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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 22, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             All the more honor to Harry Brecheen for the way the pitching star of the recent World Series continues to be the same modest Harry that Ada baseball fans have known for 17 seasons. Average Net Sept., 1'ald Circulation 8575 Member: Audll Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 160 ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Small Son Of Mack Bralys Is Drowned Tragedy Takes Leonard Allen Braly, Almost Two, Member of Pioneer County Family Leonard Allen Braly, small son of Mr. nnd Mrs. Mack Braly, 723 South Confer, was drowned late Monday afternoon in n fishpond. He would have been two years old on December 18. Funenal services will be held Wednesday morning at o'clock from the First Baptist church. Dr. C. C. Morris official ing: burial in Rosedale cemetery. 'He had been playing in the yard, then had been missing not more than 15 minutes when his mother. Mrs. Claudia Braly, look- ed for him and, not seeing liim, heard some boys playing to the east, started through the neigh- borhood, following 11 path the small children often used. She found Leonard Allen in n shallow fishpond on the grounds of the home of Mrs. Alice Fleet, and when her scream brought others, had them call an ambu- lance and the fire station where a pulmotor is kept. Pulmolor Csed The motor began artificial res- piration and when the ambulance driver arrived he continued this. Then the firemen came with the pulmotor and for two hours the battle for the small boy's life continued. At one time his heart was felt to beat faintly but the efforts of the workers could not keep it sustained. Third son of the Bralys, Leonard Allen was born not long after his father had gone overseas with his field artillery unit. Mack Braly, after service in Central Europe, emerged from his army service vith rank of lieutenant colonel. Mack Braly has been city at- torney here for 12 years. Member of Pioneer y The Bralys are a pioneer fam- ily in this county. J. A. Braly, great-grandfather of Leonard Allen, came to this area in the early nineties. A great-grand- mother. Mrs. Emma Muratet, also survives and is living in Ada. Other relatives, in addition to the parents and brothers, include Mrs. Lottie Braly and Mrs. George Moore, grandmothers, both living here. John Moore, Oklahoma City, brother of Mrs. Mack Braly, was in South Dakota Monday and this caused delay of notifying him of the tragedy. Leonard Allen was described "the happiest child in the delighting in being with people he knew and winning their pleased affection in return. Patrolman (hecks On School Buses Clark Inspects 38 Buses From Dozen Schools In Gorvin County Highway Patrolman Glenn Clark, who is stationed in Ada, inspected school buses from 12 schools in Garvin county Monday. The inspection there was the first of inspections to be made in the county areas worked by the patrolmen. Some 38 buses were inspected Patrolman Clark put his 'O.K.' on them. The buses from Brecheen Ready for Fishing m "THE CAT" IS LOOKING OVER HIS FISHING EQUIPMENT for the first time since finishing off the Boston Red Sox in the final World Series game. The rod and reel are both new, but many of the fish lures shown in the tackle-box are well seasoned as they have been used several years. Fishing is cither Harry Brechpen's second or third love. He naturally puts baseball first, then it is almost a toss up between fishing and hunting. Right now his'time will be devoted to fishing, but not entirely as he will soon start conditioning his dogs for bird season. the 12 schools were in Pauls Valley for the inspection. The buses are checked for the various things that make them safe for transporting school chil- dren to and from school. Each bus is inspected separnlc- 3y and a copy of the inspection record is filed with .state author- Buses in Pontotoc county will be inspected next week and Johnston county buses will be in- spected the following week. Trooper Kenneth Will will in- spect the Pontotoc county buses and Trooper O. O. Campbell will co the inspecting in Johnston county. Canned Porkr Beans Are to Go Up Oct. 22 Grocery prices for canned pork and beans and baked beans will go up two to three cents a can, OPA announced today. The agency allowed an imme- diate increase in ceilings for pro- cessed beans because of higher labor and other costs. The in- creases will reach consumers, OPA added, when the first cans of the higher priced food .reach retail stores. k Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. IWEATHER! OKLAHOMA Cloudy tonight and Wednesday: local light rain or drizzle south tonight and west and south Wednesday: not much changs in temperatures. Hansen's Report Shows Progress On City's Problems W. E. Hanson, who is starting his second week as city manager in Ada, made his first report to the City Council Monday night at its first regular meeting since the new manger came to office. The council was pleased with the com- pleteness of the report given. A complaint registered with the council Oct. 34 concerning flood conditions that exist on East Seventh between Beard and Mis- sissippi was investigated by the city manager. He reported that inasmuch as the street is not paved, it is not advisable to at- tempt a permanent solution at this time. However, measures of a temporary nature have been taken. A temporary concrete drainage line is now being .in- stalled for a distance of approxi- mately 232 Toot long. Tile Already Owned The stock being used to help remedy the flood condition is from u stock owned by the city. The drainage tile was purchased, several months ago, but was never used. Hansen said that this job should be completed before the end pf next week. The city manager brought to the attention of the council the fact that the city loses money every imp a building permit is issued. "The existing method of schedule does not afford the le- gitimate contractor, the property owner or tenants the protection they are rightfully entitled Hansen said in his report. Suggests Permit Schedule Change The proesnt policy is to charge for constructions estimated from to and the maxi- mum charge is for construc- tion of buildings estimated from to Hanson pointed out- that the continuance of the foregoing schedule will be a continuing of a direct monetary loss to the city. He then suggested a new rate to be charged. The proposed schedule is to charge for buildings cost- ing between and on up to for those estimated to cost from to Each ad- ditional or fraction to and including would be As the estimated cost increase the price per decrease. The council told Hansen to con- tinue with his plans for making the changeover. Locales Shop Equipment Hanson made an inspection of the present shop facilities and found several pieces of equipment in order for the mechanic to carry on the repair work required on city-owned vehicles. He reported that one hydraulic floor jack, three-ton capacity; one heavy duty bench drill and stand, one-half inch capacity; one air compressor having about seven cubic feet of air capacity per minute; one paint spray unit com- plete with spray gun, one six-inch double-wheel bench grinder, one transmission grease gun, one dif- ferential-type one or one-and-a- half-lon hoist and one valve re- seating outfit, universal type, is needed now. The total cost of the items mentioned will not ex- ceed "Go" Signal on Signal Lights The council gave Hansen the 'go' sign on recommended work in connection with the installa- tion oT new wiring for signal lights. "Inasmuch as this defective cable will have a salvage value far less than the cost of 'removal, it is recommended that the cable be abandoned in place in the new cable Hansen said, then added, "It is proposed to do the necessary excavating and street repair work with city em- Celebration Pleasant Surprise to Modest Card Pitching Star He may never say just how much he appreciates the boat and trailer that is going to be pre- sented to him, but Harry "The Cat" Brecheen will get just what he wanted when he takes the presents home with him follow- ing the celebration Tuesday after- noon. All thr money and prestige that goes with being a big-league baseball player hasn't changed "The Cat" in one respect' He is still the same type of fellow who played Junior Legion baseball in Ada back jn. the early. 30's. Surprise To Him Brecheen had no idea that there was anything like the planned celebration "in the wind" when he purchased a new out- board motor and mailed it to the fire station. The boat an aluminum af- Russians Blocking U. S. Proposals On German Banking By EDWIN SHANKE BERLIN, Oct. 22 (VP) The Russians have blocked Allied agreement on an American pro- posal for decentralizing German banking institutions and setting up central land banks patterned after the U. S. Federal Reserve system, an announcement of the Allied Control Council disclosed .today. The proposal, discussed yester- day at the council's regular "meet- ing, aimed at liquidating .the economic power over business and banking held by five leading German banks. The Soviet delegate- to the council, Gen. P. Kuroohin, took Cancer Unit Clink Draws 96 Persons Visiting Physicians Pleased With Response Here; Local Organization Planned There were 96 persons regis- terd Monday at the cancer clinic held at the First Christian church, more than had been anticipated. Visiting physicians in charge of the mobile cancer detection unit that was here for the day expres- sed pleasure at the response, say- ing it was satisfactory in every way. Some of those who came had already had cancer identified, some had some of the indications that, point to possibility of cancer and there were some who didn't think they had cancer but simply wanted to take the examination and be certain. Results Known Soon Results of the tests will be sent back in about a week to local physicians, nnd at the same time letters will be mailed to the individuals examined and found with cancer or possibility hav- ing it advising them to report to Mandates One of First Major Problems to Come Up After U. N. General Assembly Opens Buyers Show Balky Mood _ fair1 that is the latest thing in j the stand that the American plan boating because it is light and i was a "partial and compromise can be easil yhandled was pur- j measure which, instead of liqui- chased to go with the motor that dating Germany banking monop- he bought while on n trip with olios, sought to delay a decision." on Page 2, Col. 3) the St. Louis Cardinals. The program hns been so ar- ranged that several notables will appear on the speakers platform, which will be located at the cor- ner of Main and Broadway.-The 100 block on South Broadway will be roped to handle the crowd. Starting at the corner of Thir- teenth and Broadway, the Ada High School band and Contna- l-.oma pep club will march to the speakers stand, according to C. Russell Smith, who made most of the arrangements for the pro- gram. Trice Broadrick, Ada High school principal and president of the Junior Chamber of Comrfierce will be master of ceremonies. Mayor Frank Spencer will give a welcome address. Leonard (Pep- per) Martin will have a definite part on the program as he will bi called on to make a talk, in- troduce Brecheen and present the boat and trailer. The program has been planned to the very minute and most of it will be broadcast over Radio Station KADA from to 5 p.m. The celebration was started by the Junior Chamber of Commerce with the Chamber of Commerce and members of the fire depart- ment assisting. It was through the cooperation of these three groups that the program has reached its present peak. Newsmen and photographers from Dallas, Tex., and Oklahoma City will be present at the affair to give it full coverage. He proposed therefore, disasso- ciating the question of 'immediate liquidation of banking monopolies from the problem of establishing a central German banking ma- chinery as a substitute. This question, he insisted, should be decided in connection with general finance problems of Germany, such as stabilization of currency. In disagreeing with the Soviet proposal, U. S. Gen. Joseph "T. McNarney declared "it would be an indefinite and, long time before the finacial structure of Germany received quadripartite agree- ment." Because the council could not agree, the proposal was with- drawn from the agenda. The practical effect was that the entire matter will be referred back to the individual govern- ments, said Theodore H. Ball, deputy director of the finance division of the American military government. LAD SAYS JUST BORROWED BIKE Indian Boy Also Unworried Over Idea of Industrial School City police arrested a 14-year old Indian boy over the week- end after finding a stolen bicycle in his possession. The boy lives in a trailer house east pf the un- derpass south of Ada. The youngster told the police that he was in' Ada and didn't want to "walk he just "borrowed" the bicycle to make the trip to his home. Police were still trying to figure why the youngster painted the bicycle if he only wanted a ride home. County Judge W. G. Lor.g talk- ed with the boy Monday morning to get a little more background on the case. He mentioned send- ing the youngster to the Pauls Valley Industrial School for Boys. When the school was mentioned, the boy said, "Let me go over there for about three months and see how I like it." Coal (ounly Vole Tesf Is Refused Supreme Court Refutes To Nullify Elections Under Senate Law of 1937 OKLAHOMA CITY, Oct. state supreme court to- day refused to enjoin the state election board from, holding fur- ter elections under va piecemeal senatorial re-districting law of 1937, although it had previously held that only a state-wide re- apportionment is valid. The suit was brought by H. M. Shirley, Coalgate, defeated pri- mary candidate for the senate from Coal and Atoka counties, and 'John R. Hickman, former secretary of the Coal county elec- tion board. The court pointed out that the law in question was passed nine years before its decision -holding piecemeal re-districting unconsti- tutional and ruled that the pres- ent districts had been in existence too long to-be affected by court action now.. Counties involved' in the' suit were Bryan, Choctaw, Pushmata- McCurtain, Coal and Atoka. in Ada Monday night cut atten- dance at the meeting planned for showing of a picture on cancer and an accompanying talk, so this was postponed until a later date. The physicians with the unit then assembled with members of the Ppntotoc County Medical As- sociation, showed the movie and engaged in a clinical discussion of cancer with the Pontotoc coun- ty physicians. Local Organization Planned Next step' planned here is or- ganization of a county unit of the state "Field Army." Mrs. Ju- lia Mae Smith has been desig- nated commander and is already making plans for get- ting the group organized and working toward an effective pro- gram1 that will eventually mean adequate, facilities for .cancer de- tection arid 'treatment at Ada, to serve this part of the state. _ 'Mrs. Smith expresses' apprecia- tion for assistance of several local citizens, including Miss Flora Tibby, of the East Central State college registrar department, and Mrs. Beulah Mae Smith. These two took care of. the secretarial work of registering the 96 who came to take the examination. She also appreciates the use of space in the Christian church. Doctors here with the cancer unit were Dr. A. B. Abshire, Dr. Refusal to Pay Sharply Higher Prices for Meat In Big Centers Has Effect By The Associated Press The growth of definite buyer resistance to meat prices that have spurted to an extreme of a pound was shown today in a heavy majority of the key cities covered in a nation-blank- eting survey. At the end of the first full week of uncontrolled meat prices, a spot check of 48 cities by the As- sociated Press produced a score- board that read like this: Red 'meat has come back in sharply improvem to ample quan- tities on the counters of 39 com- munilies, in nine others six of them in the east meat is still scarce to. non-existent. Prices have risen everywhere, in a few cases by as little or even less than the federal subsidy that vanished with OPA control, but in one-third of the 48 cities prices of a pound or more have been chalked up for choice cuts. Resistance to these prices has appeared in degrees ranging from beyond the muttering stage to ac- tive organized picketing in 34 of the survey cities. In others the and Dr. Malcolm Phelps, accom- panied by Dr. Gray, dean of the Oklahoma .University School of Medicine. Fire in Southern Ice Company Plant Two Hours Required To Extinguish Stubborn Blaze Starting in Engine Room Fire Chief Ed Haley was un- able Tuesday morning to arrive at a figure in relation to damage done to the Southern Ice com- pany plant when fire started in the engine room some'time after midnight Monday. Firemen rushed to the scene of the fire at 2 a.m. and worked un- til 4 a.m; before the blaze was extinguished. Most of the damage was done to the east wall of the building and to the roof over the engine room. Almost every part of the build- ing was damaged by smoke, ac- cording to Chief Haley, who made an inspection Tuesday morning. Employees of the ice plant are having' to check all the freezing containers that occupied the room that caught fire to see that no excess water entered them. Chief Haley said that it will be Wednesday before the cause of the fire and the damage can be determined. Coal County Store Reported Robbed A 'general' store located, near Eureka school, three and a half miles southwest of Tupelo in Coal county, was robbed over the weekend and Sheriff John- (Continued on page 2, column 1) Break in Cotton Market Heads Off Clothing Boost WASHINGTON; Oct. An OPA official said today that November shoppers for cotton dresses, shirts and similar items are due to save money as a result of last week's market break. "The drop in cotton prices on markets will avoid a threatened boost in ceilings during Novem- the agency, spokesman told a reporter. He provided this ex- planation: Under a provision of the OPA extension net, the ceiling tags of most cotton goods must be lied to the market prices of cotlon. Thus if market prices rise one month, OPA must lift its ceilings on col- ton products the next month. Such increase were required for August, September and Oc- tober. In the case of men's, women's and' children's cotton garments the'boosts totaled about 10 per cent. Ceilings on cotton lexliles, such as piece goods, climbed 23 per cent during Ihe same period. The provision requires OPA lo compute'its-nei.v ceilings on either the so-called parity price for .cot- ton or the recent average market whichever is higher. With the parity price near 25 cents a pound, the average mark- et price has been much higher. Last month it averaged 36.51 cents a pound during the 8th to the 22nd base period used by OPA for the purpose. For the period October 8 to 16 the aver- age was above 38 cents. However last w'eek's slump off- set the early increase so there will be no boost in ceilings for November, the OPA official said. Original of Noted Painting Destroyed Crossing The Delaware" Lost In Bombing Raid on Bremen BERLIN, Oct. 22 orig- inal of the famous painting, "Washington Crossing the Dela- ware" by the German artist Leutz, was destroyed in a British bombing raid on iBremen Sept. 15, 1942, the newspaper of the American port command at Bre- men said today. The painting, familiar to every American schoolboy, was origi- nally to be hung in the capitol Pres. Truman to Deliver Welcome Address Wednesday; S. Africa-India Wrangle Up NEW YORK, Oct. from over the world called their staffs and advisers into last-minute con- ferences today to shape the policies they will present in the meetings of the General Assembly of the United Nations which open tomorrow in Flushing Meadow Park with Presi- dent Truman as the welcoming speaker. Most delegations already settled in overcrowded N nie Phillips of Coalgate 'at Washington, but when it was ed Sheriff Clyde Kaiser's force and the city police to assist him in breaking the case. The reason for calling in Pon- totoc county authorities on the case was that the case is similar to_one that occurred in Ada only a short time ago. Most of the loot consisted of merchandise ranging from dom- inoes to sugar, coffee and other _TT. food items. Several cartons of SHAWNEE, Okla. .Oct. 22 cigarettes were also taken from Yank, a five-year-old fox terrier i. the store. owned by Mrs. Nettie Davies here, is a former "honorary ser- geant of the U. Force." S.j Fifth Air Born in Austrialia, Yank went along on 50 bombing missions, has crossed the Pacific twice by air and once by ship. He brought home by Mrs. Davies' son, Eugene Davies, ex-GI. A. fingerprint expert from Ada was taken to Coal county to make some prints found in the store, but by Tuesday morning there had been no individual connected with the prints found in the store building. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. slightly damaged by fire the artist retouched it and sold it to the German government in 1863. Later it was hung in the Bremen Kunsthalle (art German art directors at Bre- men said they valued the paint- ing at marks at prewar PONCA CITY, Oct. 22 Ponca City Chamber of Com- merce is sponsoring a tri-county farm and home improvement con- test, with the winning couples to receive a five-day trip to Chicago, starting Nov. 30, with expenses The contest is open to families residing in Kay, Noble, and Osage counties. More than 50 per cent of the family's income must be de- rived from agricultural work. Read The News Classified Ads. in overcrowded New York hotels, but late-comers still were arriving by air from far parts of the globe. Among those due to arrive today were two prospective antagonists' Field Marshal Jan Christinan Smuts, prime minister and foreign min- ister of the union of South Afri- ca, and Mrs. Vijayalakshi Pandit of India. Her plane trip was de- layed by engine trouble, at Al- giers and then by the TWA pilots' strike in Shannon. Eire, where she changed planes. Indian Delegation Has Plans .Although some negotialions were reported in the wrangles between India and South Africa, Mrs. woman dele- gation prepared to carry on a fight in the assembly against "Jim Crow" conditions allegedly imposed upon Indians in South Africa. She is the sis- ter of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, chief minister in India's new in- terim government. The Indian delegation also has organized a campaign which may be sprung to oppose South Afri- ca's intentions of annexing south- west Africa, the old German colony which the union adminis- ters under a league of nations mandate. The annexation pro- posal has been placed before the general assembly for considera- tion. Other Mandates Ready -The disposal of several other league mandates under trustee- ship council seemed assured with the announcement last night that the United Kingdom had submit- ted terms under which it would agree to trusteeships for Tangan- yika, Togoland and Cameroon, all in Africa. If the British proposals and those of Australia and France for trusteeships over their mandates are accepted by the assembly, the trusjeeship council would be set up as the last major organ of the U. N. lo be established. The mandate holders would servi; ns administering states, with Ihe United States, Russia and China the non-administering mem bers of the council. France has offered French To- goland and Cameroon and the Australians have offered their portion of New Guinea. UNRRA End Means Problems The American delegation head ed by former Senator Warren Austin of Vermont continued its day-long sessions of combing through the list of problems on the assembly agenda. It met in almost continuous session yester- day and last night lo determine a policy on future needs of the refugee-care agencies after the ending of UNRRA next year and also completed its committee as- signments. Austin himself will serve on the assembly's general (steering) committee and the headquarters committee, which will point the way for establishment of the world peace capital in nearby Westchester county or may ac- cept one of the rival proposals offered by New York City and the San Francisco area. An estimated 50 per cent of the U. S. population are church- members. MARBLES FELT LIKE COCONUTS When Chief Haley Yanked On Boots and Found Grandson's Marbles There "They felt like was tlie comment of Fire Chief Ed Haley when he jumped into his boots to go to a fire at the Southern Ice company Monday night. He was referring to some marbles that he found when ho slipped the boots on. What the fire chief didn't know that his grandson. Joe Ed Jared, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Jared, Jr., had been playing with his boots duringg the day. It all happened as a surprise to Chief Haley and while still half asleep it took him a full minute to determine what had been crammed into his boots. To remedy the situation, the chief plans to keep his boots out of the reach of his young grand- son, but even then he says that he will inspect them before slip- ping them on. The fire chief apparently had forgotten how children get a- round because his youngest child is olayinp football for the Cou- gars, but the one lesson is enough of a reminder that there is a youngster in the house. U. S. Rebuffed By Bulgaria Russia Says No to U. S. Plan for Guaranteeing Free, Fearless Elections By ALEX H. SINGLETON WASHINGTON, Oct. Russia's jealous grip on the Bal- kans was underlined anew today as the stale department docketed still another Soviet rebuff this time in connection with Bulgar- ia. The department disclosed that the latest friction developed when Russia bluntly rejected an Am- erican plan for Allied action to guarantee free and fearless elec- tions in Bulgaria. Moscow's official representa- tive, Col. Gen. Sergei Biryusov. asserted the plan was not only improper from a standpoint but also constituted "rude interference" in Bulgarian affairs. Will Watch Anyway Obviously nettled, the state de- partment countered yesterday by serving notice that it will keep a sharp watch on the Bulgarian elections, scheduled for October -7. In addition, it appeared like- ly that the United Stales will continue to withhold its recogni- tion of the Bulgarian government. at least until satisfied that Bul- garia's assurances of a free elec- tion have been fulfilled. The issue once again emph- asizing Soviet resentment over any attempt to probe into Rus- sia's spheres of interest deve- loped originally from request made by Secretary of State Byrnes in Paris on September '14. At Unit Byrnes naked for a special session of UK; Tri-Powcr Bulgiirinn council control coin- mission to "consider the slops" necessary to insure a free elec- tion in Bulgaria and urged the following: 1. Freedom of press, radio and assembly for the opposition. 2. Non-interference by the mil- ilia, either with candidates or vo- ters, except to maintain law nnd order. 3. Release of political prisoners, or open declaration of charges against them. 4. Elimination of any possible threat of post-election retaliation for political reasons. Reminded of Promise Byrnes also addressed a letter to Bulgaria's prime minister Kim- on Georgiev reminding him of the hopes expressed at Yalta by Pres- ident Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill and Marshal Stalin for free democratic elections in the liberated lands. The slate department said Gcorgiev replied that the Bulgar- ian government hud already de- cided to hold "entirely free elec- tions" and specified that freedom of the press in Bulgaria wns "fully assured within the limits of existing law." NORMAN. Oct. 22 new veterans housing units at the University of Oklahoma have been named the Niemann apart- ments in memory of Hal Nie- mann, son of Dr. and Mrs. George Niemann, Ponca City. Young Niemann was killed in a polo accident while playing with the University of Oklahoma team at Roswell, N. M., in 1936. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. TH' PESSIMIST tlr nnk Jr. Jet planes can fly pretty fast, but nothin' t' compare with a pound o' ninety-cent butter. Next t' a Pekingese dog, the'r ain't nolhin' as down- right useless around a homa as 'n antique chair.   

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