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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 21, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 21, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             VrVresaid to be in the east central part of the state it looks as if when the forecast says rain for the east we're in the central and when it says rain for the central we're in the east Nrt .Sept.. I'nlil circulation 8575 Member: Audit Ilurcnu of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 159 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY More Than 60 Register For Cancer Tests Clinic Held During Day For Those Wanting Tests; General Meeting Tonight More than 60 persons register- ed Monday for examination afte a cancer clinic, sponsored by Fed ?rated Women's clubs of Okla hpma. was set up at the Firs Christian church. During the time that clinic, have been held, some per sons have been examined am 600 of that number were founc to be affected by cancer. Fifteen other clinics will be held in Oklahoma before Dec. 15. Men in working with the can cer clinics include Dr. A. B. Ab shire. Dr. Joseph Kelso, Dr Elmer Musick and Dr. Malcoln Phelps. The doctors will give the examinations. Dr. Gray, derm ol the medical school at Oklahoin; University, accompanied the men :o Ada. A public meeting at R p.in Monday in the church will per- mit any one to learn more about the disease- thai is now killiitj, many people throughout the na- tion. Thi- clinic in Ada will be fol- lowed by organizing a count} unit of the American Cancer so- ciety. M'.-s. Julia M. Smith has been named chairman of work in Pon- totoc county and will be in c-.haige of organization pleasures. "A field army, consisting of the members in all the counties in the state, will be Mrs. Smith said. She added that the Business and Professional Wom- en's organization of Ada will be the sponsor of the organization to be established in this county. Kiwanians Talk On Youth Delinquency Committee Available For Call By Authorities To Help On Future Cases Juvenile delinquency came in for lively discussion at the Ki- wanis meeting today. Police Chief Q'uinton Blake said that study and observation had convinced him that there are two basic causes of youth delin- at home and lack of something to do. He urged use of the reform school as a last resort. He also advanced the idea of a boys' farm for taking care of those whose home conditions arc detrimental and who get into serious trouble lor lack of anything to do. Rev. F. R. McConncll and oth- ers in general discussion talked over their ideas of causes and so- lutions and the committee on boys and girls was instructed to be available for call for assistance to the authoritiqti in dealing with specific cases that come up here. Homer Stale Field Head of Foundation Permanent Chapter Of Sister Kenny Foundation Now Being Organized HOLLYWOOD, Oct. V. Borne.- of Tulsa today was nam- ed Oklahoma Field 'Director of the Sister Elizabeth Kenny Foundation for infantile paraly- sis. Announcement of his appoint- ment was made by Kate Smith, national chairman, and B i n g Crosby, chairman of the execu- tive committee. At the same time it was re- vealed that a permanent Oklaho- ma chapter of the Sister Kenny i oundation is now being organiz- ed. Its objectives are: To provide scholarships for registered nurses from Oklahoma who will be sent to Minneapolis The Cat" Is Here Harry Brecheen To Be Honored With Special Occasion Tuesday, Presentation Of Boat And Trailer By Adons Harry "The Cat" Brecheen ar- rived in Ada Monday morning nursing a cold that he picked up before returning to Oklahoma where he visited his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Brecheen, in Mc- Alestcr before coming to Ada. He was swarmed by a host of friends, who had 'words of con- gratulations to offer to Brecheen, who won three series games for After looking over a long list of fellows who played baseball with ''The Cat" at one time or another, several of them have been invited to attend and take part in the celebration here Tues- day afternoon, Pepper Martin Coming' Pepper Martin, one time Card- inal player and more recently coach of a Pacific Coast league the St. Louis Cardinals against team, has informed local men the Boston Red Sox. Brecheen was in a more talk- ative mood when he arrived here this time than he has ever been before, but he has more to talk about since he gathered in about all pitching honors for the World Series. He has only to lake his choice of hunting grounds because be- fore noon Monday he had numer- ous offers. Set for P.M. A big celebration with music, people and especially, the guest, Brecheen, will be on hand for the occasion between Main and Twelfth street on- Broadway Tuesday afternoon at o'clock. The Ada High school band, the ConlnahoiTui pep club and other orgiinizations will participate in the celebration for the home-town boy who made good in major league baseball circles. Early plans included a banquet, but this item was dropped be- cause Brecheen wasn't strong for the idea. In telephone conversa- tions with several close friends, Brecheen told them lo continue with arrangements for the other portions of the affair. Boat and Trailer Along with the celebration, Brecheen will be presented with an aluminum boat and a trailer that he can use handily in con-_________ __....... ncction with his many sporting needed" a activities. that he will be present for the affair. Martin like Brecheen is a great sportsman and ,it is likely that he and Brecheen will slip off to some wooded area after the cele- bration for a few shots at some squirrels. Brecheen is expected to do some squirrel hunting, but he will spend niost of his time right now preparing for a fishing trip. He won't forget his bird dogs, how- ever, because he will have them in condition for quail season when it opens. "The Cat" spent Sunday in Mc- AIester visiting with his parents and friends while his wife, Vera, came to Ada to visit her parents, who make their home here. Answers Questions on Scries Brecheen had a better season last year than he did this year, but he didn't get a chance to par- ticipate in a World Series as the Chicago Cubs won the pennant. Many of Harry's friends want- ed some first hand information about the World Series this year and he promptly obliged by an- swering questions as quickly as they were asked. After getting away from the bulk of the crowd that surround- ed him most of the morning, Bre- cheen took one close friend, walk- ed into a barber shop, his destina- tion of the morning because he cussing a fishing 'trip. OPA Likely To Keep Control On Car Prices Power Strike Over, Pittsburgh Industry Swings To Normal PITTSBURGH, Oct. life in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area swung back towards normal to- day upon the end of a 27-day -power .strike longest and nost costly in the nation's history. for training technicians. as expert Kenny 2. To defray expenses of Okla- homa physicians and surgeons who attend the.periodical demon- stration courses at the Institute at Minneapolis. 3. To assist local health auth- orities in Oklahoma with the co- operation of the national Kenny organization, in case of serious polio outbreak. 4. To provide funds for the treatment of any indigent pa- tient in Oklahoma, regardless of race or religion. 5. To eventually establish an Oklahoma clinic, which woulfl be staffed by the technicians train- ed at Minneapolis under Oklaho- ma scholarships. Homer stated that the 1946 Sister Kenny fund campaign will be launched nationally Novem- ber 13 and December 7. continue through Secession Threat Hangs Over Chinese Peace Conference By HAROLD K. MILKS NANKING. Oct. icse communist and government icgotiators met today for what ome observers called a last- hance peace conference. Gen- rayssimo Chiang Kai-Shek him- elf called the meeting to order, vhile fresh fighting flared in the orth and one Red spokesman nid secession of communist areas from China "hangs by a hair." hour, however, Chiang departed, accompanied by Maritime Chiang on a four-day in- spection tour of Formosa, the of- ficial Central Daily News re- ported. Hundreds of industrial plants There was no immediate hint of the trend of the conference, which began almost immediately after the communist leader Chou En-Lai arrived by plane from Shanghai. U. S. Ambassador J. Letghton Stuart attended. Other conferees were the orig- inal delegates to last January's political consultation conference which set up a paper shot full of holes by both sides. Each blames the other. Up to the moment of today's meeting at least, communists had not changed their public a demand that both sides revert to their January territorial hold- ings in China. And the govern- ment still was insisting'that any new truce should freeze positions as they now are. The communists have lost several key areas since January's short-lived truce.) A new communist offensive thrust has cut the Peiping-Tient- sin road 57 miles southeast of resumed work make up for at full speed to lost production. Street car transportation was normal again and bus line opera- tions almost normal. For the first time in nearly four weeks, the Duquesne Light company announced that the persons in the affected area could use all the electricity they wished. The current was voluntarily rationed during the strike. Making- Repairs With its unionized em- Supply Still Short; De- Control Speedup May Take Ceilings From Bread, Flour WASHINGTON, Oct. OPA and agriculture de- partment officials indicated today that price controls will drop from flour, bread and other baked goods, this week, possibly today or tomorrow. An OPA spokesman said there has been some discussion, of de- controlling bread, rolls and other baked goods while temporarily retaining ceilings on flour and other miller's .products. "OPA has opposed this as in- the agency spokes- man said. "We informed the agri- culture department that if con- trols are to be lifted-on bread and baked goods, they also should.be lifted at fthe miller level upon flour." This official pointed out that controls had been removed from all fats and oils, including short- ening, which are a big share of bakers' costs. Deadline On Petition Today was the deadline for ac- tion by the agriculture depart- ment upon a -decontrol petition from the bake gopds industry. Agriculture previously had de- nied a decontrol request by mill- ers but the industry renewed its petition and a public hearing was conducted last week. Freeing of. flour, bread and other goods from price ceilings would reduce OPA controls to "a small share of the average fam- ily's food. Cereals make up about 13 per cent'of the average family budget and about 80 per cent of the food budget, had been freed from price lids, previously. On the automobile front, where four industry-wide, increases in the last year have boosted ceil- ings roughly 22 per'cent above 1942 prices, the OPA official told a reporter: "Most of the major manufac- turers agree, with us that auto- mobile prices have gone about as high under ceilings as they TWA Pilots Strike For Higher Pay And Ground Many Planes Some Fliers Move To Enforce Wage Demands; Other Airliners Not Affected By First Such Walkout i WASHINGTON, Oct. (AP) Approximately AFL pilots employed by Trans World Airlines struck for higher pay today, grounding all planes on the company's United States and transatlantic routes. More than 90 flights were cancelled, leaving an estimated passengers temporarily stranded. In addition, the move- ment of 25 tons of msil was diverted to other earners. TWA, fourth largest U. S. air line, operates over miles of routes. FORTUNE FOUND IN TRUNK: Shown examining in crisp bills, ranging in denomination from to which was found in; secret compartment of battered wardrobe trunk owned by Mrs. Minnie Hosser Weigle 79-year-old widow who died two months ago, are, left to right, Robert Raymond co-administrator of estate; P. F. Reilly, bank executive and Timothy J. Healy, attorney for es- late. Attorneys found the money and jewelry in a routine search of her Manhattan, N. Y., apartment. (NEA telephoto) Silent On GM Request The official declined to com- ment specifically, however, on a pending General Motors' request for ah additional price-boost sim- ilar to that granted the Ford Motor Company some weeks ago under terms of a hardship provi- sion of the new OPA act. The Ford increase amounted to about six per cent and was in addition to the general hikes granted to offset higher wage and material costs and to restore nor- mal margins to dealers. OPA has refused to say exactly how much of a boost GM has asked, although the figure of a car has been mentioned by com- pany executives at Detroit. Officials have stressed that were let slide during the strike. It announced that all the arc lamps in downtown Pittsburgh, burned- out during the strike, would be lit again within 24 to 48 hours. However, it will take probably a week, to replace to incandescent lamps burned out in suburban areas, a company spokesman said. The Sun-Telegraph estimated the strike cost the steel capital "at least in business and wages. Conventions Canceled Conciliation sessions to end a 21-day old hotel strike, also cost- ing the city considerable busin- ess, resume today. The eight largest hotels here have been virtually closed, resulting in can- cellation of a number of conven- The power strike ended when the light company employes vot- ed to submit their demands for a 20 percent wage increase and other issues to ('arbitration. The vote, taken at a secret from the administration's'Novem- ber 1 goal of getting rid of most price controls. And some have interpreted President Truman's meat decontrol speech as mean- wage controls are. to be junked only as price restraints are taken off specific industries. CIO-UAW Asks Wage Boost Hence it was not clear here what the government's official reaction would be to the actipn of the ClO-United Auto Workers union yesterday in calling for "substantial" wage adjustments from all motor makers whose contracts have reopening clauses. A statement designed prima- rily to clarify the status of the resignation-ridden wage stabiliz- ation board reportedly is being prepared. Whether it may now be revised to take note of the CIO-UAW ac- tion at Cleveland remained a matter for speculation. Separate petitions asking de- control of flour and bakery prod- ucts have been filed with the ag Two U. S. Marines Missing, Taken By Armed Chinese PIEPING, Oct. 21, United' States marines, members of a nine-man hunting party, were captured yesterday by arm- ed Chinese and still were missing today, marine headquarters an- nounced. In another insident, three U. S. sailors traveling by jeep near Tangku Harbor fought off 501New Mexico-Oklahoma diocese Rev. Alexander To Tulsa In New M. E. Appointments TULSA, Okla., Oct. 21 yp) More than 350 appointments of pastors and district church offi- cials were announced at the clos- ing session of the East Oklahoma conference of the Methodist church's annual meeting here yes- terday. Bishop W. Angle Smith of the More Bombings In Germany Expected, Says Army Official By RICHARD A. O'REGAN STRUTTGART, Germany. Oct. 21, army officials, still investigating triple bombings of German and American instal- lations in the Slrullgart area disclosed today that German arms caches Chinese in 'a. gunbattle in which several Chinese were wounded. None'of the sailors were hurt. Both groups of Chinese were presumed to be communists. .AU._nine.members of-the hunt- ing party were seized by three separate Chinese patrols but seven were released after being brought together. Authoritis sought to negotiate for the release of the two oth- ers. The sailors were1 traveling from Tangku toward Tientsin when their jeep was stopped by seven Chinese who attempted to take their weapons. The Chinese opened the 'sailors re- sisted, and soon a larger group of Chinese emerged from the brush to enter the fight. The sailors managed to wheel their jeep about and retreat to Tangku no names were given. announced the appointments. Dr. V. A. Hargis, head of the Tulsa district for six years, was counter intelligence agents in ef transferred to the pastorate of J forts to c'-ack the .bombing of twt denazification board headquarer Saturday, "about 10 were seized over the week-end in widespread searches in southern Germany. Two cachs of arms were un- earthed at Donauthal, southwest of Ulm, and the remainder in southern Bavaria. The officials said, however, the seizures were not connected with the Struttgart bombings. A high ranking American army officer said he expected more bombing as "uprotests against the denazi fication program." "The American military govern a widespread out break against the denazificatioi the official, who ma> not be named, said in Berlin. U. S. military and German criminal police worked wit! ting the dispute which led to the strike, throwing thousands of men out of work in other busin- esses and dislocating the daily lives of many inhabitants. The Peiping, however, the govern- I has a total membership of ment acknowledged yesterday, and battles or skirmishes were scattered along 1GO miles of the Peiping-Hankow railroad south of Peiping. The Yenan (communist) radio said that volunteers had joined Red forces in the last two weeks and that guerrilla tactics Ada High Band Places At Norman were crippling the government's i NORMAN, Okla., Oct. 21, military machine far to the south, CWo------'" '-----1 particularly in Kiangsu province just north of Shanghai and Nan- king. KANSAS GRANGE LEADER EMPORIA, Kas., Oct. 21 Funeral services will be held to- morrow for Daniel James, 71, former overseer of the Kansas Shawnee's highschool band won the class "A" competition over Ardmore. only other school in that class, during the University of Oklahoma's band day Satur- day. The university also announced today .that Pauls Valley was the winnpr 'n nlaco "15" winner in class "B Other 'an' W dled schools placed in this order: Nor- r- man, Drumright, Seminole, Ada, WEATHER tonight and Tuesday with rain east and south tonight and continuing in east Tuesday; continued mild except becoming cooler panhandle Tues- dav. i a, day at his farm home southwest Chickasha. Hobart, Anadarko of Emporia. James, a farmer and stockman, was grange overseer from 1925 until 1936. He was born at Osage City, Kas., Sept. 13, 1875. Survivors include his widow, two sons, Harvey James of Em- poria and Capt. Howard James of Lawton, Okla.; a daughter, Mrs. Fred Lynn, Emporia, and three brothers, John and Evan, Emporia. ad Sam James, Mara- mec, Okla. and Madill. Kingfisher took first in class followed by- Fox, Kingston, Bowlegs, Chandler, Hollis. Elgin, Mulhall, Tuttle, and Dundee. Winning bands in each class will be invited to play during the university homecoming game with the University of Missouri November 16. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. the deadline for action on the bakery products. Officials however, that rather than remove ceilings by that route, which would require a finding that the products plentiful supply, the petitions themselves may be denied and an independent decontrol order is- sued on the government's own in- itiative. This was the- procedure followed in lifting controls over meat one week ago today. Dr. Mayes Leaves Public Health Work Will Move Family To Lindsay When Locates House Dr. R. 'H. Hayes, former head of the Pontotoc county health unit, was in Ada Sunday visiting his family. He resigned recently to enter private practice of medi- Two Die In Weekend Traffic Accidents Oklahoma's Highway Death Toll Equal Now To Total For All Of 1945 By The Associated Press Two 'persons were killed in traffic fatalities over the week- end, bringing- Oklahoma's high- way death toll for 1946 to equalling the total number of persons killed in' all of 1945 on state roads. To this date last year only 298 the First church at Ada in the only change in district superin- tendents. The Rev. Virgil Alex- ander who has held the Ada post the past five years, will replace Hargis. New appointments include: McAIester District Ada First, V. A. Hargis, former superintendent, Tulsa district. Ada, Asbury, A .A. Puckett. Allen, Atwood, W. G. Beasley. Antlers, Littleton Fowler (Ada High graduate) from West Ok- lahoma conference. Bennington, R. T. Blackburn (former Ada First pastor) supply, from Broken Bow. Broken Bow, F. L. Einscl, from Coalgate. Centrahoma, J. J. Land. and a U. S. military jail whicl some investigators thought to be connected lo the approaching Germany trial of H j a 1 m a i Schacht, truculent old banke who was acquitted at Nuernberg No one was hurt. Schacht, under arrest in a Ger man prison some distance from the one which was bombed, shout, ed to 'a reporter from his ccl that the bombings were "obvious, ly a democratic protest agains the Hitlerite measures of the Ger- mans who want to try me again.' The city of Stuttgart offered a reward for information American authorities disclosec that an American motor pool was destroyed in an explosion in the CoalEate J G f i area early this month Coalgate, J. G. Patterson, for- anri that w.pl, hpf' mer army chaplain. Durant Wesley, 'A. W. Oliver, from Fittstown. Fittstown, H. L. Crawford from Kingston. Konawci, Keith Kelly. Pickett circuit, Cecil Holding Maud, W. S. Dabneyt Roff circuit, Raymond Cooley from Centrahoma. Sasakwa, T. J. Durham, from Fort Gibson-Okay. Stonewall, Franklin Simmons, from Cameron circuit. Tishomingo, Wallace M. Crutch- field. McAIester District Calvin-Stuart, J. W. Quaid, from St. Louis. Heavener, L. E. Shackleford, former army chaplain (former as- sistant pastor of First Methodist deaths were recorded. This I church here, later pastor at month there have been 19 deaths Stonewall and Tishomingo before 'chaplain St. Louis, Hugh H. Harrison, from Calvin. Muskogee District Boynton-Council Hill, W. E. Jared, from Sasakwa. Haskell, A. D. Gregory, from Stonewall. Westville, Harvey Human, from Coweta-Porter (former pastor of Asbury in Other Leonard Cronin, former pastor of Asbury here, later army chap- lain, and recently at Talihina in traffic accidents. Dr. Harold Charles Jedlicka, 49, Midwest City dentist, died yesterday of injuries received in an automobile-truck collision on the outskirts of Oklahoma City. Albert Gus Myers, 68, Oklaho- ma City, was struck and killed by an automobile in Oklahoma City Saturday. -------------X------------ Cotton Futures In Hew Down Break NEW ORLEANS, Oct. 21 Cotton futures broke the limit of 200 points on- some months here today at the'opening of the mar- ket, after. Saturday's suspension of trading to allow liquidation of holdings of a large New Or- leans operator. The tone was irregular to a bale lower with May, July and Oct. reaching the a bale limit for one day. Heavy buying marked the re- opening. Traders considered it a continuance of selling of the past three sessions when the market hit, the limit on each day. Whether other brokers lost in the week-end liquidation of the large operator was undetermined, as no records were made public by the exchange. He will move' -his family to I The New Orleans market re- Lindsay when he is able to locate sumed operations today along a house. He is leaving public health work entirely, he says, and will not, as was reported in The iNews with the New York, Chicago and Dallas exchanges. Opening prices were: Dec 32.60 cents a pound, Mch 32.21, May of last week, help with part time 31.02, and Jly 29.45 and Oct 26.36. direction of a Garvin county unit. -------------K------------ Greater returns for amount in- Read The News Classified Ads. vested. Ada News Want Ads, and that a week before the Stutt- gart bombings, an American army officer's car was demolished south of here by an infernal machine The investigators thought both incidents "possibly may some connection." Schacht, who was Hitler's finance minister and reichsbunk president early in the Nazi re- gime, said he learned of the bombings early today. "It could not be a plot to kill would want to kill The tall, heavy jowled German said fiercely. "I am no Nazi. They are protesting against the illegal measures of these Germans who today are trying to imitate Hitler. "I am being detained illegally. These Germans are stupid fool's. Criminals. Rogues. Hitlerites. Who ever heard of a man being tried twice on the same charges? This is not democracy, this is Hitler- ism." transferred to Western Oklahoma conference. Bonner Teeter, former Pickett pastor, left without appointment to attend Perkins School of Theology. Shelton Wildcat Drills At Drilling has already begun on the W. T. Shelton and Central Pipeline company's wildcat test in the Lula area. The well is their No. 1 Foster in the NE NE SW of 33-3n-8e. Monday morning it was report- ed at feet. On-Job Vets Asked To Attend Meeting Tonight's Is To Organize Correspondence Work For Small Group Classwork Veterans who are taking on- the-job training and whose occu- pations are not such as to have enough of them for a class in their subjects to be at Ada high school tonight at o'clock. J. B. Walters, director of the program here through which the required classwprk for on-job trainees ..is provided, announced today that an ICS representative would be at the meeting to help chart courses. Correspondence courses with supervised study will be provided for the vets whose class groups aren't large enough for separate classes. Already classes are organized and functioning for several groups in which there are enough vets to form a full class." Glen Johnson May Be Here Later This Week Glen Johnson, democratic nom- inee for congress, was ill Satur- day and could not meet his en- gagement to speak in Ada. He plans to come to Ada the latter part of this week, if he recovers in time, his organization here an- nounced. A new electronic device makes visible records of speech sounds. The spoken word is reproduced as a pattern upon a moving belt or upon the screen of a cathode- ray tube. Anyone trained in in- terpreting the pattern can repeat the sounds aloud. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Bryan Fur- long, Mr. and Mrs. Carroll Col- lier and Mr. and Mrs. Gene Bal- lard were visitors in Ardmore during the past weekend. 1 Company headquarters here said the flight cancellation was effective for a 24-hour period be- ginning'from the time the strike started at a.m. Oper- ations plans beyond the 24-hour period were not disclosed. Only One Picket Mne Other airlines were not affect- ed by the first of its kind in the history of com- mercial aviation. Strikers threw up a picket line at Kansas City maintenance shops tout there were no reports of similar action elsewhere. _The AFL Airlines Pilots Asso- ciation, whose members fly TWA's Skymasters and Constel- lations, demanded wage increases which the company said would make top pilots' pay year-' ly. The union estimated its de- mand .it monthly for first pilots. Called "Last Recourse" In an advance statement issued for release one minute after the strike deadline, David L. Behncke, union president, term- ed the action a "last recourse" ef- fort to settle a wage dispute more than a year old. Considerable confusion pre- vailed earlier today when the union, after announcing the deadline, said shortly after 2 a.m. that the strike had been moved up to 3 a.m. It was several min- utes after that hpur before the press officer for the union ad- vised all news services that the original time still stood. At a.m., Thomas Bell, pub- lic relations representative for TWA, said the company had re- ceived "no notification of anv strike action" and that Jack Fryc, TWA president, had retired for Ihe night. Got Ultimatum Saturday Earlier Frye had said Behncke confronted him Saturday morn- ing with a 30-hour "ultimatum" to meet the union's demands. The first hint of the impending strike came last night with reports that the pilots were being ordorod out. After these were confirmed Os- Wald Ryan, acting chairman of the Civil Aeronautics Board, said the possibility of government seizure of the airline would be discussed at a board meoting to- day should the walkout mate- rialize. It was the first strike of its kind against a major airline in aviation history. As the strike deadline arrived, national airport attaches reported no sign of any activity to indi- cate that the strike was on. How- ever, there were no scheduled TWA flights out of Washington betw8cn o'clock 'last night and a.m. today. Ada Realtors Will Meet With Council Invited By City Manager To Discuss Building Code, Zoning Plans Members of the Ada Real Es- .ate board, building contractors and allied contractors, and real jroperly owners have been asked by City Manager W. E. Hansen o meet with the city council Monday night at on the sec- ond floor of the convention hall. The object of the joint meet- ng is to discuss plans for an ade- quate building code and zoning ordinance for both business and buildings. -----------------------fc---------------------- Greater returns for amount in- 'csted. Ada News Want Ads. TH' PESSIMIST nr Vlnli Jr. Don't w o r r y, ever'thing will come out in th' includin' th' color an' th' buttons. We wonder how a lot o' 'fellers, who say that thinkin' is painful, know.   

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