Japan's second city of caught the full force of the earth's blow. Kyodp said first reports from the stricken and isolated peni- sula put the death toll in that area at 43. New Shocks in Nlirlit New earth shocks were record- ed during the the usual echoes of great seismic they were felt neither in Tokyo nor Osaka, Associated Press Corresuondenl Frank L, White in Osaka said that city escaped major damage. British army officers said field reports indicated their occupa- tion area on Shikoku, one of the southern main home islands, was hardest hit by the quake but they were unable to> confirm --arlicr reports that a British soldier was missing. The new reports spread the pic- ture of devastation far beyond the original scene, with deaths re- ported in Gifu prefecture, 130 miles west of Tokyo, and to the north of Gifu in Ishikawa prefec- ture, on Honshu's western coast. Vast .Area Involved Others occurred more than miles southwest of Tokyo in 'the sea-side prefecture of Oita, which is on Kyushu at the west end of the inland sen. The inland sea it- self became a funnel for the force of the seismic waves, and damage was heavy on both its north and City of Osaka Is Unhurt south Japanese began talking in caused numerous highway acci- dents with seven dead In Indiana alone. Snow ranged up to three inches in northern Indiana, Just About Everybody Takes Part-in Toy Factory' Here By JOHlsf CLAYTON Did you know that we have a toy factory in Well we do and a very good one too. I doub that anyone not connected with the toy program sponsored by the Ada Lion's club could'realize how intricate nnd how big the job is to supply toys for 286 kids, starting with nothing but an idea and willing hearts and hands. To explain the story, I must start at the beginning. First was the idea, conceived by the Lions. Then they launched the drive to get the toys. A great' -number of men and businesses had to help in this. Many Helped Gather Toys Transportation had to be fur- nished. Automobile dealers took care of that by lending trucks and pickups. Then they had to have workers. Members of the different civic organizations (not Lions exclusively) and a huge body of boy scouts helped there. The McSwain theatre and all af- filiated with their "free show for a toy" program helped. Then came the worry of where to put them. After'some trouble involving a call to Durant, they secured the old Hostess Ice Cream parlor on South Townsend as a store house. Before the building could be used, stoves had. to bo installed and the lights turned on. This was 'contributed by tho Co. and the Southwestern Gas the gas men laying ov-I paired without material. So hnrd- fu.200. feet of pipe, requiring I ware dealers chipped "in with bolts and screws, paint stores gave the time using donated transportation and labor. .C S cleaners gave all ot the rag dolls a thorough dry clean- ing. Keith Marshall, an employee of the Retail Merchants Association here and chairman of the Lions toy drive, reports that the job of playing Santu is in its last stages now. Then The Wrapping Thursday night, a group of men and their wives gathered at the store room to wrap each gift individually and put a name on it. Names of needy children over the community (not just in Ada) were secured by the Salvation Army. Now each child will be presented with his gifts personal- ly. The presents will be deliver- ed before Christmas so that the gift will be just as if the parent had bought it. Some of the' gifts will be dis- tributed by the Welfare Associa- tion, but many will be delivered by members of the Lions club. So now you see just how com- plicated this operation has been and how many people it envol- ves. No one group can be given all the credit, and none of them ask any credit or thanks. They only say. "If the kids have us much fun with the toys as we did giving them, will be very about four hours as a Many Needed Repair of the toys were broken and were not fit as gifts. They had to be repaired. For this job, the manual training and home economics department of both Ada High school and East Central helped, along with the Ada firemen. Broken doll beds were fixed, toy guns were paired, and repainted if neces- sary. Dolls were repaired and dresses made for them. (One East Central girl even cut off some of her own hair to put some on a Have Almost Enough Now After these toys had been re- paired to look like new, they decided it would be nice to give some brand new gifts as well as the.repaired ones, Contributions were made by gift stores, depart- ment stores and others. Girls staying at Knight hall at their Christmas party, instead of buy- ing gifts for. each other, bought gifts that younger kids could use. Alter they were handed out at the party, they turned them all over to the drive. The Ada- High school seniors did the same at their party at the youth center. They how have nearly enough toys to give each of the 286 chil- dren a new toy. But these dolls and guns and beds and cars could' not be re- Tokyo of appealing for Allied as- sistance for earthquake victims, is they did two decades ago. American and Japanese relief teams rushed into the disaster zone fearful that the. death toll night rise from tho tidal wave and earth shock, described offi- cially us five times Kreator than 'he one which killed 143.000 pcr- ions in the-Tokyo area in 1923. _ Inland Sea Area Hit Death and destruction also spread into the inland sea area, and ncwciit army reports said were known dead in the eily of Okayamn, on the north shore DO miles west of Osaka. Twenty were reported killed at Matsuyama, 85 miles southwest ol Okayamn and on the opposite (Continued on Page 3 Column 4) Charges Woman's Treatment Barbaric Held Six Months in Arkan- sas Jail as Material Wit- ness in Murder Case LITTLE ROCK, Dec. 21. A young woman held six months in the Pulaski County jail ns a material witness in a murder case was freed today by Circuit Judge Gus Fulk who termed her incar- ceration "barbnric." The'woman, Mrs. Frances Mor- ris, 21, is a principal witness in the slaying last March of a 50- year-old Little Rock man. Two taxi cab drivers were charged with bond Morris was unable to post bond and, was kept in jail. Informed by a bailiff that the witness still wns held, Judge Fulk signed a release order, 'di- rected her deposition bo taken for possible use in any Irinl of the case, and declared heatedly: "I think the Arkansas legisla- ture ought to abolish this atro- city It is certainly contrary to the spirit of American institu- tions that a mere witness mny be- held in jail, possibly indefinite- ly, in order to secure testimony in n criminal action, x x x "It is n relic of the barbaric methods of English jurisprudence still in force now under changed conditions of securing evidence. "This statute has no parallel in American law and ought to ba repealed x x x." murder and released on three months ago. Mrs. Newsmen from Tokyo Find Great Mctropolii On Edge of Disaster Area Ry FRANK L. WHITE OSAKA, Sunday, Dec. a finger of the terrific earthquake and tidal wave which lashed areas 30 miles from hero flicked this industrial metropolis of Japan yesterday. Life was just about back to nor- mal this morning as the first cor- respondents from Tokyo reached this northern edge of the disaster me. A light houses collapsed during the quake but otherwise the city apparently was untouch- ed. The latest death toll for all Osaka prefecture remained at 18, according to U. S. reports. The city did not feel any trem- ors last night, hours after the first quake, when U. S. seismographs reported new shocks. Rumors of damage and casual- ties on Wakaynma peninsula to Inn south, circulated here, but '.hoy were impossible to check mmcdintely. I arrived in Osaka this morn- ing in u party of ten other foreign correspondents and photograph- first group of foreign newspapermen to reach the dam- aged area. The trip from Tokyo was uneventful. Although some tunnels report- edly were blocked by landslides early yesterday, travel between here and Tokyo were normal. Army public relations officers arranged jeep transportation for correfiponrlenls, who immediately left Wnknyiiinn nnd other stricken areas. Reports to Osaka from Waknyinnii said disunities and damage still could not be as- sayed. Another area, believed equally hard-hit by tidal waves, wns the Kochi district of southern Shiko- ku, which is reachable only by ferry from the western const of Wnknynnin ordinarily. MARTINSBUHG, W. Vn Dee 21. Bulldozers went work in the wrong orchard lo- dny, nnd before anybody runlized the mistake, flOO bearing apple trees lay in ruins. Officials, sorrowfully survey- ing the havoc, explained it this way: American fruit growers orch- ard engaged a contractor to clear 15 acres of old trees preparatory to replanting. The two bulldozers sent 'by the contractor got on the- adjoining properly of Smith Orchard com- pany by mistake and cleared exnctly 15 acres of good, live trees bearing annually hundreds of bushels of Stay-men, delicious and golden delicious apples. TH' PESSIMIST We nin't no angel 'er re- former, but we think Christ- mas would be n lot bettor if we'd all pray more an' "mix- an'-pour" less. We don't care much for th' housewife whose "cookln1" consists o' peanut butter sandwiches an' n sack o' po- tato chips.   

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