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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 14, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 14, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             The candidate who could say only that he'd "try to make you a hand" has a better chance to make good than many campaigners now lavish with promises they won't be able to fulfill. A viTJur Net Pale! t'I r dilution 8575 Audit Itnrrnit nf t'lecu tun THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION IS.'l ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1046 t'lVIC CUNTS TIIK COPY Hansen Takes Over Early As City Manager of This City Startj Moving Fast Chocking Up on City Equipment And Properties, Colli It 'Just Looking Around' T. lliui.scn, who before being sworn in as city manager of Ada was city mmingcr at Monterrey, Calif., a city that had S.i.OOO on bund when lie took office there and more than (KK) when he resigned, started to work in Ada Monday morn- ing, which was a clay earlier than he was scheduled to replace Acting City Malinger Luke B. Dodds. Monday So Is Life Speeded Up These Days Lets Than Two Hours For Doc to Fly to Dcnison, Get Patient, Operate By HKI.ICN fllOKKI.ANI) With a sharp staccato the telo- t'hono rrnig in the office of Dr. W. Ci. Peterson al Ihe Sugg Chine-. Ho WHS heard lo say, "is yju. referring lo brother. Herbert Peterson, v. do is in business in Oonison, "ileib" explained that ho had ;i terrific "tummy ache" and thai Tins doing the queerest things, us nil the pain moving lo !r.s left side. "Say no more, just your suit .said the little doctor. He railed the airport and told them to warm his plane up. Like eak of lightening he was out and on his way to Dcnison. greeting wns, "Come on vuu are going lo hnvo n gi-ney appendectomy." Wit tiie doctor, patient and sui i-.-isiv quickly packed inti '.no plane and on their way buel to Ada. In a matter of n few minutes Herb was on Ihe opcrnling table !..-itis Ins "trjeky Al happened in' less than two iiours. from the time Ihc tele phone rang Ihc first timo unti He: b dreaming bnek ;n his hospital room. Hr rritliy believes thosr sutures they are using, fo ll-.e next morning he was v. around investigating what reully docs go on in a Four days later, on Sunday, Dr !vto.-.'on bundled his brother up it-it him in his plain1, and deliv- eieii him sjifolv lo his dooi t -.vithoiit his appendix Terminal Leave Pay For Enlisted Men lo Arrive n Mn these His hoy. ciuei fiat, Begins So far :ir, he has been able to learn. Arthur K. Hot-old, IIH's SoiitSi MisM.ssippi, is tin1 first here to receive Ic-rininal pay under tho bill proviri iiie men pay for former pnlist- rci rw n. He is under.staiitlahl.y cheerful over yetting the bond and check and fig-.iros that hundreds of olli- former service men will be K'-Hir.g theirs soon, after n period of unerrtainty as lo just when leave pay would start com- :nc in. He: old spent 5 months as n ca- det at Kast Central Stale college, then spent a goodly number of Ti.onths in the Southwest I'ac-ific .11 :m anti-aircraft unit. His bond wai for nnd ;iicrr a check for Tbp ehoeks under Ihe provis- ions nindo by congress are for v. h.'ilevcr amount there is com- :nc to veteran above an 'even rri'incv' bond amount. Veterans in Stale To Get More Homes OKLAHOMA CITY. Oct. State OI'A rent executives .-'.-i- to see that Veterans get billll them under i'ii- l-'edei.-il llnui.iiig Adminiiitra- '.i'U-i'.-. pi mi itv in-ngriim. A mooting hero dis- cussed plans for slrlel enforco- ii.i-nt of the regulations for both .-entalK and home pun-liases. In wen- Charles H. Car- iii-n, tale rent executive anil iJif.1- area ihreelors -Kd Mar- Tulsa; liobert A. Thomas, Mi'.V.eslcr; Don L. Nicholson, and f'harles Unrtor, Oklahoma City. Arch Props, re- Ki'iniil OPA rent irxoriitivu from nlso was present. PAVLS City olficials are seeking eiti- :'i ti s reaction lo proposoc.1 instal- meters in Pauls Valley. WAI.TKHS. (Jet. M -Civile eovinly rlerk of Cot'ton rminlv. Ims i effei.-livo C >t t :il tu enter the ministry. morning looking over cily equipment und talking with city employees. "Just looking was the way I-lan.son put il. Arrived Sunday Hanson, his wife and two yetlr olrl baby, arrived in Ada Sunday and will make their home at the Aldridgo hotel until ho finds a place to rent. 'Later he expects to purchase a homo. lie has uli-ciuly started chock- ing on the possibilities of putting tho signal lights working and left the impression that he would have them working within a short time. At Ihe present time, ho doesn't, know just what meth- od ho will use in pulling the lights into working order. Will Standardize Meters It is tho plan of the new city manager to slnndiircliy.o all wfitcr meters used in Ada, which will in turn save tho city money by nol having lo curry purls for va- ried makes of walcr meters. Many technical problems arise constantly in the maintenance In operations of the water system, the disposal plant and other city proporlios und Ada (loos nol have a oily engineer, bul Hanson's rec- ord indicates he is capable of uiulllng this right along with his oilier duties. On u form presented to the sislunt cily clerk Monday morn- ing, mi excellent efficiency ruling was shown. Tho form was 'pre- pared by Iho army. Preventive maintenance I.H one of the things thai Manager Han- son believes la most in the opera- lion of a city and he says thai he is going to practice il in Ada, no mailer whal Iho previous policy has been. Tho now manager wns nol at ull pleased with the things he found during nn inspection ol eily uyopcrly mid made plans im- mediately to change them. Already IVIukinff Plans He has a number of things that he is already working on and ex- pects to see some results in the near future bccau.se ho knows exactly how hti intends lo handle Iheiii. Not once did ho crltlcis'. Iho way the city has been oper- ated, but ho did sny thai there will bo some changes made. Munnger Hanson mot and talk- ed with heads of the various de- partments of city government and requested that they lako time out from their regular rou- tine work nnd prepare- a list of equipment and other items need- ed now by Hie city. He told the department heads o disreKurd cost in preparing the list because he wants to know exactly whnt is needed so that lie can start making plans lo ob- luin that particular equipment, As to thu ears, trucks, pickups and other rolling equipment own- ed by the city, ho said thai ho would nilher they bo painted the lame color so thnl ho and citizens, could loll cily equipment when Ihoy see il. Me did nol say that the oquip- nont would be. painted any pnr- lieular color, bul he added that ic likes 'white' because it looks clean. By noon Monday, Hanson hnd about throe hours looking >ver city properly and'employees, ind already formed n few opin- ons in Unit short time. Within several days, ho will have dcf- nile plans. From n background of appropriately dramatic dark- ness, Hans Fritxche, Nazi acquilled in war crimes trial, walks through gale of Nuernberg house in which he is Jiving. Photo is first one made showing him at liberty after being freed from Al- lied custody. Funeral Wednesday For Mrs. Rich Ado Woman Fatally In- jured in Auto Collision In Now Mexico (old Wave Shifts Direction, Warmer Wealher Due Here lly Tim AMocliUml I'ritm Balmy weather wns predicted for Oklahoma today and tomor- row by federal forecaster, who said at the sumo time that the crest of a flood rolling .slowly down the Worth Canadian.would reach Oklahoma City tonight or tomorrow. Delay in tho arrival of the flood crest at Oklahoma City, where it was feared lowlands would bo inundated, has helped reduce its volume und the river probably will not go more than one foot over.flood stage when it arrives, the forecaster declared, The river stood at f.eot curly today at El Reno, n ri'iu of three quarters of a foot over- night and al, 5.0 nt Oklahoma risc> of one half foot in tho same period. Al Cnnlon, Ihe forecaster re- ported, the- (.-rest of the flood had passed today und the river had dropped to 7.0 feel, a fail of five fool since Saturday. A cold wave reported lust night to bo headed toward was derailed when tho wind shifted from the north to the south and residents cun ox- pecl warm weather today undilo- morrow, Ihc. foreciist said, Tho official, prediction: "Fair and warmer today and tomorrow. tomponiluros from lower to middle 50's to- night. Increasing cloudiness and continued mild Tuesday." Lowest Icmpornlurn roporllud In Oklahoma overnight was 35 at tdnbcl, in the southeastern section of Iho slate. Tho high yesterday wns at Wnurika. WEATHER! OKLAHOMA Generally ;md Tuesday; ortiiwest half tonight. Film-nil services will bo held Vodnesday tit 3 p.m. from the mith l-'iineritl Chapel hero for Mrs. Vehnti Mich of Ada, fatally njui-fd Wednesday morning in n automobile collision noiir Gnl- up. N. Mexico. The accident, a head-on colli- ion. occurred between nnd o'clock in the morning, Hi miles oast of Gallup. A son-in-law of Mrs. Rich. Noble Turrunl, wus driving. He and his mother, Mrs. Tin-run I, were seriously, injured and are in tho Gallup hospital. Mrs. Mich's daughters, Mrs. Louise Tun-mil, Hi, nnd Ernostino Northcult, 15, wore injured but are able lo return to Add for the funeral. Ono person in the other car was killed. Mrs. I'Uf.'h grow up in Ada. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. :R. S. Sun- ders, are now living al Stonewall, Surviving are hor husband, Lincoln Hii-li; her pnreiil.'i, daugh- ters and other relatives. OKLAHOMA" c i TYTocT :i 4 Tinker Army Air Field's uir- cruft repair section handled '256 pianos during September for a now peace-time- record in air- plane modification. The section exceeded Us quoin by (il pianos, i nob toed four B- warmer Ships repaired and sevsn Bring Out Bodies From West China All Killed in Plane Crash; Tales of Gun Battle With Lolos Proved ,Untrue By JOHN RODERICK SICHANCr, Oct. -14, mournful procession of sedan chairs .bearing the white .sheet- ed corpses of all 31. personsiwho i.llod jn tho crash of a Chinese National Aviation Corporation transport piano. Oct. (i made its way down sleep Lochi mountain lo Iho village of. 1-lHichia today. Rumors which emanated from this west China territory occupi- ed by bararous Lolo tribesmen had given vivid descriptions at. "survivors" fighting a gun bat- tle with before being cap- lured. The fact nil aboord evi- dently died outright when the craft smashed into Iho side of. the mountain point- ed up the unreliability of stories spread in this fantastic .country. It wns another indication thnl reports of the capture nnd en- slavement two'years ;igo of five or so American fl-21) pilots might also be n figment of Lolo imng- Ination. A soiirch party, novor.tho.loss, is search Ing l.ololand for a trace of a and Its occupants who crushed in and Is expected back in a clay or two. .._____________________________L-___________ NORMAN, Oct. 14 Stu- dents tit the University of Okla- homa, are going to have to watch their driving. The University e'nr committee was authorized by the board of regents Id fix pciiuUios not lo exceed for violutions of traffic rules governing the use of curs by students. French Vole New Conslilulion With Legislature on Top By ROBERT C. .WILSON PARIS, Oct. consti- tution for France's fourth repub- lic, providing for a powerful ICK- islaluro overshadowing the pres- ident, bore the stamp of public approval today, given in tho face Gen. Charles De Gaulle's op- position. The people of- continental Franco ficcopted.thejiow .consti- lution yesterday by a, margin of some a per- centage of 53.6 in favor to opposed. Voting was light, with per cent of the registered voters staying away from the polls. Gen, Do Gmillo, wartime lead- er oil the fighting- French, hud contended that the chnrter was inadequate because under It the executive would be too weak. He warned that t h e constitution would ondaijfier France's future and urged its rejection. But the result of the referen- dum, fur from being regarded as' a defeat .for the general, was taken rnlher as strong testimony' to his continuing prestige. Al- most single hnndodly ho, nearly defeated tho constitution-despite Iho fact thatsit 'was backed by IfYunctj's throe .major parties. Official interior ministry' re- turns for continental France showed votes for the constitution to against it. Unofficial returns from three .North African dupartmonla show- ed that lhat part of the cmpiue hud rejected the constitution, 58 to the unofficial totnls .for the 03 depart- ments of Franco nnd North Africa "Yes" and "no." Still missing were reports from Corsica, Martlncjuo, Madagascar, Ihe South Pacific, Indo-China and other oversea territories, but they could not change, the overall re- sult. The constitution will not'take effect until, early December, when parliament is scheduled to bo seated. Ono chamber, the National As- sombly.oi: Deputies', will be elect- ed Nov. 10. Tho second, tho Coun- cil oil the Republic, is to.bo chosen by a complicated doctoral college system. The charter will be ef- I'eetlvu from the day that two- thirds of the council's members arc seated. An analysis of the referendum left no doubt In tbo minds of most observers of Ihe scope of Do Ciiuillu's "moral over President Georges Bidault in a tug-of-war for leadership of the popular .Republican movement Joplin Area Folk Oppose Meat Lid JOPLIN, Mo., Oct. 14, a week butchers in the tri-stato urea asked their customers to ex- press their views on what wus lo be done in the meat situation, T3y the week's end, Worberl J. Riddle, international representa- tive of Iho Amalgamated Meat Cullers and Butcher Workmen oC North America (AFL) miid this was the result: urged discontinuance of OPA controls except on 20 risked that-they remain in force. t He said the petitions .would be sent to President: Trum'an. Cities represented were Joplin, Carth- age, JVcbb City and Neosho in Missouri; Pittsburgh, lo'la, Cha- nulo, Cherryvale and Coffoyville in Kansas and Miami and Pitcher in Oklahoma. Nation Wails For Truman Word on Meal Decision Due for An- nouncement Tonight On Stabilization, Meat Prob- lem By MARVIN L. WASHINGTON, Oct.- 14, Housewives Scurrying for meat and politicians lor votes cocked un our to the White House for President Truman's decision to- night on what to do about get- ting steaks nnd roasts baek. Hours before the chief execu- tive's .all-network1 broadcast sel for -10 p. m., pastern standard time, the republican pnrty term- ed the scheduled address "politi- cal" and demanded radio time to reply. Issue Is' Clear While there was no clear-cut indication what Mr. Truman plnns to say in his 15-minuto discussion, of stabilization and the meat problem, the issue be- fore him boiled down to Whether to scrap ment con- trols outright, as many republi- cans and some democratic lead- ertr.havo demanded, or keep them unchanged, Or, whether to compromise on some relaxation of controls 'in- volving perhaps, higher ceilings, a bonus plan to induce market- ing .of livestock, and possibly importation of meat. Mr. Truman is on' 'record as firmly opposed to removal of OPA One indication that he may have changed his mind came from a high official who .is fami- liar with the problem. He hint- ed to a reporter that top aides helping prepare Mr. Truman's .speech met at the White House last night and that decontrol of meat is In the picture. Wage Controls, Too There has been speculation, moreover, that Mr.' Truman might dual with wage 'controls, too, and possibly scrap that pro- gram. On the other among those playing an active part in drafting the president's state- are OPA Administrator Paul Porter and Reconversion Director John R. Steelman. Porter has openly opposed re- moval of meat controls. Steel- mnn, on the subject 'of controls generally, recently said that to 'let prices go" would .be the "worst possible" course. The GOP contention that Mr. Truuman's address "will be poli ticnl" came from Carroll Recce chairman of the republican na tionnl. committee. Politics, Cries "Just three weeks before i caicial congressional election; Recce said in u statement, "Mr Truman has chosen to tie up most of the nation's radio facili ties with an explanation of hi administration's so-called stnbili zntlon program, with pat-licula reference to, the stabilized short age of meat. Whatever; may be the form of his explanation, it substance und its obvious politt cal purpose will'be political. "If Mr. Truman has in mine some action to solve the mea it is to be hopcc that he can take that ac lion at his desk in. the White House, where it could have been taken many weeks 'ago. xxxx" Meanwhile, Rep! Jenkins o Ohio, chairman of the rcpubli can. congressional food study committee, called for "immediate and permanent elimination of al OPA controls and price regula- tions over the livestock and meat industry." The committee reported thai Paris Peace Conference Ends Work on Five Treaties, Now Foreign Ministers Take Over U. N. Studies Bomb Control Canada Offers Plan For Complete Checkup From Mines to A-Bomb Com- pletion Read The News Classified Ads. nt hearings it recently conduct- ed in Sioux City, Kunsus City nnd Tulsti, witnesses were "uri- nnlnioUH In tiint ano- ther temporary decontrol period 'would bo the most tragic und disastrous thing that could hap- pen to rhflut producion." Sapulpa Will Honor Co-Pllot SAPULPA, Okln., Oct. Eugene P. Ankin, co- pilot the nnvy's "Truculont Turtle" on its breaking .flight from Perth, Austral in, to Colu'm-' bus, O., will got the key to his homo town tomorrow, Runkin is scheduled' to arrive here from Bui-bank, Calif., for a brief visit with his parents. Mr. nnd Mrs. James A. Rankin, before going on to Oklahoma City Wed- nesday to be the guest of Gov. Robert S. Kerr nt I; he'National Aviation' Clinic. Negroes (an Get Emergency Fund OKLAHOMA CITY, Ocl. 14 Robert S. Kerr today authorized transfer of from his emergency fund to the consolidated Negro inslitulion at Taft. The amount was earmarked for maintenance, food and clothing before June 30, 1047. High prices, the governor said has caused a shortage of..funds in the Institu- tion's regular budget. By LARRY HAUCK LAKE SUCCESS, N. Y., Oet. 14 problem "of how lo prevent clandestine operations in atomjc energy occupied Ihe atten- tion of.the political committee of the United Nations Atomic Ener- gy commission today as delegates were called into session lo begin a delailed study of safeguards necessary' to restrict use of atomic power to peaceful purposes. The agenda for the p.m. (EST) meeting contained a Canadian resolution, previously unanimously adopted, providing for a thorough examination of three possible kinds of Clandestine 'operations, diversion of materials and seizure of mater- ials or facilities. The Canadian plan recommend- ed' a complete checkup at every stage of .production from the mines up. The United Stales delegation was expected to submit another one amplify- ing the question of controls mid stressing the necessity for a strict system. Meanwhile, the' Security Coun- cil will go buck into public ses- sion tomorrow for the first time, in weeks to debate eligi- bility for the international" court of justice. _ Arguments hinge around Rus- sian-Polish opposition to allowing Franco Spain, which is barred from U. N. .membership, from having -access to the agency's, court. The position of the 'United States and generally of the other delegates was that tho question is juridical and not political and that all countries should have rights of entry'to a court of jus- tice. As the Oct. 23 meeting of the General Assembly nonrod, Now York City announced it was cam- paigning to get the assembly to change its decision on u si to'nnd locate permanently within the city. New York wants the U.N. to take over the old world's fail- site in Flushing, whore .interim headquHters have been establish- ed for ,the assembly, as a per- manent home for the entire U. N. Under its earlier decision the assembly Jimilcd the possibilities to Wostchestcr and Fail-field counties on the New York-Con- necticut border and should it re- open the question now sovornl other cities, including San Fran- cisco, might renew their bids. The interim facilities for all bodies except the assembly have been set up here, presumably for about five yours until a perma- nent site is made ready. He WanfedlcT Sleep Something OH Molotov Protests Treaties Unsatisfactory To Russia, Charges Domination by U. S. By MEL MOST PARIS, Oct. Pm-is Peace Conference, ac- cused by Russia of failure in many respects, wound up work tonight on fivb peace treaties, and the Fore'i gn Ministers Council prepared to take up in New York the completion of these pacts and a start on the new treaty with Germany her- self. In the last hours of the peace conference Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov protested that many of its acts had been unsatisfactory and would have to be gone over by the foreign ministers. One of the conference's last actions was to vote down an American appeal to reduce Finland's repara- tions by one-third. Russia protested that and said the United States had dominated the 11-week, conference. Molotov remarked that portions of the draft treaties with Italy, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Finland pleased Russia and indicated that many oT the issues would be thrown into the Foreign Ministers Council where decisions must bo unanimous. An American spokesman said the foreign ministers would meet Nov. -1 in 'New York to complete work on the treaties with Italy, Romanin, Hungary. Bulgaria and Finland and began work on the pud which will decide (.ho fu- ture of Germany. The spoltos- mnn indicated the treaty with Germany would not be complet- ed in Now York, since both Molo- tov and French President Geor- ges Bidaull preferred that it be designed in Europe, Molotov will leave for N e w York tomorrow nnd Secretary of State Byrnes will follow Wed- nesday to attend the meeting of the United Nations assembly convening Oi-l. He accused the United States, Greoto.Britain and Franco of "vio- lating their agreements" and "re- treating" from four-power accord ELGIN, Okln., Oct. 14 Peace officers of western Okla- homa had a bad time Sunday af- ternoon after they reiceived word a citizen had seen occupants of an automobile stop on a highway near Lnwlon, pick up a stuff it into a truck and speed away. A dragnet of policemen, sher- iffs deputies and stale highway patrolman located the automobile described by the at an establishment here. Advancing with drawn guns, the officers (sounded on the doors of 'the automobile, which was empty, and then looked in its trunk. K e K t I 11 K quietly was the corpse." He turned out to be a friend uf the men in the car who had .Jiclcod him up and hidden him m the trunk until he could sloop off the effects of Homelhlng which nade him sleepy enough to lie down on the ronrj. Wallacelollake Few Speeches WASHINGTON, Oct. A. Wallace disclosed lo- !ny through friends that he will peak in at least seven slates in upport of what the associates [escribed as "progressive demo- ratic candidates" bclwopn now ml election day, Nov. D, His revised itinerary calls for addresses In .Dotruil 
                            

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