Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 25, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Any rule for notions to tell how mony troops they hove ond where they ore disposed is loo much like osking o cooch to let everybody know all about his team for it to be accepted readily. Average Net October Paid Circulation 8601 Member: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 189 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 194C Weather In Swiff Change Over Night Unseasoned Warmth Of Sunday Driven Out by Blast Of Cold Wind Here Maybe it finally got just too mild to continue. At any rate, after Sunday's delightfully pleas- ant weather the situation changed over night Here and now it's late fail again. The Saturday high of 63 was followed by a moderate 59 de- prc-e low which gave the ther- mometer a good start for Sunday. It kept going up until it reached 71 but normal for this season. During the night the wind, which had been blow- ing strongly from the south, changed and began whipping in from the north. It drove the mer- cury down to 36 degrees. Clouds, cold rainfall dur- ing the morning and a sharp wind liept the seasonal weather in place during the early part of Monday, and bore out the fore- cast of more wintry weather hero. By Ax.tnclatrd Press Snow, sleet and rain were re- ported in Oklahoma today as cold weather swooped into the state after a comparatively mild Sun- day. The highway patrol made a survey and said: Alva had sleet during the right: two inches of snow fell at Buffalo: Boise City, at the ex- treme west end of the panhandle, had inches of snow; Guy- mon had an inch of snow? Wood- ward reported sleet and snow this morning: it was sleeting at Enid and highway bridges and culverts were beginning to gel slippery west of Clinton. All roads are open but are be- coming slippery, the patrol said, warning motorists to use caution. Near-f r e e z i n g temperatures were forecast for most of the state tonight with the northwest area likely to have sub freezing readings. Fort Sill's high of 75 Sunday compared with a low reading overnight of 3C degrees. Ardmore had 74 Sunday and a low reading during the night of 40. Other comparisons between Sunday's high and the overnight low: Elk City 75 and 30; Enid 08 and 29: Guymon 60 and 26, Mc- Alester 68 and 40; Oklahoma City 74 and 32; Ponca City 69 and 28; Tulsa 63 and 32; Waynoka 68 and 23. Gage reported a third of. a'n inch of rain. FIVE CENTS THE COPY Federal Judge Orders Lewis To Stand Trial Wednesday On Court Contempt Charges SECRET ARABIAN ARMY: Members of the underground Futuwa Army, all of them Arabian fol- lowers of the Mufti of Jerusalem line up during secret drill in Abu Dis, a village between Jerusalem T. N. Winters Is in Hospital Injured When Car in Which He Was Riding Col- lided with Another Sunday A traffic miles north collision about of Ada early Sun day afternoon resulted in seriou- 68, and to Thomas N. Winters minor hurts to severa other persons in the cars involv- ed. Winters is in Valley View hos- pital recovering from lacerations about his face, right eye anc hand that required 40 stitches he also was bruised when, throwr from the automobile in which he was ricjing. According to members of the state highway patrol who inves- tigated the accident, Ray Loyle Winters, Route 3, Ada. was driv- er of a pickup and Lloyd Button, 524 West Main, the other. Winters was driving north and Sutton south when they recogniz- ed each other and began driv- ing their vehicles playfully only to end up by both turning the Rogers in Plea Of Innocent Today EL RENO. Okla., Nov. 25, UP) O. C. Rogers plead- ed innocent today to a charge of murder in the death of his wife, Peggy Rogers, 32, whose body was found in the spillway below Lake Overholser near Oklahoma City Nov. 16. Rogers. 33, was brought hand- cuffed into county court. Judge R. M. Faubion asked for his plea lo the charge. Rogers said noth- ing and stared at the floor. A deputy sheriff standing near Rogers repeated the question in a louder tone and Rogers repli- ed: "No. I'm not guilty." The judge set a preliminary hearing for Dec. 4 and Rogers was returned to the Canadian county iail. -K wrong way' and colliding. With Winters was Floyd W. Winters and Thomas N. Winters. In the car with Sutton were Wanda Nipps, Route 3, Ada, and Louie McKay, 310 East Sixteen- th. All received treatment follow- ing the wreck, Mr. Winters re- maining at Valley View hospital where the attending physician said Monday he may stay for several days as he is not yet entirely out of danger. Also at Valley View hospital, Jim Biggcrstaff, critically injur- ed Friday when run over by a trailer while at work near Stone- wall, was reported somewhat, improved. City Police Have Lively Weekend After a four-day rest from Tuesday to Thursday, during which time no arrests were made, the Ada police depart- ment were again given their rush. Saturdny night, one person was ar.-c-st'-d for reckless driving and It-leased on a S20 bond, three were picked up for drunkenness, pleaded guilty and paid the reg- ular fine. Early Sunday morning, around or seven minors, ages IS to Ifi. were picked up on Main street. They hnd been roaming the streets all night, and were booked at the police station for violation of the city curfew law. After a sound "talking they were releas- ed. Sunday night, two were ar- rested for drunkenness, pleaded guilty as charged and paid a fine each. Tne city hit the "jack pot" on traffic violations again last Sat- urday. Around 40 traffic viola- tion tickets were paid, one of them being a fine for speed- in c. WEATHER! Oklahoma Clearing north- west, mostly cloudy cast and south: light rain or sleet south- east: somewhat colder; low tem- peratures 20 Panhandle, 32-35 southeast tonight: Tuesday partly c'.oudy and a little warmer. Truman Gets to Eat Turkey Dinner With His Mother Sunday By ERNEST B. VACCARO WASHINGTON, Nov. recollections of a Sun- day holiday and dinner back home in Missouri buoyed President Truman today as he returned to a desk piled high with grave prob- lems. He found his mother, Mrs. MnrthH E. Truman, "just when he flew to Grandvicw, Mo., yesterday for a turkey dinner in honor of her 94th birthday anni- versary today. The president, his.mother and 14 other members of the family sat around a huge table in the other's frame dwelling near the old farm where Harry S. Truman worked as a boy. The president's brother, J. Vivian Truman and his family and the president's sister, Miss Mary Jane Truman, were all there. It was a typical family dinner, the kind the president has always enjoyed. "Turkey and everything that goes with Miss Truman re- ported. The president could stay little more than a couple of hours be- cause his plane, bucking stiff head winds, arrived an hour la- ter than he had planned. The flight back set a record for his trips between Washington and home. His pilot, Lt. Col. Hen- ry T. (Hank) Myers, gave the time as three hours and 25 min- utes, as compared with a flight of more than five hours on the way to Missouri. Tail winds help- ed coming back. No prior 'announcement was made of Mr. Truman's intentions to fly home. Because of the pres- sure of engagements this week, he decided it was best to make the trip Sunday, rather than wait for the birthday. His sister said: "Mother wasn't too surprised by his visit, be- cause Harry always comes if he an. But we didn't know in ad- vance." Last year Mr. Truman made a similar surprise flight home on nis mother's Read The News Classified Ads. Dying Yonkers Community To Send Some Residents To Yonkers, N.Y., Tercentennial YONKERS, Okla, Nov. community's en- tire population of 69 was in a collective dither today over the arrival of two representatives of the Yonkers, N. Y., Ter- centennial Commission'to arrange a trek for a select few to Huge Assortment 01 Cut Diamonds Found By Yanks in Japan Hundreds of Thousands Of Gems Were Gathered By Government in War Finance Move By ROBERT E. GEIGER TON, NOV. Hundreds of thousands of cut diamonds probably the great- est 'assortnTe'nf'ever' 'assembled" in' modern times is in the hoard which American occupation forces uncovered in Japan. Government officials said today the Japanese government collect- ed the huge treasure from the Japanese people as a desperate war financing measure. Appar- ently the intention was to sell the gems for foreign exchange and purchase munitions and raw ma- ;erials. A War Department announce- ment said the gems are valued at between and But gem experts with cnowledge of the hoard said the army undoubtedly was speaking conservatively and of the New Yo.lc wholesale price. In settings and in the possession of indivi- duals, they said, the value would ae far greater. One Nation's Diamonds "Thej represent the entire dia- mond resources of the whole na- Edward Henderson of the Smithsonian Institution told a re- porter. "This undoubtedly is a situation unique in history. I know of no other time when vir- tually every diamond owned by every individual in a nation was assembled at one place." The gems now are in vaults of the Bank of Japan in Toklo. They wore found buried and hidden in r.-.any places of the Japanese em- pire. The gems came into possession of the Japanese army when the government appealed to the peo- ple to turn them in. When the Japanese surrendered, the hoard became widely distributed. Telling how the diamonds were found, officials here said one .box was located in Tokyo after a Japanese reported to Americans he knew of a place "where dia- monds are scattered all over." Found "Gallons of Diamonds" American army intelligence then uncovered other hiding places which yielded gallons of diamonds, often in flimsy con- tainers such as shoe boxes. The g -z 'were "in a confused condi- tion. Dirty and mixed with worth- less the army announce- r-.ent said. Henderson and Dr. William H. F' :hag, curator of minerals at the Smithsonian, were called to Tokyo to classify and appraise the "collection." "If they had been piled in one heap, on a desk, I don't suppose you could have stretched your arms around the bottom of the Henderson said. There were so ,many that it took Henderson and Dr. Foshag, working with four Japanese, five sclid months to count and classify them. No famous individual diamonds turned up, and apparently none from the Japanese crown jewels. The three heaviest weighed a to- tal of 100 cnrats, This compares with 106 carats for the famed Kohinoor diamond of the British crown' jewels. Japanese have told the Ameri- cans the diamonds all were from Japanese; none from the victims of war. If this is true it still is a i.iystery what happened to some loot from Hong Kong and other places that fell to the Japanese. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. the eastern metropolis. A dozen or so Cherokee Indians who -live in the nearby eastern Oklahoma hills mingled with vil- lagers before Mrs. Young's gen- eral store to hear Ted Worner outline details for the trip to the "city of gracious liv- ing." The most exciting event in the history of the 34-year-old farm- ing town will begin, tomorrow when 10 Oklahomans will pile into a brand new, de luxe all- Effects Are Spreading Many Thousands of Fac- tory Workers Face Layoffs, Household Pins Low On Coal By The Associated Press With the soft coal mines shut down only since last Wednesday midnight, repercussions already were widespread. Steelworkers and factory hands by the hundreds of thousands faced layoffs because of dwind- ling coal piles. Householders anxiously eyed their own bins while a spell of winter weather swept eastward from the Rockies. Aidimout more drastic than in wartime was ordered into effect in 21 states tonight, and coal burning railroads slashed passen- ger service 25 percent. All governors were asked by secretary of the interior Krug to set up machinery whereby cities could ration coal and close schools if need be. Mayor William O'Dw- yer, reversing an earlier stand, called on New York citizens to suspend, needless lighting. But Georgia's governor Ellis Arnall, in a statement, said light-saving wasn't the answer that Krug and President Truman should Rules Lewis Had Not Cleared Self, After UMW Objections His Court Lacked Jurisdiction By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON, Nov. Federal Judge T. Alan Goldsborough declared today that John L. Lewis and his United Mine Workers "undertook to decide the law for them- selves" and ordered them to trial Wednesday for contempt in the soft, coal shutdown. The trial probably will run into next week while indus- trial paralysis tightens from the diminishing coal supply. Welly K. Hopkins, counsel for and the union, sought aluminum trailer for the journey busy and settle the strike, to Yonkers, N. Y., and that city's Demands continued for a spec- jal session of congress Former secretary of the interior Ickes last night broadcast a call for prompt legislation which could curb the "impudence of a dictator, such as Lewis." He said the government should" a'sfc" "dismissal of it's order restraining a coal strike: in other words, abandon the court effort and rely on a special, lame-duck birthday celebration. Worner and his assistant, Frank Beaton, mounted spotted ponies to ride to each home in town to select'the lucky residents. .Two Key and Jim Joyce, both of whom remember how this place got it; name. "Feller by the name of George Lowery boarded with my mother and father back in explain- ed Key. "He said he was from Yonkers, N. Y., and thought it would be a good idea to call our town Yonkers. Told us lots about that place back east and we just decided to give 'Ourselves name." Unlike its "city still growing after three centuries Yonkers, Okla., is doomed. Two years from now the entire area will be flooded as part of a state flood control program, and with its demise there will be only one Yonkers in the country. Postmistress Myrtle Pryor re- ported she wouldn't be able to leave her post to make the long- awaited eastern trip, but her son, Dale, 11, has been getting, ready for the jaunt for the past two months. He even wrote a school composition on "What" I Exnect To See In Yonkers." The trailer to be used was do- nated by the Spartan Aircraft Co., Tulsa, whose plant was vis- ited by the tercentennial envoys. CLARA CITY, Minn., Nov. 25 salesman walked into William Dqnner's jewelry store, set down his grips; and immedia- tely rushed out again. He returned a short time later, carrying a box of eggs which he carefully laid aside while he opened the grips to display 000 worth- of jewelry. "Do you mean to tell me you left those valuables here unat- tended while you went chasing asked Donner. answercj the salesman, "Eggs are hard to get where I coirie from." session. Small Freighters Collide and Sink Coast Guard Searches For Men of Crews MIAMI, Fla., Nov. Two small freighters 25, collided and sank off Miami today and the coast guard began a sea and air search for about 17 members of the two crews. First word of the accident came from the Caribbean trader Evangelos, which flashed a dis- tress call a few hours after leav- ing -Miami Haiti for a cargo of bananas -and other island pro- ducts. The craft reported she was in Fulbrighl Proposes Ban on Strikes In Basic Industries By JACK BELL WASHINGTON, Nov. 25, Senator Fulbright (D-Ark) pro- posed today that congress outlaw strikes and compel arbitration, of labor disputes in basic industries such as coal mining directly af- fecting the general welfare of the country. Such machinery could be made applicable to future coal work stoppages if not the present walk- out, Fulbright told a reporter. He said it might be applied also to enterprises such as oil, steel, transportation and public utili- ties. His idea. Fulbright explained would be to ban strikes altogeth- er in- these industries and force arbitration of disputes either set up-on- the pattern :of the interstate com- merce commission or through a special court, or both. He added that the government might have to exorcise regula- tory powers over the industries, just as it now does over some utilities, and might have lo con- trol prices of the industries' pro- ducts in order to adjust wage disputes equitably. The Arkansas senator's sugges- tion came while legislative lead- ers of both parties waited to see whether President Truman in- tends to call' them into confer- ence about possible ways and means of ending the coal walk- out. There have been indica- tions the president is thinking of such a move if developments point to a prolonged mine shut- down. While he said he could think of no legislative solution to the present dispute between John L. Lewis and the government, Ful- bright insisted that some action must be taken to remove the threat of strikes in industries af- v.j.uj.4, i v-f-c-fi ucu. OllC VV as lit f i- A-i------------------------------- collision with the freighter Mar- lectmK tne economy of the whole sidee. from Nassau? and was sinking. A short time later the Mar- sidee reported the Evangelos had sunk and she too, was sink- ing. Coast guard rescue craft sped to the scene in the Straits of Florida about 30 miles south of Miami, but returned no survi- vors immediately. Const guardsmen said first re- ports were that the Evangelos carried a crew of 10, and the VTarsidee a crew of 7 men. It will be foolish for President Truman to offer himself for re- election in 1948. H. Crump, Memphis, Tenn., country. Life of Nation Involved "We cannot let one man or one group of men stop the whole economic machinery of the coun- try by the power they exercise in any one basic he declared. "I have no quarrel with the workers' right to strike in industries whore a stoppage has only a local affect or which merely inconveniences the pub- lic. But the very life of the na- tion is 'at stake here." In passing Fulbright said no-strike law. it is his belief that congress should define de- finitely the industries it believes fall in the category of those dir- ectly affecting the general wel- Read The News Classified Ads. (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Lewis ana i.nq union, sought n delay (o permit Joseph A. Pad- way, general counsel of the AFL, to join in the defense but Golds- borough refused the request, commenting that the "public in- terest" requires as speedy a set- tlement as possible in view of the mine walkout already in its fifth day. Speaking in low tones. Golds- borough also expressed the hope that labor unions would not "do something that might influence congress" to pass legislation which might "set the labor move- ment back for years." "I don't know whether I was justified in making that state- he commented after- wards. was extra-judicial." White House Silent The White House meanwhile maintained silence. Presidential Press Secretary Charles R. Ross told reporters there was "noth- ing" there on the coal situation. The questions whether there is any movement under way to bring Republican leaders to the White House to talk over the coal crisis, Ross replied with "no com- Goldsborough set Wednesday's trial after ruling that Lewis had not purged himself of the con- tempt charges directed against him Nov. 21 for failure to with- draw a non-contract notice to the government. It was Lewis' can- cellation of the work agreement that'touched off the walkout of soft coal miners, lewis Lets Attorneys Talk Lewis sat silently in the crowd- ed courtroom during the 40-min- ute session while Hopkins argue that Goldsborough lacked juris diction either to issue an orde requiring Lewis to rescind the no tice or to issue the contempt cit tion that followed. Attempts by government coun sel to argue that point immediate ly were cut off by Goldsborougl When court opens Wednesda Goldsborough said: "I wilf pass on the contemp citation first, then pass on th merits of the restraining order. "This complaint was filed b the sovereign power by societ the judge said. "I don't think any thinking per son wants to see anything happen to labor unions insofar as thei raising their standards of livin; are concerned. "The defendants say they hav< done nothing. That amounts tc saying they did not obey the re straining order. "But they say they did no have, to obey the order bncausi it was not legal. That's their pos ilion." Lewis returned directly from Dozen Yanks Flown Out Lived on Box Lunches, Then Candy Bors, Drank Melted Snow in Gla-cier Stay By REMBERT JAMES INTERLAKEN. Switzerland, Nov. 25. Americans who survived five days on an Alpine glacier feet above sea level were safe on a United Mates Army hospital train en- route lo Vienna today, rescued from their plight by the same route they got into the air. Swiss army officers in ski- equipped, three-place Fieseler Storch planes brought them and their baggage out yesterday in nine shuttle flights over the 10 miles between the airport at Meiringen, some 15 miles east of Interlaken. and their snowy per- girl. metal framework of a light plane, its twisted, blackened re- itji6! a midnlSht frolic protrudes from the roof of a Ft: Worth residence at 2541 Shirley St. The house was occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel E. Hale, and all its occupants es- caped without injury The plane was piloted by B obby T. Pirkle, 23, a Pacific-bat eveteran who Telephoto) Southwestern College of Aeronautics and who killed in the the court to UMW headquarters He grinned at waiting reporter.1- for the first time in inany days but said nothing. Asked whether he would hold a news conference, now that the preliminary court skirmishing was over, Lewis grinned jignin nudged Hopkins and thrust hi? thumb in the direction of the questioning reporter. Hopkins smilingly commented: "The subject had no HOPARADE Rain, Cold Force Calling Off Of O. C. Plans OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. and freezing tempera- tures forced cancellation this af- ternoon of a parade which was to open Oklahoma City's week- long celebration welcoming the musical show "Oklahoma." But all other phases of the pro- gram will be held. Bebee Pie Supper There will be a pie supper nl. the Bebee school house Wednes- day night of this week. Everyone is invited. Proceeds are to furnish the Christmas Tree program for the school so all are asked to come out, have a good time nnd give Santa a boost. The royal antelope, also called the dik-dik, is the smallest ru- minant known. It is a native of West Africa and is only 12 inches high. ch on Gauli glacier. The 11-year-old K.I., four women, four army officers, two non-commissioned officers and a male been m a sheltered hole in the glaci- er, 13 miles southeast of Inter- laken, since the crash landing Tuesday of a U. S. army C- Dakota transport plane en- route from-Vienna to Pisa by way of Munich. They had lived on box lunches for three days and. after those gave out, on candy bars they had purchased at the Munich post exchange and doled out one a day to each. They drank snow melted over fires of gasoline, oil and parts of the plane, nnd had slept on blankets nnd the trans- port's seats and upholstery. bwiss mountain guides reported a three-foot snowfall hnd con- verted the cabin of the slightly damaged plane into a cozy "ig- loo' for them. Not (ill Friday was the wreck located. Metal in the mountains deflected radio beams sent from the stricken plane and receiving operators got the impression it was 80 miles south of here. Staff Sgt. Wayne G. Folsom of Postville. la., the crew chief, was the only stretcher case among the 12. He had frostbite, a knee in- jury and foot bruises. Capt. Tale said he deliberately pancaked his ship into the glaci- er when a down current headed it toward a mountainside. His father said the captain set his own course and then "for some reason we don't know yet. found hirnself in the midst of mountain peaks." Marital Argument Leads to Slaying 'DEWAR. oki.r, NOV. A shooting following a marital argument resulted in the death of Cothcal Stephens, 23, curly Sun- dny, nnd the nrr-si of his father- -m-law, Vorlin 40, for in- vestigation. Sheriff Jim Kirby ropnrtod. No chiirRos have bi-ch filed. Kirby said Stephens and his wife quarreled, and she went to her father's home where he learn- ed of the argument. The sheriff said Henry went to see his son- in-law armed with a shotgun and sistol. Tho shooting occurred at Stephens' front door. Stephens was hit three times by a shotgun ind three times by n pistol, Kirby said. Henry is held in Okmulgee county jail. The. Stephens are parents of 'our-monllis old son. Read Tho News Classified TH' PESSIMIST lloh Gather Harp, who had carburetor t u n e .1 up last week, has taken out bank- ruptcy. Gran'ma Wheeler will eighty-five years ol' next coal strike.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication