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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: December 1, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 1, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             As far as the Ada Jaycees are concerned, the Christmas season is just around the corner for members of the organization start decorating today and the season opens officially Tuesday. Net Ortohrr Paid Circulation 8601 Audit Murenti of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 193 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Government Study Holds That Guaranteed Annual Wage Can Help Stabilize Economy Facts Contained in An Interim Report Made Public By Murray Latimcr; Many Industrialists Oppose Idea By NORMAN WALKER WASHINGTON, Nov. government study held today that a guaranteed annual wage for workers can help stabilize the economy and point the way to enduring prosperity. The findings wore contained in an interim report made public by Murray W. Latimer, former chairman of the Na- tional Railroad Retirement Board and director of the study, was made at White House direction. Christmas Seals on Sale Funds Will Be Used To Conduct Small Chest X-Ray Service For Everyone November 25 was launching day for the month long Christmas Seal sale, the 40th an- nual drive for funds to further the operation of the county, state and national Tuberculosis Asso- ciation. Homer W. Peay, county sea! sale chairman, reports thai he has mailed out letters this year compared to mail- ed last year. Out of the received dur- ing last year's drive, re- mained in this county; the re- mainder went to the state and fund. The drive board hopes to receive nl least durinc this year's drive. Local Care For Some These funds lire used for co- operation with the County Health Department, Dr. A. R. Sugg, tem- porary head, furnishing x-rays and equipment, health education ;md other supplies, travel of pa- tients to clinics, ami for their care before admission to and jjfter release from This year, funds will be used to conduct a small chest x-rny i-ervic-e for everyone. The mach- ines for the operation have been ordered and will soon be avail- able to all them as rapidly as time permits. Many Workers A large number of city and county citizens have been work- ins hard to mail out the stamps and Inking rare of donations sent in. Those working with sale chair- man Homer Pcny are: Mrs. Hugh Warren's high school romniercial classes, Trice Broadcrirk, Mrs. McKoy's high school study students, the office force of the Rain- bow the American Legion z.nd Auxiliary, the VFW Auxil- iary. Camp Fire girls and the Jaycees. The remittance checks are to be mailed to either C. C. Byrne, county treasurer, or your local rity chairman. The city chairmen Mrs. A. C. Complon, Allen; C'. A. Ucrficr, Vanoss; Mrs. "Walter Grnper, Fittstown; V. I.. Gibson. Stonewall; Harold Chaf- fm. Francis; and Mrs. Nora Chil- drc-ss, Kitzhugh. 200 Christmas seals are in each envelope, priced .-.I 1 cent a seal. Mail your or whatever contribution you can afford, as soon as possible. Thanksgiving Guest Unique Distinguished visitors were very much in evidence here for Thanksgiving, but after scruti- nizing 1hr list, without a doubt thp Crnbtree family at East Fifteenth street, had one of the most unusuiil guests. Thanksgiving morning Donald and David Crnblrce with Roy Fry and scm Bill went hunting. Quail were conspicious by their ab- sence. Just a little disappointed at not findmc one of the nire ;md delec- table morsels. Donald's eye sud- denly widened as he saw a rab- bit hawk with a wine-spread of about a yard, lie took dead aim and blasted the bird, only to stun 1h? creature. After an exciting bout with the I'.irri. he picked it un find took it home. Enterine the door he released his charge much to the regret of the whole family, because the bird wasn't exaetly friendly. Donald explained that his mother made him give the bird his freedom because she felt sorry for it. not that It wasn't in the Crabtree home. Anyhow, that evening Donald put the bird in a tree and said it was gone next mornirig. Christmas cards should be ad- dressed to the home address rath- er than to a business address. JWEATHER! r T T, ,r .1 cloudy to- night and Sunday; cooler Sunday east and south; low Icmperalurcs tonight IS to 48. Many industrialists have op- posed the wage guarantee idea on the ground they would lose a great deal of money if required to continue ,.aying wages for as long as a year to workers they had to lay off. Latimer's report held that even in most seasonal industries, wage guarantees can be granted with- out increasing costs to employers by more than six per cent if co- ordinated with the existing sys- tem of stt'.e unemployment com- pensation. Action Urged The report urged that the fed- oral and state governments take broadening present un- employment compensati. .1 bene- fits and extending special tax ex- emptions to encourage more widespread acceptance of the guaranteed wage plan. "The study has rocognized that the guaranteed wage system is nol a panacea for the insecurity of our economic system, that it cannot '.i and of itself eliminate the flucluations in the economic sy the report said. "On the olh-. hand, it is quite clear that widespread wage guarantees can make a substan- tial contribution to the stabiliza- tion of the economy through the stabilization of wage earner in- and hence of consumer ex- penditures." Other Factors Recognized The report recognized that oth- er factors roust be considered "beyond the immediate expendi- tures for consumer goods of the of guaranteed wages." It disclosed that a companion to the plan's "over-all economic being completed. This phase of the study is be- ing done by Professors Alvin H. Hansen of Harvard, former eco- nomic adviser to the federal re- serve board, and Paul A. Samuel- son of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The report said that reserves in the slate unemployment com- pensation funds are large enough to warrant increasing the bene- fits jobless worker may receive, both as to amount and duration of payments. It suggested to a week for 26 to 30 weeks. Room for Supplements But even these increased rates, the report said, would leave "ample room for voluntary sup- plementation of benefits" by guaranteed wage plans initiated by business. The report noted that at least JHti guaranleed wngc plans were in opurntion in curly 1946 and said the majority of them pledge paymenl of full pay for a year. Besides affording "security for the it added, the plans achieve economies for employers because of "improved labor rela- tions" resulting in "a higher rate of productivity." The study was an outgrowth of a case before the former-war la- bor board in which the CIO Steclworkcrs union asked for a guaranteed wage plan. The WLB turned the union down but rec- ommended that the late Presi- dent Roosevelt have a study made of the whole idea. Twenty Colleges May Take Part In Debate Meet Here On Thursday, Friday and Sat- urday. December 5-7, East Cen- tral State college will be host to more than 20 colleges from 5 states. On these days there will be a debate tournament and speech contests. The debate question is: Re- solve, labor should be given a direct share in management of industry. The final rounds of the debute will be on Saturday afternoon. Many of the contests will be of special interest to the students. On Thursday there will be a group discussion on the question: Should the United Nations be evolved into a world federation government? There will be other contests, including: poetry readings, story telling, extemporaneous and im- promptu speaking and oratory. The winners of first, second and third places will be award- ed gold medals. Entries have been received from almost all the state col- leges, N. Texas Teachers, Tulsa, O. B. U. S. M. U., T. C. U.. Drury and others. D. J. Nabors, speech director, expects this to be one of the best tournaments held at East Cen- tral. Meat tenderness is associated with Ihe diarneler of the muscle fiber. The smaller the fiber, the tenderer meat. Administration Authorizes Fines T. G. Kelly Dies Friday Funeral Services Will Be Conducted At 2 P.M. Today, Burial at ft. Smith Thomas Grover Kelly, 'for more than IS years a resident of Ada, died Friday night at 9 o'- clock, following a stroke of less than 24 hours before. Funeral services will be held at the Cris- well Funeral Chapel Sunday af- ternoon at 2 o'clock, and burial will bo in Forest Park cemetery, Fort Smith, Arkansas, Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Re'v. James O. Michael will conduct the services in Ada, assisted by Rev. Victor Hatfield and Dr. C. C. Morris. Mr. Kelly was born in Carroll county, Arkansas. Nov. 4, 1885, and thus was 61 years old. While a young man he moved to Fort Smith and started as a common laborer with the Fort Smith Light and Traction company on Sept. 2, 1909. In 1925 he was appointed superintendent of the street railway system in Fort Smith, and in 1928 .was made manager of the Poteau district of the Oklahoma Gas and Elec- tric company, To Ada In 1930 On May 1C, 1930, he was trans- ferred to Ada and made the manager of the Ada district, a position he held until death. In all he was with the elijctric com- pany, in Arkansas and Oklaho- ma, for 37 years. At Ada he succeeded the late R. D. Weldy. He was married on June 8, 1906 to Miss Florence Ellen Wallace in Bokoshe, Oklahoma. In addition to Mrs. Kelly, whose home address here is 1030 East Eighth, survivors are two sons: Howard of Fort Smith and T. G. Kelly, Jr., of Okmulgee; and one daughter, Mrs. Ed Martin of Ada. Civic Worker Few men have given more time to civic affairs than did Mr. Kelly. For years he served as chairman of the local, chapter of the Salvation A'rmy, helping put on the budget drives and lending assistance to the army in many other ways. He served a term as president of the Ada Cham- ber of Commerce, and many terms as a member of the board of directors. He was for a year president of the Ada Kiwanis club. He was a member of the Round-Up club and the Elks lodge. He was an active mem- ber of the First Christian church in Ada. In his duties as manager of the Oklahoma Gas and Electric company, he did everything pos- sible to keep service regular and was always courteous and oblig- ing to patrons. He saw to it personally that service was all it should bo and spent much time checking and talking to users to determine what if anything might improve the service. Entertaining Speaker Mr. Keliv was an attorney, but outside of some legal work for his company he preferred man- agement of a utility to work in the court room. Mr. Kelly was an entertaining speaker and always had a big list of funny Arkansas .iokes to break. He was not far behind Bob Burns, who grew up in the same general part of the state. Tom Kelly will, be missed in the business, social and civic life of Ada, for he made a hand in all civic endeavors. Pallbearers will be James I. Mailer, Eldwood Blass, Elton Jordan, Ormand Shaw. Hoyt Moore, of Fort Smith, and Eve- rett Mcnasco and Clyde Rawl of Ada. Honorary bearers will be Pink Shaw, Bert Woods, Judge Hill, Morgan Wright and Dr. J. S. Greggs .of Fort Smith. OPA EXTENDS FOE 30 DAY USE OF TWO SUGAR STAMPS WASHINGTON, Nov. 30.- (JP) today extended for 30 days the use of two sugar ration stamps issued for home canning. Both stamps, No. 9 and 10, were scheduled to expire Nov. 30. They are now good for five pounds of sugar each through Dec. 31, OPA said. -------------K------------ Canned rations for soldiers were issued during the Civil War. The word "can" itself comes from canister projectiles. Shopping Days To Christmas BONES OF CORTEZ BELIEVED FOUND: Upper photo shows men removing from the wall of Hospital of Jesus in Mexico City, a casket which supposedly contains the bones of Corlez. In the bottom picture is a closeup of the gold encrusted, crystal urn which contains the bones wrapped in ribbons. The urn was en- closed in two lead U. S. Joins Soviet Russia In Atomic Bomb Demands By FRANCIS W. CARPENTER LAKE SUCCESS, N. Y., Nov. The United States joined Soviet Russia today in calling'upon the United Nations to give the atomic bomb. No. 1 priority in world- wide remained the principle of applied to a disarmament pro- gram. The British disagreed with Russia and the United States on such a high rating for atomic weapons, insisting that, they be considered along with all other modern means of warfare. The Six Persons Hurt In Two-Car Wreck Saturday Night Six persons were injured in a two-car accident about o'clock Saturday night at the corner of Fourth and Broadway. Hospital attendants reported that there was nothing official to re- lease concerning the conditions of the accident victims. The accident occured when a 1934 Chevrolet, driven by Guy Alston, attempted to 
                            

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