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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: December 15, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 15, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Let's hope that through the years ahead the United States won't come out as poorly with'the Manhattan site deal for U. N. headquarters as did the Indians who first traded it to the Dutch Net Nov. I'uld Circulation 8607 Mrmbrr: Audit llureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 205 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1946 32 Pages FIVE CENTS THE COPY, Council In Statement About Milk Explains Action Banning 'Grade A Pasteurized' Un- til Change Made Every year through the Into Jail, winter ;md enrly spring, the milk consumer in Ada has been buying milk labeled "grade A p.-isteurized" and has been Hotting milk which is actually "ungrndcd pnsteurir.i'd" milk. The reason is lhat there just is not enough grade A milk produced in this area during this pnrt of the year; jmd the reasons that enough is not produced during this part of the year are: (1) Uncontrolled breeding, so that most cows come fresh in the spring. Actually there is a surplus of grade A mill: curing the summer. (2) There is nol enough d if Terence in price between grade A milk and un- graded milk to encourage enough to qualify for grade A production. A farmer will not spend to improve his facil- ities unless he feels that he will bo paid enough more for grade A to justify his expense. Fur- thermore, the consumption of iniik has doubled in Ada during liio Inpt five Quality Unchanged Tho health authorities am) the city council are ol the opinion That, if "ungraded pasteurized" milk is sold in Ada, it should be j-o not labeled "grade A pasteurized." They have therefore ordered the distributors of such milk by December 23 to place caps on y.ich milk labeled "ungraded pas- teurized" and that it is no longer to bo labeled "grade A pasteuriz- The quality of the milk be as good as previously. The health authorities will exor- cise strict supervision to see that the milk is properly pasteurized. The authorities have given such distributors until April 1 to begin distributing "grade A pns- t'.-urir.ed" milk. They believe that thereafter enough such milk will be available the year around if a campaign for controlled breeding is carried out and if producers ere paid enough more for grade A milk to encourage them to im- prove their plants and methods fi qualify for grade A produc- tion. In order to encourage con- trolled breeding, the price clif- ierential between grade A and ungraded milk will have to be greater in the winter than in the summer. The following distributors have been selling "grade A raw" milk fnd will continue to do so: Hig- rion's Jersey Farm, Welch's Dairy, Cochran's Dairy, Gran- ger's Dairy, Ada Jersey Dairy and Pontotoc County Guernsey >'arm. They are properly super- vised by the health authorities. The milk shortage Is statewide. ]n practically every city, milk inis-labeled "grade A pasteuriz- ed" i? being sold, and it is doubl- iul whether more than two cities in the state actually nre getting A pnsteurized" milk. Ada's milk supply is therefore not any worse than that of al- most all the other cities of Okla- homa, The health authorities and the city council have merely decided that "ungraded pasteurized" milk shall be railed by its rifftil name and that Ada consumers shall no longer be misled by erroneous labels. The authorities will ex- iTcise the greatest diligence to see that the milk, although "un- is properly pasteurized, that a sufficient supply of "grade A pasteurized" milk is de- veloped at the curliest possible moment. Until there is a sufficient sup- of "grade A" milk, the authori- ties approve use of "grade A raw" milk of the distributors mentioned above or the "ungrad- ed pasteurized" milk of Coody, Steffens and Markwell. Alfred R. Sugg, health officer; B. I. Poc, sanitar- ian; Joe Hensley, II. J. lluddlcs- Vernon Roberts, Charles F. Spencer, M. W. Walker, city councilmen. TRUMAN SLASHES HOUSING CONTROL Barnell Burial This Afternoon Peevy Avers He's Innocent Accused of Fast-Talking Out of Folks On Advertising Directory Racket MUSKOGEE, Okla., Dec. 14. Hubbard (Hub) Peevy, 30, was held under 500 bond in city-federal jail hero today following his arraignment on a federal charge of fraudulent use of the mails in soliciting money for advertising directories which he never published. He is charged with obtaining from more than 700 individuals and firms in '21 cities in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky and Cali- fornia. Pccvy was arrested yesterday lit Pauls Valley, Okln., and plead- ed innocent when arraigned at Ada, Okln., before U. S. Commis- sioner Silas Freeman. He is held pending action of the next fed- eral grand jury, which probably will be convened next month. Has Operated in Ada Clyde E. Zurmohly, a chief in- spector for the postoffice depart- ment, said his office has numer- ous letters and cancelled cheeks relating.to Pcevy's operations in tlii! Oklahoma cities of, Frederick, Ada, Seminole, Chic-kasha, Pauls Valley, Durant, Idabcl, Clinton and Anadarko; the Kansas cities of Fort Scott and Hutchinson; Carthage, Mo.; Clarksvillc and Columbia, Tenn.; Bowling Green, Ky.; New Roehclle and, Harris- burg, 111.; Wntortown, S. D., and Santa Kosa, Cal. Peevy is accused of beginning solicitation last April for adver- tising for dirocloncs to be pub- lished by "Sooner Publications" of Pauls Valley, where he for- merly was employed as a news- paper advertising solicitor. He had been sought by federal agents since last October and was arrested when he returned to Pauls Valley to attend the funer- al of a relative. .Didn't Pay Helpers Zurmohly said that in Oklaho- ma City Peevy collected with the 'largest amounts being taken at Chickashn and Pauls Valley. He said Peevy was a well- dressed, personable man, who stayed at the best hotels during his travels and made, u very J'av- onihle impression. Peevy employed local men, preferably ex-CU's, us solicitors for but most ol these men never received the pay they were promised, the postal inspector added. He said Peovy launched his directory business at Pauls Vul- ley, but that no directory ever was published and no money was refunded. He said Peevy had no facilities for compiling and pub- lishing any directories. Valuable Find MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay, Deq. 14, from the Ameri- can freighter Richard K. Call, which docked here today, said they hud found n subHlnnec at sen which is believed to be am- bergris valued nl Jf the substance proves to be ambergris, Capt. Andrew Gavin and his crew of 38 will, share in the prize. The mn.-is was found floating on tho ocean sur- face near Cape Polonio off the Uruguayan coast, t Ambergris, a waxy substance from the sperm whale, is used in making perfume. Read The News Classified Ads. SOLDIER VICTIMS OF TRAIN WRECK: GI shoes protrude from the wreckage of a crack passenger train, The Golden Triangle, Pennsylvania Flyer which crashed into 'scattered cars of two freight trains near Mansfield, Ohio. Fifteen are known dead and many injured. Tho train was mostly, crowded with soldiers who were on their way home for Ada Hurries Cheerfully Into Final Pre-Christmas Splurge Of Shopping, Parties, Carols Adans' Plane Goes Wild After They Get Out at Lawton LAWTON, Okla., Doc, and Mrs. Orville Earl. Wolfe, of Ada alighted from their air- piano at the Municipal nirpovl hero today, bul Ihe plane kepi on going. Mrs. Wolfe accidentally "knock- ed open the IhrqlUc as she slop- ped out and Ihe plane crossed a field, u ditch, Iwo fences, circled back to the field, spun around in n mudholc, crashed into a ditch nnd caught fire. The Lawton fire department had arrived by lliis time nnd put. oul the blaze. The plane was a Boeing P-J7. The Wolfes were cnroutc from Ada to Frederick. Mrs. E. J. Wolfe, mother of thu pilot, said that the couple 1 e .t t Ada about p.m. Saturday en route to Frederick where they were going to have the plane numbered. Wolfe called his mother'into Saturday and told her about thu accident nnd snicl that the plunc, one of two which he owns, was almost a total loss after Us hair- raising solo flighl at LavHon. Mr. nnd Mrs. Wolfe -were, grounded ut Lawlon municipal airport because of a low ceiling. Wolfe has been' J'lying for the past 19 years and at the present time is spending an exlended va- cation at the family home cast of Ada. While here, he is receiving medical treatment for some trou- ble that he lias been having with one of his cars. Schools Plan- ning Special Programs For Next Few Days Christmas preparations Satur- day rushed into the final phase, with a swirl, of shopping, party- ing, decorating and caroling. The impossible weather of the firsl three days of the week changed to permit what one mor- chnnl referred lo us 'three Satr Friday and Saturday being favorable and the buyers making the most of it. A coroner's jury has returned a verdict of accidental doalh in the shooting of Leo Barnott of Coalgate at Conlgnte Thursday afternoon. County Attorney H. M. Shirley of Coal county report- ed Saturday afternoon that no charges have been filed against Eouel McCool. Deputy Sheriff McCool was! employed in Ada before going to Coalgate to become a deputy and one time was caretaker at the barn, norlh of Ada. Funer.-il services will be con- ducted this nfttM'noon (Sunday) from the Church of Chrisl in Coalgate at o'clock with C. A. Manness officiating. Burial will be in Ihe Coalgate remetcrv. OKLAHOMA: Partly cloudy Sunday and Monday except most- ly cloudy with occasional light drizzle- northeast nnd norlh cen- tra! Sunday morning: no decided temperature change Sunday; slishtly warmer Monday east. Santo Visits Ada a Bit Early, Furnishes Much Needed Tiles City Officials Pussied by Find of 400 Feet Of Buried It to Use in Needed Spot Some'concreto covered with dirt seems lo be almost worthless to mention, but when lhat -concrete is in the form of eight-in h lile the discovery takes on more im- portance, especially when discov- ered by the right group of peo- ple. The city has been in dire need of n large amount of concrete! lila ot any size, but il wasn't until Inst week that city employees dis- covered several hundred feet of the desired material. II took considerable work to gel Ihe tile, bul iporo than feel of eight-inch' lilo has been obtained. Hiul Never IJccn Used The surprising pnrt of the dis- co v ry is that the tile has never been used, but hns been .under the ground for an undetermined length of lime. When ciuestionecl nboul the dis- covery, Cily Manager W, E. Han- sen snid thiil he didn't want to talk nbout the tile. After sonnj ciuestiofMT'. he confessed lhat tho tile is being oblained from the Chaunccy Airport north of Ada. It look an excavating job to get to the tile, nnd when 'it was reached it was in perfect condi- the worse for having been underground. Some 250 feet of the eight-inch jomls were discovered but as work continues more and more ha; been found and by Sa'urday afternoon close to 400 feet hacl been uncovered. "Why" Still Unanswered Asked how the tile come to be buried at the airport, Hanson re- plied, "f have only been in Ada about eight weeks nnd have. m> idea who put the tile where it WHS found or how long il had been there." Thp tile, however, is being put to a good use us H is being laid at a new location ns fnst ns it can be uncovered. The new rusting place wi. oe at the cli-snostil being laid from the low grounds at the disposal plant, where water slfinds after n largo rain, to u creek bed several hundred feel awny to drain the area. Hanson says lhal Ihere may be enough lile lo complete the line thai was started Friday morning. Store Closing Hours Salurday morning 25 mer- chants were unanimous in agreement for Ada stores to adopt the following revised store closing schedule begin- ning Thursday: Next Thursday, Friday, Sat- urday nnd the following Mon- day, n p. m.; Tuesday (Christ- nms Eve) 0 p. m. They nlso urge buyers to pick up their lay-nwny purchases before Christmas Eve. Sat u r d n y throngs mov- ed through the stores, moving the buying volume up severnl more notches, cheerfully making their way through crowded aisles exchanging comments with smil- ing clerks. Churches, homes and schools hove been busy wilh parlies and will be even busier Ihis week all ovec the counly, and with more groups out caroling the sweet songs of the Christmastide. The First Christian, church choir lonighl presents a cantata, nnd a week from today all churches will have special Christ- mas music. And the calendar ''seven more shopping days until Christ- mas. Drcamboat Pilot Weds NEW YORK, Dec. 14. Col. Clarence S. Irvine, 47, pilot of the Pacusan Dreamboat which made a record flight from Hon- olulu to Egypt last October, and WAC Capt. Ruth Ann Salteman, 3G, obtained a marriage license today. Captain "Snltzman is attached to the army air forces, Pacific air command in Washington. They will be married Monday. Read The News Classified Ads. Pauley Reveals Soviet Threats To U.S. Envoy While in Korea By JACK BELL WASHINGTON, Dec. M. A bizarre story of a heavily- jjunrded tour in Russian-control- led Korea which produced threats that picture-takers should be shot but wound up in an ex- change of daggers with a Soviet general and n farewell vodka dinner was unfolded today in the diary of Reparations Commis- sioner. Edwin W. Pauley. Pauley's diary of: a six-day in- spection trip through the north- ern (Soviet) zone went to Presi- dent Truman with a report in which-Pauley said it may be Rus- sia's aim to force a Moscow-dom- inated government on all Korea before it agrees to withdraw its troops. The inspection group of 1'J Americans was accompanied into northern Korea by a contingent of Russian soldiers armed with American "Tommy" guns, dwarf- ing in size the White House se- cret service detail. Tried to Block Talks The Russians made direct and determined efforts to prevent the Americans from talking to Kore- ans, Pauley related going to Ihe length of "shouting clown" Amer- ican interpreters. At one point a Russian general told him that if the Americans did not stop taking pictures "some of us might not even have the opportunity of being sorry we took them." Pauley, who wears the title of the President's personal ambas- sador, rein led that he and Col. Gen. 1. M. Chistiakov, the Soviet supreme commander in Korea, could not agree at their .first con- ference on the areas the Ameri- can mission was to visit. So the U. S, reparations com- missioner tried a little strnlegy. Ho sent thr> Sovk'l. general n rid- ing crop and found the Jiussinn much more affable at their next meeting. "It was a special one nnd a very fine one with a thin dagger sword blade inside of Pauley wrote in his diary. "Jt evidently made a great hit and may have caused the change in his alti- tude." Later Chisliakov, nol lo be out- done, gave Pauley, "a beautiful- ly finished dagger knife." This presentation, Pauley said, was followed by a "typical Rus- sian dinner" at which vodka flowed freely and there was "ten times too much lo eat." Previ- ously the party had been guests at a dinner given by General Romnnenko, who conducted the (Continued on Page 2 Column 1) Shopping' Days To Christmas Choking Fog Grips Britain Worst in Living Memory Ties Up Travel, Sets Off Burst of Thievery By WILLIAM E. MACKL1N LONDON, Dec. 14, choking fog, described by the royal automobile association as "the worst in living held the British Isles and most of northern Europe in its for Ihe fifth straight day and gave a Sherlock Holmes setting tonight to new jewel theft my- steries.. Linked by Americans to a Pittsburgh, or St. Louis "smog" because of its spot-ladden grime, it snarled atr, seal highway and rail subway trains. It also complicated the pre- cautionary guarding of Scotland Yard headquarters and historic marble arch which bobbies encir- cled after nnnonymous telephone callers threatened to blow up those structures, Scotland Yard declined to link the threats with earlier reports that the Jewish resistance in Palestine mighl ex- tend its operating to London. An anonymous letter also was received by the station masters office threatening to blow up Victoria station at 3 p. m. Police took precautionary measures and the hour passed without inci- dent. Operating in the "pea thieves cut the strap of the hand- bag of tho Americnn-born Mnr- quise de Zuhnra nnd got away with worth of jewels, including a Russian emerald and diamond brooch, a diamond and ruby bracelet and a ruby solitaire ring. All ship sailings from South- ampton, busiest English port, were cancelled. The U. S. liner America docked 24 hours late at Lo Havre, France. The Ameri- ca's smaller relative, the Wash-' inglon, docked 20 hours Inle nl Southampton yesterday. Divers recovered the bodies of two of the three persons who wore drowned when thcil' car ran off a dock in Ihe fog at Southampton; During World War II, psychia- trists found more mental, illness among troops led by poor offi- cers than among those led by good officers. U.N. Assembly Approves Plan For Start on Arms Reduction Russia Foils to Get U. S. Atomic Bomb Secrets Laid Open; Final Adjournment May Be Reached Today By LARRY HAUCK NEW YORK, Dec. u s s in today lost hoi- fight -to lay open the American atomic bomb secrets im- mediately but the United Nations assembly appr ovccl a universally acclaimed plan for arms reduction which would, in time, scrap all weapons of mass destruction. Optimism over the arms program was the keynote as Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov sailed for home with American assurance that international control of atomic energy with step-by-step disclosure of all the facts would be given, top priority in the plan to discard arms. The (iplimism was reflected New Steps Aid Rent Building Anyone May Build for Hit Own Occupancy, Priorities On Materials Dropped By STKIUJNC, F. GREEN WASHINGTON. Dec. 14. President Truman nut housing under the decontrol showi'r to- night, washing away I he major controls of the Wilson Wyatt program and ordering now steps to aid rental construction. The 810.000 sales price ccilin? on. new homos was abandoned Housing Al A Glance WASHINGTON. Dec. 14. ill a glance is the new hous- ing program announced by Pres- ident Truman tonight: Anyone mav build a house for his own oi'cupaiH'.v. l.'ntil now only veil-rails could gi'l permits. Priorities on building mater- ials will hi' dropped. "Some increase-" in non-rcsi- denlial construction will be por- m it led. The price ceiling is removed on new houses built for sale. It was S When? new houses and apart- ments are huill to bo rvnlod. rent ceiling for all the in the project will average some may be more and some loss. Until now a flat ceil- ing was imposed. The allocation of raw matori.ils In manufacturers of building ma- terials may be drooped April I if production continues high. More- federal financing will given In rental housing. U.N. Accepts Site Where British Hanged Nathan Hale NEW YORK, Dec. The United Nations assembly chose New York Cily for its per- manent headquarters tonight by an overwhelming vote after up- proving unanimously a univer- sally acclaimed plnn for world- wide arms limitation. By CHARLES MICKCI5II NEW YORK, Dec. First Avenue they're measuring tall buildings against the und where a few see shadows cast cross their lives .most resi- dents of thu area envision a shin- ing new world capitol. Known locally as "Turtle Bay" since the days of Washington Irv- ing, the area now bounded by 42nd' and 48th streets and First Avenue and Franklin D. Roose- velt Drive contains .some history some irony, if the United Nations settles there. At the exact center of the pro- posed loealion, where the United Slates and Britain with other na- tions will pursue peace, Ibc Brit- ish tried and hanged Nathan Hale as n spy in the war of independ- ence. Nearby, on Sept. 15, 17715, the British landed and took pos- session of Manhattan to the con- sternnlion of General George Washington. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. That Mistletoe Isn't Going To Kill Your Tree, Says Professor Decorative Semi-Parasite Becoming More Common In Ada Shade Trees in Recent Years Have you noticed any mistle- toe growing on'the tree just out- side your home? This decorative semi-parasite is becoming quite thick on the here in Ada. Most of us are so accustomed to seeing it that we do nol realize just how lucky we arc to have it. If we decide to use mistle- toe as a Christmas decoration, some have only to do is step out- side and gather it from the tree. People in the New England states and even in the larger towns here in Oklahoma are not so lucky. Every year near the Christmas holidays, thousands of dollars w'orth ot. mistletoe are shipped out of this state to the Northern and Eastern One man ne.'.u.1 'Mountain View (and there arc others in the state) has his own "mistletoe farm." Leave Buds When Gathering1 This tree parasite grows readi- ly, but when gathering it from the Iroc, one ban to be careful to leave some buds for future growth. M. P, Hatchelt, botany direc- tor at East Central, tells that thert ia a sticky film covering the berries, and Ihe general way of spreading mistletoe is done by birds lighting on the berries, get- ling some of the sticky substance on their feet, and-carrying it with its seeds lo other trees. Not All Parasitic Halehett also said lhat the par- asite does very little harm to the trees. "Sometimes, it will stunt Ihe growth of a limb from where it grows, on out lo Ihe tip, but I have never seen a tree that hns been killed by he ex- plained. "You he went on, "this parasite does not live entirely off of Ihe tree. Although il depends on the host, for its waler nnd minerals which arc taken from the sap, it has leaves and secures the oxydcn under its own power. It is only partially parasitic." Halchclt said lhat if sonic.1 en- terprising person would take Die trouble to study the hnbils nnd growth of mistletoe, he could grow his own and reap some amazing profits during Ihe Christmas season. Remember, too, it is Oklahoma's state flower. far away' as Moscow where the government newspaper declared Ihe work of the United Nations and foreign ministers council here had been "fruitful" and "substantial." The paper said that "one cnnnnl fail to see n sub- stantial achievement benofilling the cause of internntionnl peace." These developments came after Secretary of Slate James I1'. Byrnes, British Foreign Secretary Ert.'st Bevin and Mololov ad- dressed the assembly late last night and early today. Tho .secretariat gave up hopes of reaching final adinurnmopl lo- night in the midst of long debates over minor items and announced another plenary session for p.m. (EST) Sunday. Tin; arms reduction program was approved unanimously this morning amid n wnvc- (if npplntiso in the Flushing Meadows Assem- bly hall. The 54-member nations then turned down by a vote of lo (i, j the Russian demand for an im- mediate global census oT troops nnd all armaments to implement a long-range proposal for their reduction to the size of a peace- keeping police, force. As Molotov boarded the liner Queen Elizabeth after attending the foivign ministers conferi-nri: and most important U. N. ses- sions hi! commented thai results were satisfactory to the So- viet delegation ;IM they nre lo Ihe other delegations." West Texas Slate College Closed Regents Act When Stu- dents Strike Protesting Housing Conditions CANYON, Tex., Dec. A strike by students' protesting housing conditions today brought an order from the board of re- gents closing Wesl Texas Slate college indefinitely. The Panhandle college hns an enrollment of about Sludcnls stayed away from classes ycslcrdny after business Manager Virgil Hcnson ignored nil ultimatum to resign. A mass mccling held Thursday night protested that housing facilities were inadequate nnd blamed Hcnson, President A. J. Hill todny snid Ihe housing situation "was jusl like everywhere else." He .said it was bad. but compared witli other colleges and towns, it was "average." The hoard of regents loday ordered tho sfhool closed "until further notice." Closing notice." wore posl.od on bill Id.in bonnls, CAUSE FOR STOMACH ACIIK LOS ANGELES. Dec. H. General hospital physicians diag- nosed the ailment of Diehard Case, Hi, MS stomach ulcers until an X-ray picture disclosed he had swallowed two bedsprings nnd parts of a thermometer. The bodsprings are the small type used in bunks. and Die a month rental ceil- ing The priority system on building materials was junked. The way was cleared for anyone, veteran or not. to build a house for his own occu- pancy with government permis- sion. "J am determined that a vigo- rous housing program will con- tinue to be carried out in snid .'i presidential .statement. Truman Wants Rr.sull.i "The techniques wo will arc those tlint will work lodny. I. am inli'ri'.sled in results and I am cnnvimvd thai this 1347 pro- gram will produce results." Tin; net ion followed in large part the recommendations of real eslali! and construction industry leaders who contended that more homes would bo built without govcrnmi nt restrictions than with llirm. Every control Mr. Truman re- moved ri'prcsoiUi'd a reversal of the program advociilrd by Wyatt, former mayor of Louisville. Ky.. who last wi.u'k ns housing expediter when tin; White Housa would not give him the author- ity nnd lighter nil PS hi- wanted. The prc-sidcnt snid that ri'ronMriu'liim finance corpora- tion will continue lo assist pro- ducers of pivfnbricated housing and industrially built dwelling components it will do so "when it warranted." Decisions to RFC The financing miiller wan mil- nnrliciil.-irly in dispute. Wy- nll wanted power to direct RFC to make prefabricated Jin had asked for some in such loans and gotten nbout The president ap- parently settled thai point final- ly by putting it up to RFC to dc.'termine what is "warranted." The president fixed no speci- fic housing gonl for objective was units starlerl in nnd of which. were to bo under way this year. Prospects nre lhat something UVI.T will ba under way by the year's end. Several questions remained unanswered in the presidential announcement. A major one was: What happens to the approxi- mately homes now under construction which builders pro- mised to offer to veterans a certain price? TH' PESSIMIST lloli Jo, 1 j You know you've rlenncd when you git In' cli-anin' bill. You can nllus spot n small lime likes t' show off like a top sergeant.   

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