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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: December 20, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 20, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Indochinese aren't much interested in any season of peace on just added to the world's disturbances by large-scale armed attack on the French people in their city of Hanoi Nov. I'nlrt Circulation 8607 Mrmhtr: Audit Illirmu nf Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 210 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1946 12 Pagci FIVE CENTS THE COPY. Operators Split on Coal Negotiations Northern Group Ready To Talk with Lewis, Southern Group Remains Defiant By HAKOI.n W. WASHINGTON, Dec. 20.. A sharp split among soft coal op- nutitrs over whether to negoti- ate now for a new contract with John L. Lewis dashed hopes to- day for a quick nationwide peace between the industry and its miners. Profluccrs whose pits yield 00 per cent of the country's coal held themselves ready to dciil with the United Mine workers chief "at any convenient without waiting for a supreme court decision on his legal trou- bles arising from the November walkout. But the powerful Southern Coal Producers association, whose mines produce a 'third of thr annual sup- ply, broke away from the major- ity with decision to hold aloof uiitil the roinl.'i have hail their my. Far western mine owners indi- faicd they would go along with the southerners. Appeal Hearing Jan. M The high court will hear on Jan. M Lewis' appeal from 510.000 in fine? against himself and the United Mine workers, im- posed after the UMW chief Ignor- ed a district court order to head off the recent 17-day strike. Long-smouldering differences between the Southern associa- tion, biggest .single producing unit in the national negotiating committee, and Iho remainder of the industry broke into the open at a nine-hour meeting yesterday. The committee was adjourned sine any day set for j-eassemblin meant Dieir is scant chance of a na- tional conduct in the foreseeable future. Two Douhtlul Kuclorx Whether negotiations might soon bo started oven between Lewis and the industry majority still was doubtful because: 1. Lewis would not agree to a separate contract excluding the southern group when this was suggested in negotialings Sept. 11. after the Southern association balked at meeting terms of the government-UMW pact which ended last spring's strike. Lewis said the UMW conven- tion would have to pass on the question of whether to abandon the union's policy of a nation- wide agreement or none at all. In October the convention declin- ed to change this policy. 2. The fact that operators of the northern, midwestcrn and "captive" steel company mines expressed willingness to meet with Lewis did not mean they would make immediate overtures to the mine leader. These operators said they were not rushing into anything, but were merely re-affirming their stand of last spring that they were ready and willing to nego- iatc with Lewis any time. Lewis Prefers to Wail 3. Lewis himself has indicated he prefers to wait until the su- preme court has decided his con- tempt appeal, which may be about Feb. 1. One thing seemed clear: The next move is up to Lewis. The UMW president, in calling off the strike December 7, sale the miners would negotiate-wUh any groups authorized to make a contract. Lewis was in Springfield, 111., visiting his aged mother. A mem- ber of the family there said ho had no comment on the develop jnents. Some Go Far For Holidays Joe G.illo by Plane to Boi- ton, Group to Ponniylvonio From Eait Central Although homo is far-for 11 niunbi.'r of lOiuil Central stu- dents will bu "homo for Christ- mas" this year, Joe Giillo, who comes Jill the wiiy from Boston, MIIKH., stnrtcd home Wednesday night by plane. Kcldio Moore, formerly with the cadets al E. C., will not go to his home in Colorado but IN driving imilead to ChoMlor, 1'emiHylviinui, where ho will .spend the holiday with ii buddy whom ho met while with the cficletK here. Stnnley Val- ancius and Bill Duffy, both of Philadelphia, will drive up with Mq.rc. ChoHtor is n suburb of Philadelphia. Jim Garner is also going with Moore to visit friends in Philadelphia. John Hay will fly to his home in St. Louis, Mo. Most of Iho students who live out of town, unless they are mar- ried and have established a tem- porary home hero, will go home for the holidays. School turns out Friday, but some of them "jump- ed the gun" and left during the middl" of the work. Cla.sses will bt.1 resumed on Monday, December ISO. Allowing for travelling lime, this does not give much timo for those who live very far, but noverthelens, most of thorn expect to be buck on .schedule. P.O. Adds Sunday Delivery (o Help On Christmas Mail Additional measures are being taken hy the Ada postofflce, to head off a piling up of incom- ing and outgoing mail nnd par- cels in the just-before-Christmns days. Sunday there will be regular city delivery of mail, This will relieve some of what may still be a heavy load for Ilir: pont- iilen Monday. Also, parcel delivery will be in operation Sunday afternoon und one window will be kept open at the posloffice from 12 noon to 3 p. m. for mailing. The ppstoffice is remaining open until 8 o'clock tonight and Saturday night to make it pos- sible for those who cannot get to the windows during the regu- lar hours to get their packages on their way in time to reach their destinations by Christmas. Aged Blind Tulsa Invalid Is Saved But Riding Academy, Lum- ber Yard Damaged In Scries of Fires TULSA, Okla., Dec. 20, An aged blind invalid was -sav- ed from death or injury, a riding academy was destroyed and a lumber yard suffered heavy dam- age in a scries of fires here last night. A neighbor and carried the blind a passerby man, James RADIO PHONE FOR CAR IS EXPENSIVE LUXURY OKLAHOMA CITY, Dec. 20 can have a mobile radio telephone in your automobile it will be considerably more expensive than the custom- ary non-mobile phone. The installation charge is Then comes a ninthly rental charge for the equipment, plus a minimum charge of month- ly for service. These rates, submitted by the Southwestern Bell Telephone company, were approved yester- day by the state corporation com- mission. WEATHER OKLAHOMA: Partly cloudy to cloudy: not so cold tonight ex- cept lair with not much tempera- lure change in Panhandle; fair with moderate temperatures Sat- urdav and Sunday. FORECAST FOR DEC. 20-21 Missouri. Kansas. Oklahoma, and rain south- east Missouri Saturday, other- wise no precipitation indicated in district through Wednesday; tem- peratures will average near nor- mal through district Saturday, becoming colder Nebraska Sat- urday and over remainder of dis- trict Sunday and Monday; up- ward temperature trend Tues- dav and Wednesday; tempera- tures will average near normal 1o slichtly below over district for pf riod. Nails. 70, from his burning home in which they found.him sitting in his chair. He had smellecl smoke but was not alarmed until the flames had.almost enveloped the dwelling. Ten horses were removed safe- ly from the Osage riling acade- my's stable 10 miles from the city before fire razed the struc- ture. A blaze which started in a dry kiln damaged buildings and destroyed the Kiln at the Amer- ican Hardwood Lumber Co.' yards. Firemen's prompt action kept the fire from spreading through the highly inflamablc yard. The three fires occurred just a year after the Renb.erg Clothing store and Barnes-Manley laun- dry were destroyed in Tulsa's biggest 1045 conflagrations, ENID, Doc. young men, inmates the North- ern Oklahoma hospital, an insti- tution for mentally ill persons, have received membership cards and a Boy Scout charter. 'The now Scout troop is believed to be the first of its type in the nation. Uniforms for the mem- bers were provided by the Enid Exchange club, sponsors of the organization, Pilots Saved Passengers In Rare Accident Huge Scrape In Air, Fliers Land Damaged 85 Safe ABERDEEN, Md., Dec. 20. Split-second reaction by two pllolH wore credited today with saving the lives of 85 passengers nnd crqw members of two Miiimi- bound airliners which collided feet in the' air near here in an accident unprecedented in American commercial, air travel. None of the passengers suffer- ed so much as a scratch, although both planes were damaged in the collision, which occurred in clear weather shortly after dark last night. The co-pilot of one, a big, four- engined DC-4 Eastern airlines craft currying 50 passengers, said he sow the other, a two-engined Universal airlines C-47, ap- proaching from the left three or four miles north of Aberdeen. He pulled his ship up at the last instant and scraped over the top of the Universal plunc, Eastern officials said. Hud Only Second or Two The co-pilot, R. Brown, of Mi- ami, said he had "just n second or two" in which to avert dis- aster. The pilot of this plane, J. B. Kuhn, also of Miami, told n reporter, "Brown saved the day." A three-by -five-foot hole was ripped in the tail section of the larger plane, while the Universal liner carrying 22 passengers nnd H crew of three on a charter flight, had n hole driv.cn into the upper portion of the fuselage, Us escape hatch wrenched free and Its radio and hydraulic system knocked out of commission. Despite the damage, Henry Norris, of Cambridge, Mass., pilot of the Universal ship, brought it down safely at the Aberdeen Proving Ground field, while the Eastern plane wns landed un- (JVonU'ully by Kuhn before wall- ing crash-wagons and fire-en- gines nt National airport, Wash- ington, D. C. DG-4 Overtook Other Th9 four-erigined DC-4, cruis- ing at about 230 miles an hour, apparently had overtaken the slower aircraft. It had started from New York, while the Uni- versal plane had taken off at Newark, N. J. Occupants of both planes, mostly vacationists and business men, reported little if any con- fusion at the time of theic nar- row escape, and most said they had been, unaware of the extent of their danger. All, however, had lavish praises for crew mem- bers'. Plans "Survivors Party" One grateful survivor of the Eastern plane, Ben J. Slutzky, of Ellenville, N. Y., announced he was presenting to the crew and iniyted other passengers to "survivors' party" at a Miami night club. Officials of the Civil Aeronaut- Byrnes Request For Peace Treaties Action To Test Senate's Sentiment MEKRY CHRISTMAS-FOR Wolf, husky German shepherd dog, H will be the first Christ- mas, at home after spending four years in the army's service, and his young companion, Patricia McCrnckcn, seems equally pleased al tho prospect of their being together for thu Yulolkle, U. S. Plan Okayed 'In Principle' Gromyko'Remains Silent In Opposition to Atom Energy Commission Vote ics board, who questioned the EAL crew in Washington for hours after they landed, said it was the first time in American commercial air history 'such an accident had occurred between two planes headed in the same direction. Federal safety regulations re- quire planes flying in opposite directions to maintain different altitudes, but plaries on the same headin'g, although separated by time intervals, fly on the same levels, Aluminum, magnesium, and stainless steel are predicted for body structure of future trucks. Robinson Little Injured in Fall Circumstances of Being Down on'Downtown Awning Unexplained The circumstances are some- what vague in the case of Frank Robinson being found on the awning just below the Dixie Rooms at 128. West Twelfth. The incident happened Thu sday By MAX HARRELSON LAKE SUCCESS, N. 'Y., Dec. 20. ..United...Nations atomic energy commission today approved "in principle" the United States atqmic control plan after. Soviet-Delegate Andrei A. Gromyko announced dramatically that he was withdrawing from the discussions. Gromyko did not leave the council as he did last April during discussion of tho Iranian case in the security coun- cil, but he made it clear that his silence was not a mere absention. Despite personal appeals from Great Britain and China for his cooperation, Gromyko flatly re- fused to vote. The commissi'on already had re- jected a Soviet demand that ac- :ion on the U. S. atomic plan be postponed and a-'Polish proposal that the American plan be sent to the commission's political com- mittee without recommendation. vote was on a Cana- dian' compromise, which provided that the commission approved tha "principles" set forth in the U. S. plan, but that .the final wording be left to the committee. The Canadian proposal previously had been accepted by the United States delegation. The vote was 10 to 0, with Pol- and abstaining and Russia's'vote uncounted, at the request of Gromyko. Gromyko reserved his right to speak .on the U. S. proposal at a "later stage." The commission ad- journed at p.m. OKLAHOMA CITY, Dec, families have trouble making Christmas tree ornaments- last one season, but the E. J. Juhl family is using ornaments which first decorated 'a tree 34 years ago. 'Shortest Day' Three Times This Year Has Three With Shortest Period of Daylight Hours Don't be surprised if you roll out of bed next Saturday or Sun- day morning and .find it's almost time to go back to bed. On a poll taken of Adans and college students at random, this question was asked: "What is the shortest daylight day of the Many of them said, "It's either the 20th or 21st of December." Others said, "It's the 21st or 22nd of December." And still others didn't know when it was except that it was sometime during the winter months. Well, the usually correct answ- er is the 21st of December since that day is the first day of wint- er. But this year, either the 21st, 22nd or 23rd would be right. This year's World Almanac shows that on December 21 the sun rises at a. m. and sets at p. m. The 22nd is exact- ly the same, but on the 23rd. the sun will rise one minute later and set one minute later, making' the actual length of the three days same. M. P. Hatchett, science teach- er'at East Central, explains this fact thusly: "The reason 'for the shortest day of the .year is that the sun vertical over the tropic of Capricorn." So if one of these three days you think you are running be- hind schedule, it is merely be- cause the' .day only contains 10 hours. But there is some conso- lation in the fact, that next June 21, the first day of summer, is the longest day in the year, at a season when we can- be outdoors and make th6 most of it. Grade School Band Serenades Hospital And Orphanage Potients ond Children Enjoy Thursday Evening Christmas Programs Patients at Valley View hospi- tal and children at the Baptist Orphanage north of Ada were serenaded with Christmas carols Thursday night played by the combined band, and Graham, director Ada schools. Ada Grade directed by school Harold of music in The new B-50, an adaptation of the- B-29, is being designed for service anywhere on the from equator to poles. night. Robinson was found on. the Shopping Days To Christmas nwnlng and taken to Valley View h. pital where he was given first aid treatment for minor cuts and bruises about the head and body. He had a small laceration on the right side of hi? nee': and a cut place on the top of his head. Hpspi'al attendants report that Robinson was apparently intoxi- cated and sent him home after he was treated. He listed no less than three home addresses with the hospital. Police records show no report on the incident. Firemen Dudley Young and Herman Landrith Went to tho scene and took Robinson from the awning. Robinson apparently fell or walked through a window on the second floor as a window is re- ported to have been broken out just above where he was found. O'DONNELL TO BE COLONEL WASHINGTON, Dec. 20 Clarence J. O'Donnell of McAles- ter, Okla., is among 27 marine corps lieutenant colonels approv- ed by President Truman for pro- motion to the rank of colonel. The promotions are to be sub- mitted to the senate -for confir- mation when congress convenes.' Ada Evening News Annual Bargain Offer CLIP and MAIL TODAY Ada Evening Ada, Oklahoma f Gentlemen: Attached find or money order) for which enter my subscription to the Ada Eve- ning News to be delivered as indicated below. BY CARRIER OR MAIL By carrier in Ada, or Q] by mail anywhere OUTSIDE Pontotoc and adjoining counties. Per Year Name Street Number or R.F.D'. _ Town State The usual humdrum condition didn't exist at the hospital Thursday night because the chil- dren made everything lively to the extent that every patient who could, went to his window to see the serenaders. Christmas carols were played for about 10 minutes, then the band members were invited into the hospital where they were treated to hot chocolate and cookies. All Enjoyed Them J. F. Barker, superintendent al Valley View, said that the Christ- mas carols were enjoyed im- mensely by patients at the hos- pital. The hospital has been decorat- ed. for the occasion with a large star placed above the hospital' and. a smaller star to. be seen over the nurses home. Composed of fifth and sixth graders, the band was made up of about 20 members of the ori- ginal 40 that were to attend, but couldn't because of the cold. Then To Orphanage At -the a 25-minT ute program was presented, in- cluding special numers. Devon Atom Energy Use Is Near Commercial Use Within Five Years If Government Gives 'Green Light' BOSTON. Dec. mercial use of atpmic energy within five; years was predicted today by a group' of New Eng- land experts providing the gov- ernment gives the "green light" to industry. Atomic generation of electric power, they said, could be ac- complished at an original cost co mrnble to present modern methods and eventually for much less. These views wore expressed in n report by n New England coun- cil committee which includes in its membership Karl T. Cornrton, president of Massachusetts. Insti- tute of Technology and one of the developers of the atom bomb. Clearly Possible. Although no atomic plimln have been built, they said, "there now seems to be no question, from the purely technical standpoint, about the possibility of generating large amounts of power from Iho heat liberated during the opera- lion of atomic piles." Many factors, they added, would affect the speed with which the atom is put to com- mercial them gov- ernment financial support for re- search nnd re- lease of technical information commensurate with security and "provided that industry be given the green light to proceed with its own development." Elcctrlc.il Power In Five Ycnrx Granted those, they said, "it seems probable that within five years atomic piles could be oper- ating for the purpose of produc- ing electric The committee said it was dif- ficult to predict what the first commercial uses of atomic oowor would be put that "it seems likely that it will be for purposes need- ing heavy and continuous loads of power." Federal funds for research and development of peacetime indus- trial and -.humanitarian applica- fion of atomic energy .re neces- sary, the report said, as well as for "large-scale fundamental studies of nuclear phenomena." Requires "A Lot Of Money" is one kind of government financing that we can not afford to curtail whatever may be the national policy along general lines of retrenchment and econ- said the committee repre- senting the council, an industrial and promotion group. "A lot of the commit- tee said, would be necessary to bring about the practical utiliza- tion of atomic energy for indus- trial power to propel ships, turn the wheels of factories and light homes. However, the report said that electric power could be produced from atomic piles "at a cost com- parable with that from the most modern high-pressure tide-water steam central stations" nnd pre- dicted that eventually the cost "may go well below present pro- duction costs." Herrings gave the children at the orphanage a saxophone solo; the student director of the! band was BJlly Cheek. Mr. Graham said the occasion was enjoyed by every child at the orphanage and by every child participating Following in the band. the playing of Christmas carols, band members presented the children at the or- phanage with Christmas gifts, then returned home. OFFER EXPIRES JANUARY 15. 1947 Warmer Weather Called Possible Sub-Freezing Levels General Over State By The AifftoclRted I'riMtff Sub-f r e e z i n g temperatures were general throughout Okla- homa again din-ing the night but warmer weather is possible Sat- urday. Guymon in the Panhandle again reported the.lowest read- this was nine degrees higher than 25 hours earlier. Guymon's 4G-de- gree reading Thursday also was the highest in Oklahoma. Other minimum temperatures: i 26 at Enid, Elk City, Ponca City and Oklahoma City airport, with 128 recorded at Oklahoma City's downtown weather station; 29 at Fort Still; 30 Tulsa and Ard- more; 32 at McAlester. BARTLESVILLE, Dec. Rev. Donald M. Sheridan has announced his resignation as pastor of the First Christian church here to accept a call to the East End Christian church at Pittsburgh, Pa. Reverend Sheri- dan had served tho local church for 13 yeari. CIO Suggests That Steel Contracts Hold During Talks PITTSBURGH, Dec. 20, The nation's vast steel fabricating industry today studied a CIO- United Steelworkers' proposal that the companies agree to ex- tend present contracts until the union can work, out a 1947 pat- tern with basic steel producers. The request was made by Philip Murray, who heads both the CIO and the Steelworkers' union, at the conclusion of a series of conferences held here by the CIO's top-ranking strate- 174 members of tho wage-policy committee. Murray declared the union's action "indicates a desire of the union lo make a peaceable acrcc- ment in the industry" and added: "Approval of the plan will furnish the smaller unions an opportunity to accept the same terms and conditions provided for in the basic steel industry or negotiate for different condi- tions in such other ways as may be mutually satisfacory to both parties." The steel fabricators, which employ about 45 percent of the union's members, use as their raw material the steel pro- duced in basic steel plants. No time limit on the proposed con- tract extension was set. Most contracts involved expire Febru- ary 15, as. in the basic steel in- dustry where contract negotia- tions are expected to begin about Jan. 15. Will Submit Four Pacts Hopes for Quick Action On Axis Satellite Treaties Moscow Meeting By .TACK BELL WASHINGTON, of State Byrnes is re- ported r idy today for an early in of the new Republican-con- trolled senate's attitude on inter- national affairs with a request for action on four peace treaties with Axis satellites. Byrnes has advised interested senators he wants to place tho pacts with Italy, Bulgaria, Ro- mania and Hungary before thu foreign relations committee short- ly after they are formally signed J-Vb. A fifth Allied' tn-aly with been drufted, but will not come before the son- ata for consideration. The United Slnlcs was not at war with Fin- land and had no voice in the treaty terms. Sonic May Waul la Whilj he is expected to ask, speedy consideration in nn at- tempt to clear this hurdle before the March 15 meeting of foreign ministers in Moscow, there arc indications that some republicans will want to go deeply into the whole matter of treaty negotia- tions. Because It normally tnkes sev- eral weeks for senate committees to process an important matter of this kind, Senator Vandcnbcrif (R.-Mich.) has told it probably will be impossible for him to accompany Byrnes to opening of (he Moscow mooting. The Michigan senator apparent- ly feel., that he and Senator Con- nally both of whom have served as Byrnes' advisem at past foreign ministers' discus- sions, can not leave until the sen- ate net finally. Vnndenberg is slated to succeed Connally as for- eign relations chairman January o. Occupation Involvec" Byrnes' hope for quick action on the treaties reportedly is based in part on his desire to have the two senators with him in Mos- cow. But the underlying urge for speed is represented as stemming from the treaties' terms calling for the withdrawal of occupation forces in some of the countries in- volved. Russia promised to get her troops out of Bulgaria nnd to withdraw all but communications garrisons from Romania and. Hungary 90 days after the treaties are ratified by the four major powers and pul into effect by the former enemy nations. Thursday Had 36 Degree Maximum Was it snow or was it jusi heavy frost? The official report' Is inclined to call it frost, though a number of residents here are convinced that the white stuff they found here and there Friday morninjt was snow. Thursday was definitely cold. Raw. damp weather prevailed throughout the day and register- ed a 30-degrcc high. The night's low was 28 degrees, still low enough to cause freez- ing of exposed water but milder than the 20-degree low of night before. Okl.ihoman Killed LORDSBURG, N. M., Dec. 20. E. Dismore, 25, of Hcadriclt, Okla., died in a hospital yesterday of injuries received Wednesday in the collision of his car and a truck 15 miles west of here. His wife suffered minor in- juries. PONCA CITY, Dec. Herbert Allen couldn't find a house. So he went back to Arkan- sas City, Kansas, cngi ged a mover nnd hnd his Cape Cod cot- S hauled to Ponca City. TH' PESSIMIST ny Ain't it funny how you drop into a grocery store fer a loaf o' bread an' come out with a bag o' stuff that you can carry with two fingers? Jest because some don't live th' average routine o' th' average person, people consider 'iin a consider it none o' thc'r durn business.   

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