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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 24, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 24, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             th. weather t. fall bock on and Ad. had plenty of it in si9ht Wednesday ni9ht; perhaps there's m.re conversation in who, didn't happen than if had com. through A r Nrl Si-pi., Paid C'trcuUllon 8575 Mtmhrr; Audit Hureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 162 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY East Central Division of OEA Holds Annual Convention Here Most of Program to Be Friday Teachers to Come To East Central From 11 Counties Administrators Meeting; Tonight Opens Schedule, Dance Friday Night Closes It Champ Steer Nets Iowa Champ Boy's Grand Hereford Sets World Rec- ord Price KANSAS CITY, Oct. 24 A 15-year-old farm boy from Ida Grove, la., said goodbye to his grand champion Hereford steer It's an old story now, this an- pocketed almost with r.ual convention of the East Cont- ra! division of the Oklahoma Ed- ucation Association, but its appeal to teachers of the 11-counly dis- trict is ever fresh and attractive. A combination of visiting, se- rious discussion and pleasure-able entertainment, this year's conven- tion opens tonight and continues through Friday night. During that time there will be a banquet and program for school administrators, two general ses- sions, numerous departmental group meetings and a dance for classroom teachers. O. D. Johns, Scminole superin- tendent, is president of the asso- uribelief a check for the pi-ice brought by the animal at auction at a world record price of a pound. Jack Hoffman, 4-H club mem- ber whose T. O. Pride was named 1946 grand champion steer of the American Royal livestock show was still bewildered today by.the bidding last night. E. W. Williams of the Williams Meat company, paid the record price. American Royal officials said the previous woHd record price was a pound. The tall farm youngster and ,_. niniw w .1 in ciation and Doyle Sullivan, Ok- at the opening. Karl Hoffman, his father were in the main arena as the price began to climb with some 100 bidders rruigee. is vic-e president. W. P. Hope.-. East Central, is secretary. One Meeting Tonght Opening the program schedule will be the annual banquet and program for administrators with '.he Ada Chamber of Commerce as host organization. Clayton Rand. Gulfport. Miss., publisher, will speak. J. Arthur Herron, Pur- ceil, is chairman, H. T. Hopkins oJ Asher is vice-chairman and Miss Margaret Baker of Pauls Valley is secretary. The dance, especially for class- room teachers, will be held from 9 to 12 p. m. Friday in the gym- with band, refreshments and floor shows, sponsored by the Ada Junior Chamber of Com- merce. Departmental Groups In Morning Departmental sessions begin at a. m. These include English and speech section; art, music snd foreign language groups; commerce, social science, home ec. mathematics, science, indus- trial arts. for childhood education, nudio-visual and phy- sical ed sections. Each section meeting will have own officers in charge, with a program of general discusssipn and special speakers from the dis- trict and from elsewhere in the The first general session opens a: a. m. in the auditorium; principal speaker will be Clayton Rand. The second general session, which will include a business period, will have Cong. Brooks Hays. Arkansas, and Dr. A. Lins- cheid. East Central, as speaker. Then, at at Norris Field, State of Arkansas in the annual Homecoming game, crowning of the football queen a bptwcen-halvps feature. Two Ada Boys Held In New Mexico FBI Has Them in Case Involving Car Thefts Frank Smith. 16-year-old Ada boy. and another boy whose name local police said they can't re- rr.ember. are in the custody of FBI officers in New Mexico. (Po- lice didn't remember what the name of the town in New Mexico is. The story behind the arrest is that the pair left Ada in a stolen car that they had taken from its parking place at Norris Stadium last Friday night. The owner of auto was attending a football game. The pair, officers said, drove the car to a service station lo- c-au-d just acros? West Eighteenth irom the cement plant, where :hrt-o cases of oil are missing; and thc-y are alleged to have filled the t-ar uo with gasoline. Driving to Spminolc, Tex., the boys abandoned the car stolen in Aaa and drove off another car. The second car was driven to the town in New Mexico where :he pair was arrested by FBI of- ficers. As for T. O. Pride himself, he will go on exhibition until Christ- mas. Then Williams plans to pre- sent steaks to his friends and customers as Christ- mas gifts. Williams said he had been determined to have the steer at any price. The champion steer was pur- chased 17 months ago from the T.rO. ranch at Raton, N. M. The Royal's reserve champion, a Angus steer owned by Carl Harkness of Goldan, Colo., brought a pound. The previous American Royal top price for a champion was a pound, paid in 1941. ------------X------------ Norman FFA Group Gets 'Gold Emblem' One of 16 Chapters in Na- tion Whose Record Brings Coveted Award KANSAS CITY, Oct. 24 The Norman, Okla., chapter of the Future Farmers of America is among 16 chapters in the na- tion to be honored with coveted "gold emblem" award. The awards, announced last, night at a victory convention of the FFA, are presented in recog- nition of outstanding achievement in farming practices and com- munity improvements. The Norman chapter was cited for an extensive program which included culling of head of poultry on 83 farms, blood test- ing head of poultry on 42 farms, taking soil tests on 74 farms, testing cows for but- lerfal, pruning trees, start- ing a farmers' market and re- paJring more than pieces of farm equipment in their school shop. Norman's 50 chapter members completed an average of almost seven farming projects each, 13 farm improvements each and 27 supplem9ntary farm jobs. The average investment of each mem- ber in farming is Their chapter-owned incubator was used to hatch qhicks in a cooperative activity. The mem- bers also jointly raised and mar- keted 500 broilers and raised 000 tomato plants in a hotbed. Robert Bates is president of the Norman chapter, and E. F. Fore- man is the chapter advisor. East Central Third Among State's Higher Schools Back of O. U., with Students; Held Sim- ilar Place Before War East Central's current enroll- ment stands at and this fig- ure ranks the college third among state-suported colleges and uni- versities, and fifth among all in- stitutions of higher learning in Oklahoma. Early registration reports in September gave East Central 194. At the same time other four- year colleges (except the Nni-: versity of Oklahoma and Okla- homa A. M. college) reported; Central State college, 817- North- eastern State college. 883; North- western State college, 554; Southeastern State -college, 954. and Southwestern Institute of Technology, 820. The largest of the Oklahoma junior colleges is Cameron State Agricultural c.ollege with 709 stu- dents. Under OCU and Tulsa East Central is larger than all but two of the state's private and denominational colleges. Its reg- istration figure is greater than that of Oklahoma Baptist univer- sity and Phillips university, but smaller'than Oklahoma City Un- iversity and University of Tulsa. East Central had for a number of years preceding the war ranked in third place among state-sup- ported institutions of .higher United Nations, General e United Nations; Paul Henri Spa'ak, of Belgium, Executive Assistant to Telephoto) Truman Leaves To Krug Threat Of Soft Coal Strike Declines to Discuss Lewis Ultimatum for Reopening Of Mine Contract City lipping One of Fines Will Assess Maxiumum For Reckless Driving; Side- walk, Sign Hazards to Go A change in some city policies announced by W. E, Hansen, city manager, includes an increase in learning. Its ten-year average en- rolment (1932 to 1942) exceed that of the five sister colleges. During the ten years, 1932 to 1942, Central was larger than East Central in 1936 and Northeastern larger in 1938, but the local col- lege was larger .than'the'others for'the other eight years. 10 Year Average The annual cumulative aver- ages for ..the''32-'42 period- (Ac- cumulative refers to individuals enrolled in all three semesters, but no name is counted more than once even though enrolled more than. one semester in one year) as compiled by the Okla- homa Board of Regents for High- er Education shows that East Central had an average annual enrollment of Central was nearest to this fig- ure with a average. North- eastern had annually, and Southeastern, 1IT A t n. m 1111-j. an iill_l ccloe J1J WASHINGTON, Oct fine following a charge and con- -President Truman left the viction fov reckless driving threat of another nation-wide soft Instead of to fine the coal strike squarely up to Secre- manager says that the maximum of wiu be assessed. Also cars and trucks parking Judge Crawford In Nuernberg, to Hear Trials of Doctors NUERNBERG, Germany, Oct. h r e e United States judges have arrived here for an American military court's trial of 24 German doc- tors accused of cruel medical rxperimcnts upon human bc- inRS. Justice Walter W. Heals of the Washington state supreme court. Judge Harold L. Scbrinc of the Florida supreme court, Judge Tal Crawford of the Oklahoma district court at Ada. arrived yesterday with Lt. Col. V. C. .Swearinjtcn, former V. S. assistant attorney gen- eral, who will serve as an al- ternate judge. State May Change Hospital Set-Up System for Handling Men- tal Patients Under Fire OKLAHOMA CITY, Oct. tion of the state's system of handling mental pa- tients discussed yesterday at a meeting of the state board of affairs and heads of all mental institutions. The board of affairs, taking note of recent newspaper stories on conditions at various state in- stitutions, acknowledged that some mental patients were not receiving adequate treatment. In submitting its next estimate of budgetary requirements, the indicated it would recom- mend greatly increased appro- priations for all mental institu- tions, to provide for enlargement, nf medical and nursing staffs and building improvements. Plans were discussed for seg- regating mental patients, with those in the first stages of men- tal illness to be trealed at the Central Stale hospilal, Norman; palienls wilh long-time mental illnesses, to be treated at the state hospital at Supply; crim- inally insane, Eastern State hos- pilal, Vinitn; and epileptics to be transferred to the State Hospilal for Epileptics at Pauls Valley. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. j Indian-Owned Land Gets Consideration Washita Valley Lands to Benefit from Soil Conser- vation Plan Revision WASHINGTON, Oct. -Thousands of acres of Indian- owned land in the Washita val- ley of Oklahoma will be consid- ered when a land treatment pro- gram authorized by congress is worked out, the Indian bureau today assured Rep. Jed Johnson (D.-Okla.) Johnson recently transmitted to the bureau a letter from direct- ors of the South Caddo (Okla.) soil conservation district declar- the district has acres of Indian lands which under pres- ent regulations would not be benefitted or treated by the soil conservation service with funds through the flood control tary ___ Mr. Truman declined to discuss John L. Lewis'" ultimatum for 'a reopening of the United' Mine Workers' contract at his news conference. The president likewise de- clined to comment on questions as to his plans on continued wage controls, telling reporters to read his speech of Oct. 14 lifting price ceilings .from meat. Meanwhile. Secretary of In- terior J. A. Krug. expressed doubt that the miners will quit their jobs on Neyember John L. Lewis has intimated a conference on new wage demands begins date. in Washington on that In emphatic Lewis has set a November 1 deadline for reopening negotiations, Declaring that otherwise the government's contract with his United Mine U. S. With Russia For Maintaining Veto Of Big Five Few Items to Be Under Ceilings By Coming January When Congress May Kill OPA; Cosmetics, Most Foods Decontrolled Now placing under "U. N. trusteeship j the Pacific islands captured from WASHINGTON, Oct. may kill OPA in Jan- 1 American People Support U. N. Small Nations Are For Abandonment 01 That Authority However, U. S. May Work For More Limited Use Of Veto Than Russia Favors By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER NEW YORK, Oct. clash appeared to be developing today between the United States and Russia over the right of the United Nations, general assecbly to discuss small nation proposals for ending the big power veto in the security council. The American delegation, in a mooting today under the leader- ship of Chief Delegate Warren Austin, decided that it would in- sist upon 1hc full right of the assembly to discuss this nnd two other issuer, listed on n provisional agenda now before the assembly's steering committee, .___ This means that the United of information in which there is I 1S preparing to argue for much interest here: what is the United States going lo do about Truman Urges U. N. Action Pledges U. S. to Full Sup- port, Wants U. N. to Have Anti-Aggression Power NEW YORK, Oct. 24 ident Truman, in his speech to the international United Nations assembly Wednesday, told the delegates that "The United States will support the United Nations with all the sources that we pos- sess." He also urged that the dele- gates reject "talk of war" but warned that "to permit the United Nations to be broken into irreconcilable parts by different political philosophies would bring disaster to the world." American officials said that his address, while detailing the needs for early United Nations action on many, issues, had laid down no new points of American foreign had omitted one piece uary, .some high administration officials predicted today. But they added that by then only a slim list of very scarce, in the center of downtown streets badly needed items in addition create a hazard to the motoring public. Hansen says that center parking must be eliminated, with no exceptions. The Fixit Shop on West Twelfth has moved merchandise from the sidewalk, in front of his business, thus removing a hazard, and similar action is-urged-for other merchants who have been in the habit of displaying goods on the walks. A survey is. being made to de- termine ..what overhanging sighs are not properly hung and owners of any found unsafe will be asked to hang, them safely, or remove them. Jack Conn, attorney, has given the city an easement on property located on East Seventh -between Beard and Mississippi for drain- made available Washita valley program. Congress, the directors said, has authorized for "va- rious treatments to be adminis- tered to the entire watershed" in Oklahoma and Texas. "Since approximately one-third of this soil conservation district which is located in Caddo county has not been provided for in land treatment measures it is difficult for us to see how .the flood con- trol program will accomplish any material good as it is a recog- nized fact that to be effective soil conservation work must be car- strike, since the miners follow a "no contract, no work" policy. "I don't see how I can be there November Krug told news- men last night in Boulder City Nev. "But I don't think they will walk out. After all, the time and place of the meeting have been set." Krug did not specify either tlxe time or place "set" one of" the major points in pre- sumably referred only to the fact that he has offered to meet Lewis Driver Runs Off While Holding Flashlight For Cop Making Out Re- port on Car Accident An accident occurred about 15 P'J1' Wednesday in the 200 to rent will remain under ceil- ings. As if to emphasize this forecast, OPA snatched its price tags from cosmetics and'a long list of non- food products' today in a quick followup to. last midnight's sweeping food and beverage de- control. the two actions swept overboard another big segment -of wages control because the govern- ment applies its pay curbs only when higher price ceilings are involved. Wage Control Off However, it did reaffirm the American intention to take a leading part in the quest for peace. "The overwhelming majority of the American people, regardless of parly, support the United Na- Mr, Truman said. "They are resolved that the United Stales, to -the full limit of its strength, shall contribute to the establishment and mainten- ance of a just and lasting peace among the nations of the world. "However, I must tell you that the American people are troubled by the failure of the Allied na- tions to make more progress in their common search for lasting peace." Two of the "greatest obliga- after November 6 when his west- ern inspection tour is due to end Truman Declines To Predict on Voting Replies Smilingly to Ques- tion to Remark Bets Against Law in Missouri WASHINGTON, Oct. With the smiling observation that election bets are against the law where .-he comes from, President Truman today declined to fore- cast the outcome of next month's congressional contests. The president was asked at his news conference if he had made a wager with himself by placing his guess in a sealed envelope, as the late President Roosevelt used to do. He smiled, and said no. Then a reporter wanted to know whether he was willing to make a bet. The president commented that wagering on elections is contrary to the law of the state of Missouri. however, he indirectly predicted the election of J. How- ard McGrath as senator from I A another car that was parked on the street, doing minor damage to both .cars.' When an officer arrived at the scene of the accident, he tried to move the Ford, but his efforts were not rewarded because the car wouldn't move. The officer started filling out a report on the. accident, and asked the driver of the Ford to hold a, flashlight so he could see how to fill out the blank. Before the officer finished the report, the driver ran away, leav- ing the officer in the dark. The city policeman gave pursuit, but couldn't catch him, according to the police. An accident report was filled out on the wreck, but the driver of the Ford was not arrested by late Thursday morning. .ublul. >v n. 11JU13I, uc Udl T5 J T 1 T mL ried out on all lands regardless Island. This came when he of ownership in order to mate- if rially reduce floods or secure lasting the directors wrote. MUSKOGEE, Okla., Oct. Assessor Carl Pate has announced that Oct. 30 has been selected as the' date for the "Protestant's meeting" held an- nually here before the fiscal year's budgets are sent to Okla- homa City. At the meeting, county tax- payers confer with county, city and school officials in an attempt to iron out any fiscal difficulty and thus diminish possibility of official objection to budgets later. PAULS VALLEY, Oct. 24 A Garvin co_unty livestock im- provement here Nov. clinic will be held 1, it has been an- nounced by Alton Perry, county agent. Read News Classified Ad.s. was asked if he had accepted Mc- Grath's resignation as solicitor general. Mr. Truman replied that he had, and remarked that a man couldn't be senator and solicitor at the same time. For the third consecutive news conferenje, Mr. Truman said he had no plans for making a speech in the congressional campaign. A questioner asked if that meant he wasn't going to speak for the democrats. The presider.tjsaid he didn't say he would not make a speech, but that he had no plans to make any speeches. He added that he expects to go home to Missouri to vote. Mr. Truman said he did not dis- cuss politics with anyone on, his trip to New York yesterday to address the United Nations Gen- eral Assembly. Read The News Classified Ads. case of food and restaurant in- dustries along, some workers were cut loose from wage control. On the food list, only sugar, syrups and rice remain under OPA. Frankly acknowledging that there is widespread belief in the government that congress will come back primed to knock out OPA quickly and finally, one ranking official said privately the policy between now and year's end will be get rid of ceilings rapidly but in orderly sequence. This official said the view is that it would be to President Truman's political advantage to trim the controlled list to the bone, then let congress take the responsibility if it wants to go the rest of the way. Consumers Closely Watch Prices Housewives and their husbands meanwhile watched retail costs at groceries, restaurants and li-tuqr stores, as OPA officials predicted the cost of living and drinking would certainly go up, at least temporarily, as a result of the bread to beer retreat from ceilings. One OPA food authority said increases can be expected in bread and baked goods; jams, jellies and preserves; dry beans; canned fish; bananas and most whisky. Trade sources generally ex- pected some temporary price gradual return to the old price rises, but saii there would be a system of supply and demand. In 40 percent of the countries in the United States, recognized hospital facilities are lacking to serve about people. to be Mr. Truman said. Must Agree on Atomic Energy lie declared, "we must reach a.- agreement establishing international controls of atomic energy. "Second, we must reach agree- ments that will remove the dead- ly fear of other weapons of mass destruction. Declaring that "we are not dis- couraged" about solving those problems, Mr. Truman said that "we shall also press for prepara- tion of agreements in order that the Security Council may have at its disposal peace forces ade- quate to prevent acts of aggres- sion." On economic and social prob- lems, about whiclt the president said "a greal opportunity lies be- fore he called for the earliest possible creation of trade, heallh and refugee organizations and for a "concerted effort" to "break down Ihe barriers lo a free flow of information among Ihe nations of the world." In summing up the problems before the present assembly meeting, the president declared that "the difficulty is that it is easier to get people to agree upon principles of law and justice or to agree to subject their own acts to the collective judgment of mankind." Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada Want Ads. MOLOTOV GREETS MBS. ROOSEVELT: At the opening of the United Nations General Assembly at Flushing, New York! Mrs Franklin D. Roosevelt chats with Soviet F.oreign Minister Molo- tov. In the center .background is Andrei Gromyko, Russian dele- gate to the United Nations Ada Got Everything But Rain in Night Lakeside Area Has Good Downpour; Cooler Weath- er Promised State Ada early Wednesday night got everything but the was lightning and thunder nnd a few pattering showers, just enough to register 'trace' for the records. The Lakeside area west of Allen reports a fairly good rain and some other nearby areas may have sha.'ed in some enough promising clouds came in sight of Adans to indicate that somebody was getting rain. The display followed two days of weather unusually warm for late October. Tuesday had a maximum of 82 degrees; Wednesday moved it up to 85 with some humidity to make it more noticeable. During the night the minimum was a mild 68. The Associated Pross forecasts icooler weather for Ihe cuntrnl section tonight. Hujivy rains foil overnight in the north'e.-islern .sec- tion, Pryor recording 1.33 inches and ].20. Waurika had 88 degrees Tor 'the hottest recording and Guymon was coldest with 46. In many well-conducted a n d modern prisons it costs the pub- lic from to annually to maintain a felon. It costs far less to keep him on parole. Walter B. Martin, warden Attica (N. Y.) Stale Prison. full discussion of a proposal which it intends in the end to be against The delegation favors rejecting all efforts lo eliminate the great pow- er veto, and in this respect is lined up with Russia. But it in- tends to try to restrict use of the veto and on that point likely will be in disagreement with Russia. 53 Main Hems On List steering committee, Ameri- can informants said, is expected to meet late today or tomorrow to go over tho list of 53 main items of assembly business which are supposed to come up once general debate, beginning today, is ended early next week. In an informal meeting of the steering committee two days ago, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Andrie Vishinsky though American informants said he did not make it Russia would oppose assembly discussions of: 1. Australian and Cuban pro- posals for ending the veto voting system by amending the charter. 2. A South African proposal for annexing the mandate of South- west Africa. (The United States may or may not favor this pro- ject, but thinks it should be dis- cussed 3. A Canadian plan for limiting assembly debate to ton minutes per speaker and otherwise speed- ing up procecdure. {The United Stales is reported opposed to the plan, but feels it should be per- mitted to come up in the meet- ing.) The Russians desire to block discussion of these items was de- scribed by American officials as entirely logical from the Russian viewpoint.' Normal Soviet proce- dure on proposals to which they are opposed is to fight those pro- posals from the moment they first come up. The Unilcd Stales, on the other hand, upholds the prin- ciple of free discussion as an end in ilself, regardless of Ihe Ameri- can view on Ihe mailer to be dis- cussed. Mr. Truman disclosed the main lines of American policy on the velo issue in his speech. In it he also pledged that the United Stales "to the full limit of its strength" would continue to work for a "just and lasting peace" and urged that the United Nations get on with the tasks of controlling atomic energy, suppressing mass destruction weapons and other- wise creating the conditions of peace. The veto issue appeared cer- tain lo kick up a prolonged argu- menl in the assembly's general debate, beginning today ai'ter U. N. Secretary General Tryfive Lie leporls to the 51-nalion body on Iho progress of the peace organ- ization lo date. Two fuJl-dress sessions were scheduled. Cuba, Australia and the Phil- ippines all have come out for end- ing the voting system by which any one of Ihe Big-Five America. Russia, France, Britain and block action in tliu- security council. TH' PESSIMIST nr Hoh nin.kt, JP. Th' smartest woman in world is th' one who allus makes 'er husband feel like he's jest a link; smarter than she is. If you want t' know whut solitude really in on relatives sometime when you're broke.   

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