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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 20, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Coming of the mobile cancer detection .unit to Ado Monday offers an opportunity for free examination that could be priceless to those with cancer in therefore Average Net Sept., Paid Circulation 8575 Member: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 158 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1-J46 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Cancer Clinic Here Monday To Give Tests Mobile Unit Ready To Give Free Tests to All Interested Persons A cancer clinic will be held Prices For Major Foods Into Whirl Indications Showing Up Consumer Resistance Beginning To Develop Against Products With Higher Sales Prices CHICAGO, Oct. removal of OPA con- trols has sent the price pattern for most major items in the American food budget into a dizzy whirl and there were in- dications today of growing consumer resistance to those pro- here tomorrow (Monday; at the ducis which turn up with a higher sales tag ri.-st Christian church. Regis- tration will be at 8 o'clock Mon-1 ine impact ot sudden decontrols hit the markets an er- day morning, and free examina-1 ratic blow and it was too early to tell how the food dollar of .ions wnl be given, starting at 1 thfi neap future cQmpare buying ,_ week. o'clock in the afternoon. An invitation is extended to ar.y one to take this examina- tion free. It is that people have cancer in its early stages without knowing it. By learning that cancer or poten- tial cancer is present and treat- ing ii early it can often be cur- ed before any permanent damage is done. A public meeting at 8 o'clock Monday evening in the church permit any one to learn about the disease that is now killing so people through- out the country. This clinic is to be followed by organizinc a county unit ot the American Cancer society. College Gets Shop Buildings Three Former Frederick Air Base Buildings to Furnish Needed Shop Space East Central has received three buildings from the Army Air base at Frederick, Oklahoma. These ........._____ ____. buildings are 150 feet long and Mrs. Julia M. Smith is the chair- 25 fect WJde. They have asphalt man for this county and will tlle roofs. walls of sheathing cov- head the organization work. A field army, consisting of the members in all the counties in the state, is to be formed. Mrs. Smith hopes to make Pontotoc one of the leading counties in this field army set-up. N Membership in the Cancer Society will be classified as Founders, those donating or more: sustaining members, those contributing S25 or more annually: contributing members, those who contribute or more Ennually; and unit members, those who join the local units by paying annual dues of The field army will detect cases of cancer, keep up the pro- paganda for cancer control, and assist in every way they can in keeping this disease from crip- pling and killing human beings. The county units will consist o! a commander, appointed by the state and district command- ers: a medical advisor, and unit members. Trading in Cotton Futures Suspended In Three Markets NEW YORK. Oct. 19 ton futures trading was suspend- ed on the New York. New Orleans and Chicago exchanges today fol- lowing three days of sharp price breaks, a federal inquiry into the market's position and senatorial charges of a "bear raid." Heavy liquidation had sliced ered with tar paper under white asbestos shingles, and they are equipped with plumbing and a sprinkler system for fire control. They will be placed on concrete foundations and will have con- crete floors. Oscar Parker, East Central bus- iness1 manager, and Hugh Morris, head of industrial arts, have just returned from Frederick, where they inspected the buildings. Parker says that they are very similar in appearance to the vet- erans' housing units now being erected on the lower campus. The three buildings will be used to house the industrial arts shops. Now the college will be able to use thousands of dollars worth of new shop equipment that has been stored because prior to this time there has been no place to install it. Nqrris says that the light, well- ventilated buildings will be much better for shops than the The major staple decontrolled to be relative- ly plentiful in butcher shops across the nation in a few days but at prices above old OPA ceil- ings. Dealers, consumers and trade associations have joined1 hands in efforts to keep prices down. The prices of all livestock shot up, despite an avalanche of re- ceipts, and record highs were es- tablished in so-.r.e markets. Both cattle and hog prices, however, experienced downward trends when offerings were the heaviest. In the commodity markets, the price of soybeans, lard and flax also went rjp. Many Commodities Drop However, a long list of com- modities dropped i'n price, in- cluding poultry, eggs, butter, wheat and cotton. Trade sources attributed the butter drop to the removal of ceilings on other fats and oils. Reports of buyers resistance to higher meat prices came from many cities. In some instances, resistance was building up basement Hall. quarters in The new buildings will'be ship- ped to Ada in the near future and will be erected on the strip of campus between the presi- dent's home and the Mayhue ten- nis courts. This location will place the shops where noise from them will not disturb other class work. Driskill Appointed District Judge To Succeed Crawford ticipated Monday. Rumors in New Orleans trade circles that a large New Orleans operator had been unable to meet heavy margin requirements in New York were without confir- mation here. But the agriculture depart- exchange au- ment's commodity thority, requesting details of ac- counts between the close of busi- ness Oct. 15 and the close Oct. 18, said these reports would show tne identity of all persons active in the markets and the nature volume of their trading. Chairman Elmer Thomas (D- Okia.> of the Senate Agricuture committee announced in Wash- ington that a subcommittee will open an investigation Thursday into the price- break, agriculture department officials will be asked -o explain the scope of their in- quiry, he said, and officials of farm organizations also will be invited to testify. Managers of the New York ex- change said only that the closing "would best serve the interests of the public and the exchange." A spokesman described it as a -breathing spell to analyze the Situation." At New Orleans, exchange president D. T. Mangel. Jr., in a statement referring to the "con- i'-sion and uncertainty" of recent said, ''The rumor afloat that certain people are in financial difficulty is, to our mind, greatly exaggerated, all contracts in our clearing house are margined up to our full requirements." The senator, describing the drop as a "bear c.-.a.-ged that the exchanges. branch houses, customers' and clients'' had planned "to drive cotton prices down to the lowest possible point." New York exchange managers corned any such involvement and should Thomas present "any tangible evidence" it would in- vestigate and take any remedial artion required. Mi.inc is closer to Africa than Florida. appointed Saturday by Governor. Kcrr to fill the unexpired term of Tal Crawford. Judge Craw- ford resigned to accept a position with the government as a judge in Germany. He is either on his way to Europe or may have ar- rived there by this time. .Judge Driskill took the oath of office before Claude Bobbitt, county clerk, Saturday, and will be in his judicial chambers Mon- day ready for business. Crawford left less than two weeks ago when orders to report in Washington came close on news that he had been accepted by the civil justice department of the War Crimes commission for judicial service at Nuernberg, Germany. He served Ponlotoc county 10 years as county judge and would have completed next January 12 years as district judge. He failed to win renominatioo for a fourth term as district judge. Driskill has been assistant county attorney, county judge, returned after overseas service with the army in time to make a successful race for district judge nomination in the July primary. W.G. Moser, Former Ada 'Resident, Dies Was in Business Here 1913-1923, Then Moved To Skiatook W. G. Moscr, who was in busi- against higher prices for dairy products. The American Meat Institute, saying prices would be higher until demand is met, urged housewives to "shop around for the best buys." Some dealers re- fused to buy meat at high prices and the president of the New Jersey Independent Butchers' as- sociation urged consumers to "strike" until meat prices come down "within reason." present Phone Campaign On, Butter Science I In Helena, housewives started a chain telephone call movement" buyers strikes against butter prices of 89 cents to a pound. A sim- ilar campaign among women's groups was started against a two cents milk price boost to 18 cents a quart in Portland, Ore.- Consumers were reported "passing up" moat in many' cities when confronted with prices ranging up to a pound for steak, for roast beef, 75 cents for hamburger and 59 cents for weiners. Food articles which compete .directly with meat, such as poul- try, closed the week with price Fowl, selling at 35 cents a pound in the Chicago wholesale market Monday, drop- ped to 29 cents at the week's close. Eggs also weakened, and trade sources explained that with more meat available a diminished de- mand for eggs was expected. At Chicago a grade of eggs which brought 57-60 cents a dozen wholesale Monday sold at 53-57 cents as the week closed. See More Oleo, Fats Butler cracked, badly on Thurs- day, reacting to removal of ceil- ings on fats and oils, the agricul- ture department, in its weekly summary, said, "one of the fac- tors of weakening the market was the possibility'of freer sup- District OEA Meeting Here Coming Friday Will Be 31st Annual Con- vention of Teachers Of East Central District East Central State college and the City of Ada are preparing to welcome next Thursday even- ing and Friday teachers and school administrators of the 11- county district in the annual dis- trict Oklahoma Education As- sociation. Oliver D. Johns, Seminole sup- erintendent, is president of the teachers assemble for the 31st annual meeting. Special speakers are Cong. Brooks Hays, and Clayton Rand, widely known Gulfpoft, Miss., publisher. Special Entertainments School administrators will be guests of the Ada Chamber of Commerce Thursday evening. Classroom teachers are invited by the Ada Junior Chamber of Commerce to. be guests of the Jaycees at a dance in the college gym Friday night. Friday will be Homecoming Day and will feature, as in oth- er years still well remembered here, an afternoon football game, this time between the' fast-step- ping East Central Tigers and the Henderson eleven, from Arkan- as. Departmental sessions will meet Friday morning with talks, general discussions and features for each group. Two General Sessions The first general session be- gins Friday morning at Clayton Rand will speak and E. E. Battles, Henryetta superinten- dent and O. E. A. president, will discuss amendments proposed by that organization; The second general session be- gins at p. m. Cong. Hays and Dr. A. Linscheid. president of East Central State college, will speak. This convention, the second since the end of War II combat, will bring back to East Central many more former service men who will assemble with their fellow teachers for the first time in the postwar period. Truman Is Expected to Join Vandenberg, Connally With Strong Backing For Byrnes U. S. Is Not Using Softer Policy In Handling of Japs By DUANE HENNESSY TOKYO, Oct. 19 MacArthur described tonight as a "complete fallacy" any sugges- tion that the United States has adopted, a new, softer policy to- wards Japan. The statement, issued by a spokesman for MacArthur, was prompted by the repercussions of an American British Russian clash in the Allied Control Coun- cil on Wednesday. U. S. Asking Cooperation Delegate to U. N. Would End Charges, Counter- Charges; Meeting Opens Wednesday By MAX HARRELSON NEW YORK, Oct. 19 a new bid for cooperation among the major powers in the United Nations Security Council, U. S. Delegate Herschel V. Johnson to- day called for an end of "wild and 'unsubstantiated charges, harsh accusations and counter- charges within the council." Speaking before the foreign policy association as delegates from 51 nations gathered for Wednesday's opening of the U. N. General Assembly, Johnson crit- icized what he called "misuse of the council for propaganda pur- poses" and too frequent use of the veto. People Have Misgivings He declared that people throughout the world '.'react with deep misgivings" to the way the Security Council has operated so far and added: y "All of us, I think, feel the need of substituting a spirit of cooper- ation for one of recrimination. We can, if we will, change the climate of international inter- couse my trying harder to win the peace than to win a point in debate." Johnson declared that the big powers had special responsibili- ties as well as special powers and warned that the "great Hope of the charter becomes'dim" if the powers ever, use, their position "to compromise the' principles of thg charter itself for their own ad- vantage at the expense of others." Obligation to Each Power "We feel that the 'Obligation under the charter is for each of the permanent members to seek ways of concurring .and thus meeting the he said. "Thus requires a spirit of accommo'da- tion and the recognition of the ultimate goal of peace and secur- ity with justice." John Foster Dulles, alternate U. S. delegate to the General As- sembly and a leading republican authority on foreign affairs, de- clared in a speech at the same meeting that the United States must continue' its bi-partisan for- OH, THE PITY OF IT! No one was hurt in the accident pictured above, but it was a tragic happening just the same because those four smashed cars were all brand new. En route from the De- troit factory to Mason City, la., the huge auto transport hit a via- duct.at Moline, III Top of the front car was completely sheared off. Administration Junks Truman Limit on Spending for Federal Works Projects for This Year Steelman Order Allows T4 Agencies to Spend Extra on Construction; Economy Program Jolted ..-.WASHINGTON, administration to- night' junked President Truman's limit4on federal public works projects with an order allowing 14 agencies to spend an extra on construction in the year ending June 30. Eisenhower Back In U. S. Praises Yank Troops in Germany WASHINGTON, Oct. Dwight D. Eisenhower, returning from a four-week Eu- eign policy and must make it pPean inspection trip, said today c far to the'wTrld that i he was more than gratified" at deal to the world that Ameii- improvements shown by Ameri- can -occupation troops in Ger- cans today stand where their forebears stood, believing that men are endowed by their creator At that meeting, the-Russian I with certain inalienable rights, requested information and seeking 'the recognition of those rights everywhere." Meanwhile, advance contin- gents of the General Assembly on what the Japanese govern- ment had done about election law violations. Ambassador George C. Atchi-: delegates held preliminary con- .Tv vthi i v'c ririlitinnl j._ son, Jr., MacArthur's political adviser and chairman of the council replied that the. elections last April were fair and honest, that the Japanese government should be complimented upon them, and added: "The time has come when Jap- plies of margarine and cooking anese aims are practically sy- fats 'now that ceilings have been with removed." A grade of butter which brought 88V4 to 89 cents a pound in the Chicago wholesale mar- ket Monday was down to 80 to cents at the week's close. Cheese prices did not slump as sharply as butter and the agri- culture department noted "cheese and butter prices are now definitely out of line." Diamond Concern Sues lor Big Sum LITTLE ROCK, Oct. The Diamond Corporation of America, holders of a 50-year' lease on the Pike County Dia- mond Mines, filed suit in chan- cery court here today demanding in damages from Glenn L. Martin, Baltimore, Md., air- plane manufacturer. Tile action was an answer and ness here from 1913 until 1923, I cross-complaint to Martin's re- died at Skiatook Friday after-' nonymous with allied aims." W. MacMahon Ball, British Commonwealth member, chal- lenged this immediately as "ex- pressions of cordiality and confi- dence towards the present Japan- ese with which "I should not wish to. identify my- self." The Russian delegate said he was surprised. Tonight's statement by a Mac- Arthur spokesman followed re- ceipt here of a copy of the New York Herald Tribune in which Atcheson was criticized editori- ally on the groun4s of taking sides with the Japanese against the Allies. IWEATHER! OKLAHOMA: warmer west. Fair Sunday, noon. Funeral services are to be held in St. Louis, Mo. He was 76. He is survived by a daughter, Miss Helen Moser, now assistant professor of home economics at Cornell university, Ithica, N. Y., and a sister-in-law, Miss Adrian- naVreeland, Ada; Miss Vrecland is in St. Louis for the funeral ser- I trolling interest. cent charges that he had invested in the corporation and that its affairs were being "mis- managed" by the controlling stockholders. The airplane builder was ac- cused in the cross complaint of attempting to wreck the corpora- tion in order "to acquire a con- Mr. Moser was born in Hanni- bnl. Mo. He was married to Ada Vroolnnd in 1901. She died in The family came to Ada in 1913 and Helen Moser was graduated from Ada high school in 1.920, In 1923 he moved to Skiatook and continued in business until he re- tired some time ago. He had been in ill health for 15 years. Read The News Classified Ads. Martin made similar charges against the corporation in obtain- ing a temporary injunction two weeks ago prohibiting the com- pany's officers from withdrawing any funds from a special account in a St. Louis bank. The corporation's answer asked the court to dissolve the order and dismiss the original com- plaint. Ray E. Blick, Chicago, and Allen B. Williams, St. Louis, incorporated the firm in Arkan- sas, Nov. 7, 1945. Fitzhugh School Opening Delayed Opening of the Fit'zh.ugh schools has been postponed for one week, according to Ray E. Harrell, superintendent. Tile schools will resume their fall classes on Monday, October 28. The date had originally been set for tomorrow but because of several circumstances it has been decided to delay the opening. Harrell is serving his first year as superintendent at Fitz- hugh and Thos P. Daniel is prin- cipal. Led Other States Pennsylvania, of all the states, the biggest percent- age of its 1940 population to the armed per cent of its total. Unexploded bombs caused eva- cuation of areas in London, but don't fear car just get Sinnett-Meaders' service. 10-20-lt ferences with their staffs to map. plans, while other delegates sped to New York by sea and air. One of the largest groups will arrive early Monday when the giant liner Queen Elizabeth docks with 15 delegations, including the Russian, Belgian, Bolivian, Chin- ese, Chechoslovakian, Dominican Republic, Norwegian, Lebanese, Syrian, Polish and Turkish. This group will icnlude Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov, his deputy, Andrei Y. Vishinsky, President Paul Henri-Spaak of the General Assembly, Philip J. Noe-lBaker, British minister of state, and Jan Masaryk, foreign minister of Czechoslovakia. Main activity over the week- end was expected to be campaign- ing of New. York City and San Francisco to win the permanent home of the U. N. for their re- spective areas. many. In view of what we have been through in the last year and a half their advances in training and discipline were he told reporters. The trip completed his inspec- tions of major army.overseas in- stallations as war department chief of staff, except for Alaska. 1 This will let these agencies alone spend a total of 000 and more increase are on the way for additional agencies. The order WHS issued by Re- conversion Director John R. Steelman. It does not list specific is'tip to the agen- cies. It means the econ- omy program mapped last Aug- ust by President Truman is at least partially out the window. Had Weeded Out Some That program called, among other things, for holding, down federal public works expendi- tures to in the cur- rent fiscal year, compared with approved by cong- ress. It imposed a 60-day mora- torium on government projects and ordered n weeding out of the less important ones. Congressmen bellowed when some of their pet projects wore hit. And there already had been some whittling away at the re- strictions. The lid on flood con- He said he was "too tired" to go trol expenditures was tilted up- Murray Says Higher Wage Need Obvious CLEVELAND, Oct. 19 serting "it is obvious to all that higher wages to meet higher costs are absolutely CIO president Philip Murray said late today "the course of action by the CIO on the wage question will be passed upon by national body nonets adminish-ator at its 1O" HHtlClS adminiStl alOI. there this year. Eisenhower said American and Russian troops got along very well and he saw "very little to worry about in personal rela- He described'American occupa- tion forces in Germany as "ade- quate for what they were put there to although "we could want for more in numbers and efficiency at times." He found their morale "sur- prisingly high" although are mostly young men and want to be home." "The housing situation is not very good for he reported. With Mfs. Eisenhower, who ac- companied him on the trip, Eis- enhower returned from Frank- furt in his army plane by way of the Azores and Bermuda. Soil Coal Reported Al Record Figure WASHINGTON, Oct. 19 A record production of soft coal since the navy took over the pits last May was announced tonight by Capt. H. H. Collisson, the coal ward on Thursday from 000 to Others Being; Received Steelman said in a statement tonight the budget bureau is re- viewing limits on the interior de- partment's reclamation bureau, the commerce department, and the civil works of the army en- gineers, which include rivers and harbors as well as flood control improvements. "It is he said, "that final action on this program can be taken next week." The agencies given the clearance tonight are the navy, interior, agriculture, jus- tice, treasury and state depart- ments, Veterans .Administration, federal .Works Agency, Recon- struction Finance Corporation, Maritime Commission, Tennessee Valley Authority, Panama Canal, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and war department branches; at its convention Nov. 18. In a press conference which ended a session of more than three hours with the board of the United Auto Work- ers board necessarily will be their own and will not reflect any na- tional CIO policy whatsoever." Asked whether there would be any coordination of wage de- mands by various CIO unions, he replied: "That is a reasonable as- sumption." The UAW board originally was scheduled to conclude a two-day wage policy meeting today, with Murray sitting in on the final session this afternoon, but before leaving for Pittsburgh tonight Murray said "the board thought it was a sufficiently serious prob- lem to extend its discussion through In a report to Secretary of In- terior Krug, Collisson said bitum- inous production since the navy took charge on May 21 totals tons, against 000 tons for the comparable per- iod last year. Because of a strike in the spring, the total to date for all 194S is tons be- low 1945. But Collisson said the June, July, August and September out- put was the greatest for those months in mining history. Usually they are a period of slack opera- tions. It takes six tons of coal in blast furnaces, steel mills, power mills, coke ovens and generator plants to produce one automobile or truck weighing one and three- quarter- tons. Two Oil Tests In Disappointing Show One in North, One in East Side of County Hove Light Shows Last week brought some dis- appointment in oil tests in Pon- totoc county. The Norris-Crowell No. 1 Bayne, NE SW SW of 16-5-6, edge of tiie Conservation pool, drilled to set pipe and per- forated to test a gas. sand at feet. Operators said Siiturdny that the test showed water and that drilling is tem- porarily abandoned. The Dillon No. 1 Byrri, NW SE SW of 35-3-7, north of Stonewall, a wildcat, drilled into the sec- ond Bromide sand, made a drill- stem test and reported a small show of oil. The operators said Saturday that they were yet to decide on the next step. I- U. N. Speech Is Awaited Presidc'nt Has Commended Byrnes Foreign Policy Address Reference To Russia WASHINGTON, Oct. 19 Senator Vimdenberg (R-Mich) took a strong stand' beside Sec-. rotary of State Byrnes tonight for a "patient but firm" policy to- ward Russia amid indications President Truman might speak up along the same lines next week. As lop U. S. ad- viser at the Paris peace confer- up Byrnes' Friday night report on that mooting with a radio appeal for support of "America's bipartisan foreign there were these develop- ments at the White House: 1. It was announced that Presi- dent Truman's address opening the United Nations general as- sembly in New York Wednesday will be a 25-minute speech and that he will fly there to deliver it. Truman Okayed Byrnes Speech 2. At was disclosed that Mr. Truman had approved Byrnes' Friday speech in advance; had listened to it on the radio, and had telephoned the secretary of state immcdiaUy uf towards to ex- press warm commendation. 3. The president, Byrnes, Un- dersecretary of State Dean Ache- son and Senator Austin American delegate-designate to U. N., conferred for more than two hours on "United Nations matters." The White House said nothing about the content of Mr. Tru- man's U. N. speech. It announced only that the president will fly to New York Wednesday, deliver the address about p.m. (EST) p.m. CST) and return to Washington by train after attend- ing an assembly reception. More Than Just Welcome I-liijh government officials ob- served, however, Ihal 
                            

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