Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: December 6, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 6, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             It all depends on how you look at children with eagerness counting the lessening days until Christmas while elders regard the caSendar as a spur to hurry and get things done. Avcrnje Ntt OtMolirr raid Circulation 8601 Audit 13turn u ot Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 198 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Southeastern Takes Early Point Lead In E.G. Speech Tourney Places in Early Contests Divided Among Entrants From Many Schools; Debate Tournament to End Saturday Southeastern of Durant is leading the field in the East Central debate tournament that started Thursday afternoon and ends Saturday evening. In the sweepstages race, South- eastern has piled up a total 59 points in the men's indi- vidual contest while Phillips university of Enid has col- lected 20 points to pace the field in women's individual con- Tourney Sidelights East Central is the proud host to ]8H from around 20 different in six dif- ferent states. Most of these con- testants have come to the tour- ney, armed with talent and a variety of individual ideas. By just wandering around from room to room, one- can pick up ideas on world, national and state matters that it would take months to read if he could find the material in books at all. Scol'y Nobles, a .senior from Southeastern at Durant and win- ner in the finals of the group discussions Thursday night, has brought with him as n debate colleague this year Gerald Sand- ers, a buddy whom he met in the navy. Nobles attended the T.C tourney 'in '41 and '42. his school going to the semi-finals both years. He has attended Southeastern two years and Louisiana Tech one year. Nob- les is a refreshing and talented speaker. Many original answers were given to the question for discus- sion at the group discussions Thursday night. The question was: "Should the UNO evolve immediately into a world federa- Some of the answers were given in a four speech prepared by each .speaker, then a croup discussion with the audience asking questions was held later. Howard Friedman, O. U.. said, "We should get rid of the UNO immediately and form a federa- tion, because legally a confcra- tion. such as the UNO, has no power whatsoever." Betty Massrn. O. the VNO stands, it is powerless. A confederation may only submit suggestions. To accomplish world pence, our soverignty must cive way to a federal world government with limited reprc- ;Continued on page 2, Column 5) Sales of Prize Cattle Continue Swine Ring Brings Spirited Bidding; One-Armed Youth Hoi Top Barrow CHICAGO, Dec. Sales of prize cattle continued lit the 47th international live stock ex- position today with the nation's junior farmers taking the spot- light. Keen eyed buyers in the auc- tion ring were prepared to offer fancy prices to the youngsters whose untiring efforts nnd pa- tience had produced the top meat animals of the 10-I6 agricultural There also was keen interest in the swine ring where William Worthington, of Pon- 111., was presenting his 228 pound junior champion Hamp- shire barrow, for some spirited bidding. Worthington lost his right arm in n farm accident last April but the loss failed to keep him out of competition. In the sheep ring, all eyes were "Snowflakc." the 110 pound Southdown larnh that won the grand championship of the sheep riivision. Tin- i.'tmb is owned by Wayne Disch, 1G, of Kvansville, Sales yesterday brought 273 to exhibitors who sold caf.le, 805 hogs and 725 lambs. Cattle buyers paid an average of S42.78 hundred weight for steers. for hogs and for lambs. tests. College and university speech students started arriving at East Central Thursday morning and the last college group checked in Friday morning. The college was humming with activity Friday morning with stu- dents checking the outcome of. various events while other stu- dents were practicing for coming events and others participating in contests in progress. Highlighting tho Friday pro- gram will be an after-dinner speaking contest, which is sched- uled following a banquet for con- testants and coaches. Following is a list of winners of c -ents completed before noon Friday: of- South- eastern; Webb of Hardin-Sim- mons and Fioldman of Oklahoma university tied for second, and Hultgrcw of H a r d i n-Simmons third. Poetry South- eastern; Hicks, Southeastern; El- liott, Phillips. Book O. U.; Klliott, Phillips. Womcns Poetry Reading Cecil, Tulsa university; McKin- slrey, T. U.; Ashmore, Phillips. Impromptu Impromptu Brown, Drury; Stewart, Scminole Junior Col- lege; Givens, Hardin-Simmons; Crew, Southeastern. Story South- eastern; Stcphenson, Howard Payne; Elliott, Phillips. North Texas; Mortin, Missouri Slate college, Gray, North Texas. The total number of contestants in all events is 189, according to D. J. Nabors, speech director at East Central and director of the tournament. WEATHER OKLAHOMA: Fair and mild tonight. Saturday and Sunday; somewhat warmer north central tonight; high Saturday and Sunday 75-80. Weather Forecast for Dec. 6-10 Missouri. Kansas, Oklahoma and rain indicated except possible few light show- ers Missouri Sunday; mild tem- pera'-urcs Saturday, somewhat cooler Sunday: little trend Mon- dav: warmer Tuesday and Wed- nesday with temperatures aver- seing 8-15 degrees abovt al normal. Big Toy Drive Is Coming Saturday, Many Cooperating Saturday's mammoth toy drive, sponsored by the Ada Lions club, combines the efforts of ten groups and organizations to collect, re- pair and distribute old toys at Christmas keep the Santa Claus tradition alive for Ada's underprivileged children. Saturday, Dec. 7. beginning at 1 o'clock, the Boy Scouts will go from door to door asking for old, but repairable toys. THey have requested that people ex- pecting to'be awny from the resi- dence leave the toys to be dona- led on tho porch. But a caution is added: Be certain that every toy left on the porch is tagged for the Scouts to pick up, in order to prevent confusion over other toys that children may have left on the porch or in the yard. The Scouts will be aided by trucks from the auto dealers and Ada Milling Co., hauling the boys rind the toys collected. Allen Walsh, of the Lions club, ar- ranged transportation for the col- lection drive. Then comes the repair phase of the program, handled by the East Central shops, under Hugh Nor- ris; Ada High School shops, under Lelancl Newton; the firemen, and a few Lions. The repairs will be made using materials supplied by lumber dealers, paint, and hardware stores. Arrangements for mate- rials were handled by Wilbur O'iye for the Lions club. Then, distribution will be map- ped out by tho Salvation Army. The of children whose Christmas can be made happy only with toys from the Lions are being gathered now, and the list is growing long. The Lions will turn over tho playthings to par- ents of the children that Christ- mas may follow its traditional pattern. Adj. Van Dec, of tho Sal- vation Army, directs this phase of the program for the Lions. Press and radio make the ninth and tenth organizations lending a hand to make the toy program a success. Over-all direction is by Keith Marshall. Shopping Days To Christmas Industries In State Pinched Roil Freight Embargo, In- ability to Move Finished Products Out Felt By The Associated Presi Although in the heart of. the nation's natural gas producing area, Oklahoma industries are beginning to feel the pinch of the nation-wide coal strike. Materials inventories are being depleted due to a railroad freight embargo resulting from the strike. However, a .more pressing problem is the inability to move out finished products by rail which may force a curtailment of industrial-operations even be- fore stock piles are exhausted. First Shutdown At Enid The first shutdown resulting from the strike was at Enid, where Stearman Aviation, Inc., which produces bicycles it would close temporarily. The plant was in airplane manufacture during the war. Approximately 100 employes were laid off but a skeleton crew is being maintained. E. J. O'Connor, executive .vice president of the Associated In- dustries of Oklahoma, predicted unemployment would increase as a result of the strike. Layoffs To .Increase "Shutdowns and layoffs will increase from day to day as ma- terial becomes more scarce due to shutdowns in plants supply- ing Oklahoma he said. "Processors and dealers in steel-and metal products, how- ever, will have to curtail pro- duction as their supplies and parts on hand dwindle, and this unemployment which is now get- ting serious will increase in sev- erity the longer the coal strike continues." prilling To Be Curtailed Drilling operations in oil and gas fiel'ds will be curtailed with- in a few weeks after steel mills close, oil men conceded. The first to be affected is the small independent operator without stopk piles of pipe, tubing and casing. At 1'ulsa, Howard Stover, exe- cutive vice president of the Gaso Pump nnd Burner Manufacturing Co., said the strike and the em- bargo would affect his concern's operation "from now on ex- plaining that the company had considerable finished products ready for shipment and was un- able to move them. Only 80 days materials are on hand, he added. Reduced storage space will curtail production soon at the W. C. Norris Manufacturers, Tulsa makers of oil pumping supplies, President J. H. Eustice said. George A. Hays, executive vice president of the Hinderliter Tool Co., at Tulsa. said his firm pro- bably would continue in produc- tion about two months on" its present inventory. WAA Leaves Final Pipeline Decision Up to Congress In Meantime, Gas Starts Moving from Louisiana On 850 Mile Journey By FRANCIS M. LeMAY WASHINGTON, Dec. The War Assets Administration checked to congress today the question of eventual disposition of the "Inch" pipelines, now be- ginning to carry natural gas for coal strike emergency relief. Caught in a conflict betwe.n ;as and oil .interests, War Assets Administrator Robert M. Little- John told the house surplus prop- erty investigating committee, "I ntend to refer the matter back to congress." Economic interests of coal and the railroads which car- ry those deeply in- volved in the wrangle over ulti- mate disposal of the Big Inch and Little Inch Pipe- lines running from Texas miles to New Jersey. The huge conduits were constructed in war- time for oil transpprt when Ger- man submarines .crippled Amer- ica's oil tanker fleet. Natural gas 'began flowing through the system yesterday at a rate of cubic feet a day, under an emergency lease as the .government sought to re- lieve the fuel shortage resulting from the coal strike. However, five days to two weeks will be required for deliv- ery to the first consumers 850 miles away in the Ohio, Ken- tucky, Tennessee and West Vir- ginia area. 'The government hopes to step up the load to cubic feet daily, but at that rate the gas would substitute for only about tons of coal a day, while the normal daily coal production is around tons. Gas was cut into the system, idle since the war, at Natchi- toches, La., yesterday qt p.m. Operation is by lease to the Tennessee Gas and Transmis- sion Co. From 65 to 70 per cent of the world's supply of antimony comes from the Chinese province of Hunan. Organized Labor Drops Old Feuds For Solid Front Backing Up Lewis Rail Embargo Hits Nation Effects of Soft Coal Strike Snowballing as New Un- employment Soars PITTSBURGH, ,Dec. 6, An embargo on railroad freight shipments today climaxed 'the snowballing effects of the soft coal strike with an avalanche of new unemployment that sent the idleness total above in related industries. Ten's of thousands of Ameri- can workers were handed pre- Christmas layoffs as the 1G- dav stoppage gradually choked off the economic, social and edu- cational life ,of the nation. Predictions from aci-oss the country indicated more than 000.000 workers would be idle by New Year's if the coal strike is 'still in progress. More Conservation Moves Meanwhile, the government planned more stringent conser- vation measures to save the meager coal supply, including an extensionof the drastic brown- outs now observed in 21 eastern states. John D. Small, civilian produc- tion chief, glumly predicted, "we'll, have people cold within a .because of the strike. 'The miners, generally, were restive but apparently content to watch and wait for 'word from John L. Lewis. However, in Durango, Colo., 40 AFL-Uiiited Mine Workers at six small coal mines in the area reported back to work yesterday. "We needed Christmas the terse comment of the returned miners who in- cluded Frank Martinez, president of the local. Ford Closing- Down Ford Motor Co. beginning lay- offs that may spread "to automobile workers within a week or 10 days, idled em- playes at midnight last night and said more wilr be released tonight because of the coal short- age. A Ford spokesman said all 000 Ford workers will be out of work within two weeks. The Budd company laid off employes in its Philadel- phia and Detroit plants today because of the freight embargo. Th.e company, which makes auto- mobile bodies, has a total per- sonnel of Railroads also again drastical- ly slashed payrolls with workers furloughed.. in Kentucky alone. Chesapeake and 'Ohio railroad said it will lay off an additional men Monday, bringing the line's total idle to ----------9> Route of Adml. Byrd's 1947 Antarctic Expedition> Map above shows the approximate routes to be taken by the three main groups of I he Navy's Antarctic Expedition, scheduled to leave the U. S. early in December. The Atlantic Fleet Task atigmented by units of the Pacific Fleet, will'enter tho Antarctic as soon as ice conditions permit to an extensive training and development Report Urges Czar Where Were You When Japs To Get Job Done Struck Pearl Harbor on That In Veteran Affairs Lewis, UMW Post Bonds On Fines Judge Stays Actual Collection Pending Final Disposition Of Case WASHINGTON, Dec. John L. Lewis and his United Mine Workers today posted bond to meet the in fines levied against them for contempt of court stemming from the coal strike. Lewis posted a cash bond of to cover his personal fine of the same amount. The union deposited in face value of United States government bonds. With the1 posting of the bonds, Federal Judge T. Alan Golds- borough signed an order staying actual collection of the fines pending final disposition of the case. Court Clci'k Charles E. fjtewart told reporters the cash and in government, bonds were deposited in the court registry and immediately trans- ferred to the U. S. treasury- Allen Responding To Gifts Appeal Will Have Large Number By Dec. 10 to Send To Vets in Hospitals Allen is responding in its us- ual manner in giving gifts to hospitalized veterans. The win- dow display at the Allen Clean- ing Shop has a strong appeal, as shown by the many gifts sur- rounding the tree. All of the gifts are to be sent to the veterans in ..state hospitals to help make their Christmas a merry one. The drive is being sponsored by the American Legion and the Auxiliary whose members urge everyone who has not done so to bring his gifts by December 10. WASHINGTON, Dec. 6. A federal czar of veterans af- fairs was proposed today in a war department report which said many former servicemen'are bitter over net results of the G; I. bill of rights and other legislation for their benefit. Lt. Col. Winthrop Rockfeller said a top level coordinator em- powered to "cut red tape and act" is needed. He reported on a six months survery which he said showed both the federal government andx local communi- ties are "confused" for lack of a "master plan" for dealing with veterans problems. Not Criticizing Bradley Rockefeller made no criticism of Gen. Omar N. Bradley, vet- erans administrator, or the vet- erans administration whose rec- ord of accomplishment he termed "spectacular." The survey was undertaken at the request of Secretary of War Patterson who endorsed the re- port. A single official is needed, Rockefeller advised, to coordin- ate the work of more than'fif- teen fe'deral agencies, including the veterans .administration, which deal directly or indirect- ly with the veterans. Urges Prompt Action Urging prompt "drastic ac- tion" Rockefeller reported that "in spite of the fact that an im- portant majority of veterans have accomplished reintegration into thtf community, disillusion- ment is rampant, nnd unemploy- ment and under-employment have reached distressing propor- tions." Aside from appointment of a top-level coordinator, he recom- mended: 1. Creation of a citizens' group to conduct a far-reaching em- ployment drive "designed to cor- rect injustices and hardships that have been the lot of. far too many deserving men." 2. Steps to amend the adminis- trative legislation of certain por- tions of the G. -I. bill of rights "which currently docs not pro- vide for either effective or ef- ficient operation." 3. Active support of organiza- tions devoted to study and solu- tion of problems involving racial prejudice and discrimination, along with "wise, tempered lead- ership" by wartime military leaders of efforts to prevent in- justice due to color. County Pecan Show Comes Saturday An inyitation is renewed for entries in the annual county pecan show to be held Saturday and for interested persons to visit the show and look over the dis- plays. Cash premiums are to be awarded on'each of 17 varieties of pecans and also on seedling pecan varieties and on walnuts. Entries close Saturday at 11 a.m. The exhibits will be ar- ranged and the business session, which will include election of of- ficers, will begin at 2 p.m. The show is being held at the county courthouse. Memorable Day 5 Years Ago? Glory is theirs who went from their many tasks Dec. 7, 1941, to fight a war against that struck with- out warning at Pearl Harbor. It is with due respect that Ada and Pontotoc county remember the beginning of a tragic war that started just five years ago Saturday. Where were you1 on Dec. 7, 1941? A interviews here with ex-service personnel bring a cross-section of where many were when Uncle Sam called them from peace to war. Goodpasturc Was in Training In the case of Lewis Goodpasture of Route No. 2, Roff, he was more or less prepared, for on Dec. 7, 1941, lie was with Company C, 160th field artillery of the 45th division and at that time was in Abilene, Tex., in training. Goodpasture saw plenty of territory before the same day rolled around, some five years later. He served .in Sicily, Italy, Southern France, Germany and saw action from al- most every angle. He was a truck driver of a son section which operated with forward observation and was with the through such air struggles as Anzio where the 45th was on the line for 122 days. Jimmy Hall In School Jimmy J. Hall was attending Horace Mann school when the Japanese made their attack at Pearl Harbor; he entered the ser- vice March 5, 1945. He served with the army 21 months with the 32nd Infantry Division and was overseas 14 months, most of which was spent in Japan. Hall received his discharge from the army, Dec. 2, 1946, and is making plans to reentcd school. Parker Back In School Bob Parker was a student in Ada High school when the con- flict started. He entered the navy and did considerable traveling and saw plenty of action. Parker went to New Guinea, Australia, Solomon Islands, New Georgia Islands, Leyte, Manila, Pearl Harbor, Okinawa, Panama 18 months. He has returned to his task of Dec. 7, 1941, and is attending East Central college. Men weren't the only ones who gave their time and efforts to helping win the war. Mrs. Betty Page of Allen was employed in MuskdKcu on Dec. 7, J it'll. Aflcr working with Civil Serv- ire for n time she joined the SPARS and was connected with that branch of service from 'ny 10, 19-14, to Dec. 19-15. She lias returned to her pre-war job us u secretary. From Studies To Arms Jackie Wise hadn't given war much thought until Pearl Harbor was attacked, but not many months after the conflict started he was in the thick of things. the blow was struck on Dee. 7, Wise was a student, but he left his .studies to spend alir.ost four years in (he army with the fi57 Field Artillery oper- ating in England, France, Bel- gium, Germany1 and other Euro- pean countries. Times have changed, but not as sharply as the musses thought soon after the; struggle started; in many cases time spent in service is just so much time lost and the task of picking up where things stopped when the conflict started seems to be a major problem. For instance, the young, care- free school boys of 1941 arc now men, but (hey arc picking up where they left off by going back and resuming their studies. Hereford Is Champ In Feeding Contest CHICAGO, Dec. The grand champion steer of the jun- ior feeding contest, a Hereford, sold for a pound today .at the forty seventh international livestock exposition. The steer "A C" owned by Phy- llis Bonnater, a red headed blush- ing 15 year old 4-H club girl from Keswick, Iowa, went to the First National Bank of and will be served in the employees lunchroom. The price Phyllis received for her champion compared with a pound paid yesterday for "Royal the. grand cham- pion of the entire show from Ok- lahoma college and was double that paid for the reserve grand champion, "Wyoming Chal- lenger Standard." -------------K------------ Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. Many Have Mumps, Don't Know It WASHINGTON, Dec. The army surgeon general's of- fice estimates that probably HO percent of the American people have had mumps without know- ing it. This estimate is based on stud- ios of 50 groups of children and adults, conducted by Pennsyl- vania and Harvard university medical men under contract with an army commission .set up to study mumps and measles. Four physicians reported that about a third of young adults had a probable immunity to mumps, apparently as a result of some past infection of which they were unaware. Mumps thus seems to bear a likeness to poliomyelitis, which about 90 percent of the popula- tion has at some time in sub-clin- ical form, thereby obtaining per- manent immunity, the report said. Assail Court Order Ruling Government Prepares Fuel- Saving Restrictions; Tru- man Talk Awaited WASHINGTON, Dec. 6. I'll Justice D. Lawrence Gronor of the circuit court of appeals today granted a justice department motion to Iransfer the John Lewis contempt case directly to the supreme court. 6. '.It- President Truman counseled with top government officials today on his Sunday night coal strike broadcast as labor marshaled a solid front against ending the walkout by injunc- tion. Presidential Secretary Charles G. Ross told reporter's, as the weekly cabinet meeting conven- ed, that Mr. Truman was con- sulting with administration offi- cials on the broadcast. Cabinet members would not details of thp hour-Ion? conference as they left the presi- dent, but Secretary of Commerce Herrimnn told questioners: "Yes the coal situation was dis- cussed. You'll hear about it from Ihn president Sunday r.ight." Mr. Truman will speak over all major networks at p m 'EST) Sunday. Other cabinet members told re- porters that the coal crisis occu- pied virtually all of the discus- sion. Secretary of the Navy Forres- lal said the situation at naval coaling stations overseas is "crit- ical." "No Turning Back" One cabinet member who de- clined to be quoted said: "There will be no turning back in this fight." Actual writing of the speech, Ross s.-iid, has yot begun. CIO President Philip Murray formally invited the rival AFL and the Independent Railway Brotherhoods to join the CIO in "unified action" to combat what he culled a "deliberate and monstrous movement" to crip- ple labor. In a letter directed to AFL President William Green and to leaders of the railway workers., the CIO chief declared the fed- eral court injunction against John L. Lewis and the "vengeful fine" of upon the workers is the first slop in a campaign of "hysteria" against labor. CIO Joins In Appeal Murray said yosturdav the CIO would join Lewis' AFL Mino Workers in appealing the con- tempt fines, levied against them for ignoring a fedora) court ord- er (o end the strike. In his letter re-leased today. Murray wrote: "The slagi? is sot for the 80th congress tn be mot by national hysteria deliberately fomented and inspired. "It is my sincere conviction that we, the leaders of our re- spective organizations, must- in thp interest of our nation and our democratic institutions arise- above any (petty or personal quarrels to assure the successful completion of such a (labor uni- ty) program." In acUlilinn to Grocn. tho letter went to President A. F. Whitney of the Brotherhood of Railwav Trainmen and Chairman T. C. Cashcn of the Railway Labor Executive association. Silent on Green Suggestion At the White House, Ross told reporters the.ro was no comment on Green's suggestion of yester- day that the government "make a new approach" to the situation by calling an operator-UMW conference. He said the sugges- tion IKK! not come to tho White (Continued on Page 2 Colun.n 2) TH' I PESSIMIST j Jm, Ther' ain't nothin' that throws a housefiold in such a stale o' turmoil as a wife without face powder an" a husband without a headache powder. It's like havin" a member th' family return frum th' grave when they git home frum a car ride.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication