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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: November 27, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 27, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Despite the rash of fighting and turmoil in many places around over the globe, there are few in this area who cannot count their blessings in abundance in this Thanksgiving season of '46 Average Net October Paid Circulation 8601 Member: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 191 ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Judge Says Miners Guilty If They Walked Out Despite Court's Order Leadership Conference Held Here Could Serve for Model Peabody Professor Urges Teacher College Instructors To Catalog Talented Students for Prospective Teachers FARMERS BEAT COAL SHORTAGES: Coal shortages will be no bugaboo this winter for these Boone County, Missouri, farmers. They pooled their equipment and labor to uncover a. 32 inch vein on one of their farms. Ralph Valentine, a veteran, rounds up his wagon load before pulling it with his tractor two miles to his farm home where the coal will keep his wife and three small sons warm this (NEA Services of Praise, Visiting, Hunting, Football Will Occupy Residents of Ada on Thursday Residents of Ada are ready now lor Thanksgiving Day, with a varied assortment of activities being planned and with Ada taking an almost complete holiday from routine affairs. A union Thanksgiving service sponsored by the Ada Ministerial Alliance will be held from to Thursday morning in the Ada Junior high school gymnasium. Hev. James O. Michael, First Christian .church, will preside; Rev. V. A. Pcndlcton, Trinity Baptist, will give the invication, and Rev. M. S. Epperson, First Presbyterian, will read the First Thanksgiving proclamation. Rev. p. G. Bozeman, Church of God, will read the Scripture pas- sage and Dr. V. A. Hargis, First Methodist, will give a prayer. After the sermon by Dr. W. A. Carter, Sapulpa, superintendent, White House Ends Wartime Social Blackout Officially First State Dinner Since 1939 It Elaborate Affair Headed by Trumani Eust Oklahoma district, Nazarcne churches, Rev. -K. R, Jones, Pen- tecostal Holiness, will give the benediction. Music will include singing of two symns by the audience, and Misses The I ma Hokey and Bar- bara Hansard will sing "Thanks Be To God." Earlier in the day the First Baptist church will hold its an- nual praise and thanksgiving service at St. Luke's Episcopal church announces Holy Communion for 10 a.m. Schools are out and many col- lege students are gone to their homes elsewhere for the: four- clay weekend. Hundreds of others are leaving or coming into Ada for visits with kin. Bird hunters will be out in force, and football fans will be in (he stands at Norris Stadium by lo sec East Central and Spulheaslern clash in their tra- ditional football rivalry, the final game of the season. By RUTH COWAN' WASHINGTON, Nov. w a r t i m c; social blackout now has officially ended. The president and Mrs. Truman were hosts last night to repre- sentatives of 30 nations and to 38 other guests at a diplomatic dinner. It was the first state din- ner in the White House since the troubled days of 1030 when Hitler the world. A second diplomatic dinner will br given next Tuesday. The re- sumed formal social stale calen- dar will continue- through Feb. 18 with four additional for the cabinet, the chief justice, the president pro tt-mpore of the senate, and of the speaker of the five receptions. Brazilian Ambassador First The dc-cision to hold two diplo- matic dinners was prompted by increased size of the diplo- matic corps. To the first dinner was bid the dean of the corps, Carlos Martins. Ambassador of Brazil, and Madame Martins. Be- ginning with him as number one, the invitation list included the odd numbers in length of diplo- matic S. 7 and so on. To the second dinner will come the oven 4, 0 and ?o on. The guests assembled in the east room where they were erected by the president and Mrs. Truman. The first lady wore a black velvet gown with a .short tram. Margaret Truman, their 22- year-old daughter who bar, been in New- York, did not attend. In the entrance way to the state dining room were baskets of red carnations, and in bowls in alcoves along the hall were deep red roses. On the right of ihe foyer was a portrait many of the guests had not seen That of the late President Frank- lin D. Roosevelt. Vsc Gold Dinner Service The guests diner at the famous horshoe table at the center of which, facing the room, sat the president in a high back chair and opposite him Mrs. Truman. To the president's right was Ma- dame Martins and to his left, Madame Loudon. wife of the am- bassador of the Netherlands. The gold dinner service was used. From fine crystal glasses in _____ _......, the Hawk pattern the guests Woodward Enid, Ponca drank water, sautcrne, sherry and City and Bartlosville; (C) Be- champagne. i twecn Oklahoma City and Dal- An innovation was that no ad- 'las, Tex., via Shawnoc, Wewoka, ditional gucfts were invited in Ada, and Avdmorc, Okla., Gaines- ior the musical program that fol- ville and Fort Worth, Tex.; (D) lowed the dinner. The girl wholDurant, McAlester, Wewoka, and plsyed for a half hour was ajOkmulgee, Okla.; (E) Between No Paper to Be Published Thursday The Ada News will not publish a paper on Thurs- day but will resume pub- lication on Friday. The management and the em- ployes will take a holiday for observance of Thanks- giving Day and join in wishing for all a pleasant occasion. Tuesday afternoon, in a sum- mary of the Leadership Confer- ence held at East Central, Or. Henry Harap, Peabody Teachers college, Nashville, Tenn., stated that he had never before seen a more energetic and enthusiastic group than the one assembled there, He said that if the plans for work groups were successful, the conference held here would serve as a model for the other districts all over the state of Ok- lahoma. The principal criticism given by Harap of the present status was that the superintendents of various schools are too sharply separated from the teachers col- leges. Would Have Lists Handy He suggested that the superin- tendents choose certain instruc- Itors in the teachers colleges as agents for them, to tell them of outstanding pupils and then the superintendent should make a note in a catalog. When the need arose for the hiring of an indivi- dual of certain qualifications, he would have a list in his catalog. CAA Approves More Feeder Airlines T6 Serve Two Slates WASHINGTON, Nov. 27 civil aeronautics board to- day authorized two new feeder airlines and one existing airline lo provide new air service in Oklahoma and Texas for a three- year period. The board also amended the certificate of a present feeder line and the permanent certificates of two other airlines to provide additional service in the two stales. The board's decision adds more than new route miles of lo- cal air service in the area. The airlines affected are Avia- tion Enterprises, Inc., Central Airlines, Inc., Mid-Continent Air- lines, Inc., Pioneer Airlines, Inc., American Airlines, Inc., and Chi- cago and Southern Airlines. The board granted a three-year temporary certificate to Central Airlines, Inc., for air service be- tween (A) Oklahoma City and Wichita, Kan., via Enid and Pon- ca City, Okla., and Arkansas. City- Winfield, Kan.; (B) Between Am- arillo, Tex., and Tulsa, Okla., via young Chicopee. Mass., girl., Syl- Dallas, Tex., Zaremba, who with her moth- i Ark.-Tex., via c-r. Mrs. Anna Zaremba, were Paris, Texas, dinner guests. and Texarkana, Greenville and Huge-nut refugee's in the Sev- enteenth Centurv an: credited with making important improve- ments in the Irish linen industry. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. iWEATHER Oklahoma Fair tonight and Extend USD Drive For Another Week An extension of one week in Ihe U.S.O. drive for Pontotoc county is announced by Calvin Bates, drive chairman. The closing date first set was Tuesday of this week but results have been slow coming in and Bales and his helpers have de- -.iirsday: lowest tonight 30-35; jc-icled lo continue Iheir efforls for warmer Thursday afternoon. lunolher week U.N. Committee Overrides Soviet On Troop Tally By MAX HAHREL90N LAKE SUCCESS, N. Y., Nov. political committee of the United Nations assembly today over-rode Soviet'opposition and approved1 a British resolution declaring the proposed interna- tional troop inventory nnd the question of arms reductions were parts of a single general question. Voting paragraph by paragraph on a British amendment to the original Soviet proposal for a troop census, the Si-nation com- mittee decided by 33 to 17 that the two issues were separate as- pects of the same general sub- ject. France voted with Russia in opposition and the other three members of the Big Five voted for the British proposal. The committee then quickly approved by a vote of 36 to 12 the second paragraph of the Brit- ish proposal, which declared that the troop inventory was "the first step" toward disarmament talks and was needed to help set up the U. N.'s proposed interna- tional police force. Russia and France also voted against this. The next three paragraphs, which were similar to those pro- posed by Russia, were approved without opposition. They pro- vided for reports on troops in both enemy and friendly slates and for reports on air and naval bases maintained abroad by any country. Summing up their positions be- fore the voting, the United States and Great Britain called on the committee to override Soviet ob- jections and broaden the troop inventory to include all forces at home as well as those abroad. Wires Strung For Christmas Lighting Joycees Do Work Prelim- inary to Big Decoration Job of Sunday Preliminary work to the dec- oration of Ada streets for the Christmas season started Tues- day morning when workmen be- gan stringing wire across the streets in downtown Ada. The wire is a necessary part of the fixtures as all of the over- head lighting and other decora- tions are strung on it. After the wire has been stretched across the streets, Junior Chamber of Commerce members will find their job somewhat easier, but still it is a long hard task that will possibly be completed before Monday of next week. Junior Chamber of Commerce members Sunday will be busily engaged in putting up the decor- ations. Blessing In Disguise CHICAGO, dimout in Chicago has put a crimp in one business that is most satisfying to police. In the two nights of the dim- out, Deputy Chief of Detectives John Warren said, there has been a sharp decrease in burglaries, holdups and other crimes. Harap stated that from each of the separate groups that met Tuesday afternoon and during the panel numerous original ideas were given for the successful op- eration of work or study groups. These groups will submit plans ,for the selection of leaders in the jtcachcrs schools and for bringing 'out the innate abilities of the stu- dents. In this way, more qualified and appropriate teachers could be selected. More Conferences Planned If the superintendents would use the catalog phm suggested by Harap, there would be no delay in procuring a new teacher when the need arose. As it is now, teachers are recommended by a council and much valuable time is lost in getting the teacher, he. contends. At intervals throughout the rest of the year, various groups will convene at East Central to make plans for work groups. The next meeting will be that of the Classroom Teachers, to be held the first or second week in Jan- uary. Krug Called by Committee For Questioning About Strike Jailed Again, With Six Marriage Tries Robertson Had Three When Only 17 PROVIDENCE, R, I., Nov. 27, A. Robertson, 23, who at the age of 17 had collect- ed three wives without benefit of divorce, was in .jail today af- ter allegedly having run his string of martial ventures to six. He was held in for trial utter arraignment in dis- trict court yesterday on big- amy charge. He had the assurance of his sixth wife, June Ivy Castranova Robertson, that she was going to stick by him "because he is so romantic." He received the pledge after embracing her and describing her ".the best of all" shortly before arraignment. Police said that three of Rob- ertson's marriages, two 'in Kan- sas City and one in Corpus Chr- isti. Texas, had been annulled, but a previous union in Spartan- burg, S. C., t and subsequent Springfield, Mass., marriage still are intact. Robertson, known in the mid- dle west as the crooning lover, was released from Kansas refor- matory at Hutchinson a year ago on his promise to return to South Carolina and sing his way into the good graces of the first o( his spouses. Reformatory records showed that after his first venture Rob- ertson, then 17, married three other young women witfein three months in Texas and Kansas, and served 22 months in Hutchinson Institution for Polygamy. -------------r------------- TULSA, Okla., Nov. 27, The Klar Jewelry store on Main street was robbed last night by two men who escaped with and jewelry. Police detectives said the pair entered the store at closing time, asked to look at some diamond rings, then drew guns and trus- sed the store's two clerks, J. Kel- ler and Mrs. Minnie Schichtle. Committee Wonts To Know Why Big Pipelines Not Carrying Natural Gas WASHINGTON, Nov. an unprecedented action, a congressional committee sent out the interior Krug. Krug, carrying the brunt of the government's buttle against John L, Lewis, was commanded to ap- pear before the house surplus property investigating committee at 2 p.m. (EST) Monday for ques- tioning about the coal strike. The committee voted unani- mously to draw the subpoeanae when Krug failed yesterday to ap- pear in response to i.m "invita- tion" issued two hours earlier. The committee) wanted to know why the war-built "big inch" and "little inch" pipe- lines are not moving natural gas from the southwest to the coal- short east. Congressional parliamentarians told newsmen they could not re- call, a committee of congress ever previously having subpoenaed a member o fa president's official family. Senator Wiley senior republican on the judiciary com- mittee, commented that "this raises a very serious question whether congress should interfere with the executive, nnd whether it has authority to compel the at- tendance of a cabinet officer. It: might involve our system of checks and balances." However, Krug indicated he would not seek to bring any con- stitutional question to a show- down, An aide explaicd that the sec- retary had been in conference with attorney general Tom Chirk discussing government strategy in the coal crisis, when the com- mittee sent its invitation, "The secretary had offered be- fore the subpoena was issued to appear before the committee on Monday, and he will appear Mon- this spokesman tolds news- men. Asserts That Early Walkout A Mistake Goldsborough Holds That Norris-La Guordia Act Doesn't Apply In This Case WASHINGTON, Nov. 27, Federal Judge T. Alan Golds- borough today ordered a ton-day extension of his order of Nov. 18 which was designed to avert a soft coal walkout. The extension was ordered at the request of Assistant Attorney General John F. Sonnctt, who broke into John L.. Lewis' con- tempt hearing just 20 minutes be- fore the order was due to expire at 3 p. m. Sonnctt interrupted a lengthy argument by Joseph Padway, AFL general counsel, who was seeking dismissal of the contempt action against the United Mine Workers and their president. The original order instructed Lewis to withdraw his Nov. 15 notice terminating the TJMW's contract with the government. WASHINGTON, Nov. 27, Federal Judge T. Alan Golds- borough said today John L. Lewis and his mine workers "are guilty of contempt of court" if it is proved legally .Ihey disregarded his order against a coal mine walkout. In those words, Gpldsborough indicated that his decision in the contempt case against Lewis and his miners would not be Influenc- ed by the'union's claim that the stop-strike order violated the Norris-LaGuardia anti-injunction act. Regardless of whether or not I the Norris-LaGuardia act applies in the soft coal case, Golds- borough said, no one can disobey a restraining order. Would Menu Anarchy "If that could be done we would have the judge com- CHICKASHA, Nov. 27, Maria Cristina San Jose, Costa Rica, has arrived here to teach Spanish at Oklahoma Col- lege for Women. Read The News.Classified Ads. "If the defendants disregarded the restraining order, then they are guilty of contempt of court whether the Norris-LaGuardia act applies or docs not apply. "Thtit, in this court's opinion, Is the law." Lewis, who snt stony-faced with his attorneys and the UMW so far have made no attempt to show that they tried to obey the judge's runtrainiiiH order ofNov. 18, which instructed the UMW chief to wilhdrnw his notice to the government that their work- ing agreement was ending Nov. 20. Shortly after his sharp interjec- tion, Goldsborough recessed court at p. m. and cleared the room. The whole morning hnd been taken up with argu- ments of tliroe Lewis- lawyers seeking to win dismissal of the contempt action. AFL Counsel Sees Differently Prior to the recess, Joseph Pad- way, general counsel of the AFL, !appearing in a demonstration of [AFL-solidarity behind Lewis, dis- jngreed1 with Colclsborough's nniil- lysis of the.lifw. Padway told the that Lewis' attorneys had ;advised the mine worker's chief that he was within his Hunts in disregarding the restraining ord- :cr. The justice drew a laugh when he remarked dryly: "The cemetery is full of people who took the doctor's advice." At another point, Goldsborough remarked that. Lewis and the United Mine Workers made "a very great mistake" in walking out before the courts ruled on their contract dispute with the government. Also, he said, the transfer of 500 policemen from the day shift to night duty may be responsible for the curtailed activities of bandits. Maybe, Warren smilingly sug- gested, the thugs are afraid of the dark.-. Whale milk is not essentially different from cow's milk. Food Shortages Likely in Big Cities If Strike Is Prolonged Food Processing Plants Depend on Coal, Transportation Would Continue in Better Shape Than Power Sources By OVID A. MARTIN WASHINGTON, Nov. 27, Food shortages may develop in major cities, agriculture depart- ment officials said today, if there is a prolonged coal strike. They told reporters they fore- saw no immediate disruption in processing and distributing sup- plies, nut that should the strike continue several weeks, short- ages would become acute in many areas, particularly in big cities distant from major produc- tion sections. Drastic curtailment of rail shipments of livestock could bring on a meat shortage more severe, they said, than that which developed before the lifting of pPA price controls. While much livestock is moved to market by trucks, the latter might be re- stricted for the want of gasoline normally moved by coal-burn- ing locomotives. Fruits, Vegetables First Officials said the effects of the strike will be fell first and most sharply in transportation of citrus fruits and fresh vege- tables from Florida, Texas and California; Most of the nation's food pro- cessing plants depend upon coal. Hence, a prolonged shortage of fuel would force many such plants to curtail their operations not close, In this category are dairy pro- ducts manufacturing plants, oil- seed crushing plants, refrigera- tion plants for perishable pro- ducts, sugar refineries, flour mills, nnd meat packing plants. Some Milk Areas Threatened Officials said milk production might be seriously affected in areas where dairymen are de- pendent upon feed supplies ship- ped in by rail, much of the- e.i.n depends on grains grown in the midwest. They said a long stoppage of corn production would make an already bad shortage of food fats and oils considerably worse. They reported that some West Coast Copra crushing plants al- ready have hern closed, anrt that plants for crushing soybeans, fliixsced and cottonseed face the sumo prospect. The effect of the sti'ikc on food exports will depend, they said, on the length of the strike. They said rail movement of foot! to ports probably won'l he ham- pered for a time. Shortage of coal for processing plants, or cur- tailment of electrical energy for such plants, may have more ser- ious repercussions on exports than transportation difficulties. Farm Needs Endangered The strike will seriously cur- tail the production of farm mach- inery, fertilizers and insecticides needed for next year's produc- tion if it lasts very long, offici- als said. _ It might also result in restric- tions on rail transportation of development which could affect the supply of food containers. The tobacco industry might also be affected since coal is needed for re-drying plants as well as tobacco product manu- facturing plants. Move Begins to Deny Congress Seat to Gotham's Marcantonio OPERATION DUCK: 'Men of the Sixth army pour ashore at Liso Canyon, Oceanside, California, as Operation Duck got underway. Tho operation began at dawn on November 25th, with approximate- ly troops (NEA Congreitionul Committee Probing His Election; Charged of Being Com- munist Mouthpiece II.V WIMJAM V. AHHOOAST WASHINGTON, Nov. A cjuiet move is underway to deny a scat in the now congress to veto Mercunlonio of New York City, it was learned today with disclosure! that a rnngre.'iKionnl committee is investigating his election to the house, The move has the backing of Rep. John E. nankin who has crossed verbal swords with Morcantonio on many occa- sions during the Jailer's JO years in congress as an American labor party representative. Based On Applications nankin told reporters "it is probable" a resolution to deny i> sent to Mercantonio will be of- fered when the new house con- venes .Ian. ;i. Hu declined lo say whether he. personally would of- fer it but indicated Hie challenge will be? based on the New York- er's political affiliations and ac- tivities. Holding both American labor a n d democratic Marcantonio was roeloeted Nov. !j over Republican Frederick Bryan despite support for Bryan by Patrick J. Hannigan who Josl the democratic nomination to Marcanlonio in the August pri- mary. Appealing for his friends to vote for Bryan, Hannigan said he had entered the primary against Marcantonio "solely for the purpose of driving from pub- lic office the mouthpiece in cong- ress for the communist forces in this country." House Can Deny Scat A majority vote of the house can deny a seat to any membei- elect, and for any reason. Any member may offer a resolution either denying him his office or denying the right to sit pentling an investigation by a house com- mittee. Chairman Priest (D.-Tenn.) disclosed that the house campaign investigating committee is in- quiring into Marcantonio's elec- tion in the 18th New York dis- trict. Priest told reporters 'the com- mittee wants to find out whether the fatal beating of Joseph Scat- lercggio shortly before the polls opened was part of a plan to in- timidate voters. Scatlereggio was a poll worker for Bryan. Mayor, Manager At Municipal Meeting Spencer ond Honicn At State League Convention; Legislative Ploni Talked Mayor Charles R .Spencer nm! City Manager W. K. Ihmsen :U- tenclcil the -.'tUrd annual conven- tion of the Oklahoma Munici- pal League held Monday and Tuesday at Oklahoma City. Spencer was elected to the executive board of Ihe organiza- tion. Tho convention discussed a legislative program for the com- ing year, involving pnrlieularlv means of improving the finan- cial condition of chief. Okla- homa cities now are with mi valorem tux income and many are having difficulty loca- ting enough other sources of in- come to finance noce.'sary city operations. There was discussion of Im- provement of laws involving bonds issued for sewer lino im- provements, and of feasibility of it law making possible issuance of bonds for laying of sidewalks old provisions for forcing sidewalk construction having proved unworkable1. CHTCKASHA. Nov. 27, Fifty three former high school, football players have checked oul uniforms for the "Army and Navy" football game tonight. Twenty two of the ex- gridstcrs are Army veterans and 21 are Navy veterans. The game is sponsored by the touchdown club to raise funds for the organization's projects. TH' PESSIMIST That's Reason FORT BELVO1R, Va., Nov. 27. S-Sgt. Chester Conrad de- cided to have a spot of lea before retiring so he parked his car in front of the Engineer Training Center club, and went in. One hour and four teas lot- he returned, but his car wouldn't budge. A quick investigation showed why. Someone had stolen the entire drive shaft. Read The News Classified Ads. ur noli Mighty few folks-can sland in front o' a the'rselves straight in th' eye an' nol feel guilty. A radio is a grant you can slop il any lime you git ready.   

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