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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 15, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Considering stubborn stands of Lewis and Hie operators in the big coal disputes about only soft thing to be found in the whole affair is in designation of the product as 'soft Average Nrt Oclobrr raid Circulation 8601 Mrmbrr: Audit Iliirrau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 181 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1946" FIVE CENTS THE COPY U. S. Insists Veto Power Be Retained Firm Against Elimination or Modification of Big Power Privileges in Security Council; Favors Rare Use of It By MAX IIARRELSON LAKE SUCCESS, N. Y., Nov. United St.-itfs announced its firm .stand today against any amend- jni-nt of the United Nations Charier to eliminate or modify the power veto privileges in the Security Council. At .same time it called on the other four major pow- ers to restrict the use of the veto voluntarily to "the very jare and excepkinal cases." The American position was set forth in a H-point program by Toni connaiiy I first representative of the big powers to reply to the nlluck on (hi! veto which was launched in Hit! general assembly's; 51-mem- ber political nncl security com- mittee- ycslcrdny by six small tuitions. Connaiiy warned bluntly that "division between the great pow- in Can Be Friend, Ally May Need Her Some Day, Says Laccrda; Bewildered People Mutt Learn De- mocracy By HAL BOYI.3 NEW YORK, Nov. Can Japan, beaten and prostrate i. industrial loader of the O: :cnt. become friend and ally of "Yes." s a y s John Laccrda, v.Tir veteran anil roving t respondent of the Philadelphia Evening bulletin. "It will shock a good many pc-ssons, but the Mark reality is mat the new Japan can become n good friend and ally of the he r.iud. May Nerd Her Some. Day "She may one day be our first V.r.o of defense in the atomic war men who despair over the grei-dy imperialism of nations f ..lt If we fail, then Japan will cam become a festering sore we appear to be succeeding. Step by step we have been draw- tr.e nation out of the morass feudalism." All of It Isn't Pretty The rest of the book is a nuilli- rrod sandwich in which La- ce: ria in successive chapters lays the impact of a conquering white- culture upon a proud brown people in their work, their schools, their beliefs. lie has some scathing statistics n American Army carpetbaggers, they cost the U. S. Treasury f'OO.OOU a month for a while exporters who hope to reap .a qjick profit from Japan's misery, nnci native play-with-lhc-Kang-in- PHWIT boys who are still doing nusmess at the old stand. This despite the some directives issued by the Allies to force the Japanese house into order. Lacerda is careful to give both r.ioes f.f the story and makes it i. democracy-- and oilier wesl- :-n ways--will have hard going :n Japan. Clearing Up Sewer Break Where Line Had Gone Bad, Workmen Find Where Old Boiler Pipe Used A portion of sower line from Constant avenue to O. C. A. ;-.nd A. railroad tracks on East Twelfth being replaced bc- causo the old line has detcrioral- c-d. letting an odorous scent drift about that section of town. The "smelly" condition was re- porU'd to the city manager, wiio directed a crew of workmen tc ir.eck the line and determine the :eDHirs neces.sarv. V.'hen workmen started their investigation, they found some pipe that had been laid us f. line years ago. The ixpe that was found r.id inert iiny present speci- a'ld C'ltv Manager W. Iv Hansi-n said that be doubted if :t met any specifications. Hansen said that he tried to find additional information about sewi-r hue. but found no riT- i-'ris available- that par- nrs over intervention or the use of force might result in war in- stead of peace" but declared that the- veto mUKt not be used to "frustrate" the functioning of the council. He did nnt mention Russia by name, but in what appeared to boj' a reference to the frequent use of the veto -by the Soviet Union he declared that the per- manent members of the council "have no right to cast a vole in any narrow or nationalistic or selfish interest." "Let thprc be no embezzlement of power by the Security Council or by any he said. Connaiiy declared flatly that "any amendment to the charter is impossible at Ihis bul expressed Ihe hope that agree- ment among the five big powers "may make it possible in the fu- ture to modify" the use of the veto. The American position, Connai- iy said, is as follows: "1. We regard the principle of unanimity as of the highest im- portance for the success of the United Nations. "2. We believe thai Ihe respon- sibility imposed upon the great powers by the charter requires them to exert every effort to reach agreement on important is- sues before tbp Security Council. We reaffirm the position we took at San Francisco that the veto should be used only in the 'very rare and exceptional cases. "4. We insist that the use of the veto cannot relieve any state from its fundamental obligations under the charter. "5. We do not favor amendment of the charter at this time, al- though we hope that full agree- ment including of course that of the- five permanent members may make it possible in the future to modify the practice of great power unanimity as il applies to the peaceful setllcment of dis- putes under Chapter VI. We believe that the voting formula should be clarified in the light (if experience and 'practical need. The Security Council should embark upon this task at the ear- liest practicable time. "7. In particular, believe that the Security Council should agree upon as complete a list as possible of typos of decisions where the veto does not apply. OKLAHOMA BANKS ARE GtVKN AWARD OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. 15, the ninth conseculive year. Oklahoma banks have been given the "1.000 point award" by the agricultural commission of the American bankers association for outstanding service to farm- ers. News of the award for 1946, made at the commission meet- ing in Louisville, Ky.. came lo- day to Banker Dan W. Hogan. Hogan said the award is bas- ed upon both the regular ser- vices of providing adequate cre- dit for expansion of livestock and crop production and for special services .such as financial sup- port, for soil erosion control and boys and girls club work. GERMAN SUB IS SL'NK: Off Pro.vincetown, Massassacbusetts, the German Submarine U-977 is sunk by the U. S. navy sub, "The'Atule." Broken in half by the force of the explosion as it was struck by a new type lethal, torpedo, the U-977 rises out of the water before plunging to Ihe bot- tom. The sinking was carried out under the Iri-parle agreement as is considered to be "routine." Telephoto by Harry Lederhandler, taken from a navy WEATHER] Oklahoma Rain tonight arid Saturday turning to snow pan handle'Saturday afternoon; some- what warmer east tonight; lowest 38 pan handle, 50-60 remainder of state; colder western two-thirds Saturday with freezing pan handle by night; rain east and soulh, snow norlhwest Salurday night and Sunday; much colder Saturday night and Sunday with cold wave northwest Saturday night; temperatures 20-25 north- west. 35-40 east and south by Sunday morning. Both Houses Organized Democrats Elect House, Senate Leaders; Plan Senate Rules Revisions OKLAHOMA CITY. Nov. 15, of both houses for the 21st session of the state which convenes Jan, 7 was com- pleted at democratic caucuses yesterday. Following the pattern set at unofficial meetings last week, the house, elected Raymond Board, Boise City, speaker; Claud Thompson, Antlers, speaker pro tempore; R. Rhys Evans, Ard- more, floor leader and Paul Bal- lingcr, Holdenville, assistant floor leader. In the senate caucus. James C. Nance, Purcell, was chosen presi- dent pro tempore; Perry Porter, Miami, floor leader, and Ray Fine, Gore, assistant floor lead- er. Gov.-elect Roy J. Turner spoke briefly, to both caucuses, expres- sing his thanks for the support pledged by the democratic legis- lators. He urged their coopera- tion with the incoming adminis- tration. Committee Heads Later The newly selected" leaders, whose official approval is a for- mality at the opening session of the legislature in January, indi- cated -committee chairmanships in both houses will await later 'decisions. Board said House committee heads would in general follow the pattern he announced last week. Nance announced he would name a committee on committees to choose committee personnel near the start of the session. The senate caucus wasted no time in getting down to business, reemploying two of its veteran employes, Secretary J. William Cordell and Journal Clerk Miss W. E. Shipley. Other' employes will be named later. Research Committee Likely A committee headed by Rep. Grace Milchelson, will choose house em. Senators authorised Nance to name a "research committee to inquire into various campaign assertions which have created general comment over the state; study the proposition of employ- ing technical advisors for the senate in the next session, and name a committee to revise sen- ate rules to speed procedure and streamline the committee -sys- tem. To Lump War Time Agencies Government May Group OPA, CPA and Others Into Single Liquidating Unit By JOHN W. HENDERSON WASHINGTON, Nov. low-cost clothing program junked, .the government report- edly is on the verge today of lumping OPA, CPA and possibly some other wartime agencies into a single liquidating unit. This followup to President Tru- man's sweeping decontrol order last weekend has been the sub- ject of conferences among stabili- zation director John R. Steelman, budget bureau officials and rep- resentatives of the extinction- bound agencies themselves." At their peak they held a tight grip on most prices and much of the nation's production and distribution facilities.. OPA, which now has control only over rent, sugar, syrup and rice ceilings, last night announced plans to whittle its present staff of around workers down to by February 1 and .to reduce its 64 district offices to branch status by December 1, CPA Into Action Simultaneously, the Civilian Production Administration took another long step toward casting off its remaining restraints by abolishing the low-cost clothing program. Under that setup textile manu- facturers were required to chan- nel specific percentages of their output to clothing makers who were required to produce certain quantities of low and medium priced garments. "The termination of all price controls on CPA said "has made (this) no longer prac- ticable. There is on basis for con- tinuing these restrictions either on the producers of the fabric or TWA Pilots' Strike Ends Agreement Reached for Arbitration of First Big Commercial Flier Walkout By JAMES J. STREBIG WASHINGTON, Nov. 15, The Trans World airline pilots' nation's first ma.ior walkout of commercial ended today with an agreement to submit the dispute over pay and working rules to arbitration. Paul E. Richter, executive vice president of TWA, and David L. Bechncke, of the AFL Pilots un- the agreement at a. m. (EST) in the office of Chairman Frank P. Douglass of the national mediation board. Nearly nine hours of continuous conferences over the final word- ing preceded the signing. TWA said it expects to put its first planes into the air about 7 a. local time Saturday, with transcontinental flights starting from ..both coasts.. The walkout of approximately pilots Began October 21 ov- er demands' for higher pay for pilots and copilots of four-engine plane-s. It grounded 115 aircraft along most of the company's 000 miles of route on three con- tinents, threw nearly non- flying employes out of work and cut off in weekly re- venue to the company. While initial flights will begin tomorrow, at least two weeks will be required to restore the line's full schedule.. The agreement signed this morning ends the strike by leav- ing to the decision of a three- man panel a number of disputed points. Most important of these are the rates of pay for pilots and copilots on Douglas Skymas- on the manufacturers of-the cloth- and Constellations ing." iJ.yinK domestic and internation- The agency added that even ol routes: the question of a min- Comir.erce, pioyes. though it might have retained j ]mum monthly pay for pilots in set-asides, priorities and produc- the international service: the tion controls, it was "no longer Question of flight time limitation possible to ensure that the items for pilots in the international for manufacture would be held service, and whether there should to 'prices within the low cost! be a new bidding procedure for field." 1 runs. Skeleton Staffs to Remain OPA said its staff reduction plans contemplate employment of not n-.ore than persons on Jan. 1 and not more than on Jan. 31. These figures com- pare with a peak of on July 31.1945, and a month ago. While announcing that its 64 district offices will be "closed to the public" on. Dec. 1., OPA added that certain divisions will be maintained in the same locations 11 ici i jii lilt; When Nance takes his post as I to handlc sugar controis and en_ president pro-lempore, he will i forcement duties. become the second man in Ok- lahonTa history to have served as presiding officer of both houses of the state legislature. FORECAST FOR NOV. 15-19 Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Nebraska, and northwest half of Kansas Saturday and rest of districl Sun- day then gradually warming over district beginning in west portion of district Monday but becoming colder again in West Nebraska Wednesday; temperatures will average- 5 degrees above normal except near normal West Nebras- ka and northwest Kansas; scat- tered light showers Nebraska and Kansas Saturday and Oklahoma and Missouri Sunday and in west Nebraska and northwest Kansas again about Wednesday: average The five-day-week has con- Hributed to a railroad freightcar shortage because of the typing up of cars over week-ends. Re_nt control will continue to be administered by existing area rent offices under the supervision of the eight regional offices. Other agencies mentioned as likely to figure in the proposed liquidating consolidation are the (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) BLOOD PLASMA ON BLACK MARKET: A Chinese newspaper- man in Shanghai, China, holds a box of American blood plasma which is now selling for (U. S. money) on the Black Mar- ket. The American Red Cross on November 14 demanded that Foreign Liquidation Commission get back some 290 tons of the v ...t-.L.fs.- j. w, nun wuiiii.nasiun K uttCK Hume wl -M.-..H inc iSews Classified Ads. i precipitation quarter to half inch. I plasma worth about Slate Has 47 New Producers in Week But 42 Others Dry; Strike Of Week Globe-Vickers Test in Garvin County TULSA, Okla., Nov. Oklahoma's oil men brought in 47 new producing wells good for an initial crude output of barrels daily the past week and five gas wells with an output of cubic feet per day. But 42 other wells over the state were dry and abandoned by their operators. Top strike of the week was the Globe and Vickers No. 4 Priram. in NW SE SW of 29-3N-2W in Garvin county which produced barrels daily from a depth of feet. Oklahoma county also was the scene of two excellent wells. The Sinclair Prairie Oil Company No. 2 A. H. Crabb in NW SW NW of 3-14N-1W was good for 828 bar- rels from feet; and the Mag- nolia Petroleum Corporation's No. 1 B. C. Housel in C SW NW of 10-12N-4W made 484 barrels at feet. Two best wells in cotton coun- ty, still the scene .of lively oil activity, were the S. F. Hutchin- son No. 1 Galloway in SE' SW SE of 4-3S-11W completed for 360 barrels at feet. The Skelly Oil company got two 300-barrel wells in Stephens county in the No. -3 Romine "B" in NW SE SE of 14-1S-5W, good for 355 barrels daily, and the No. 7 in SE NW NW of 25-1S-5W, good for 380 barrels. -------------K------------- A book about the history, cul- tivation and use of tea appear- ed in China in 780 at the request of the tea merchants. I U. S. Under Fire Of Laborite Revolters Chiang Calls Assembly, Reds Pack to Leave, Hinting Civil War to Blaze HigherThan Ever By HAROLD K. MILKS NANKING, Nov. 15, Chiang Kai-Shek called the na- tional assembly into session to- day as the boycotting communist delegation hinting that China's peace hopes were sunk, packed its bags to leave Nanking. The departing communist lend- er. Gen. Chou En-Lai, said dark- ly that 'the government's "un- ilateral decision" to go ahead with the assembly would send civil in north higher than ev- er. While the communists and the democratic league stuck to a decision not to send delegates, the generalissimo stood before the assembly and hailed it as the beginning of constitutional gov- ernment for China. The day of political tutelage in China, he said, was now ov- er. Among the listening dele- gates was Madame Chiang. The assembly adjourned until Satur- day, when the first preparatory session will be held. Course Not Clear Yet It was not immediately clear what the government proposed to do next. The convention, made up mainly of Kuomintang (government) party delegates, is charged with the task of draft- ing a new constitution. Chiang delayed opening the assembly four days ago in one last effort to bring the commu- nists and the two other ma.ior the convention. This effort was pressed through long and wearying night sessions Lewis Rejects U. S. Proposal Truman Says Krug's Offer Fair and Equitable, Best For All Concerned without success. The commu- nists insisted that first the gov- ernment must return vast stret- ches of communist territory seized since last January. Red Charges Chiang Wnng Ping Nan, communist spokesman who is No. 2 man on the delegation, warned that if the assembly met "there will be no more negotiations." Apparently, Chou realized Chiang meant lo plow straight ahead, because he told the As- sociated Press last night that he was leaving for the communist capital, at Yenan and "my mis- sion has finished." Oniy glint of hope was his statement that a "peaceful solu- tion is. still possible." But he said it before the assembly met. Chou asserted that Chiang was "tearing to pieces" last January's cease firing agreement reached at an all-party conference in Chungking. He indicated the communists would now launch a counter-of- fensive, saying it had been with- held last month in the hope that peace still was possible. He warned that if the govern- ment loosed its rumored offen- sive against Yenan "it means they will be forcing their way into the Holy Land of liberated China and we will fight back." "Civil Chou said, "al- ready is on a nalion-widc scale, but the political, split resulting from the government's unilateral assembly naturally will aggra- vate the situation." Br HAROLD W. WARD WASHINGTON, Nov. Truman checked squarely to John L. Lewis today responsibility for any pre-winter soft coal mine shutdown. Lewis promptly moved to end bis work- ing contract with the government. At the same time the president, terming the government's pro- posal "fair and called for its "serious reconsideration." He declared a second look will convince the United Mine Work- ers it is "for the best interest of all concerned." In a formal statement, Mr. Truman said the government can- not replace private management as the bargaining agent with the coal miners "without interfering with true colleclive bargaining between management and labor." Krug's proposal, the president said, "has been accepted by the Bituminous Coal Mine Operators' negotiating committee." Mr. Truman's statement issued at the White House shortly after Mr. Truman boarded the yacht Williamsburg for a trip to Annapolis. The president's de- parture had been delayed about an hour by last-minute confer- ences with Krug and Reconver- sion Director John R. Steelman. Krug proposed to convene the mine workers and the operators' committee tomorrow or soon thereafter -for a two months bar- gaining session. During this truce, the present contract would remain in opera- tion. Under the proposal, which was attached to the president's formal statement, the mines would -be returned to private operators by January 16 if no prior agreement could be reached. The president said he was "thoroughly familiar with this proposal and I consider it emin- ently fair to both mine workers and operators." For the first time, Mr. Truman disclosed that Attorney General Tom Clark had taken the same position as Krug in holding that the present operating contract was "clearly applicable for the full period of government opera- tion." The president said the attorney general "further informs me that it makes no provision for reopen- ing, without mutual consent, to discuss new wages, hours or other employment terms." "It was intended to be replaced by a direct employer-union con- Mr. Truman said. -------------K------------ OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. ]5, Robert S. Kerr today appointed Floyd L. Jackson, Lawton, district judge of the fii- th district to serve the unexpir- ed term of Toby Morris, who re- signed this week. Morris, also of Lawlon, was elected sixth district congress- man, Nov.-5. Wyatt Hoi About Offer fo Trade Influence for Fees Housing BOM Wants In- vestigation of New York Lawyer's Mysterious Bid WASHINGTON, Nov. 15, Housing Expediter Wilson Wyatt called upon Attorney General Tom Clark today to investigate a New York law- yer's alleged offer to trade as- serted government influence for in stock and in counsel fees. In the background is a many- sided dispute involving: 1. The govern- ment-owned Dodge-Chrysler war plant in Chicago. 2. The Tucker Corp.. of Chic- ago, a new automobile manufac- turing firm. 3. The Lustron Corp.. also of Chicago; a prefabricated housing concern. 4. Wyatt's national housing administration, which wants the government to lease the Dodge- Chrysler plant to Lustron for the assembly line manufacture of homes for veterans. 5. The war assets administra- tion, which already has leased the huge plant to Tucker. Wyatt's demand lo Clark for an immediate inquiry followed a statement by Preston Tucker, head of the auto firm, that he had been approached by the New York lawyer with an implied of- fer to help him in the lease dis- pute. Taking up the story there, the housing expediter said that in less than two climatic hours, the lawyer tried to talk Tucker into signing contracts purporting to affect the success or failure of Tucker's bid for the wartime plant. Wyatt's statement said the lawyer presented the contracts to Tucker" at noon on October 28 and stated that unless they were signed by p. m., the national housing administration would is- sue a directive at 2 p. in. turn- ing the plant over to the Lus- tron Corp. Such a directive was issued on that date. Wyalt quoted Tucker as say- ing the unnamed attorney "in- timated he could use his in- fluence to stall action by the of- fice of the housing expediters in transferring the plant" to the Lustron Corp. PHOTOGRAPHERS TO MEET IN OKLAHOMA CITV IN 1947 OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. 15, T. Baker, photographer today announced that the photo- graphic societ of American will meet in Oklahoma City Oct. 8 to 11, 1947, Photographers from all parts of the world usually at- tend. It will be the first time the j meeting has come west of the j Mississippi river. The code of tea from which the Japanese tea ceremony is deriv- ed was formulated by Lu Yu, a Chinese, who wrote in 780 A. D. Rebels Would Alter Policy Hot Debate Due Monday Over Demand for Divorc- ing U. S. in Foreign Dealings HY CRKAGH .LONDON, Nov. do- mand for iin immediate change in British foreign policy, which has caused a critical cleavage in the ranks of the ruling labor party, will come before thu house of commons Monday for debate. Speaker Douglas "Clifton Brown ruled today. Cabinet sources loft no doubt that they intend to fight with all their power the proposal by more than 50 labprilc rebels for re- casting British foreign policy so as to avoid what they termed an "inevitable conflict" between the Soviet Union and the United States. H appeared certain that with the full force of the government and conservatives under Winston Churchill both lined up behind Foreign Secretary Ernest Bovin's conduct of foreign affairs the cabinet would receive a thumping vote of confidence', if the iisue comes to a showdown vote. Won't Press For Vote The so-called "Bevin sponsors of an amendment to the king's parliament-opening speech from the throne demanding that Britain's foreign policy be tied neither to that of Russia or the United States, have already an- nounced thoy do not intend to press for a vote, however. Some of the insurgents, them- selves had said privately they would not vote against the gov- ernment, but intend to carry out in debate their already sharply worded criticisms of. what they call "Bevinism." Hector McNeil, minister of stale, has been designated to car- ry the ball for the government in the debate, expected to be the hottest in the house commons since labor took over the gov- ernment 15 months ago. Sugges- tions that Bevin might fly home from New York to defend himself were discounted in official circles. Leaders Fear Disunity Effect Prime Minister Clement Attlee1 and leading ministers are quite openly concerned about the split in. labor's normally solid ranks, particularly because of the im- pression of disunity it might in the United States and Russia. Lahorilc Tom Driberg, one of the sponsors of the amendment, capped a free-hitting argument in the house last night with a hotly worded attack on Britain's close tics with the Unitec. States and a demand that Britain become more friendly with Russia. He said the United States was the only great nation in the world where some "ordinary people wanted war." Says America Inflamed He maintained that America was inflamed with "war fever" and asserted that Britons never would follow Foreign Secretary Bevin "to war. now or in five years time, against SoS-iet Russia in partnership with the barbaric thugs of Detroit or the narrow imperialists of Washington or Wall street." Brendan Bracken, a member of the conservative opposition which has supported Bevin's foreign policy, interrupted Bribcrg with the comment that "several hun- dreds of thousands of young Americans died in the war and he (Driberg) should refer to the country more civilly." But Driberg retorted that it was in the United States that "worship of the dollar x x x and racial intolerance was most wide- spread." War fever in that coun- try, he said, was inflamed by the "more disgraceful. newspapers such as those of Hearst and Me- Cormick." Laborite W. M. Warbey, an- (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) TH' j PESSIMIST j II7 nob niMlu, JB. "Well, this might bo pretty good time t' replied Lem Wheeler, when Junior said he expected t' set th' world on fire. Some fellers win in a walk, while most o' us run into trouble.   

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