Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: December 9, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 9, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Most of us are inclined to shiver at the thought of a norther but there are people in the county who would like to have one come they can butcher hogs and restock smokehouses. Avrrtje Nov. raid Circulation 8607 Audit Hurrau of Clrcitlnllnn THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 200 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY; Heavy Rains Soak County, Part of Stale Ada Has Heaviest Down- pour Reported for Sunday Night, Temperatures Stay Mild Clo--ds that had been moving northward over Ada for a day or two thickened late Sunday and as night fell began deluging the city with a scries of heavy thun- ciprshowprs.. Those continued until well up into Monday. By 7 a. m. Mon- day the government gauge regis- tered 1.95 inches and estimates for the rainfall after that read- ing ranged from an inch up. Temperatures remained mild. Saturday's high was an un-win- terlike 72 degrees and even with the skies cloudy on Sunday the maximum rose to 68 degrees. Shortslccvc Weather Holds Weather continues to be a sub- ject for conversation here, com- ment ranging from the unbe hcveable warmth that has en- couraged shirtsleeve garb foi men to wondering when the cole will finally arrive anc take over for the next two or three months. The Associated Press reports heavy rains at Muskogee, Ard- Enid and Tulsa during the night, varying fr6m nearly an inch to 1.17. Temperatures remained mile through the state, the lowesi overnight minimum being 30 Guymon and the next lowest 45 at Waynoka. Most temperatures in the fifties and at McAles- ter the low was degrees. Mc- Alestcr received a fifth of an inrh of rain. Meanwhile, in Ponloloc coun- iy there are numerous farmers who wouldn't mind having an old-fashioned northern come along. They didn't have their hogs ready "for butchering during the cold of, son e weeks ago, arc anxious now to quit feeding the animals and to start feeding on them. Some have been taking a rhiince and butchering during the unscasonnlly warm weather of the last week or two. And occasionally now someone is heard to wonder if the cold will cor--' along at the right time to furnish Ada with that rare item, a while Christ Jaycees Will Take Santa Visiting Now Start Tonight on Annual Good Will Trips To Neighboring Towns Ada Jaycees start tak- ing Santa Claus on a scries of bus trips to nearby communities in the annual good will tours that are becoming a looked-forward- to part of every Christmas sea- son. They will go by bus, starling from the Donco station, and are being urged to '-go along' in real numbers. Those who have been on such trips the last year or took wouldn't miss 'em and newer Jayccc members are being asked to go on the tours and share the joy and fun of distributing hap- j neighboring towns. This week's schedule; Ada at bo in Cenlrahoma lo 8; be in Tupelo to be in Stonewall at 9. Hotel's Fire Death Toll Climbs to 120 Multiple Probes Ordered Of Atlanta Disaster; Origin Still Unknown ATLANTA, Dec. Winecoff hotel fire death toil climbed to 120 today as multiple Ada at 7; ar- investigatons were ordered into Saturday's disaster which was the nation's most costly, ho'.al conflagration. Three names were added to the death list. Mrs. George D. Burch, 20, of Chattanooga, died of in- juries suffered when she fell 10 improvised rope "land, to last week, had descended three floors to reach fire ladders. Two other names which had escaped the Red Cross were re- corded. They were Charles (BUI) Berry of Ccdartown, South- Duck Season Ends For State With Few Brought Down OKLAHOMA CITY, Dec. 9. (XT') duck season closes p. m. the only ones happy over the way the sou- son turned out are the ducks and jyi-sf. Most of the .iliitc nminxls wcnr lucky to get a dozen good shots in '.he abbreviated 45-day season which was cut from 80 days in 3045. And things are liable to get next season, Slate Game "Warden Jeff Kendall said. lie pii'dirlPd thai in 1IM7 both (he jr.in-.hc-r of liays (mil bug limit, would he Kendall, icliivning from Co- lumbia, Mo., where he attended ii mc-ftmg of the midwest asso- ciation of game and fish commis sinners, suid the season would be curtailed "if another drought oc- curs in the northern duck fac- tories during the nesting season as it did this year." "California had more ducks than any other section this Kendall went on in an inter- view. "The central flyway, which includes Oklahoma, was decided- ly low. with few ducks. The two eastern flyways also had poor movement." Geese increased, especially the big blue and snow species, Ken- dall said. But prospects "must bo better." he pointed out, if the seasons are not to be cut again. After a disappointing start, quail hunting is picking up. Fav- orable reports are coming from the eastern, ccntrdl and north- eastern sections of the state. The state quail season closes Jan. 1. TALL, CUT. SHOCK CAUSE BOY'S DEATH DETROIT, Dec. Roald Bruland family returned home Sunday from Christmas tree shopping and three-year-old son Ronald was sent to a grocery for milk. The boy fell on the driveway of his home and cut his hand badly on an empty milk bottle he was carrying. Taken to a hospital, he died of a heart seizure as his hnnd was treated. Physicians said the heart seizure was traceable to excitement and shock. iWEATHER cloudy wfs4.. cloudy east with scattered showers and thunder storms east this afternoon and extreme east tonight: cooler west and north to- night; low temperatures middle 20's Panhandle to middle   A Supreme Court Will Give Quick Ruling On Lewis, UMW Appeal Miners Troop Back to Work As Walkout End Halts Rising Tide Of Unemplbyment Across U. S. weekend deluge of publicity for Prince Philip of Greece and Den- mark today whetted the British people's expectation that the handsome, 25-year-old court fav- orite soon would become engag- ed to Britain's Princess Elizabeth in the "royal romance" of the year. Th r e e nationally-circulated newspapers devoted considerable space Sunday to Prince Philip, and a blessing on the reported Engagement came from an unex- pected source Tom Driberg, left wing labor member of Par- liament, no admirer of the Greek royal family, who described the prince as "intelligent and broad- minded, fair and good-looking.1 "It seems fair to interpret his request for British citizenship as, in part, a desire to be disentang- led from Greek politics perman- ently." Dribcrg wrote in his Rey- nolds news column. Prince Philip, sixth in line for the Greek throne, will forfeit his right to succeed his second cou- sin George II of the Hellenes by becoming a British subject. Newspaper writers stressed that Prince Philip, who served in the Royal. Navy during the war, has spent most of his life in Eng- land, has English blood (he is Princess Elizabeth's third cou- sin) and frequently is a week- end guest nl royal, residences. "It is no secret at court that Uncle Dickie the family mime for. Lord the Prince's uncle is a whole hearted supported of the mar- riage." said the Sunday Pictorial, adding: "Close friends of the Princess smile and say: 'She's very young but she knows her own mind'." PITTSBURGH, Dec. 9 The soft coal miners trooped back to their jobs today and resumed production of desperately needed fuel, ending a 17-day work stop- page that crippled the nation's economy. Spear-heading the back-to- work movement by the Mine Workers were the diggers in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, which has about one- half of the soft coal miners. Early reports from these fields showed miners generally obeyed John L. Lewis' order to return to work. although full production may not be reached before Tuesday or Wednesday. In the coal-rich Pittsburgh area only a couple of large mines were reported idle and union- ists explained work would be re- sumed at these as soon as the official work notice had been re- ceived from the union. Fuel Sorely Needed Among the mines re-opening were captive pits of such stee: corporations as U. S. Steel. Jones and Laughlin, and Republic Steel. Fuel was sorely needed by in- dustry and to warm homes and schools across the country. The back-to-work movement, which came after nearly 300.000 other workers had been idle and complete economic paralysis was threatened, started yesterday at three small Ohio pits. Clcan-uo crews and shifts of "cat-eye" cutters worked through the night at many mines to j ready them for the 6 A.M. shift, today the first operation in 18 days. President John P. Busarello of UMW District 5. embracing Pitts- burgh, said 02 percent of his 000 miners voted to return. Some Still "Sore" "They're plenty sore over the raw deal we got from the gov- Busnrello said, "but they are going back because Le- wis requested them to go back." William Haynes. UMW chief in Uniontown. Pa., coal fields, said all pits there are expected back in operation within two days, "because the union and miners still are squarely behind Lewis and always will be." The miners generally were calm and quiet as they prepared to go back to work. But many echoed the words of one Library. Pa., digger who moaned: Halts Lay-Off Rise "I hate to go back with noth- ing to show but three weeks' lost pay. And we'll probably have to do it all over again next April." Calling off the walkout, dra- matically announced by Lewis at a news conference Saturday, halted a rising tide of unemploy- ment and ended drastic dim-outs over more than a score of states. Railroads, steel and other coal dependent industries prepared for a quick recovery from the al- most disastrous effects of the walkout of miners. Rescinding of layoff orders that would have sent unemploy- ment soaring into the millions within a few woks assured many of a merry, instead of the bleak Christmas in prospect a few days ago. JUST IN TIME LOS ANGELES, Dec. Pianist Artur Rubenstein stepped from an airplane in time to es- cort his wife to Cedars of Leban- on hospita.1 for the birth of the couple's fourth child, which is expected soon. The 60-year-old pianist arrived here yesterday tour in the east. a concert Highway Patrolmen Make Four Arrests Members of the highway patrol stationed' in Ada made four ar- rests over the weekend and charges were filed. Orrell Johnson was charged with public drunkenness, Doro Catherine Moreland was charged with violation of the rules of the road No. 1, Paul H. Rogers was charged with public drunk- enness and Charley Cleveland Jones was charged with public 'drunkenness. Charges were filed in the Arm- strong and Bourland justice of the peace courts. Kenneth E. Will and O. O. Campbell, patrolmen, were the arresting officers. Report Finding Of 99 Pints Liquor Members of the sheriff's office, accompanied by Constable Jess Lea, report they found 99 pints of tax paid liquor at a location on North Broadway. Charges of illegal possession of toxicating whiskey filed in county court. Noble and George Brown are listed as defendants in the case. Records in the court clerk's of- fice show that similar charges were filed against Noble Brown, August 14, 194G, and also show that similar charges were filed against George Brown'and Neal Winters, Nov. 7, 1946. There has been no court action on either of the cases. Strong No-Strike Pledge For Industries Government Goal Fumbled (an Of Blazing Gasoline Costs 11 Lives 1 SASKATOON, Sask., Dec. flames which the fire chief said "moved like a solid wail" swiftly turned the Barry hotel into an inferno before dawn Sunday, killing 11 persons and injuring IB. The fire was the worst in Sas- katchewan history and the- worst in Canada since the Queen's fire in Halifax in- 1939 when 211 died. A can of gasoline, inexplicably placed beside the kitchen range, appeared to have caused the holo- caust. Fred 'Fries, a waiter, said the cook called him to the kitchen when he found the g'as range blazing and the can of gasoline shooting flames eight feet high. Fries grabbed the gasoline can and tried to run into the street with it but bumped into a fright- ened-guest. The can fell and roll- ed into the hotel lobby. Someone else tried to kick it through Public Utility Field First To Confer on Voluntary Arbitration Plans By NORMAN WASHINGTON, WALKER Dec. Tlie government pushed fpr an iron-clad mi-strilto pledge in key industries today in the wakr of its victory over John-L. Lewis in the coal strike. Officials opened the drive in the hope that the administra- tion's handling of the- mine shut- down might persuade other un- ions lo seek pence-fill selLleniLMit of liibor disputes in vital indus- 'J'hc initial no-slrike pledge ef- fort was (liro.cled ;it the public utility 'field. of unions and management in the gas. power, light and municipal transportation industries were summoned to a meeting lo con- sider a plan for voluntary arbi- tration of disputes without re- sort to strikes. The conference was arranged by a labor-management advisory committee composed of repre- sentatives of the AFL. CIO. Na- tional Association of Manufac- turers and U. S. Chamber of Commerce. Additional "peace" meetings in the door, but the draft from a other industries where strikes large electric fan sent the flames could imperil the national econ- spiralling inward. Fries said within, a minute of the last fum- ble, "all hell broke loose" and the fire was beyond control. Acting Fire Chief E. Clark or- dered fighters to. "forget the building; there were lives to be saved." Firemen visited every one of the 87 rooms while the blaze still burned and found "four or five people wandering around in dazed conditions." Some guests jumped safely from the second and top third floors in scanty at- tire. The weather was mild. Oth- ers made escape ropes of sheets and blankets. Some jumped thro-tgh the rotunda skylight. ---------------------K-------------------- Eisenhower Rests MIAMI, FJa., Dec. 9. General Dwight D. Eisenhower was in Pratt General hospital liere today for a month's rest and treatment for bursitis in his left shoulder. The general, accompanied by Mrs. Eisenhower and his military __ aides, arrived last night ami. intoxicating whiskey have been i went immediately to the hospital omy arc soon by the committee, which functions un- der auspices of the labor depart- ment. Some labor leaders conceded privately meanwhile that the ad- ministration's stand against Lew- is may discourage another round of strikes in the steel, automo- bile and similar major industries which have 'contract agreements expiring in the next few months. These leaders noted that as long as the Smilh-Connally war labor disputes act remains in ef- fect, President Truman has the power to- seize plants or indus- tries where strikes were in pro- gress or threatened. And seizures could lead to prosecutions such as Lewis faced. Busy Weekend City that in suburban Coral Gables. i _ WASHINGTON, Dec. 9.. The model airplane, a liny thing in itself, has built up a big and nationwide industry. A commerce department report said today that wholesale sales police records show liccnien had i end making 23 arrests on eight i charges. I Eight persons wore arrested for drunkenness, throe on complaints, two for lighting, three for posses- sion of intoxicating licjuor, two for loitering, one for investiga- tion, three for. disturbance and u iuj of model plane parts and motors driver" last year totaled I cuver _ This year they are expected to Oklahoma was opened for sel- i reach tlerrient in 1889. Hearing Set For Jan. 14 Arguments by Counsel For Both Sides to Be Heard On Contempt Conviction WASHINGTON, Dec. The supreme court today agreed to give a quick ruling on the val- idity of the contempt conviction of John L. Lewis and his United Mine Workers, in the soft coal strike. The- high court set Tuesday, January 14, for hearing argu- ments by counsel for both sides. A decision could come any moment after arguments ara completed. The high court acted on a gov- ernment plea of the public interest case bo taken out of the hands of the U. S. court of appeals hern and speeded to a final, "authori- tative decision. Lewis and the union were con- victed for contempt in ignoring a U. S. district court order intended to head off the 17-day soft coal strike which was ended last Sat- urday. Their fines totaled 000. Saves Month Or Two Today's action means a final decision can be expected a month or two earlier than if the issues involved had been decided first by the court of appeals. Lewis in calling off the strike at least until March 31, said fu- ture contract negotialions will be "within the limitations of the findings of- the supreme court." He said one of the reasons ho end- ed the strike was to enable thti court in considering his case to be "free from public pressure superinduccd-by the hysteria arJ frenzy of an economic crisis." Jubiliant over the week-end surrender of Lewis which ended the economy-wrecking walkout, officials familiar with, the government's legal strategy expressed confidence that the top court of the land would take jur- isdiction for an showdown. May Delay Decision But these officials as well as union nides said that with the strike over the court probably will put the case on its regular calendar, rather than docket it ahead of other matters. This might nut off a decision until February. In tin.- wake of Lewis' siidiii-n mid dramnlii: capitulation Satur- day, the nation hustled to get in- dustrial wheels turning full speed again. Lewis beat his unexpected re- trciit even as President Truman, wns ,-it work on n bnre-knurkln nulio spci'ch which he nlnn- nod to deliver lii.sl niKht. Mr. Trtimim ciinivlU'd du- talk when lio roci'ivi'il won! tlio strike wat OVIT, but made no romtni'iit. Capitol Dome KloodliKhlcd Swiftly the government strip- ped away most of the series of emergency orders which had been invoked to save coal. Out went the freight, express and parcel post embargoes, the slash in railroad passenger travel, and except in a few areas nearly out of fuel the 21-statc dim- out. The Capitol dome glistened under floodlights again. Lewis ordered his men back: to.the mines under Die terms of the same contract with the gov- ernment which he declared void Nov. 35 five days before the start of the strike. He said coal production would continue until April J. but this docs not neces- sarily mean another strike at that time. Never scour china or pottery. Hard scrubbing and cleaning powders may cause the color or gill to fade and damage the smooth finish. TH' PESSIMIST nob ntHki, Jm. Mr. nn' Mrs. Gather Hnrp wuz invited I' n party last night, but declined, as they wuz jest gitlin' over Th1 folks who've got a "stomach full" o' anything _these days 're lucky.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication