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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: November 24, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 24, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             There are keys and keys but the one that no person has ever been able to develop and keep is the one every coach needs to key up his team for every game during a football season Avfraje -Nct October Paid Circulation 8601 Member: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 188 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Leadership Conference Here Tuesday Dr. Harap of Peobody College Coming to Lead District Teachers Dis- cussions Dr. Henry Harap, curriculum expert of George Pcabody col- lege for teachers. Nashville, Tenn.. will be a special guest of East Central district teachers in a leadership conference Novem- ber 26. Edgar E. Harris, assistant state superintendent; Dr. Victor H. Hicks, director Horace Mann School; Ira E. Bugg. Pottawa- lomie county superintendent; Gordon M. Harrcl. professor at East Central college; Charles N. Johnson, state department cur- riculum director, and Earlc E. Emerson, superintendent Crom- Schools, will discuss "Lead- ership Through Workgroups for Improvement of Instruction." Panel plan will be used for this part of the program. The morn- ing session opens at 10 and con- tinues !o noon. Two Afternoon Groups Afternoon program has two phases. Sniall groups including school administrators, county sup- erintendents, classroom teachers, and rural teachers will start meetings at to plan action in opening group work in all centers where it is not now func- tioning. Dr. Harap will give a summary of the meeting in a general as- sembly Tuesday. Four purposes are viewed as most important now. They are: (1) To give in- formation on in-service training for teachers; (2) To lead to or- ganization of study groups: (3) To help in development of re- source use education; and (4) To develop broader and more gen- pine co-operation among teach- ers, students, patrons, education officials, and out-of-school youth. Group Leaders Chosen Paul Allen, superintendent Pauls Valley schools, will lead the administrators' group. The county superintendents be under the direction of Willis Mor- gan. Garvin county superinten- dent. Alva Wells, ShawnecT will be chairman of the classroom teacher group in the Ada confer- ence, and Mrs. Ruth Bbzcll, pres- ident East Central O. E. A. divi- sion of rural teachers, will meet the rural group. "These conferences have direct bearing on the type of instruction offerett in our schools: and when they are coupled with the study teachers accomplish in groups, the advantages to education arc ouite Ben L. Morrison, director of rural education for East Central district, says. ___ .._ -W _..____ Columbians' Leader Knocked to Floor Attorney Unable to Take His Tirade and Swings Heavy Fist on Him ATLANTA. Nov. The president of the anti-Jewish, anti- negro Columbians -was knocked to the floor today in a judge's chamber by a husky assistant at- torney general in the climax of an argument over the organiza- tion's charter. "Dad blame it, I've taken all 1 can from you." yelled Dan Duke as he struck C. Burke with his fist, opening an inch-long gash over his left eye. His face covered with blood, Burke staggered to his feet to shout back that "You'll answer for this." Duke said he swung after a "tirade" in which Burke implied he was not a "white Anglo-Saxon public official." The flnreup climaxed a session in the chambers of Superior Judge E. E. Pomeroy in which the organization won a six-day postponement of the stale suit to revoke its charter. Duke has been representing the state in this suit Hf. he has in similar action against the Ku Klux Kl.-in. Duke left the judicial chambers at the suggestion of Judge Pom- eroy who said: "I'll handle this." Duke asked the judge to call a doctor and said he would pay Burke's medical expenses. The judge first told newsmen he "was considering" action ajainst both Duke and Burke but later said he would "take no cog- nizance" of it, explaining his "back was turned" and he "didn't see any of it." Earlier, during a heated argu- ment over the suit Duke called Phil W. Davis, Columbian attor- ney, a "bald-faced liar." "I am sorry that I was unable to control Duke snid in a statement dictated to newsmen from his office. Read The News Classified Ads. WEATHER DRASTIC LOCAL RATIONING URGED ONE STEAK, PRIPE TWA Hostess Mary .McCorkle of Kansas City, Kan., E. W. Williams, local packing house owner, tells her that the glass-protected steak he's handing her is worth It was cut from 'Grand Cham- pion Steer T. O. Pride, which recently sold at auction for Steaks sells for a pound and this one weighs 2 pounds. It was flown to Pittsburgh to be given as a prize on a radio show. (NBA Rescue Squad Crawls Over Ice To Army Plane on Glacier In Alps, Removal to Start Sunday Pilots Circling Spot S0I Some Passengers Sunning Selves, 11 from Plane to Be Brought Down Today By ERNEST G. FISCHER MEIRINGEN, Switzerland, Nov. rescue squad today crawled to 11 Americans whose IT. S. ar- my transport plane but Swiss military sources said the squad had abandoned efforts to start removal of the passengers from their icy shelf until tomorrow morning. That meant that the passeng- ers, including four women and a ll-year-old girl, must spend a fifth night on the foot high glacier. Doctors were in the res- cue party, however, and supplies have been dropped to ease the plight of the injured. The Swiss authorities said that it had been planned to take some of the passengers down to a half- way hut used by skiers as a shel- ter, but this was called, off as darkness enveloped the scene. Not Sure of Survivors Radio with the plane was ineffectual and there was no way in which authorities Ada Planning Turns Now to Thursday, Thanksgiving Day From today on planning of Ada families will center 'more and more definitely on next Thurs- day Thanksgiving Day, the one truly and completely American Day. There will be a general holiday hero, school children happily making the most of a double-long weekend, much visiting, feasting of family groups. On Thursday morning, from to there will be a union Thanksgiving service in the auditorium of Ada Junior high school. This is arranged by the Ada Ministerial organization. at Meiringen could learn the con- dition of the passengers. Previous reports had said eight were stretcher cases. The Swiss announcement said radio equipment would be drop- ped at the scene tonight and that two' Fieseler-Storch planes, of German-make and similar to American artillery observation Rev. W. A. Sapulpa, planes, might be landed near the Oklahoma: Cloudy, rain anj cooler panhandle Sunday; Sun- day night cloudy, showers east and central, cooler west; Monday partly cloudy, cooler. district superintendent for the Church of the Nazarcne, will be the principal speaker. Musical numbers arc to be provided through some of the local schools. The feature oC the afternoon will be the traditional clash of East Central State Tigers and the Southeastern Savages in the final football game of the season, to be played on Norris Field. Housewives and grocery stores will be busy the next three days making provision for the festive boards. Two Clarita Stores Hit Hard Thursday Night by Burglars Johnny Phillips, Coal county sheriff, has asked the assistance of Pontoloc county, and Ada authorities in connection with two general merchandise store robberies in Clarita Thursday night. Grigsby's store was the hard- est hit of the two with a long list of merchandise, and cash, is reported .missing. Two hams, one case of pork and beans, two cases of English peas, one case of corn, two cases assorted fruit, 22 cartons of cig- arettes, 200 pounds of sugar, 10 silver dollars, two rolls of pen- nies and a role of nickels were listed as missing. The Maynard store reported that 50 pounds of sugar. 15 car- tons of cigarettes, several suits of men work clothes and from to in cash were taken. The Clarita stores were rob- bed Thursday night and an in- vestigation started Friday morn- ing.__________________ Both European and American eels spawn in sea south of Ber- motorists converge at Sinnctt-Mcaders for service. 11-24-lt glacier camp if the physical con- dition of the injured make such a hazardous operation necessary. The rescuers reached the scene of last Tuesday's crash after ploughing for hours through heavy drifts, exploring carefully for deep crevasses hidden under deceiving expanses of new snow. Plane Pancaked, Not Smashed The transport plane is resting about 100 feet from the highest range of the Gauli glacier, in a pocket three rru'les southeast of the and 15 miles northeast of the mighty foot Jungfrau. Today was clear and sunny, and pilots of planes circling the spot said some of the passengers were seen sunning themselves. Other pilots who flew over the scene reported that a fire had been started by the passengers near the door of the plane. They said the plan did not appear to have been smashed, and its wing- Up and fuselage were clearly vis- ible. It had apparently pancaked on the ice. Two or three of the passengers waved at the planes overhead.' 'Oklahoma' Finally Here Famed Broadway .Musical Stirring Up Biggest Wel- coming in Oklahoma City History OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. is finally com- ing to Oklahoma, and it's causing more commotion in the Sooner state than the original Cherokee land rush back in '89. The road company of the Broadway musical is opening a one-week stand here Monday night and, pardner, Oklahoma ia preparing one of its biggest wel- comings in history for the troupe and everyone else connected with the show. It's just a neighborly way of showing its gratitude for the pro- duction which has brought Okla- homa more jDublicity than the time former Gov. William H. (Al- falfa Bill) Murray threatened to dig up the flowers around the ecutlve mansion and plant tatoes. Sold Out Early Three weeks before the open- ing it was a sell-out. An all-time indoor record for a legitimate production already has been set with a box-office take of some set by the same show at Des Moines. Oklahoma has been trying to get a peek at its namesake since it opened four years ago, but it took the combined efforts of Gov. Robert S. Kerr and E. K. 'Gay- lord, president of the Oklahoma Publishing Co., to lasso the Broadway hit. It took so long to get the show here because the theater guild, sponsor of "Okla- homa" has a iule making it man- datory for its shows to -play in guild cities first. Now that the show is finally coming, Oklahoma is making it a memorable occasion. Giant Parade Monday A 2 hour long planned with a 450-piece as the largest ever-to school bands, more than horsemen, Indians and floats. The pioneer theme has invaded Oklahoma City, if you go into a. restaurant, you'd find the waitresses dressed as cowgirls, the menu strictly west- ern style, and the atmosphere so real you'd be expecting them to start ropin' and brandin' a steak for you. Authors Attending Officials of the theater guild, along with Oscar Hammerstein II, who wrote the book and lyrics, and Richard Rogers, who wrote the music; Lynn Riggs, native Oklahoman on whose play "Green Grow the Lilacs" the mu- sical was based, and Bob Burns of the screen and radio will be here. The Kiowa Indians will induct 1 several visitors into the tribe j while Governor Kerr intends to pass out many honorary citizen- ships. Half the people buying tickets to are from out of town and they're arriving by spe- cial trains, motorcades and buses. Because of the lack of hotels, pullmans are being left at the stations here to provide sleeping accommodations. Industry's Trend From Coal To Oil Speeded Up Since War WASHINGTON. Nov. 23, Young, chief of the bureau's bi- Dr. .W. H. Young of the U. S. bu- reau of mines reported today that industry's trend from coal to oil for fuel has speeded up since   a groccrman stick 'n Irish potato on spout o' a coal oil can lately? Mrs. Lem Wheeler bought a nickel's worth o1 gum drops yisterday fer a quarter.'   

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