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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: November 5, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 5, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Now ,h.t w.-v. p.! vot.d-w. hurry up and 9e, ,h.t w.B', b. in ,h. w.y .u, back to the dive, ting Nft Orlnbrr raid Circulation 8601 Mrmhrr: Aurtll llurrau of Irrtllullnn PHE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 172 ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY NATION'S VOTERS MARCH TO POLLS TODAY Wagons Used By Voters To Reach Polls Political Leaders Deter- mined ro fct Voters To Voting Booths Today Ponlotoc county politicians wore deU-rmined to get the vote for the general election and :rom all reports they were not i-'.oppinp at one attempt, but were lakinc the next best method a- In one section of the county v.-iere the roads become j.hle to autninulTile travel, wa- R-ms were beinc used to gel vo- v.-rs from their homes lo the TI.e Ada News and Station KADA will cooperate in tabulal-, infi untj broadcasting returns of P'.'ntoUif founty by precinct and growing totiils. Sixteen Races Are 'Mosl Significant' Involve Control of U. S. Senate; Dozen Governor Rocei Interesting _ Sixteen of the most .significant races to be decided in today's voting are hi California, Delaware, Idaho, Ken- tucky, Massachusetts, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Washington, West Virginia, Wis- consin and Wyoming. California and Kentucky now have repub- lican senators, Wisconsin a pro- gressive. All the remaining seats now are democratic, GOVERNORS Here are 12 contests worth watching: Connec- ticut, Idaho, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minne- sota, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Ohio and Oklahoma. Hou.se A few of the most in- teresting contests: Connecticut 4th (Clare Luce's present scat) being sought by John Davis Lodge, and Hen- ry A. Mucci, One man telephoned another I Kentucky 7th. Rep. Andrew J. man :.n Ada tolling him that there v.-as a certain group of people '.hat couldn't get to the polls in :r.e-ir cars. His solution was to Jake two wagons to the homes of people. Joe Beck, secretary of the county election was in a g.-'od humor Monday afternoon ;..'te-r most of the election equip- ment had been picked up by var- election officials. He told about two men whc had to ride horseback five ni'le t-i the highway to get to Ada t  A Dr. G. Breco and Mrs. snowstorm which swept into the Breco are leaving Tuesday for DENVER, Nov. 5 Rocky Mountain region Saturday and gave Denver and Colorado its worst winter lashing in more than three decades, was moving southward last night gradually lessening in intensity. Weather bureau forecasters said snow had spread north last night to Cheyenne and Laramie, that it was spend- t moved southward across the New Mexican border. Eight deathe -were, attributed directly or indirectly'to the storm. In Denver, where the storm for a time was centered, streets were packed with deep snow and trans- portation facilities were strained wj-i.------------------ wn_j rv til. c an. UlllCH Blue township with her sister-in- to the utmost, Fine snow still fell and neighbor, Mrs. Frank Wallace, to cast ballot number 31. The president and Margaret ar- rived at the memorial building three blocks from their home at a.m. The nation's first family left hortly afterwards for the Inde- >endonce railroad station to board hen- special train for Washing- on leaving at a.m. The president received his bal- ot from Mrs. Jesse Flowers, re- publican judge, after being check- off the voling list- by Mrs. Miller, democratic checker. The president then greeted the ther precinct officials, Mrs. Mur- rell. Miller, democratic judge- Mrs. Dan Riskc, republican clerk- Mrs. A. J. Blatl, democratic clerk- Roy Pryor, republican judge and nis own brother-in-law, George Wallace, democratic judge. s Like Mrs. Truman, the presi- dent said he voted the straight democratic ticket, which included Senator Briggs his own successor in the senate, seeking re-election, and Representative .Jasper Bell, fourth district con- late last night. Elsewhere in the state highway travel was all but suspended, east- bound trains were. delayed and the usual truck travel was halted Plows Open Highways Highway officials declared travel on highways opened by plows "hazardous and not advis- able." Politicans watched the move- ment of the storm with since many rural precincts may have an extremely light vote be- Redondo Beach, California, to take it easy for a whtie. "Doc" figures after, spending that many years working night arid day he is entitled to rig.up and ,reel and do a'little casting when- ever he desires. Not exactly as the pioneers did it, but the Brecos do intend to do a little roughing it when they jeep Foreign Diplomats Keep (lose Watch On Today's Voting i Molotov to Fight for Spe- cial Privileges for Yugo- slavia at Trieste By JOHN M. HIGHTOWEB NEW YORK, Nov. 5. Foreign diplomats deeply en- grossed in- the gigantic task, of building world. kept a sharp Iput. discreetly on the American congressional elections today. Persons iamiliaj! with the views of many delegations to the United -_ Ui. which Oklahomans exercise their i Margin of women over Skies Wear Gloomy Mask Continue Dripping Slow Rainfall Here, Tempera- tures Holding Steady Weather gloomy as a losing candidate's feelings greeted peo- ple of this area as they arose Tuesday for the day's work. A pattering on the rooftops be- fore daybreak had lear early awakers in on the weather situa- lion, and a fine mist-rain after light made it evident that voting day wasn't going lo be bright and cheery. W. E. Pilt, weather observer, says that .41 of an inch of rain fell in 24 hours to 7 a.m. Tuesday. That makes the three-day toliil 2.93 inches, very lillle of which ran off lo Ihe creeks. The temperature range for the period was unusually limited from 56 degrees at its highest to 52 during the night. The outlook can be summed up briefly rainy for another day. ILECTIONS AT A GLANCE By The Associated Prcsi Potential voters (persons over 21) this year, around Election Reflects Efforts to Regear Nation to Peace First Peacetime General Election in Six Years Stirs Voters to Importance American right of voting. "I can see nothing but victory by a substantial margin if they mai-Sin u Assembly and the Coun- carry out that prerogative cil of jjoreign Ministers' rerjortnri Here is a taio nt oreign Ministers reported w.ui u-auer auacneci rnov nnr, a.Seneral belief, that .present for- to camp tout all Te way nE 6'gr W- iirJi- .JI7_ partisan to rule out nnv mnini- via Waco, Austin and EL Paso; Beginning "his career in 'the medical profession' at -Canton, Texas, Dr. Breco came to Stone- wall in 1906 and remairied there until 1915, when he came to Ada. In 1923 he established the Breco Memorial hospital which he has- operated continuously until he closed it a week or so ago. He relates many interesting and varied -experiences he has had during those earlier years. When it was necessary'vto go to Allen from Stonewall, he had tb make the trip around by the land- mark as Byfd's Mill. There were very few roads, bridges or houses in this area. During his years of practice, cause ,of inability to get to the Breco estimates that he-has general election polls today. delivered n average of 100 babies gressman. on Page 2, Column IWEATHER! Cloudy with oc- onal JiRnt rain ICC Says Railroads Discriminated On Fruit Shipments OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. 5, (-P) Election clerks, whose precincts lay in remote areas, were coun- seled to devise "wrapping paper" ballots' when regular ballots could not be delivered. Of the eight deaths recorded, four occurred in Denver when persons attempted to start cars stalled in deep drifts. Husband Subbed For Doctor In the midst of the storm twin boys were born to a Denver wo- man whose physician could not a month or a total of "bun- dles from Heaven." In one fam- ily he .delivered the mother's baby, her granddaughter and the great-granddaughter.. He presents them in singles, doubles and has even surprised proud parents with triplets. Even though they .don't plan to operate the hospital again, the Brecos plan to return, for occa- sional visits and will maintain their home here and their farm partisan to rule' out any major changes. But there has been enough' political controversy over the present American attitude toward Russia in particular to raise speculation about post-elec- tion trends in the conduct of Arnerican diplomacy. "The Big-Four foreign ministers moved into their second day's work on the eastern European peace teraties amid mounting evi- dence that Russian Foreign Minis- ter Molotov will stage a last ditch fight to gain special advantages for Yugoslavia at the Adriatic jport of Trieste. The TJ. N. assembly appeared to be headed for a wide open fight over selection of a permanent home. One report was that the Russians might reverse their former stand against a site in western. Europe to favor Geneva, old League of Nations head- Here is a late picture of today's voting around the slate. PAULS of- ficials see a light vote in Gavvin because of heavy rainfall. Elec- tion Board Secretary J. H. Pat- terson said voting onened light and trend expected to keep up in rural precincts. L'ack of competi- nominees for county offices un- opposed. arrive because of the weather, i south of the city. Dr. Breco owns e Interstate Commerce commission has ruled that rail- roads are guilty of maintaining discriminatory rales on certain fresh fruits shipped from five western states to Oklahoma, ac- cording lo Rcford Bond, chair- man of the state corporation commission. Bond said the ICC held the rates to Oklahoma from origin points in Colorado, Idaho, Utah, Oregon and Washington were dis- criminatory as contrasted desti- nations in southern Kansas. N C. B. Bee, transportation coun- sel, brought the proceedings be- Her husband assisted at the-birlh. There were bright spots in the storm, since watersheds received a heavy fall of water-storing snow. The crop outlook apparently was not as dismal as early re- ports indicated. Officials of the Great Western Sugar company .said about 75 per cent of the beet crop has been harvested in north- ern Colorado, and that in areas where the crop .still is 'in the ground beels were safe unless a prolonged cold snap set in. Cattle on the open range, where me storm swep in on light winds Saturday, probably will suffer some shrinkage, stockmen said and F. E. MblJin, executive secre- tary of the Arnerican National .LivestocK Association, said large numbers of stock still remain on the ranges. several producing wells in this vicinity. IWA Wilhholding .Jioujing Rise __w______________ mostly in oast case cooler sotitli- ec.'ne.-day partly c-lou.iv fuiuciy east with shov.ers east; west half, Weather Forecast for Nov. 5-8 Oklahoma r.r, Near normal TtirstJny and Wed- j-iUoy. fohowed by slowly rising Tnursday through Sunday over district 3-f> degrees above sea- fore the ICC. Testimony in the l normal for the period; little r, precipitation except light southern Oklahoma Tuesday and most of Oklahoma Sat- given by representa- tives of wholesale fruit dealers in Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Bartles- ville and Enid. It would be unreasonable and uniust in the future, the ICC ruled to maintain rates on cer- tain fruits to Enid, Bartlesville and I ulsa which exceed by more tnan five cents the rates to Cald- well and Coffoyvillc, Kas. The ICC found there was evi- dence of competition between High School Games Drawing Many Fans OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. 5, UP) survey by Ihe' Daily Okla- noman discloses that more than persons attended high school football games in the state frnm n Incf: -11 OJT1 JJ Back to Wprk Order By JAMES J. STREBIG WASHINGTON, Nov. Trans World Airline withheld a back-to-work idle employes today while attorneys renewed efforts to draft an ar- bitration agreement which would end the 16-day-old pilots' strike. The AFL pilots who walk- ed out Oct. 21 demanding higher pay for the men why fly four- engine planes were on the verge of returning to their jobs'when both sides accepted in principle possibility follows an American move to have San Francisco and New York as well as Westchester county considered for the perma- nent headquarters. A formal 51-nation debate also was assured on proposals to take United Nations action against the Franco regime in Spain. The Security Council yesterday dropped the Spanish issue from its agenda so the Assembly might act. On New OPA Order vCeilings Raised for Some Linoleum and Floor And Wall Coverings WASHINGTON, Nov. 5, Housing; costs rose again today as UFA raised its price ceilings' for felt base linoleum and floor and all covering by 12 per cent. The agency said most of the increase resulted from higher yesterday the proposal of Federal I of lmseed oil which, it ad- Mediator Frank P. Douglass that' d.ed has nearly doubled in price the dispute, be submitted to an I Slnce l4 was decontrolled last arbitration panel. I week. David L. Behncke, president of i Higher costs of this oil also im-i i-cn ft -I.-. the pilots' union, announced in Chicago that the- government's arbitration offer had been ac- cepted and the pilots were ready to fy while the case was being handled. However. company and unio these fruit jobbers and those in southern Kansas, but no proof of iictual competition in the case of Oklahoma City and southern Kansas. last week. The estimate was based on the attendance of 24 class A games which totaled Besides the 24 class A games, 72 other con- tests were played by state high schools last week. The biggest gate was at Tulsa where watched Sapulpa and Tulsa Rogers play. Oklaho- ma City Capitol Hill and Oklahoma City Central drew 13 000, while witnessed the Altus-Lawton tilt. a.m., to 9 p.m. without writing a mutually acceptable agreement. The stumbling block was whether the arbitration pact should cover TWA's proposal that pilots on its international runs be paid a flat salary. This pay system now is followed by two competing United States airlines, Pan Amer- ican and American Overseas. England .normally imports 75-- cirgars from Cuba annu- ally. Accounted for a 24 per cent in- crease in prices of most paints announced yesterday. Previously OPA urged ceilings on enameled bathtubs, sinks and other plumbing as well as hard- wood flooring, plaster lath and a number of other lumber items required in most homes. BEAUMONT, TEX., HOMES DAMAGED BY FLOOD WATERS BEAMONT, Tex. Nov. estimate of dam- age to Beaumont homes and business houses from flood waters fed'by cloudbursts totaling more than 12 inches was made today by May or "Fred C. Stone. Some sections of the city were covered by three feet of water before the rain ceased yesterday. Rains Continuing Over State. Send Sfreams Higher By The Associated Presl Rivers and creeks in some sec- tions of Oklahoma surged to flood stage today, fed by unremitting rains which turned roads in many rural areas into quagmires. The weather bureau said the Nprth Canadian at Woodward stood at 4.2 feet early today and was rising rapidly. Virtually all rural roads were impassable because of three days of precipitation which totaled as high as seven inches at Durant. More Rain Due No relief, from the downpour was expected for at least another day, the weatherman reported. The forecast is for more rain ex- cept snow in the Panhandle today tonight and Wednesday. There 'is expected to be no decided change m temperature, with the low to- night 25 to 30 degrees in the Panhandle to 45 to 50 in the southeast. Snow still blanketed the Pan- handle area but the worst of the storm which swept down from Colorado seems lo have ended. Highway officials at Guymon re- .ported that at p. m. yesterday Boise City had 24 inches of snow and it still was falling. That was the last message received from the far western Panhandle city Guymon reported three inches of snow. At Four Corners, 24 miles west of Guymon, on U. S. highway 64, 20 automobiles were reported stalled. Water was over the high- way throughout the area, and was hub deep at some points. A deep snow covered U. S. highway 54 southwest of Guymon and traffic was halted between Guymon, Amarillo and' Dalhart Texas. From all sections of the state, reports show unusual amounts of rain with no apparent letup in sight. Durant reported one of the heaviest rain falls, over a four day 7.06 inches. Bryan county country roads are virtual- ly impassable. The rain at Tulsa since Thurs- day now totals 5.71 inches. At Duncan, Stephens county rainfall since Friday totalled 2.1 inches. It has stopped raining but roads in the rural area are in bad condition. At Mangum, heavy clouds are beginning to lift, after the rain stopped: A total of 1.80 was re- ported, putting the rural roads in men over 21_______ Estimated eligible to Estimate of probable vote Thirty-four states elect 35 sen- choose 31 long and four short terms nl slake. Maine elected n senator, governor and three representa- tives, all republicans. Sept. 9. All other stales pick represent- atives today. elected in 33 states. Minor parties have 148 candi- dates among the running for senate, house and governor. CANDIDATES IN BRIEF By The Press Senate, house .and governor seats at stake in today's voting: 500, divided as Senate poor condition. 35 House _________________432 Governor______________ 33 j Candidates running for these :s total as follows: Senate_________________ 97 House ----------------------------880 Governor______________ 88 Maine elected a governor, sen- ator and three house all republicans last Sept. 9. These must be added to today's results to determine which party controls congress and gets the edge in state administrators. County's Cotton Crop Unimpressive For This Season Ponlotoc county's cotton crop for this year seems lo be about the same as last year's, very low. Appro jnalely 75 per cent of tfiis country's crop has already been harvested, and only C50 bales have reached the gins at Slonc- wull, Ada and Allen. _ Only 3C3 bales had been ginned in Pontotqc county to October 18. These figures are a far cry from those of earlier years in the county, such as for 1924's crop and for 1919. Back in May of 1921 it was estimated that bales were still being held by county farmers with prices 6.5 to 11 cents on the streets and with an average of more than 100 bales daily being shipped from Ada. A large percentage of the crop was lost due to boll weevils and to rain. Pontotoc county in former years ranked as one of the highest producers of cotton in the .state, but in more recent years it has faded far down. The highest pro- ducing counties in the state now arj usually Muskogee and Caddo counties. Although Oklahoma is not up par in cotton, the national crop will be about the same. Arkansas has a larrje crop with approxi- mately bales already in. Texas has ginned around one mil- lion bales already. The Rio Grande valley in south Texas boasts the largest cotton crop in its history. With about 80 per cent of c'rop already in, Oklahoma has around bales. By The Associated Pren Heavy balloting in many big population centers pointed to- ward a possible record "off-year" vote today as Americans chose a new congress in Ihe first peace- lime general elections in six years. Election officials called the early turnout in Chicago "very heavy" although Illinois had neither governorship nor senior- Sal races. In Ohio, it was "unusually heavy." In Michigan it was the same. Similar reports came from Pennsylvania. Kansas City. Mo, reported an exceptionally heavy early vote. The first precinct to report wag Pointe Aux Barques in Huron county, Michigan. Twelve of Ihe 13 eligible vot- ers there cast straight republi- Cc.n ballots, one a straight demo- cratic. The count from the pre- cinct in 1944 was 14 republican, six democratic. In 1942, last off- year election, republicans carri- ed the precinct, 7-6. Weather Generally Favorable For the country as a whole, fine fall weather encouraged a large vote. An exception Ihe Rocky mountain area where one of Ihe heaviest snowstorms in years moved in over the week- end. Despite the heat engendered by some contests, the forenoon. balloting saw no major violence. In New York Cily's Harlem, a republican district captain re- ported he was slugged from be- hind while walking near a poll- ing place. He suffered n lacerat- ed scalp and possible internal injuries. President and Mrs. Truman and daughter. Margaret, were among the early voters at Inde- pendence, Mo., after casting "straight democratic" tickets they boarded a train for Washington. In the swelling tide of ballots, Ihe voters registered their reac- tion lo nearly 15 months of gov- ernment efforts lo shift the na- tion's economic machinery from war to peace. On that prime issue, republi- cans confidently predicted the democrats would be swept out of power in congress, where they have held the upper hand in both houses since 1932. Democrals, generally fighting a defensive bailie against GOP assaults on their handling of re- conversion problems, conceded they may suffer some losses. But they contended they will keep the legislative machinery in their grasp. They apparently were more confident, however, of re- taining senate control than of holding Ihe house in line. lixpcct Votes The election expected to bring out monuthim citizens in wcatlfei- forecast as fair and cool generally, although rainy in the south and snowy in Ihe Rockies, arc 35 senale places, 432 house seals and 33 governorships. The republicans need a net Rain of ]0 seats to win conlrol of the scnnte and 26 to take over the house. The democrats could lose seven in the senate and 17 in Ihe house and slill hold the legislative whip hand. The possibility of a divided congress, with the GOP winning the house and the democrats keeping the senate, already had started Washington's rumor fac- (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) TH' PESSIMIST By nob Ja, Wharves is the plural of I wharf. It s too bad we all can't ac- cumulate as much as the average dresser. t .__________ Even "Jack" can't build a house these days.   

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