Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 10, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 10, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             to ii thot will reveal how old the woman has become when her eors are no longer sensitively responsive to the flattering coif >f the wolf whistle. Avtriff Net Kepi., ClrculltlM 8575 Mrmtiir: Audit Hiirmu at THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 150 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1146 Rain, Frost Predicted In Northwest Colder Weather Duo To Spread Over Oklahoma Durinf Friday Night By The AiiocUlcd More rain and freezing tem- peratures were predicted today for northwestern Oklahoma, al- ready plagued by floods which have caused widespread damage. The .federal weather bureau said the mercury would pluirimet to a low of between 30 and 35 degrees above zero in the flood- swept area tonight. The bureau said it was not certain just how hcnvy the rains might be, and confined its fore- cast to "showers." Rivers nnd creeks in the north- western area already arc on rampage, and railroad nnd high way bridges have suffered hcav damage. Additional rain, it was fcaroc would raise the crest of a floo cascading down the North Cano dian river. The stream was near ly four feet above flood stage a Woodward early today and wn still rising. The river also wns rising Canton. El Heno nnd Oklahom FIVE CENTS THE COPY WILL. BE COOLER Football fans would probably do well for their own comfort at tonight's Adn-Ardmore foot- ball game at Norris Stadium if they take along some wraps. At some time late today or dur- ing the night, northerly winds are due here nnd the night's temperature is expected to drop to the 45-48 degree level. That would be about as cold as this fall has yet producer here. And for the night, that extra blanket had better be handy. Ada got .04 of an inch of moisture Wednesday morning, That wasn't enough to help with drying flower beds and fall gardens. The barometer at the Ada Greenhouse was falling Thursday morning but whether any showers will arrive here us an aftermath of the north- west Oklahoma downpours re- mains to be seen. City, with the crest still to come at those points, probably tomor- row or Saturday. In Oklahoma City, where it was feared populated low areas might be inundated, M. B. Cun- ningham, city water superinten- dent, said he believed the Cana- dian river would go two feet ov- er flood stage when the peak is reached. Prepared Cunningham said all precau- tions were being taken and that residents of the lowland areas would be evaculated if it seem- ed necessary- to protect lives and property. He said decision on evacuation would be withheld pending de- velopments in the flooded area. Tne frost and shower warning came in a special forecast issued by the weather bureau at Okla- homa City. The warning: "Heavy frost is indicated In the northwest portion of Okla- homa tonight, preceded by show- ers and cooler today with strong northerly winds. "Partly cloudy and much cool- er weather is indicated tonight with skies clearing in the north- west. "Temperatures will range from 30 to 35 in the northwest and from 45 to 48 in the southwest." O'Neill's New Play Praised Highly NEW YORK. Oct. 10 gene O'Neill's return to theater last night via his new play, "The Ice Man received uni- versay kudos this morning from drama critics. It was the first new play to appear in 12 years from pen of O'Neill, thrice winner of the Pulitzer prize and one-time No- bel prize winner. Though long, a four-hour play with time out for dinner, it already was a Theater U. S., Britain Call For Free Commerce On Danube River ED IN ROME DEMONSTRATIONS: From 'a sheltering wall, Rome police fire at' demonstrators "torrt Viminale. Palace, seat'of the Italian government" At 5 persons were killed, and more than 100 wounded, ployment (NBA The rioting was on the unem- Many Adans See Wednesday's Display of "Sho oting Stars" Many Adans saw the shooting stars Wednesday night nnd nornc SHW them ns fast us per hour at the penk of the djsplny. The pouk in Adn apparently was between and JO p.m., accord- ing to (oiks started watching it earlier and stayed Inter. It wos such a magnificent dis- play of "shooting stars" that most people took more interest in it than they had expected. Few of those watching the shooting stars knew' exactly what was happening, but in every in- stance they were so awed that they didn't have time to worry about the cause. Divided Grid Fans Attention A negro football game at 'the Fairgrounds was well DUt many fans turned star gazers aefore the contest was completed. By standing at the top of the west stands and looking to the south, west or north .the display could be seen probably better than most places in town. There was plenty out of the ordinary sights to see because those extra 'tails' are not the usual thing. An Associated Press report said hat the display .was at its best n the mid-western-states because heavy clouds kept scientists In other suctions from .viewing the unuKual occurrence. By Ainoclittd Most of the United States was treated to n spectacular display of shooting stars last night as meteors shed by the comet Gin- cobinizinner burned Across the skies in what some scientists said was the most brilliant exhibition seen in America this 'century. But: dense clouds marred or .completely obliterated the view for many watchers of the skies in .some sections of the country. Scientists used radar and for the first recorded' -time -reported they ;csaw" display of meteors beyond- fog and clouds. Observers from the--National Bureau of Standards in they; were, sure, that ap- pearing- on the radar-screen rep- resented meteors about 50 miles from .earth. Other scientists boarded air-- plahcs to get above thick clouds for-a glimpse of the-aerial fire- works and Harvard astronomers m an "aerial planetarium" re- ported seeing meteors at the rate of about 17 per minute. Get Radar Contact Joint army, air forces .signal corps observers at Whiteside, N. M., reported to Camp Evans, U. S. corps laboratory at Belmar, N. J., that they contacted the meteor showers with ra'dar at varied-dis- tances from 45 to 180 miles. The display resulted as- "the earth came with miles of the' spot in" space through which the comet passed eight days ago, The meteors' were shed by 'the comet and. formed part, of its: tail. Those seen' on the earth-. .were those caught by the earth's gravi- tational .pull and consumed for the -most they .plvriged through air. shelV the Jbetween the' solid matter and "the'-'.brillijint director of the Adler Planetarium: in Chi- cago, said, he: counted 149, flash- ing projectiles in a 10-miniite peak starting :at p.m. CST andfsaid the display was unmatched; in- this country' dur- ing the present century. Omahans saw scores of meteors beginning shortly after dusk and at times the display" was almost continuous with a meteor- a sec- ond. Air Flight Ban On Czecnland lifted Remains on Romania, Hun- gary; Ruisian Maneuvers May la Responsible LONDON, Oct. 10 S. leadquarters in Europe today ifted a mysterious ban on Amer-i can plane flights over Czecho- lovakia, but continued suspen- icn.of flights over Romania and Hungary and an American pilot aid here he believed the order vas linked with Russian army maneuvers. The ban on flights over the iiree countries, all in the Russian phere of influence, was clamped own suddenly and without' ex- lanation yesterday-by U. S. au- lorities in Frankfurt, Germany, imilarly, no explanation was wen why the Czechoslovak ban ad been rempved, just as sud- enly as it was imposed. Guild production sell out. Brooks Atkinson, New York Times critic stated flatly, "Mr. O'Neill has written one of best plays." his John Chapman of the Daily News characterized the play as "a magnificent drama in plan, in size, in scope, in depth." He summed up the theme as "it is our pipe dreams which make us live, and when the last dream is gone there is nothing but death death is the iceman of the drama." Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. iw EAT HER! Oklahoma: Partly cloudy north- west half; thunder storms south- east half tonight; strong nbrlher- ly winds and colder tonight; much colder northwest half; freezing temperatures and light frost pan handle tonight; Friday ..air, cooler east and south por- tions. Capt. Calvin Dyer of Jackson .eights, N. Y., pilot of a Pan American Airways plane turned back at Prague yesterday, said I think the reason' my 'plane back was because the Russians.are believed to be hold- ing army maneuvers between Oct. 9 and 14." Pan American announced here it had halted all its service to middle Europe pending clarifica- tion of the military order, under which the company said it could not fly over the three countries or over Russian-occupied terri- tory in Germany and Austria'. However, the Frankfurt an- nouncement said flights over the Soviet-occupied German and Austrian zones were continuing. An Army Public Relations spokesman in Frankfurt said he did not .know "whether the Rus- sians had anything to do with the orders." Pan-American's statement here said that, "until further clarifi- cation of the situation, all Pan- American services to middle Europe will be halted in -Brus- sels." AUSTIN, Tex., Oct. 10 torneys for Pete Traxlcr today notified the office of Gov. Coke R. Stevenson that he would fight any effort by the State of Okla- homa to extradite him to face a charge of robbery with firearms. Traxler, whose record of felony convictions and penitentiary sen- tences and escapes dates back to 1924, was arrested several days ago at Denton, Tex., on the Okla- homa charge. No Clemency, Says Allied Council, For Sixteen Nazis BERLIN, Oct.. 10 Al- lied Control Council today re- jected all clemency pleas of 16 convicted Nazi war criminals. A communique drafted by the Four-Power Council announced the decision after two threerhour sessions, yesterday and today: The Control Council is the last resort for the 11 doomed to die. council also rejected pe- titions of Hermann Gdering, Wil- helm Keitel and Alfred Jodl to be shot instead of hanged; The council ruled further that the pleas of the S.S., the Gestapo, the S.D. (Secret Service) 'and the leadership group of the Nazi party were "not receivable be- cause the iControl Council' is not authorized to reconsider the judg- ment of the International Mili- tary can only grant clemency." The council.also turned down as "not receivable" the petition of Grand Adm. Hae'der that he be shot instead of imprisoned. The council pointed out that it was not "empowered to increase sentences." ..The three convicted Nazis who disdained to appeal were S. D. Chief Ernst Kaltenbrunner, who was'sentenced.to -death; and Mu- nitions Minister Albert Speer and Hitler Youth leader Bladur Von Schirach, each, given 20 years. NORMAN TO SEND FORTY FFA MEMBERS TO 3.C. NORMAN, Okla., Oct. businessmen have donated nearly to-pay ex- penses of 40 members of the local FFA chapter 'to Kansas Cify where they will represent .the state m a national chapter con- test, Earlier this year, businessmen of Norman had raised a similar amount to erect and equip a 13 by 26 foot greenhouse, and pur- chase equipment for a farm i shop for the, FFA group. Cards 12 Red 3 Two WSB Members Offer Resignations Industry Representatives On Stabilisation Board Notify Truman WASHINGTON, Oct. 10, The preferred resignations of the two industry, members of.1 the wage stabilization board threw that agency into uncertainty to- day-over its-future status. Chairman W- Willard Wirtz said "we are assuming there will be no meetirigs" of. the regional boards, whose industry represen- tatives are expected to follow the lead of Earl M. Cannon and- A. Colman Barrett on the Washing- ton panel.' The resignations of Barrett and Cannon, submitted to I President Truman by letter, become effec- tive today ,if the president ac- cepts them. The departing mem- bers proposed scrapping of all wage controls and renewed their stand that the tri-partite form of board set up in-wartime is no longer appropriate. The was in the position of having to wait for President Truman to decide what will become of it and of the: ad- ministration's -wage cy. Some business and ilabor leaders have demanded an im- mediate end of the wage-price Petition Asks Control Ban Beef Industry Asks See. Anderson to Remove Price Controls from Cattle WASHINGTON, Oct. 10 The beef industry .coupled a de- mand for immediate scrapping of pi-ice controls' today with' a promise of ample .supplies of meat "very soon" possibly be fore November's congressiona if the administration acts. R. G. Haynie, chairman the OPA beef industry, advisory com- mittee which petitioned formally for decontrol, told reporters there are) plenty of cattle and calves reajtly for market as soon as price ceilings are' lifted. 1 The White House, scene of a special round of top-level' con- ferences on the situation late to- day, remained silent. "I make no forecasts said' Press Secretary Charles G Ross when reporters nuked him what might happen; Truman Confer From other sources it was learned- that the' president's chief advisers -political and food problems planned another series of confeernces later today. Imme- diate decontrol, as sought by the beef industry, was one of the steps under active consid- eration. The beef industry's decontrol petition, filed with Secretary of Agriculture Anderson, took sharp issue with the president's con- tention that there -was a heavy slaughter meat during July and August, when controls were tem- porarily off. ('Apparently the circumstances that have' induced this- erroneous -is the fact that these- cat- u moved''- to'- U. S.w May Use Argentine Beef as Way to Get Home-Bred Cattle from Ranges to Packers during.., normal: and. legitimate "t h e petition said. months prior to. July 1, 1946, great numbers of cattle and calves -were 'purchased by' black rharket'operators at the farm and auction markets and elsewhere which escaped the notice of gov- ernmental agencies." Claim There's No Shortage The, petition argued that there is no shortage of cattle" and calves under the meaning., of the price control act and said: "Under; these 'conditions- con- gress. ordered: 'decontrol in order that the law of supply and demand be} permitted to function. VWhether 'prices would rise after decontrol is wholly" imma- terial." The committee said that Ander- son should release all livestock and meats from controls includ- ing hogs 'and if he should find- it .impractical to decontrol cattle, and- calves, only.. Discussing .the industry move at a news: conference, Haynie said that under the law' the only ques- tion- involved is; supply. He said the petition shojved "by the gov- ernment's pwn figures'" that, cat- tle and calves .now available, for market-are above long time aver- age. program. Cardinals_________: 12 Red Sox_____.____ 2 H 20 9 Sedalia Movieless For Many Weeks SEDALIA, Mo., Oct. 10 This city "of persons hasn't seen a local movie since' last August 17 because the mayor, a self-styled country boy, and: his council -are standing pat in a fued with theaters over a 5 per -cent municipal tax. The .city council passed 'the.5 per cent assessment on gross re- ceipts because, Mayor Julian !H. Bagby says, real property-was carrying-too big a load in-the city tax structure. The theater chain houses and board- ed doors and signs, reading'. "closed in protest: to the city's unfair license The theater representatives say the 5 per; cent is not equitable, that other business houses aren't the same fashion.: The.mayor, who says should yield about to Missouri Gridmen On Meatless Die! Training Table Drooped, Players on Own irt Getting Evening Moali 10 Iowa State's football players have horsemeat on their menu, consider the plight of the University of Missouri gridmen: They don't even have a train- ing table. It was abandoned this week because of the tightness of the food situation and the play- ers have been on their own in getting the evening this student-packed city.1 Coach Don Faurot -said he hoped the table: could be: re-es- tablished next; week. .Chicken has dominated 'the -menu with only an occasional service' of beef.' Coach Faifrot.pointed: out that his Tigers haven't had a bite.of beef .on a single one ,of their three road trips, including the one to Texas; Pre-game and af- ter-game! 'said, had chicken, or fish as the meat component. By ROGER D. GREENE WASHINGTON, Oct. 10 Signs multiplied today that the government might welcome' Ar- gentine beef to America's meat- less dinner tables as a lever to pry home-bred cattle off western ranges. With the mont controversy boil- ing at peak amid forecasts of "emergency" action 'by President, Truman within a few Argentine ambas- sador, Oscur Ivunissevich, said he is-'ready to offer Argentina's help to combat the shortage. One of the world's largest meat exporters, Argentina for yours has been prohibited 'from ship- ping meat to the United StutcH on the ground that hoof and mouth disease is prevalent among Ar- gentine cattle. However, nn aide to the nm- bassador told a .reporter this is no issue now because the incut Argentina will offer is boneless and canned; He. snid there is about pounds'available for immediate shipment to this country. Most Goes to Britain Of Argentina's total supply of fresh meat, he'said, about 70 pet- cent goes to Great Britain. While pounds would not go far toward relieving the current shortage, the acceptance of the Argentine offer concciv-1 ably could spur the marketing of domestic cattle. American producers long have regarded Argentina ns .a poten- tial serious competitor for the domestic merit market. The possible resort to South Amcrlcnn imports was empha- sized by the presence of Under Secretary of State Will Clayton lit u White Houso meeting of President' Tuman's top advisers Insl night. Key Officials Confer For two-and-a-half hours, six key administration officials' Democratic National Choirmun Robert E.' Hnnnegan, OPA Ad- minislrntor Paul Porter, Secre- tary of Agriculture Clinton P. Anderson, Reconversion Director John R, Steclmnn, Clayton and Clurk Clifford, Mr. Truman's legal the dark- ening incut Hiluntlun, It wax No statement wus issued, but less than an hour nflcr the meet- ing broke up the-Argentine nm- bnsfuuior announced his Intention- to'call on Anderson today to vol- unteer his country's help, Those in u position to know. suid the six-man meeting had dis- cussed at least these possible step cussed at least these possible (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Vandenberg Opens Plea Set Up Ip Rustic And Slav States D atory. Says levin Medlock, Gentry Elected By County Teachers Association REYNOLDS TO RICHMOND .RICHMOND, ,Va., Oct.. 10, UP) Reynolds, regular wing- back in Oklahoma A. M. college's 1945 Sugar Bowl back- field which featured .Bob 'Feni- mpre, today 'was sent to the Richmond Rebels of. the .Dixie professional- league by the 'Pitts- burgh Steelers of the National league.: Reynolds will play -with the 41 000 argues: Rebels in their league- contest Sunday -against .the Norfolk Chamrocks. He was 'signed by the Chicago Cardinals after .gra- duation, but: the Cards 'sold him 1 to, the -Steelew. Nurse Suffocated [hiring Fire In Duranl Hospital DURANT, Okla., Oct. 10 One nurse died of suffocation anc two others were injured early to- day when flames swept the second floor of the Durant hos- pital, nurses home here. Four other nurses fled to safe- ty. Mary Ellen Lovell, 19, of Du- rant, was founded dead of suf- focation by rescue workers who jroped their way through smoke to the second floor' of the home Dr. A, T. Baker, director of the hospital said. Vernie .Arnold, 19, of Durant suffered an arm injury when she leaped from the window of her room. Dr. Baker said her injury was not serious. Mrs. Addah Broadhurst, 52, of Idabel, was overcome by smoke md suffered from shock, -the doc- ter said. He added she' would re- cover. Dr. Baker said the fire appar- ently started in an unoccupied r.oom and was, confined to the second floor of" the two-story milding. "We just don't know what caused the he added. "The damage to the building was minor. The fire did not spread beyond the second floor. "The -nurses were awakened by imoke, apparently, and ran from the building, with the exception of Miss Arnold, who jumped, and Miss Lovell and Mrs.' Broad- hurst. "No' other jured. "The Broke but early this morning. hospital. itself never was endangered and there was no ex- citement among patients, who all were asleep." persons were in- Pan-Am Halls All Mid-Europe Hops Military Order Bans Flight! Over Russ-Controlled Territory for Time LONDON, Oct. 10 American- Airways announced to- day that it had: halted all service to middle Europe following a U. S. military order forbidding flig S. military order forbidding flights over Czechoslovakia or Russian-controlled, territory in Hungary, Romania, Germany and Austria. clarification of the airline said in a all Pan-American services to middle Europe will be halted Brussels." The- statement said a Pan- Ameqcan .clipper from Prague to Vienna was turned back'yester- day by U. S. .military orders which.'-said that no civil or mili- tary aircraft would be. permitted to fly over Czech or Russian con- trolled- territory in Hungary or Romania from October to 14. Annual Meeting Hoi Dr. Abernathy and Message On Three Duties of Teachers Pontotoc county teachers fill- ed the dining hall of the Aid- ridge hotel Wednesday night for the annual. meeting of theii county association. They enjoyed the banquet, the Halloween decorations, the ad- dress by Dr. John Abernathy of Oklahoma City, music and' the opportunity to get in bit of visiting. They appreciated hav- ing Dr. A. Linscheid, East Cen- tral president, as toastmastcr. They elected Virgil Medlock, Lawrence principal and democra- tic nominee for the stale senate, ns president and C. A. Gentry Center, as vice president. Nor- man C. Mitchell, county superin- tendent, is ex official secretary- treasurer. School Measures Outlined Preceding the banquet, J. B. Walters, Ada High school, gave the invocation and 'Betty Lou Jumper led singing of the na- tional anthem. After the meal, William Heimann, East Central student, played a violin solo. J. N. McKeel, McLish superin- tendent, outlined the four school program proposals .to be submit- ted to Oklahoma voters on Nov. 5 and pressed the plea made by E. E. Battles, state OEA presi- dent, for vigorous campaigning by teachers for the measures. Dr. Abernathy, a favorite speaker here, is pastor of the Crown Heights Methodist church Oklahoma City. His early ex- pe'riences included some school teaching. "So This b Life" Talking in his usual informal manner, he spoke on "So This Is reminding that preachers and teachers are dealing with the most fascinating material of all, the lives of people. He called attention to three duties: To save history of man is that of prodigal waste of life through disease, ignorance, highway accidents, war. To enlarge have done much already in enlarging the borders of our thinking, of- space, of transportation, of knowledge of the world, and the challenge is to continue this. To enrich beautiful task, using history, music, art, scienti- fic knowledge, with and here the teacher and the preacher are true agencies of en- richment. MINERS SAY HEALTH DAMAGED BY SILICOSIS TULSA, Okla., Oct. 10, Charging their health Jged by contracting silicosis on .heir jobs, three former Ottawa county -miners yesterday asked damages totaling in suits :iled ifi federal district court a- gainst two mining companies. The workers were Virgil D. lox, Earn Carder and H. Gene Collins; and defendants were the Cagle Picher Mining and Smelt- er .Co. and F. W.- Evans, opera- :or of the Shorthorn mine in. Ot- awa county. Read The News Classified Ads, By JOSEPH DYNAN PARIS, Oct. 10. The Unit- ed Stntcs and Britain joined for- ces todny in calling upon the Soviet Union und the Slav to remove n barrier between cast and the west with positive pence conference action on open- ing the Danube to com- merce, U. S. Senator Arthur H. denberg (R-Mich) led off the plenary sessions deliberations on the Romanian pence treaty draft by declaring "free Danube Is indispcnsible to the economic health and pence of central Eur- ope" and that failure to open Europe's most important inland waterway would be ''tragic, re- uctlonory mistnkc." Vandenberg's plea brought prompt rejoinder 'from Yugo- slav Deputy Premier Edvard Kardclj, who attacked the major- ity report of the Balkans eom- ininnlon on two nrtlclcn in the draft dealing with the Danube. He held that the conference was not "competent to deal with the Danube question" and said Yugo- slavia deserved a greater Danu- bian role because "SO percent of its course .is through Yugoslav territory.'" Delays Vandenberg was the first speaker as the conference, with the Italian treaty out of 'the way, took up the second of the five drafts before it. He was joined in his. plea for free commerce on t h e Danube and free throughout the Balkan by British Foreign Secretary Ernest Bcvin. "The task of Europe ls made infinitely more Bcvin said, "to as there is a bnrrier between the west and the east in the Danube nreu and the commercial inter- ests of the west In Ro- mania by a whole host of dis- criminatory Bevin said the Russian propos- al, which sought "to restrict the use of the Danube exclusivity to the countries along its banks, b not only retrograde step but a deliberate discriminatory action against their allies." Causes Suspicion "It is this policy which fives rise to a good deal of suspicion as to the designs of the Soviet Union in this part of the Bcvin snid. Answering one Slav argument. that the United States should think more about the St. Law- rence river than the Danube, Vandenberg declared that ves- sels of all nations are "welcome to use the St. Lawrence on-terms of equality with those ot the United States and Canada." Vandenberg was followed by Yugoslav Deputy Premier Ed- vard Kardelj, who attacked the majority report on the ground that the, peace conference "is not competent to deal with the Dan- ube question." Kardelj claimed a greater Daiiubian role for Yugoslavia be- cause "fifty percent of its' course is through Yugoslav then declared that "we must not mix up democratic principles of the past century with the living conditions of today." Hull Belter WASHINGTON, Oct. but .definite" improve- ment in the condition of former Secretary of State Cordcll Hull was reported today by Bethesda naval hospital. He rested well last night. The 75-year-old retired cabinet officer has been in a serious con- dition since he suffered a stroke on September 30. Greater returns for amount la- vested. Ada News Want Ads. TH' PESSIMIST Mr Kiss your wife goodbye In th' mornin' an' you'll have more t' cat at noon. Th' feller who greets you with "Whutyn know" don't expect I1 be informed about anything in th' first place.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication