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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: December 11, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 11, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             A. in this rainy. Muddy weather a. dunn., the cr.wd.d tin... wh.n th.r. ju.t ,..m f.r .y.ryb.dy who won ,ed to go is the s.ogan, this trip Avrraie Net Nov. Paid Circulation 8607 Mrmbrr; AudJt Bureau of Circulation PHE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 202 ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1946 Rains Continue But Highways Open Over State, Streams Full Christmai Buying Dwindles, Mailing of Gifts And Cards Slowed; Freezing Weather Touches Panhandle Rain, unwelcome now that the soil is soaked and cannot absorb any more, set in again early Tuesday night and kept right on Wednesday morning and the weather forecast for the night and Thursday held little encouragement for its end. Streams are running full over r u in t this area, which has received, Cold on Way But Nation's Shoppers Favored Just Now WASHINGTON, Dec. 11, The breath of old St. Nick blew southward today a promise that the- nation's thermometers soon vill start making like Deeeinbe instead of May. "Don't quote me too stronglj on this." the weatherman can tioncd, "but it looks thong the cold air moving in from Can fida will soon start the mercur; skidding back down to some where around tiiat is. for December. "The northern plains and northeastern slates will star hack to normalcy probably to morrow, with the southeastern slates chilling off some Friday.' 3ut for another day or two a least, Christmas shoppers car sally forth in spring-like weath- er. Toady'i forecast shows skief rlearinc; over the New England and mid-Atlantic slates, and ti "htlle cooler, but still well above normal." Mild is the. word for thr southeastern states, includ- ing Texas, the Gulf region and the Carolinas, with a little cloud- iness and rain. Westward, the Great Lakes and Mississippi states and those in the central and northern plains are going to have it "gcn- rrally fair and rather warm." But Montana and the Dakotas mav get an advance touch of the weather to come. It's 1o br fair nnd warmer In the southwest; scattered show- ers in the northern Rockies and North Pacific area, and tem- peratures n little, above normal for thr other Rocky Mountain sections and the far west. Yesterday, with scant' regard for the padded. Pscudo Santas in the department stores and the hibernating bcnrs stirring resT- Ifssly in their warmed-up dens, the weather was definitely "mild" over the country. One thermome- ter in New York Citv touched OB decrees, which made it the liot- tf-st December day in the city's Harrisburg, Pa., report- ed 70. also a m-w mark. this area, which __ _______, along with MuAlcsler, the heav- iest rainfall of the slalewide pre- cipitalion. Ada storm sowers were unable to take care rush of surface water. During Tuesday night Ada reg- istered 1.14 inches of rain, bring- ing the three-day total to 6.11, nnd with more to bo added when Observer W. E. Pitt next checks up on the rain gauge. Temperatures have held to a small range, from a moderate 61 degrees Tuesday to 55 degrees low overnight. Shopping: Slowed Christmas shopping, which had been at an unusually early peak, dwindled rapidly, ns did mailing of gifts and cnrds, when many tumble to roach the stores or the The Associated Press reports virtually all highways in the state open with no major flood damage reported and some streams in the eastern part of the state overflowed. Pauls Valley reports nearly four inches of rain since Sunday, 1.59 inches Tuesday night. Fort Sill in the southwest re- ported 1.10 inches in a 24-hour period ending this morning. McAlestcr Total to 7.82 McAlestcr's total rain since Monday was 7.82 inches and'rain was falling there this morning. The highway patrol said U. S. 270 west of McAlestcr, closed yesterday, was open. But U, S. near Hcavener was closed by vatcrs of Black Fork. State 43 was closed east of Coalgate. And U. S. 64 between jorc and Vian may be closed be- ore the day's one) because of ris- nj? waters of the Illinois river. Rainfall reports included Ard- iiore .55; Elk City .22; Enid .04- VIcAlestcr .31; Ponca City .02; nd Tulsn .23. Freezing weather touched the 'iinliandlo where Guymon rc- orled 28 degrees. FIVE CENTS THE COPY COLUMBIANS PLANNED U. S. DICTATORSHIP: In this photo JnW w1 eiised' Ralph Childei's, second from right anS La- C-Waler> rghtl former members of Columbians, Inc. dictate M-> l nc. cae to. Miss Rene Forrest the plan by which the Columbians' were to seize the U. S. government. James Hr Sheldon, New York Citv lhe Non-Sectarian Anti-Nazi League', m yS (NEA Tephoto) Atlanta- Infantry Unit Has Places for More Guardman'i Pay Good, Equipment Excellent _ Company C. 180th Infantry, National Guard, is asking for ynunp men between the ages of IS and 35 to enlist as members of the -unit. The beginning rate of pay for a private is S2.50 for a two-hour and ns recruits are trained -or their respective jobs they may be able to obtain as much as for each weekly drill. The National Guard unit is well equipped and has praclicall} the equipment as a soldier in ine regular army. An officer of the local unit assures that the days of horse drawn trucks and wooden rifles are gone. Young guardsmen are receiv- ing actual experience with some o'. the finest equipment that is available for warfare. Any one interested in enlisting in Company C can contact offi- cers on Wednesday nights at o'clock at the regular meeting o: the -ur.it in the armory or any day from 8 a.m. 'to 4 p.m The office will be open from S to 12 a.m. Saturdays. The patrol said the Poteau riv- r was rising six inches an hour and was out of its banks U. S. 270 is closed north of Howe and U. S. 270-271 is closed between Wistcr and Poteau. Total rainfall in thn Lnwlon urea since Monday was 2.74 inches. Water covered state Highway 21) between Kcolu and McCurtain and in some places was report- ed eight feet deep. The highway patrol reported rainfall so hard between Soiling and Watonga on US 281 that vis- ibility was reduced to 50 feel, for a short lime. The temperature there was dropping. Tiny Rocket Plane loafs' at 550 MPH in .First Test LpS ANGELES, Dec. 11, A tiny plane with which the army air forcejs and Bell Aircraft Corp., its maker, expect to delve into the uncharted realm of sup- ersonic speed, has successfully completed its first tests, with 23-year-old Pilot Chalmers (Slick) Goodlin, New Alexandria, Pa., at the con- trols, was cut loose from the belly of a B-29 bomber over Muroc Army Air Base Monday. Second after America's first rocket-propelled plane dropped away from the big bomber Good- 1m turned on the power, and the craft darted away with a mo- mentum which the. former .navy pilot compared to the thrust a catapult aboard a -car- The plane is designed to fly at miles an hour, but Goodlin made no attempt to step it up Santa Greeted By Rolf Youngsters, Boosts Box Supper Santa made his grand appear- ance, coming in on the "Santa Glaus before a group of bright-eyed youngsters at the Roff Methodist church Tuesday evening. He was accompanied by a group of seven members of the Ada Junior Chamber of Com- Lower Court To Defer Any UMW Action Government, Lewis Attor- neys Agree to'Wait Until After Supreme Court Hear- ing WASHINGTON, Dec. 11. Federal Judge T. Alan Goldsbor- ough today approved an agree- ment between government and John L. Lewis attorneys to delay until late January any further lower court action against the United Mine Workers growing out of the recent coal strike. The joint stipulation approved by Judge Goldsborough provides that any further litigation be de- ferred until ten days after the supreme court hears arguments on the appeal of Lewis and the miners from their contempt con- tempt convictions in Goldsbor- ough's court. Appeal Argument Jan. 14 The appeal is due to be argu- ed on Jan. 14. The stipulation was signed by Assistant Attorney General John F. Sonnett for the government and by Welly K. Hopkins, Joseph A. Padway and six other United Mine workers' altorneys for the Lewis union. The stipulation reads: from rier. merce. VET OFFERS ONE EYE SO LAD CAN SEE HIS TOYS 3ELLEVUE. O., Dec. Siehtless Johnny Lower. 8, "is young and has lots ahead oT wrote a war veteran from O.. "while I already have had my fun in life." that, the former G. I. of- -erc-d one of his eyes, describing vision as perfect 20-20. His name was not disclosed. "One eye is better thnn said the veteran in his letter. "I hke to hcln Johnny pee Christmas toys instead of mere- ly fee-line thorn." JWEATHER OKLAHOMA Partly cloudy tnis afternoon and central and east tonight; little change in tem- peratures tonight; lowest temper- ature? 30 Panhandle to 50 south- east: partly cloudy and much c-Iacr Thursday, light ihowers ext.-eme cast Not Much Hurt In Two-Story Tumble Archie Higgins, Ada negro was slightly injured about a. in. Monday morning when he fell from outside the room of a two-story house at 102 East Fifth. A friend who saw the fall said thai Higgins had gone up a flighl of outside stairs and was at- tempting to get into a friend's room. While on the roof of the build- ing and under the friend's win- dow, Higgins started slipping and turned a somersault before "hit- ting Ihe ground. The first part of his body to strike the ground was the left, side of his face. He was taken to Valley View hospital whore he was given-first aid treatment for minor cuts and bruises. The friend said that Higgins had been drinking before the accidenl occurred. that high. He loafed along at a mere 550, using first one cylin- der, then two, and only a few four. The plane was cut loose at feet. Goodlin climbed un- der his own power to meantime diving, banking and climbing. He flow for 19 min- tites, not quite seven under pow- er, and made a perfect landing with his fuelless engine idle. The plane's power is measured in terms of thrust, rather than horsepower. But R. M. Stanley, Eric, Okla., Bell's chief engine- er and designer on the plane, said by the only available means of comparison, the engine could be said to develop horse- power. It burns ethyl alcohol, oxidized by liquid oxygen. The engine is unbelievably small to generate such a tremen- dous Ihrust. Without fuel it weighs only 210 pounds, and its overall length is 56 inches. The Santa made his appearance at the church where a box supper was being held, and with his usual smiling face, passed through the throng of children, passing out candy suckers and taking their orders for Christmas day. Little Gail Anderson, .whose father js m service and still over- a present-a little early.-He; was Btage by Santa and' presented with a toy machine gun.. After Santa hadf finished his 'business meeting" with the kids, the Jaycees decided they would stay for the box supper. Santa was given the honor of auctioning off the first box. For some rea- son, maybe because Santa was there, the box supper went over with amazing success. The 53 boxes sold reaped a total of for the coming, Christmas pro- gram fund, Two boxes sold for each and the average price ranged from five to six dollars. The Jaycees, bent on not being left out, bought two boxes for a total of and when the auc- tion was over, resold them, Trice Broaderick auctioneering, for j.50. All during the program, Santa would talk with and laugh with the boys and girls. If there is one person m the world of whom no child is afraid, it is Santa Claus. R. L. Gosnell, chairman of Jay- cees Santa Claus programs to be neld in communities over this area, reports that the appear- ances will go on as scheduled average fighter, measuring 31 feet from -tail to tip, with a wing span of only 28 feet. Army authorities emphasized at a press conference that the plane, of almost conventional de- sign, was not designed as a fight- er, a bomber or any other espe- cial type of craft its mission is purely and specifically to per- mit investigation of the super- sonic speed ranges. WASHINGTON, Dec. 11. Dr. John W. Frey, long connect- ed with government oil activities today was named director of the division of marketing in the American Petroleum Institute, an industry organization. During the war he wax director of mar- keting for the petroleum admin- istration for war and later spe- assistant to the deputy di- lie is a native of Depue, cial rector. 111. Shopping Days To Christmas Banking Course To Start Dec. 30 In-Training Veterans, Non- vets Invited to Attend A IB-Approved Class Enough applicants have called to assure an in-training class on some banking says J. B. Walters, director, and these with others who are interested are to meet December 30 at Ada High school to organize the opening class. Dr. Charles F. Spencer will teach the course, on "Negotiable Instruments." This course is approved by the American Institute of Banking. Both veterans and non-veter- ans are being encouraged to take the course, which will probably meet' on Thursday night of each week unless the class members' decide otherwise. Already about a dozen from local banks have indicated their intention of. taking the-course Veterans and others who are working in loan, real estate, in- surance and similar offices are invited to lake it, also. Two will be attending from Konawa, and Walters hopes that other communities of this area will have veterans, and interest- ed non-veterans, attending. United States ships have rights of navigation on the St. Law- rance River under a treaty sign- ed in 1872. I go to Sasakwa and Konawa Thursday; Stratford on Friday and Allen on Saturday nights. Azerbaijan" Rebels Give In, Allow Iran Forces Move TEHRAN, Dec. Tabriz radio announced today that Dr. Sallamollah Javid, the communist governor-general of .Azerbaijan province, had wired Premier Ahmed Qavam -that the provincial council agreed to the assignment of government secu- rity forces in Azerbaijan. Four columns of government troops were dispatched only yps- terday across the frontier of the semi-autonomous state which had rejected Qavam's..prders for gov- ernment supervision of coming elections throughout the nation. The supreme war council or Iran met here for three hours this morning. Gen. Razmara, chief of the general staff, was in attendance, as the troops struck northward against the Azerbaijan Fedaie (mililia) of Dr. Sallamollah Jav- id, the communist governor-gen- eral, m a movement which challenge Soviet Russia's interest in the northwestern border prov- yesterday that the It is hereby agreed, subject to the approval of the court, that all further action and proceed- ings in this cause be stayed until ten days after the1 conclusion of argument in the -supreme court of the United States in the cases entitled United States of Amer- ica verus United Mine Workers of America et al, Nos. 759 and 760 October term, 1946, after which time either party upon five days' notice to the other may take such, action as may be ap- propriate." Court Action to Be Brief Hinging on the appeal are fines of on the UMW president and on the union. Lawyers were of the opinion that the supreme court will re- quire no-more than two weeks to conclude the case there. Tax Groupfavors Cut Would deduct General Fund Levies That Much OKLAHOMA CITY, Dec. 11. in Oklahomas' tax bills totalling a year in general fund levies alone were proposed today in the final report of the interim joint legis- lative tax committee. The committee was reviewing the full report before giving it final approval. The final recom- mendations will be.submitted to the legislature in January. L. D. Melton, research director of the Tulsa Chamber of Com- merce and secretary of the com- mittee, reported the state's fi- nances were "never in a better condition." He added that money is in the treasury to retire Ihe entire state debt when it be- comes due and said a general fund surplus of about 000 is expected for the current fiscal year ending June 30. 1947. "An analysis of the condition of state finances, present and prospective, including surplus ac- cruals in the general fund, esti- mated revenues for the next bi- ennium and estimates of neces- ?arv appropriations, discloses that the committee's program of tax -revision will have only a moderate effect on general fund revenues and may safely be en- U. N. Committee Drops Plan of Britain For Troop-Armaments Count That Had U.S. Worried Barbey Says U.S. Might Lose Five Million To Fulure Surprise Attack But Admiral Soys Wouldn't Knock Us Out, Thot Our Reprisal Attacks Would Be on Way Too Quickly By HAL BOYLE NEW YORK, Dec. 11. Vice Admiral Daniel E. Barbey :hinks the United States might 'suffer five million casualties within a few hours" in Ihe eveni if a future surprise attack agninst t with mass destruction weapons "But Ihey couldn'l knock us said, the commander of tht fourth fleet and veteran andings in the nnd a matter of hours our rc- irisal attacks would be underway >n a large scale." Barbey believes thai America ias at least a ten-year edge over ther countries in the production if weapons of mass destruclion. They are a praclical monopoly. But we must keep planniii ahead." He says this military advantage is the strongest behind-the-scene-i argument for the success of the United Nations. War For Survival II another war does come, how- ever, Barbey said, "il would nut be a duel belween genllemen, but a war for the survival of the masses of civilization." He said he could see no reason for emphasizing possible attacks over the North Pole. He thought it more likely that a foreign en- emy would "send out a dozen or so submarines and atom-bomb our eastern coastal cities from scattered positions hundreds of miles out in the Atlantic." Rockels carrying atomic war- heads could be fired even while the submarines' were submerged, he added. We Could Hit Buck "But our retaliation would be swift, unavoidable by the enemy, and more we keep our said Barbey. The admiral look issue with Ihose who believe that in the event of a war with Soviet Rus- sia the Russians would move huge infantry masses into Western Eu- rope and seize such centers as Rome, Antwerp and Puris in the hope that we would not atom- bomb these friendly capitals and so would again require a gigantic expeditionary force and years of fighting to drive out the invaders. Barbey, who feels thai United Nations progress makes such a war highly hypothetical, said that even if such a situation came to pass no big land armies by America would be needed. "Nor would we find it neces- sary to bomb Paris, Antwerp or Home." he continued, "By atom- bombing Leningrad, Moscow, Kiev, Odessa, and other main communications centers we could isolate Ihc Russian armies in Western Europe from their sup- keep them isolated." "What would happen then? "If the subjected peoples re- mained true to their political be- liefs, they would soon rise and destroy these masses of Russian foot troops, cut off from ammu- nition, fuel and ideological sup- port from their own country. Invaders Couldn't Live Off Land "The Russians couldn't adapt local production facilities in time to save No modern army can live off Ihe land in the manner of Genghis Khan. It will disintegrate instead into a bow and arrow army, which the civ- ilians could cope with. "Germany supported her armies with slave labor. But the aborers worked in Germany in rerman industries." Barney said only one thing could change, this picture. "If Western Europe is inherent- y communistic and the occupied countries joined Ihe invaders in- stead of resisting them, Ihcn the Russians would succeed. They would in eTfcct simply move their capitals to Home or Paris. "In lhat case, if Europe really wanted communism, there would be r.o point in further fighting. We couldn't impose our system on .them. Asked whether, if. the nations disarmed, any country could secretly construct weapons of mass dcstruclion despite the vig- ilance of. investigative commis- sions, Barney replied: "In my opinion, no. We would learn in time to take counter measures." U. S. Was Facing Having To Reveal Atomic Secrets Committee Near Agree- ment On Resolutions For Arms Reduction, Atomic Weapon Ban By FRANCIS W. CARPENTER LAKE SUCCESS. N. Y., Doc. 11. powerful United Na- tions committee was reported authoritatively today to have dropped n controversial British proposal for a world-wide troop and armaments count in n sud- den compromise move to bre.-ilc n jam holding up ;i KiwrnI dis- armament resolution. This settlement, of Ihc major difficulty confronting the United Nations assembly after last night's plenary session un- derstood to be conditional upon its acceptance by the United States, Great Britain, and Soviet Russia. Committee Accepts Proposal However, the representatives of those nations attending the meeting of an 8-nalion drafting committee on disarmament ac- cepted the proposal, said to have been urged by President Paul- Henri Spaak, of the assembly. They agreed to report to thc'ir chiefs and then inform the 20- intioli disarmament sub-commit- tee today the result of their con- sultations. The committee, whieh needed agreement on only one paragraph to complete n resolution calling for general arms reduction and prohibition of atomic weapons became snarled shortly after it met over the proposal made last night by Sir Hartley Shawcross, British delegate, to the assembly for a count, of all weapons and in- struments of war. Then, it was reported, Spaalc appealed to the cominille.- for action, suggested that tin; troop count jdea be dropped and that the resolution already agreed Plane Missing With Few Taking Courses 32 Aboard Sought In Cascades Area acei ample funds for substantially higher appropria- tions than for the current bien- nmm the proposed report said The committee found the con- dition of state finances to be such that there is no justification for new or higher taxes in the im- mediate future." Even with the a year cut, the state's income in the next biennium will exceed ap- propriations as recommended by state budget officer Roger Phelps by between and a year, Melton' told Ing committee. mce. Reports _ troops had captured a highway and railway town five miles beyond the Ghaflankooh mountain pass, remained uncon- firmed. Premier Ahmed Qavam order- ed the military action after the Azerbaijan regime- rejected his plan for army supervision of com- ing elections. MUSKOGEE, Okla., Dec. 11 five civilized tribes agency yesterday received bids totaling for oil and gas leases on Indian, lands in seven counties. Top bid per acre was SEATTLE, Dec. 11. A coast guard ensign flying a small observation plane radioed today he had sighted wreckage three and a half miles from the Toledo airport, near the western fringe of the Cascade mountains be- tween here and Portland, which might be a marine corps trans- port plane missing since yester- day afternoon with 32 men aboard. The message was relayed here from a coast guard mobile com- munications truck group at Tole- do, which is 19 miles south of Chehalis. The flyer, an ensign named Osterberg, could nol de- termine whether anyone was alive. The plane was one of six which left San Diego, Calif., at p. m. (EST) yesterday on a non- stop flight to transfer a marine corps contingent to Seallle. The flight encountered bad weather m Oregon and soulhwest Wash- ington. Four landed at Portland One made it safely to the Sand Point naval air station here. The missing plane last was contacted when the pilot wire- lessed'the Toledo range station, a few miles south of Chehalis, Wash., and was cleared to nex't communicate with the powerful civil aeronautics administration stalion at Everett, Wash., said Comdr. P. D. Duke, Sand Point operations officer. The Toledo range station re- ported il cleared the plane to In State Schools To Become Teachers J.OP oia per acre was 18 I i, C- i me TO by Earl J. Evans, Holdenville, -y due to icing condi- fpr a 40-acre tract owned by Emma Thomas Gijbson in Hughes county, adjacent to the new east Holdenville oil pool. Leases were sold on land in Hughes. Washington, Creek. Ok- mulRec, Okfuskee, Seminole and Pontotoc counties. tions it was encountered at 9 000 feet. OKLAHOMA CITY, Dec. 11. 448 senior students arc enrolled in education courses in all slate colleges' and universi- ties, giving little hope for allevi- ation of Oklahoma's public school teacher shortage. The prospect is no brighter for Ihe following year, since only 395 junior students are enrolled in teacher courses, the stale regents for higher education reported yesterday. The tola! includes only 205 sen- iors at Ihe six stale teachers col- leges, 40 at the University of Oklahoma and 113 at Oklahoma A. M. college. The regents' report declared that all institutions "are bulging at the seams" and that "it is be- coming more and more difficult to provide adequate facilities for all those who want a college ed- ucation." The students enrolled in the slate institulions are double Ihe lolal of last year and are 25 per cent above the highest pre- war number. The total includes nore. than war veterans. Adding to the strain placed on the schools, "inquiries are com- ing in daily at all institutions from applicant who hope to bo accommodated during the secont Ihe report said. Of Ihe lolal number of student; enrolled, are taking a gen- eral arts and sciences course. Totals in other fields of sludy include engineering busi- ness agriculture home economics pre-mcdi- jcine 867; medicine 287; pre-law upon be submitted unanimously Find Way Out The committee finally accepted bpaaks proposal and agreed in ine compromise way out of the dilemma in this manner: The adopted resolution calls upon the member stales and tho security council to repon io next assembly just what has been clone to implement provisions in Ihe resolution relating to re.luc- nR troops and the withdrawal ot troops from alien lands Before the United Stales faced the "dangerous" pos- sibility of being forced to close her vital atomic .--crels to the rest of the world unmcdiatc- If the three great powers agreo on the compromise plan it wi-j said, the whole resolution can bo completed in len minutes this a tcrnoon and the assembly c.in OKLAHOMA CITY, Dec. 11 General Mac Q. Williamson today-approved a public improvement bond issue for the city of Muskogce. It included for water- works improvement and for sanitary sewers. Cleckler Appointed TULSA, Okla., Dec. 11 R. D. Wilbor, Jr., State War As- sets Administration director, has announced appointment of Wil- -liam Fred Cleckler, Tulsa, as chief of the non-industrial real property disposal department of WAA. A veteran of World War II, Cleckler has been connected with the Tulsa office of the Smaller War Plants Corporation and later was with the Reconstruction I Finance Corporation'. istry 137. At Langston university, the state's only Negro institution for higher education, enrollment totals 752, including 331 war vel- Thereafter it was silent despite ?15' Pharmacy 340 and pre-dcnl- frantic efforts of navy, army and 10" CAA radio stations. Command- er Duke added. When it finally became appar- ent the ship could be listed as "missing" rather than merely the navy appealed to news services and radio stations 'to ask clues from the public. -T----------------------k----------------------- TULSA, Dec. iron lung for use by infantile paralysis victims of northeastern Okla- homa has been presented to the Junior League of Tulsa by employes of the Tulsa District U. S. Army Engineers. The equip- ment, to be housed at Hillcrest Memorial hospital, will be avail- able for use wilhin a radius of 300 to 500 miles. TULSA, Okla., Dec. Col. C. H. Chorpening, Tulsa dis- Irict U. S. army engineer, today announced_ thai a public hearing would bo held Jan. 15 in Ihe Mu- nicipal auditorium al Fail-view to consider a master recreation plan for Ihe Canton dam area on Ihe North Canadian river. Colonel Charpening said engi- neers had drafted plans for a recreational program including such activities as boating, swim- ming, fishing, hunting, picnic- king, and camping. acl. STATE LEGISLATURE GETS READY FOIl INAUGURATION- OKLAHOMA CITY Oec H .W-The Oklahoma senate a n d house are getting ready for tha inauguration of Gov.-ch-ct Rov J. Turner Jan. 13. A senate committee of scvrri members has been appointed bv James C. Nance to meet Dec. IS wilh a house committee to be named soon by Raymond Board speaker, designate. Nance is president pro temporc of the senate. Senate members are Homor Paul. Pauls Valley; W. T. Gool- by, Pry or; Robert Burns, Okla- homa City; Phil Lower.v. Loco- Joe Bailey Cobb, Tishominpo: Boyd Cowdcn. Chandler, a n d and L. E. Wheeler, Weathcrford. CHICKASHA. Okla., II." Ida Mhy Rob- ertson died today of burns re- ceived Tuesday when her clothes caught fire from trash burning in the yard of her farm home near Cement. The girl was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Robertson. TH' PESSIMIST nntr fm "High society" is jest about th lowest form o' life. Lem Wheeler throwcd surprise party fer 'is wife last wushec. ih' dishes ag'in after only weeks.   

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