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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: November 26, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 26, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Net Orlober I'alrt Circulation 8601 Mrmbrr: Audit Bureau or Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 190 Committee Plans To Expose Communists Means to Show Influences in Government, Unions And Hollywood; President Has Ordered U. S. Payroll 'Purge' By WILLIAM F. ARBOGAST WASHINGTON, Nov. exposure of com- munist influences in the government, in unions and in Hol- lywood was ticketed today as the chief business for the house committee on unAmorican activities in the new congress, Rop. j. Parncll Thomas Ada Had Cold, Ice And Rain But Roads Remained Iceless OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1946 Aria's share of the cold wnvc didn't como up to Unit nf mniiy c.thor parts of the ;inrl that was rill right with people in this part of Oklahoma. There was rain. ;mcl colrl. ire gathering on trees and shrubs. hu'. the icy highways .'ind rnin on windshields missed but hy only n few miles to 1hc west ;md north. Statistically. t h c wrathor fhhncp brought .SI of an inch of lam to Ada ftlic November total is now a drop in trmpera- to IB degrees for Ihc lowest ".his fall. A display of rpaikhng beauty was spread ov- er the landscape when the sun Tuesday morning to find its s reflected from untold mil- Jior.s of icv drops accumulated on foilage. Hy Thi> Associated I'rrss Rain, sleet and snow which rtruck Oklahoma Monday, mak- ing highways dangerously slip- pery. had moved out of the state today and fair and warmer was the forecast. Oklahoma's highway patrol "headquarters in Oklahoma City reported clear skies, dry roads and rising temperatures in vir- tually all sections of the slate. Only in the panhandle counties were there still slippery highways and some snow but the snow was expected to be melted by night. Only fatal accident attributed 1o the weather occurred near Fairmont, in Garfield county, yesterday. James Borges Da- a war veteran who was a student at Oklahoma A. and M. college, was killed in a collision of two automobiles. The lowest temperature over- night was Waynoka's 22 degrees, one degree lower than Knid's minimum. All cities reporting to the Oklahoma City weather bu- reau had freezing or below. Mon- day's high temperature was 54 degrees at Ardmoro. who will head the group, made clear in a statement of his, plans that President Truman s move to "purge" the federal payrolls of communists and "subversive" persons will not deter the committee from press- ing its own inquiry in that field. fi He listed ns a committee aim to expose and ferret out the communists and communist sym- pathisers in the federal govern- ment." Truman Sets Up Agency Mr. Truman, by executive or- der, created an intcragency com- mission yesterday to work out standards and procedures for locating and dismissing disloyal persons who havo gained feder- al employment. The commission also is to make recommendations on whether present regulations give the gov- ernment adequate protection n- gauist employment of disloyal and subversive persons. It is' to report to Mr. Truman by Fob. Follows Ilou.se Groups Idea -the president's action was i mo with recommendations mad last summer by a house civi service subcommittee. The commission is to be made up of one representative onch from the justice, state, treasurv war and navy departments and the civil service commission At- torney General Clark appointed A. Devitt Vanech as the r.ijti FIVE CENTS THE COPY recover to stand trial "lor a retired farmer who n -Jom of their home, af- gun which the convict was pointing nd one of the convicts, Fred Wren, brutal sHvinn'nf'R'" m th9 but doctors think he will Diutal slaying of Ben La Rue, a prison guard at Government Aims At Swift Trial Of Lewis Clamps New Curbs to Save On Coal; Pinch Grows More Acute As Industries, Communities Hit By STERLING F. GREEN- WASHINGTON, Nov. government, rac- ng against factory shutdowns and emptying coal bins, aimed today for swift trial of John L. Lewis and clamped down sharp new curbs to save the nation's fast-ebbing supplies of department representative who is to be chairman. Vanech, a native of St-unford, conn., has been a special assis- tant to the attorney general since i 933. Rep. Rankin Foreign Briefs STUTTGART, Nov. Hjalmar Schacht, Adolf Hitler's lorrr.cr financial has been moved from jail to a hospital near Stuttgart after complaining of heart trouble, it was learned here today. Schacht. freed by the interna- tional military tribunal, had been in Stuttgart city prison since his release, awaiting trial by a Ger- man denazification tribunal. ATHENS. Nov. Col. Constantino latrou, intelligence staff, was reported preparing to Icavr by airlint-r (TWA) today for r.cw York with files of evidence on alleged border incidents to present to the United Nations. PARIS. Nov. ing unofficial returns from Sun- day's parliamentary elections put the Communist party out in front apam today after Iho Popular Re- publican movement (MHP) had .._ J.f.1 J.10 w 1 will be top democrat on the un- American activities :ommitl.ee, said the group would -ome cooperation from the president's commission. He called of the commission right direction." Aimed at Communists In listing committee aims, i homos said it intends: "To spotlight the sorry specta- cle of having outright' commu- nists controlling and dominating some of the most vital unions in American labor, unions (that) are now being used as Moscow pawns for ambitions and un- scrupulous communist loaders." Institute "a counter-education- al program against the supcrsive propaganda which has been hur- led at the American people" with the committee issuing periodic reports "on every phase of sub- versive activity." To give attention to groups and movements "trying to dis sipate our atomic bomb 'know how for the benefit of a foreig and, to move agains the communist element in ou educational system." City Looking To Thursday Will Be General Holiday With Union Seivice, Feast- ing, Football Finale Today's sunshine and forecas for fair and warmer weather fo Wednesday brightened the out look for Thanksgiving Day here Most everything is shaping up now toward observance of the traditional American holiday And holiday is what it will be for Ada. Schools will be out for the r -who mainder of the week after classes end on Wednesday afternoon Most stores, almost all city anc county offices, banks will -be and postoffice service, ex- Uled eroation recc'Ving and dispatching 'a stop in the distributions, will be halted for the day. A union Thanksgiving Day crvice is announced for to o'clock Thursday morning at the Ada Junior high school ludilonum with Rev. W. A. Car- er, Sapulpa, district Nazarene hurch superintendent, as peaker. The season's football finale will egm at o'clock at Norris stadium where the East Central igers and the Savages of South- astern State college of Durant will clash. This game doubles its appeal, with a long series of con- tests jn earlier years putting a touch of tradition on the .game and in addition the Tigers having a chance to pull Southeastern back from a prospective confer ence championship to a tie with Central. As fqr the gro eery stores are humming with ac tivity as housewives assemble the makings for the customary Tur- tho lead from left winger for a brief time late yesterday. Publication of unofficial figu res from Corsica issued by th French press agency was respon for the latest change in th lead. -f.e rockhopper penguin ha yellow eyes part of (lie year, anc red eyes the rest of the time. WEATHER! OKLAHOMA Fair tonight and Wednesday; warmer tonight and southeast Wednesday; cold- er northwest Wednesday after- noon: mostly cloudy and colder Thursday. Forecast For Nov. 26-29 Missouri. Kansas. Oklahoma and w snow flur- ries Nebraska Wednesday or -inursday; remainder of dis- trict Thursday or Friday except snow western Kansas and north- western Oklahoma: precipitation riear one inch southeastern halfs Missouri and Oklahoma to one- r.ajf inch northwestern halfs Mis- Oklahoma and southeast- ern half Kansas, near one-fourth Jncn northwestern half half Kansas and southeast Nebraska; will average about i degrees above normal Wcdnts- aav bc-corr.inc colder most of dis- trict .-.bout Thursday or Friday; warrror Saturday and Sunday' .empc-ra'-urc-s averaging about 5 oecrc-es above normal Missouri to near normal Nebraska and aoou: 5 degrees below normal wt-stc-rn portions of Kansas and Okiarr- No Settlement Yet In Teacher Strike St. Paul Wrangle Reported Making Some Progress ST. PAUL, Minn.. Nov. 26, (JP eight-member negotiating committee adjourned last nigh without reaching a settlement in the strike of St. Paul teachers which closed 77 schools and left Jb.578 pupils classless as the in- structors paced picket lines Monday and prepared to resume them today. George Joselius, assistant Min- nesota attorney general and spokesman for the negotiators said Monday's session was "pro- we hope to make at a meeting fitable and fimllaj. this afternoon." The group included Dean M Schweickard. state commission- er of education, and three mem- bers each from the American Federation of Teachers (AFL) and from the St. Paul city coun- cil which serves as the ex-officio school board. In Minneapolis, where the men's local 238 of the AFT had a Monday strike, Char- es E. Boyer. president of the un- on, said the 397 members had not yet accepted a board of edu- cation settlement offer made Sunday. Boycr reported the walkout vas "held in abeyance" unti-1 the men teachers conferred today vith the central labor union on yhothor that group would con- mue its support if the settle- ment were not accepted. Minneapolis women teachers vho were also to consider the cttlcment offer today, have not ct taken a strike vote but have gone on record to support the men by not crossing picket lines if they are sot up. In key Day dinner. -K- Robbed of (ash, Whiskey, He Says Woodrow Farney Tells Of Being Held Up West Of Allen Late Monday Woodrow Farney reported' to city police late Monday night that 10 was stopped by two men, who robbed him of in cash, seven Jints and one fifth of whiskey. le told police that the men rob- bed him when they stopped him about two miles west of Allen. The incident is reported to have lappened about p.m. Mon- Farney told police that the hold-up men were driving a 1933 or 35 Ford and were armed, one an automatic pistol and-the ther with a .22 calibre rifle. The two men are said to have eft the, scene and traveled west oward Allen. Local highway patrolmen were olified of the armed robbery, ut officers had not obtained any nformation about the men late "uesday mornin Everybody Was Happy 'Oklahoma' Wins Great Ovation, Both Audience And Cast Have Good Time By Sip FELDMAN OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. Broadway musical hit came home last night and it was hard to tell who was the happier, the audience or the cast. The cast took six curtain calls after an enthusiastic reception for each number in the show. And star James Alexander stepped out of his role as "Curly" to express the appreciation of the troupe for the "greatest ovation given the show" since it first opened. _ The play-goers joined in the spirit of the'musical, lustily singing two choruses of the title song during the curtain calls. The writers, producers and act- tors were just as enthusiastic about the stater..... At a dinner after the show they all voiced a single sentiment: We re glad the show is about Oklahoma because it's such a wonderful state and the people are so friendly." All those connected with the reduction, which has been on Broadway four years, were made lonorary citizens of Oklahoma y Gov. Robert S. Kerr and of Oklahoma City by Mayor Robert iefncr. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Lang- er and Theresa Helburn of the heater Guild, producer of the low, and Radio Comedian Bob urns who is here for the "Okla- celebration, were made Jews Battle British Troops Ten Soldiers Injured Be- fore Refugees Aboard Troopship Subdued By CARTER L. DAVIDSON HAIFA, Palestine, Nov. 26 teel-helmeted British troops using tear-gas, fire hoses and clubs put down a riot of shouting Jewish refugees aboard the immigrant ship Hameri Haiv- (Lochita) today after an hour- ong battle in which 10 soldiers were injured, four seriously. honorary Indians of the Kiowa tribe. Large torn toms were presented i by Kerr to Oscar Hammerstein 2nd and Richard Rogers, authors E. Leadership Conference Under Way Here Today Ben L. Morrison, director of rural education for the East Cen- tral district, opened, the Lender- ship Conference held here Tues- day in the East Central college auditorium. He introduced the principal participants in the con- ference and gave a brief discus- sion on what the meeting was lo Virginia Acts Against Lewis Colls for Hearing on In- junction Against Sole Of Memberships mCHMOND, V.-i., Nov. 2fl Federal attorneys said they will j L' Lcwi-s is served __ Wli n :i .-.i4 u.... accomplish. "From those meetings both joint and separate, we hope to ac- complish a plan in which leader- ship through workgroups will further the improvement of suc- cessful Morrison said. The morning session started at 10 and after introductions, got underway with a round-table d'is- prcss for speed at every pos.sihj point when Lewis' trial on con tempt (.'nurses begins tomorrow Thursday Thanksigiving Day be a holiday, but govern ment lawyers said they will asl Judge T. Alan Goldsborough foi a Friday session, breaking inlr the traditional Jong weekend af- ter a 'holiday. A high administration aide talking with reporters on the un- derstanding that lie would not be quoted by name, said the govern- ment lias pinned all its hopes foi an early end to the strike on the legal proceedings. No other action in presently contemplated, Hope For, Agreement In themselves, the legal moves will get no coal mined, nor will putting in jail, as could be done if he is found guilty of con- .empt. But this official indicated .he hope that the legal tactics will "soften up" Lewis and push liin toward making an agreement with the mines' private owners on of the show; Lynn Riggs, on whose play "Green Grow the Lilacs' the musical was based; Rouben Mamoulian, 'the produc- tion director, and Agnes De Mille the dance director. g.. mid Nineteenth Century New York the city council was served oysters and coffee at city expense during its meetings. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Wont Ads. OW BIDS FOR HOSPITAL UILD1NG OVER ESTIMATES OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. future of, a planned pro- st to erect a new ward building Northern Oklahoma hospital, nid, was in doubt today after e, lowest bid on the project was most twice as much as the ap- propriation. Apparent low bidder was Cow- en Construction Co., Shawnee with The appropriation was The low bid for construction of a University of Oklahoma school of nursing building here came within the Den- ne-ny Construction Co., Oklahoma City, was low bidder at The appropriation was TULSA, Nov. 26. Col George Marshall, field secretary ol the southern division, Salva- tion army, will open a 000 Salvation Army building fund campaign here at a kickoff breakfast Dec. I. Adans Were There, But Wished They Hadn't Made Trip Rounduppers Didn't Ride; Band Gave Concert From Warm Refuge In Bakery It may not have been 13 b.c- ow zero when Ada Round-Up lub membivrs arrived in Okla- .oma City Monday morning" to articipate in a parade prior to le opening of 'Oklahoma', but it would have been hard to con- vince the Adans that it wasn't that cold. When the thermometer drop- ped to the freezing mark, a num- ber of Adans were enroute from Ada to Oklahoma City, but they were still thinking of participa- ting in the parade even as the weather got worse. Two truck loads of horses for Round Up club members were transported from Ada to Oklaho- ma City and on arrival were sent 3atk to Ada. Members of the Ada High scnool band headquartered at the Bon Bakery and presented a con- cert for those who were near enough to hear. The rising bread in the bakery didn't fall, but the band member's spirits were plen- ty low at that time. The young musician's left Ada in high hopes that they would participate in the 'Oklahoma' par- ade, but the sudden change in tiie weather did away with all pre- vious arrangements. A buffalo on display had long cicles hanging from it and j] the horses that arrived early and didn't have protection werp biggest yet to attempt the dash to Palestine, to begin the remova of the illegal immigrants to three British troopships, to await legal decision on their future I was reported that refugees were aboard. "The blighters were tossing fuh tins of TJNRRA food at a po- lice. officer said. "It was ankle- deep on the dock." At the height of the fight the passengers hung a huge banner over the side of the ship. It was signed "Commander-in-chief, Jewish Resistance and read: "For every Jew mur- dered or wounded aboard this M pay in English wood. You have been warned Soldiers were repulsed in their first attempt to board the ship and returned shortly armed with tear-gas, hose and clubs. Four sten gun bursts were fired in the air, -but the refugees would not be cowed. About 50 of the immigrants overboard and were pick- ed up. Some 30 others jumped to the deck of a nearby tug, but were brought back. Disembarkation began an hour .and a half after the ship entered Haifa harbor. The immigrants were taken ashore in launches and transferred to the troopships. New Head Named To Barnard College Dr. Mclntosh, Mother Of Five, Succeeds Virginia Gildersleeve e used in this district. Those sitting at the table' down :ront, and leading the discussion were Edgar E. Harris, assistant state superintendent, Oklahoma City, leader; Dr. Victor H. Hicks, Director Horace Mann School, Ada; Ira E. Bugg, superintendent, 'ottawatomie county, Shawnee; Gordon M. Harrel, professor of geography, East Central; W. B. Ragan, education department, University of Oklahoma, Norman; Earle E. Emerson, superintendent of Schools, Cromwell. In the afternoon, starting at the different groups went lo separate rooms for discussion and to make plans. They were the United Mine Workers. The hope is that Lewis in- stead of pursuing a strike which the official said might prove dis- astrous to his miners as well as to the national economy will seek a face-saving end to the con- troversy. Lewis Could Save Face By bargaining with the private owners, the official suggested, Lewis could gracefully slide out of the present situation without loss of prestige and without yield- ing on his demands, since he has never specifically slated his de- T) finds. At the same time, the govern- ment could relinquish its unwant- ed control over the mines which with a summons cither today or tomorrow to appear before Hie Virginia Slate Corporation Com- mission Monday to show causi' why a temporary'i n junction .snoujd not be onk'red against tho United Mine Workers union or- dering th.-u of memberships' be ceased, as a violation of the slate Securities Law. In Alexandria today, Deputy Sergeant J. K. Moriarty said summons had been rei'oived th and thnl ho planned lo serve it as soon as feasible, possiblv wln-n Lewis loaves his homo 'in the morning. Moriarly said the pers were rc-n.-ivL-d this morning after the United Mine Workers loader had left his home for Washington. .Meanwhile, Governor William M. Juck today proclaimed a state of emergency to exist in Virginia because of the soft coal mine shutdown. The governor said ha was acting on advice of the states Emergency Fuel Commis- sion which yesterday went to Washington to confer with offi- cials of the Solid Fuels Adminis- tration. chairman; county superintend- ents' group, Willis Morgan, Pauls Valley, chairman; class room teachers' group, Alva Wells, Shawnee, chairman; rural teach- Bizzell, :rs' group, Mrs. Ruth Shawnee, chairman. A summary of the conference, presenting all the plans and sug- gestions made by the different jroups, was given at by Dr. j Jenry Harap, curriculum expert of George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn. The general purpose of the con- erence can be summed up under pur To give infbrma- ion on in-service training pro- gram in Oklahoma; 2. To lead to of study Government attorneys conced- ed that the federal district court trial might last days, perhaps weeks and longer than the na- tional economy could possibly stand the strangulation of its ba'- sic fuel supply, Schools, Industries Suffer As tl-.e strike went into its sixth day, more than workers i Real Thanksgiving Thursday for Dozen Rescued from Alps Each Hod Felt There Was Little Hope; Snowfall Now Covering Plane repercussions. Schools, steel mills, railroads and hundreds of communities be- gan to feel the pinch acutely. The government clamped down new curbs on deliveries of to schools and all government NEW YORK, Nov. 26 (JP) 3r. Millicent Carey Mclntosh, headmistress of the Brearley school here, has been named to s-sceci Virginia C. Gildersleeve as dean of Barnard college wo- men's undergraduate branch of Colubmia University. Dr.' Mclntosh, who will be 48 Saturday, will assume her new post next July 1. A mother of five children, she is the wife of Dr Rustin Mclntosh, carpentier pro- fessor of pediatrics at Columbia's college of physicians and sur- geons and director of the b_bies hospital there. Barnard college, with a student body of has no president other than the president of the university, but its dean holds a m the academic world com- parable to that of the presidents of other women's colleges ion officials; 3. To help in de- velopment of resource use'in edu- ation; 4. To develop broader and more genuine cooperation among students, patrons, educational of- ficials, and out-of-school youth. Berrie Is Denied Parole Application Board Does Make 15 Clemency Recommenda- j OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. jtate pardon and parole biard has denied the parole ap- plication of the Rev. S. A. Berrie, serving a life term for the mur- der of his wife at Muskogee. But the board made 15 clem- ency recommendations at a meet- olfice of tne Sohd Fuels Administration for permits. The SFA ordered emergency coal stocks held strictly for public utilities such as electricity, gas sewage disposal service and street railway transportation and for such other essential services as railroads, laundries, dairies, bak- eries, refrigeration plants, steam- ships, and for heating homos apartments and hotels. Coal-burn- ng railroads had already cut passenger service by 25 percent yesterday. A rigid checkup was ordered on the coal-saving dimout, which became effective at 6 p.m. yest- erday in 21 states and the District of Columbia. The Civilian Pro- duction Administration oted that violators may be punished by n maximum fine and one- year imprisonment. Two U. S. Steel subsidiaries an- nounced drastic curtailment of production, effective immediately Nov. 2G, (.-T; A dozen Americans who spent five days marooned on a trcchcrous glacier high in the Swiss Alps will sit down together Thursday at a traditional American Thanksgiving Day, banquet, and together give thanks for their dramatic rescue. The 12, six of them still hos- hero, made tho Thanks- giving dinner dale late Thurs- day, when there was lilUc hope that they would be anywhere on that foast day but on the crevas- se-laced gaulli glacier, huddled in their crashed C-53 transport plane. They had feared although they hestitated to admit it to each there was not much hope for them. But what the four women and the II-year- old girl among know that them did not a crevasse 150 M i_ viiM.e i ju yards from their plane was bo- to crack even while ineir discussion was under way and that they were on the prink of disaster. The men told the women the noise they hoard cracking because'of the cold.' Little Alice Mary McMahon. ing here yesterday. They inclu- iincludlnga to 35 percent oi no better off. Cumulo-nimbus clouds which figure in thunderstorms have a spreading anvil-like top which as high as may reach fait TRUMAN AND STAFF TO SEE ARMY-NAVY GAME WASHINGTON, Nov. 26, President Truman is going to Philadelphia Saturday to attend the Army-Navy football game. The White House said today that Mr. Truman and members of his staff will' leave by special tram over the Pennsylvania rail- road at a. m. (EST) and ar- rive at a siding near the Munici- pal stadium at a. m. The president will be accom- panied by Mrs. Truman. ded: Wilson McGlory, life for rob- 3ery with firearms, Tulsa county, one-year leave. J. D. Aaron, five years for auto theft, Delaware county, parole. Alline Edward White, 12 years for manslaughter in Jackson county, allowance for 227 days of ti .ie served in jail. Marshall .Carter, three years for shooting with intent' to kill, Stephens county, parole. John E. Evans, five years for forgery in second degree, Cim- arron county, parole. James H. Foley, 15 years for conjoint robbery, Kay county, 90- day leave of absence. Leon Frederick Cooper, two years for second degree burglary, "addo county, parole. now snug in the homo of Brig' Gen Loyal M. Haynes, one of her fellow passengers, did not even know the plane had crash- landed until she was told. Sho said she believed it was iust another of the heavy downdrafis the plane had been hitting for sovi.-ral hours. (The C-53 was being burird today under an Alpine snowfall a dispatch from Meiringen Switzerland, reported. It quot- ed one of the Alpinist rescuers as say me "it will bo next spring before we sec the plane again, and, if the crevasse opens up _ j_ J..V.IV.LUIP i_ n.jou U capacity by Carnegie-Illinois. I thcl'e. we will never see it again. Jones Laughlin steel droppec In fi} i percent. FIND YOUTH'S BODY IN DITCH NEAR SNYDEB SNYDER, Okla., Nov. 2G, LllClfl IS Dm t :___. The party will return to Washington immediately after the game, planning to be back in the capital at p. m Some veterans are seeking to buy surplus mine detectors to aid m a search for buried pirate ROM. vuuuur buuii VJJC. Robert Earl Jones, five years 'or larceny' of auto, Grant county, and one year for burglary, Woods county, parole. Billy Berry, five years for lar- ceny of auto, Grant county, and one year for burglary, Woods county, parole. Walter Philpot, 25 years for robbery with firearms, Custer county, leave extended one year. Elbert Kester, life for murder, Washington county, six months leave. Greater .returns for amount in- I vested. Ada Want Adi. t (u f are investigating' th, death of a youth identified fr h: -iway Patrol as Russef Kidwell, 19, whose body was found in a ditch beside a road near here late yesterday. Highway Patrol Trooper Fred -U Henry said the youth's showed head injuries and bruises The parents of the boy live at Verdcn, Grady county, but he had been living with relatives here the trooper said. government newspaper Izvestia declared today- that the' British government had "ignored the principles of equality" jn its dealings with Egypt and assert- ed that British policy in the Nile valley had given rise to tension throughout the Middle East. Til P i i 11 a 1 i nn m- The situation nas naturally f, w.J justified the legitimate alarm of all real friends and support- ers of fruitful collaboration of the paper said. Canada is the world's second largest exporting nation. A score of climbers remained in the hut halfway down the- icy slope with supplies and equip- ment moved there for the rescue which finally had been effected Sunday with Swiss Fieseler- Storch TH' PESSIMIST n r nob Jm. Th' average vocabulary consists o' Hi' word You've never done any himtin' 'til you've hunted a toon-age girl.   

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