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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 23, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             One man remorks that teachers have more fun onjess money than any other group he has ever leading another to say that if they're going to have fun it has to be at moderate expense Averate Net Srpl., Paid Circulation 8575 Member; Audit Uureati of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd Id ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1946 'The Cat' Is Welcomed By Home Folks Breeheen Receives Boat, Trailer House, to Applause Of Hundreds of Friends "It is the most pleasant day that I have spent in my 11 years of Harry "The Cat' Breechen in a short speech tolc about persons gathered at the corner of Main and Broadway Tuesday afternoon to participate in a welcome celebration given for the pitching star of the St. Lnuis Cardinals. He lold the crowd that he wanted to thank them for every thing as it meant more to him than winning four World Series baseball games. All in all it was just one of those affairs "The Cat" en- joyed to the ill most, but he had only a few words to express his appreciation for the celebration. Parade Precedes Program The parade was lead by the Ada High school band, followed by the Contnalmmn pep squad, came the finest of the day. Ridir.j; in a convertible, Breeheen was accompanied by his wife, Vera. and John "Pepper" Martin. Many of the kids from the coun- try, the kind of people that Bre- eheen knows best, could not at- tend the celebration Tuesday af- ternoon. With flash bulbs bursting fre- quen'iy the automobile arrived in iront of the speakers' stand. Mrs. Brecheon, beautiful as ever, was the first to climb the few steps to the speakers stand, where a radio program was al- ready in progress. Broadrick Is Emcee Mayor Frank Spencer was in- troduced by Master of Cere- monies Trice Broadrick and was the first speaker on the program. The mayor told the crowd that Ada and Pontotoc county is known for many things including oil. Herefords, churches and base- bali players. He said that the 000 Hereford bull that sold here :n January was out of the picture and out of the minds of baseball fans as they glued their ears to the radio to hear that final game and especially the final two in- nings of the World Series event. Hometown Boy Succeeds The purpose for all the excite- ment was that a hometown boy was bringing-home the bacon in a royal fashion and in a maner that had never been accomplished by a southpaw hurler. Mayor Spencer said that base- ball comes naturally to Americans and this section of the United States is more enthusiastic about the sport than any other section. All during the speech, Breeheen, suffering from a severe cold he up during the series, gianced at the crowd that Jiad gathered to welcome him back to Ada. He was quite at ease and appeared to feel much at home. Many "Knew Him When" There were many visitors in the crowd, but Breeheen was no vis- itor because he was back home. Many of those in the crowd knew "The Cat" when and before he became famous. The mayor said that a boxer wins a bout he is pro- claimed a world champion, when a major league baseball club wins over the other major league it is proclaimed the champion of the world. "In keeping with the cus- tom and because the St. Louis Cardinals won the series, 1 now proclaim Harry Breeheen a world champion Mayor Spen- cer said. In drawing to the conclusion of welcome address, the mayor said that this section of Oklahoma has watched the rise of Breeheen -.vuh great interest. He then said, "Stay in there and pitch, and 'welcome home.'" Makes Presentation, "Pepper" Martin the Wild Horse of the Osage said that he was once outstanding in the base- ball world. To prove his point he a story about playing in a World Series game once when a spectator hollered something to him when he was on first base. "I turned to look at the spectator and a quick throw by the oppos- ing pitcher caught me outstanding about 30 feet off first he said. The onetime famous Cardinal player told the crowd that every time Breeheen was called on it was a, "must" and each time he ose to the occasion and three times received credit for throwing FIVE CENTS THE COPY Teachers Of EC District Look to Ada And East Central and Ada Are Preparing for Their Coming to Convention All over the 11-county East Central district teachers and school administrators are carry- ing on their duties with part of their attention turning now to their plans for coming to Ada Friday for the 31st annual East Central district OEA conven- tion. East Central Slate college, host to the convention, is also carry- ing on its classwork and at the same time rounding out the my- riad matters that must be arrang- ed for the meeting to move along its accustomed smooth pace. Notable speakers for the con- vention include Clayton "Rand, jiilfport, Miss., publisher, and -ong. Brooks Hays of Arkan- ;as. Leading educators' from over Oklahoma are on various pro- grams of the day. Thursday night the annual ban- quet program for administrators given by the Ada' Chamber of Commerce will be held, with Rand as speaker, and Friday light the Jaycees sponsor a dance n the college gym for the class- teachers. And Friday is renewal of an annual event A'ith this time a football game ivith Henderson college begin- ning at o'clock. OPA Virtually Ends Price Controls On Foods, Beverages WASHINGTON, Oct. OPA virtually ended wartime price controls over food and bev- rages today. The agency removed price lids rom all foods and beverages ex- ept sugar, syrups and rice, ef- ective at one minute past rriid- light tonight. At the same time price ceilings were lifted from all sales of food and beverages by restaurants and other sellers. Principal items freed by the sweeping action include flour, bread and bakery products; can- ned fish; candy; bananas; or- anges; canned tomatoes and to- mato products; canned pineapple and pineapple juice, breakfast cereals, macaroni and spaghetti.- The agency said the action com- pletes the decontrol of all raw and processed foods, both domes- tic and imported, and all bever- ages including beer and with the following 1. "Sugar and sugar solutions including all grades of edible syr- ups and molasses and'black strap molasses. 2. "Corn sugar and corn syrup. 3. "Blended syrups which con- tain at least 20 per cent by weight or volume of sugar, sugar solu- tions, corn sugar or corn syrup, .either singly or in combinations: 4. "Rough and milled rice." OPA said that this and previous decontrol actions leaves only about 3 per cent of all foods un- der price control. Unless today's action was taken, OPA said, confusion might result because many processors and re- tailers would be handling both controlled and.decontrolled pro- ducts. It added that the restaurant controls were lifted "because the decontrol of almost all foods and beverages would make it im- PILOTS PICKET IN TWA STRIKE: Probably the highest paid personnel to march in a picket line are these pilots and cp-pilots of TWA, who are picketing the airlines' maintenance building in Kansas City, Mo., following a walkout of company pilots who are asking higher salaries. The average annual salary of these pickets is said to be from to Left.to right are, First Of- ficer R. Gregory, New York City; Capt. R. F. Menckton, Kansas City; and Capt. J. B. Hulburd, New Work Voters Invited To Hear Bill Coe In Speech Tonight William E. "Bill" Coe, who ran fourth in the first primary vot- ing for democratic nomination for governor last July, returns to Ada tonight for a speech at the district courtroom in the county butcher shops today as packers courthouse, beginning at o'-1 rounded up full crews to take More Meat Reaches Shops, Prices Due To Decline Later CHICAGO, Oct. was more plentiful although prices in most instances remain- ed most of the country's soft drinks exceptions: clock. Goe, a .vigorous speaker, is here in the interests of the 'demo- vote on Nov. 5 for the party's candidates. He was the 'surprise of the campaign before the first pri- mary, coming from far back in the field with a rush that carried him 'to a big vote and fourth place in the Part of his strength was in this area and he emerged with top place in Pontotoc county's re- turns, leading even Roy Turner by.a modest margin. The county then went heavily for Turner in his runoff with Dixie Gilmer. With the general election less than two weeks away, Coe and other party leaders are making an earnest campaign in all parts of the state to present the claims of the democratic party for sup- port of the voters. possible to controls." continue enforceable cold Sox. water on the Boston Red He made the presentation of an aluminum boat and a neat little camping trailer then turned the speaking duties over to Breeheen. "The _Cat" thanked the Junior Chamber of Commerce, the Chamber of Commerce. Ada fire- rr.en and the people of this area for everything that had been done 10 make the day a pleasant one for him. Watching everything was Jack Mealey. manager of the Galveston baseball team when Breeheen got real upward start in baseball. 111B p, uy, OI- carry- Af.er tne program ing On the absolute essential bus- .-ound 'Pap Jeter, iness will be retained until the wno had been on the speakers strike is settled." lie said "With stand during the occasion, and our income cut off, it is necessary ine two went off to talk about to cut our expenses to the min- Sugar and rice are "critically OPA said and controls were retained to prevent "high bidding by users and buyers." TWA Fuloughing Employes Only Skeleton Staff Re- tained During Pilot Strike; No Pay on Furloughs WASHINGTON, Oct. World Airlines today an- nounced it is furloughing approx- imately employes without pay as a result of the walkout of TWA pilots three days ago. Announcement that only a skeleton staff will be retained until the strike is settled by made by TWA President Jack Frye as a new wage dispute threatened American airlines. Frye, renewing his plea that the government take over and get it back into operation, said the line "is forced immediately to furlough without pay approxi- mately of its employes, working in 23 states and 15 dif- ferent foreign countries." "Only a skeleton force ing company property, or Many Injured When Two El Trains In Chicago Crash CHICAGO care of the heavy arrivals of ani- mals, the. last week. -j.-emav.al" .--of "price controls', arrivals of meat animals "in 20 of the country's largest stock yards the first two days this week were nearly dou- ble the total a week earlier. The lifting of price ceilings also was reflected in a report by the de- partment of agriculture which showed meat production under federal inspection last week in- creased 134' per cent above the preceding week of controlled trading. Although, yesterday's receipts at most markets were not as" large as on Monday, a total of meat animals arrived at the 20 markets the first two days against for the cor- responding period a week ago when price ceilings were in ef- fect. Meat production output last week totaled 265 million pounds compared with 114 million pounds the preceding week. Livestock sold yesterday at prices under last week's levels, with best grades of beef steers showing the smallest de- cline. With the heavy influx of livestock, embargoes or partial embargoes were in effect at Sioux City, la., Kansas City, and for work were injured today, about 10 seriously, when an ele- vated express train rammed the the rear of another during heavy fog phis, Tenn., and the old union The crash occurred during the morning rush hour at the 47th street station on the Southsidel Both trains were derailed but were in no danger of falling to the street. A company spokesman said all trains were operating under "fog orders" calling for reduced speed. He added that both of the wrecked trains were scheduled to make the 47th St. stop. The for- ward train was "running the-spokesman.said, and the sec- ond train was "presumed" pulling up for a stop. From to passengers were on the two trains. Police reported many of them crowded the .station platform, delaying re- moval of the injured. So jammed with milling, con- fused passengers was the plat- form and its stairway that fire- men used hook and ladder equip- ment to climb the structure. Ray Darling, a conductor of the forward train, said the train had left its previous stop four blocks away ten minutes late and that it had stopped to pick up passengers at the 47th street sta- tion when the crash occurred. Ambulances and fire equipment so congested the 47th Street sta- tion area that all street'car and automobile traffic had to be re. routed. Every available South Side ambulance rushed victims to eight hospitals. were asked to withhold ship- ments. At Ogden, Utah, an em- bargo was lifted. Although prices for many cuts at butcher shops remained far In excess of OPA Ceiling prices, packer spokesmen have said there would be a gradual de- cline in prices' as meat becomes more plentiful within a short time. Co. Will Hold Us Weekly Drill Veterans and Non-Vets Invited to Investigate What Guard Unit Offers The weekly drill of Company C. 180th Infantry regiment of the 45th Division will be held to- night (Wednesday) at o'clock in the Armory. The 45th was the first guard division to reactivate after the recent war and has advanced further toward its peace time ac- tivity than any other unit. Many veterans will be inter- ested in the various ratings that they, may qualify for under re- cent regulations. A veteran of any branch of service or a non-veteran between 18-35 years of age can obtain ad- _ditional information about en- listment at one of the regular Lewis Sharp In New Wage Demand Note Sets Nov. No Later1 Sec. Krug to Meet Him in Washington By HAROLD W. WARD WASHINGTON, Oct. John L. Lewis stepped up the tempo of his attack for fresh wage concessions from the federally op- erated soft coal industry today, whipping out a sharp new ultima- tum to Secretary of Interior J. A. Krug. In typical crisp sentences, Lewis told Krug. to meet him in Wash- ington on November no face a walkout by Lew- is' soft coal miners 20 days earlier than the November 20 deadline set previously. The 66-year-old boss of the AFL United Mine Workers Union thus underscored his demand that Krug reopen the whole question of wages, hours and other matters involved in the Lewis-Krug agreement which followed the government's seizure of the pits last May 22. Meanwhile, labor experts looked for possible repercussions from this pre-winter controversy which could affect Pennsylvania's hard coal miners. Almost. the entire hard coal output goes into heating homes and buildings. If Lewis is successful in his demand for renewing wage ne- gotiations for soft coal miners, similar demands may be expected of the hard-coal Lewis can open his hard coal contract on 10 days' notice. The'hard-coal producers signed an agreement with Lewis last June almost paralleling the Krug- Lewis contract for the soft coal miners. Far from being soothed by two federal offers to talk things over by Krug and by -navy Capt. N. H. Collisson, federal coal mines yes- terday toughened the terms of his challenge to the government on the grounds of alleged "breach of contract." -K- U. N. General Assembly Is Opening Today, Permanent Peace Being Its Major Goal bi.-d dogs. Breeheen mingled with the crowd until almost dark before he retired to the fire station to over coming fishing and hunting trips with a number of CiOi-e friendk. imum. "We are working 24 hours a day to bring an end to this strike and return our employes to their jobs. I am still hopeful that the government may' take over or.........._ that the strike may be settled." I terday. At least one hundred other pas- i Wednesday night drills. sengers received first aid ment for minor cuts and bruises at the scene. PESHAWAR, India, Oct. 23 Abdul Ghaffar Khan, Moslem supporter of Pandit Ja- waharlal Nehru, was hospitalized today with injuries suffered when hostile Moslems stoned Nehru's JWEATHER Oklahoma Cloudy, scattered showers extreme west cooler in pan handle tonight; tonight; autnmobile near Malakand yes- Thursday partly cloudy and cool- I er; showers central and east. Explosions Damage British Destroyers Report Is 38 Men Killed Aboard Two Vessels Off Albanian Coast LONDON, Oct. 23, Dugdale, financial secretary to the admiralty, announced today that 38 men were killed and 45 injured in explosions which damaged two British destroyers off the Albanian coast yesterday. Dugdale told the house of com- mons the first vessel, the Sau- marez, "was believed to have hit a mine." The other, the Volage, was damaged nearly two hours Inter towing the-Saumarez. He said "there was an explosion" which blew off her bow. Both ships have arrived at Corfu. An admiralty board is inquiring into the cause of the explosions, he said. _ "I should explain that at the time of the accident, both ships were in the very center of the (mine) swept channel, which is one mile wide, and their position at the time and one and a half miles from the Albanian Dugdale said, "the channel was searched by British minesweep- ing formations periodically from October, 1944, to February. 1945, and no mines were found." Parts of the bows of both ships were blown off. This Mother, Babe Are Really Tough NEW YORK, Oct. 23. child was born in a speeding am- bulance on Williamsburg bridge today and minutes later child and mother survived as the am- bulance overturned in a crash with another car. Mrs. .'Mary Andrigo, 30, was being rushed by ambulance to Kings county hospital when Dr. Arthur Bobroff, delivered her child while high above the East river on Williamsburg bridge. As the sped down into Brooklyn it collided with an auto and rolled over three times. The ambulance driver, Angelo Settineri, 37, suffered minor cuts. Child, mother and physician were unscathed and rode on to the hospital in passing auto. Red Cross Sending Relief Garments Local Production Woikers Ship 132 Garments Latest shipment of garments for foreign war relief from the Pontotoc county Red Cross in- cludes 132 garments. These have been started on their 'way to the St. Louis office and eventually will be distributed to needy persons in other lands. Mrs. W. W. Sledge is produc- tion chairman for the county or- ganization. Official Photos 01 Hanged Nazis To Be Released Today BERLIN, Oct. 23. (fP) Offi- cial photograph's of the bodies of the 11 major Nazi war criminals who died at Nuernberg were dis- tributed by the Allied control authority's secretariat here today to representatives of the Amer- ican, Russian and French press for publication at 12 noon (5 a.m. central standard time) Thursday. By order of the British mem- ber of the Allied Control Council, Air Marshal Sir Sholto'Douglas, no pictures were given-to British press representatives. The Brit- ish government has opposed pub- lication of the pictures. The control council, in a unan- imous action, forbade publication of the pictures in the German press and the sale of the photo- graphs to German papers by any Allied picture agency doing busi- ness here. This action was taken despite the fact the pictures will be published in American pub- lications .which circulate in Ger- many. An American spokesman said the 24-hour embargo on use of the pictures, which were, distri- buted here at noon, was fixed at the request of the Russians. They asked the delay because they had no means for radio transmission to Moscow and must rely on ait- transport. The French also favored the embargo. The bodies are pictured lying atop their bare, black coffins, with the printed name across the chest of each. The suicide Her- man Goering lies dressed in his pajamas. Nooses are still about the necks of six of the ten hanged men. The pictures of Keitel and Frick are grisly, with blood spattered over the men's faces, and pillqws. Grand Larceny Charge Re-Filed Saddle Valued at In- volved in Case Against Three Men A charge of grand larceny a- gainst George Donaho, Thad Don- aho and Jim Donaho was dismis- sed by Franklin Bourland, jus- tice of the peace, Monday after- noon, but the case was filed again in the Percy Armstrong justice of peace court. It is alleged that a saddle valu- ed at was taken from Sam- uel Ranking. Witnesses in the case include Samuel Rankin of Galey, John Underwood of Ada, Fred Ward of Galey, Deputy Sheriff L o n Pearson of Pauls Valley, Rogers and Clyde Kaiser of Ada. PickeiTfchooF To Reopen Monday Hot Lunches to Be Served On Opening Day of Fall Term, Next Monday Pickett school will open Mon- day, Oct. 28, at 9 a.m. after a two months vacation that was given children to enable them to help with work dn the farms. There will be no time lost by enrollment as students enrolled at the beginning of the summer term. I Mrs. Bill Severs, principal, said i Wednesday morning that the hot j lunch program will be resumed and meals will be served to stu- dents attending the first day of the fall term. U. S.-Russian- Split Major Worry; Festive Opening Day Planned i By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER NEW YORK. Oct. 23. The United Nations assembly was formally welcomed to New York today in a subdued demonstra- tion along Manhattan streets and at City Hall prior to President Truman's opening session speech Inter in the afternoon. Russian Foreign Minister Mol- otov v.'iis ranking diplomat in the 96-car procession which carried delegations from the Waldorf- Astoria hotel downtown to City Hall. Former Senator Warren R. Austin, chief American delegate to the United Nations, tolci tin- City Hall crowd, which police estimated at that "wo will not permit small differences to interfere with the pledge to pro- mote peace and abolish war." U. S. Ready To Help He said the United States was willing to furnish money, men and whatever else might be need- ed for part in the peace cause. I Deputy Mayor Thomas Cor- 1 conin extended the formal wel- come to the delegates as "emis- saries of peace and freedom." NEW YORK, Oct. (IP) With permanent peace as their goal and the split between Amer- ica and Russia as their foremost ference. Red Criticisms 01 U.S. Cut Chances Of Getting Loans By JOHN SCAM WASHINGTON, Oct. Russia's rcqiiest for a 000 American loan appears doomed today unless Soviet lead- ers cease their criticism of United States foreign economic policy. Similarly, Chechoslovakia and Poland may find it difficult to win approval of their requests for loans totaling from the American-dominated world bank. Secretary of State Byrnes him- self made clear at his news con- ference yesterday that the United Slates will limit its future finan- oial aid to friendly countries who do not brand dollar credits as instruments of economic enslave- ment. Directed at Russia's Criticism Byrnes' pronouncement was designed on the surface as a reply to numerous questions why this government hist week suddenly cut off a total of in American aid to Czechoslovakia. But officials said privately the secretary's remarks were directed irminly at the Russian leaders who unleashed a barrage of criti- cism against American economic policy during the Paris peace con- worry, the delegates of 51 United Nations gathered today to hear President Truman open their first great assembly on American soil. By plane, train and ship they have been arriving in this new "world capital" all week. Mr. Tru- man, with a speech in his brief case, due in dur- ing the afternoon. Secretary of State Byrnes preceded him last night. The luncheon is one of several affairs designed to make this a festive day in the history of the United Nations. But in the midst of the color and the confident welcoming speeches, most dele- gates privately expressed their concern over Hie tensions existing between the United States and Russia, Every inujor issue was be- ing examined, in that the American delegation as well as in other official groups here. Truman to Emphasize Policy Against that background Mr. Truman had to speak and it was generally expected he would take the opportunity to support and emphasize the "patient but firm" foreign policy toward Russia laid down by Byrnes in his report to the. nation last Friday on the Paris peace conference. Foreign Minister Paul Henri Spank rjf Belgium, assembly pres- ident, was slated to bring the ses- sion to order at 4 p. m.. mid Spank holds a reputation for prompt- ness. After a welcoming speech by Acting Mayor Vincent Impcl- litteri of: New York, Spnalc was scheduled 'to introduce Mr. Tru- man. Reception By Truman Tonight Prior to the formal session 1m- pellitleri invited the delegates to City Hall for a reception to be followed by the luncheon. A re- ception by Mr. Truman at a mid- town hotel (Waldorf-Astoria) (his evening climaxes the day's pro- gram. New York officially was hold- ing out the glad hand 'in the grand manner. It would like, officially, to have the United Nations settle down on the rolling green acres at the Flushing Fair The permanent site Grounds, problem, Fellowship Meet For Ada Jaycees The Junior .Chamber of Com- merce will have a fellowship meeting tonight (Wednesday) at o'clock in the Jaycee room in the Convention hall. Final arrangements will be an- nounced for the dance sponsored by the Jaycees for the OEA meet- ing here. The dance.will be held Friday night. A number of business items are to be presented to the club. Refreshments will be served following the official meeting. TOKYO, Oct. tive Nov. 1, applications for bring- ing dependents to Japan will be considered only if they will ar- rive at least one year prior to the expiration date of the maxi- mum overseas tour of service per- sonnel, General MacArthur's headquarters said today. The nor- mal overseas tour of males is 30 months. however, is one of the big issues ahead. While plans for the opening day were long on speeches and parties and short on down-to-earth grap- pling with the problems of organ- izing world peace ,the general as- sembly will get to work on its real tasks Thursday, beginning five or six days of what the dip- lomats here call "general debate." The assembly's slate of future business numbers 53 separate items and the plan is to get all this work out of the way in a litie more than six weeks. Prepare Prison For Hess and Others BERLIN, Oct. 23, in- ternational guard of 40 men, 10 from each of the occupying pow- ers, will watch over Rudolf Hess and the six other war crim- inals in Spnndau prison, Berlin, if present plans being discussed by the allied Kommandatura of Berlin are approved. This would approximate six guards for eacli prisoner who es- caped the deiith penalty. At present there is one guard each ]6 of the convicts con- fined Spandau prison. The sprawling, red brick pris- on will not be ready to receive Hess and others for approximate- ly a month. The seven will not be behind bars but in small stone cells with a solid door broken only by a peep-hole for' the guards to keep an eye on the prisoners. Both Foreign Minister Mblotov and vice foreign minister Vishin- sky levelled accusations of "dollar "economic enslave- ment" and "economic imperial- ism" against United States plans for aiding Eastern European coun- tries. Hits Russian Loans Bid Although Byrnes maintained that the United States does not intend to follow a general policy of refusing aid to the Slavic na- tions, officials acknowledged that the only criticism of American motives thus far has come from Russia and its neighbors. These officials said, too. that since Russia lias led the attack on American economic policy, it is only logical that this govern- ment's attitude will extend to the Kremlin's own bid for financial help. The United States currently is awaiting Russia's reply to a third American note on the subject sent three months ago. Soviet refusal to agree in advance to link any loan talks with an examination of economic conditions in Eastern Europe has stalled actual Russo- American negotiations. Hunlingfon Fire Really Does Hurt Because Large Laundry Blaze Hits Shirts, Pillow Cases, Bed Linens HUNTJNGTON. W. Vn., Got else may be scarce in HuiHiiiRton. it's nothing compared with today's sudden dearth of shirts, pillow cases, and bed-linen. When the Pilgrim laundry one of tile city's de- stroyed by a fire yester- day, a Jot of spare shirts went up in smoke. One large hotel lost half its bed sheets, a cafeteria reported loss of napkins plus half of. the uniforms furnished to waitresses, and Su p e r i n t 
                            

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