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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 6, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 6, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             It will b. int.r..tina w.Hh. in th. four w..k., ju.t h.w much of Okl.K.mO-. wil, gtt ,ock, OB how mueh b. >i in ii i ______.._. Avcrare Net Auiuit Paid Circulation 8462 .Member: Audit llureau of Circulation THE ADA NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 146 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1946 Finding City Manager Is Major Job Ado Council Checked Dozens of Applications, Interviewed 'Likely' Ones WITH HANSEN First Found What Was Needed. lit Task Than To Find Such Man Available Finding a city manager with the qualifications desired and who is as difficult as locating the proverbial needle in the haystack but members of ihe Ada City Council aver thut it comes in the next classifieu- tion, The council took over guidance of Ada's municipal affairs July 22, under the council-manager plan voted by the citizens in June. FIVE CENTS THE COPK FIVE PEACE TREATY DRAFTS FINISHED W ;v.- t _ '-fliW. W. Hanson After some weeks the members agreed that the city manager place was one calling for some special training and certain ex- perience. So they net about locating a man with both of these in his background. They started learning fast about the city manager field that it is a very narrow and high- ly skilled one nnd that few men are qualified to handle. They tad already found out by careful examination of the city's needs that a man was required w 11 h engineering background, and with experience as a city manager. Mnny technical problems arise constantly in the maintenance in and operation of Ihe writer sys- tem, the disposal plant nntl other city properties and Ada does not have n city engineer. More Than Engineering Then.he would need experience in city managership because he would have to reorganize the city here, know hr-'.v to train and handle personnel. He also should have a thorough knowledge of preparation of bud- gets and handling of finances. And the Ada council found that 49 cities in the U. S. had adopted the council-manager plan this year and more were planning to vote on it, so that 'the already limited supply of men with the qualifications wanted here was in growing demand. Found First Required So the counciltncn set out to find just whiit to rxpocl in a suc- c-cxsful city iminiigoi1. V. L, Snulhnm, president of the Inter- national City Managers Associa- tion and city manager nl Dallas, Tex., came to Ada in August for a conference, visited the city plants, discussed Ada's problems and gave so much information Unit Ihc councilman foci deeply indebted to him for his advice Jinri interest. Then the association ran an mi- nounceim-nt in its mitionnl bi- weekly bulletin that Ada hud changed to the council-manager plan and would select H manager, In came a number of applica- tions, from all over the U. S. At their own time and expense the council made a personal investi- gation of every outstanding city manager in the state of Okla- homa nnd found no one who would fit the job who wag nvail- ublp. Several met the standards sought but were unwilling to change. What to do then? To check with dozens of stfi- plicants. and in this the council was thorough and careful. Sach applicant submitted a de- tailed application setting forth all pertinent information about Jiim- iself nnd his qualifications. The council checked the references and did some investigating of their own. Personal Interviews If the applicant appeared to be a likely prospect, he was invited for an interview. The council had a number of these. H had decided early against any favorable dcci- World Series Opens Today Cardinals Hook Up ot f. M. with Highly Favored Boston Rod Sox By GAYLE TALBOT ST. LOUIS, Oct. S, Louis' own Cardinals, who sur- vived a rough trip to the finals and the highly-favored- Boston Red Sox held their last akul'- sossions and workouts at Sports- man's park preparatory to hook- ing up nt (CST) Sunday af- ternoon In the opening game of the 1940 World Series. A sell-out crowd of about 000 was assured for both of the games which will be played here before the two clubs move up to Boston to continue the struggle. Texan Texan? Prospects were that a couple of Texas residents, left-handed Howie Pollet of Houston and "Tex" Hughson, a long right- hander from Kyle, would be nominated as the starting pitch- ers in the opener. Pollet, who turned in 21 vic- tories for the Cards during the season, including a vital 4-2 tri- umph over the Dodgers in the first play-off game, was certain to go for Freshman Manager Eddie Dyer if the strained shoulder muscle which has hampered him recently is not too painful when he warms up tomorrow. The slim portsider took heat treatments today and indicated he would be ready. Although Manager Joe Cronin of the Sox had not stated a de- finite choice among his "big- -Hughson. Dave "Boo" and Mickey Cards felt il was a foregone con- clusion they would have to look at Hughson. The big fast-bailer won 20 this year, ripping .off eight of his last nine starts. Brecheea Second Choice Should Pollet decline the al- ignment, .pyer said 'his second choice "another lefty, Harry Brecheen. Then, if Bre- cheen feels he could use more rest after -his furious nin- th-inning relief stint against Brooklyn two days ago, Dyer's reluctant third choice would be George Munger, right-hander who only recently got out of thn service. No matter what Rodbird fling- ct finally gets the call, the Sox will firm favorites to capture tho series. The fence- busters who carried them to a runaway victory in tho Ameri- can league1 arc figured to gcner- nle too much power for the Cards, who wound up the season with only Iwo .300 hitlers. Red Sox Calralr Confident The Boston slrong boys bore a confident air when they arrived on their special train late yes- terday. One after another they said calmly: "Sure, we expect to three' Ferris Navy Band Here Today Famed Musical Organisa- tion's Concert Sponsored By last Central The United States Navy Band that .plays in concert here this afternoon has more than a cen- tury of history and tradition batk of it. This will be first time :in Ada and the occasion promises-to bo a notable one in East Central and Ada musical history. Early ticket purchases have been encouraging if the weather is favorable'this after- noon many more will be coming into Ada from neighboring ciliea for the concert, scheduled for p.m. nl Norris Sladium. And if the weather is inclement the concert will be'given in the college auditorium. If the hall cannot accommodate the crowd, a second program will be played. However, college authorities lave erected a stand on Norris slaying field and will set up u oudspeuker system to be used I needed. Tickets will be on sale up to .he time of the concert and will be available on both the weat and east sides of the stadium. The first link with recorded listory of music in the U. S. navy s when James F. Draper's me appeared in. 1825 on the jayroll of the American frigate 'Brandywine" as a musician. By' 1838 there was a navy band of six persons officially listed and thereafter development was World War I gave military music a great boost. By 1923 the Navy Band had 13 outstanding musicians and in 1925 Pres. Coolidge-signed a spe- cial act recognizing it as the per- manent representative band of he U. S, Navy. annual' our .came that fall.. British, Arabs Are A At Truman Statement On Palestine But Britfth Gov- eminent Has Criticism At Home '5 By ED CREAGH LONDON, Oct. 6 Arabs and British officials openly nursed their anger at President Truman today, but dissent with- in Britain over the government's Pnlostine policy entered the pic- ture. The foreign office, confirming previous reports, said'.Prime Min- ister Attlee had sent 'n personal note to president Truman and went even further than yesterday in expressing resentment over the president's refusal to delay publi- cation of bin statement advocating the immediate admission of' a substantial number of migrants into the Holy Churchill Critical Wins ton Churchill, Prime Minister, openly criticised the government's Palestine polity in a speech to n conservative party convention at Blackpool dec-luring it was "vacillating" and an abandonment of pro- mises" made to the Jews by the labor party, before it took office. He added that the government was hanging on to a mandate "in which they have no vital inter- est." Foreign office officials have said emphatically that BritairiJ'has no intention of giving mandate and "may ask the Nations to confirm it. A sourc'e close to Attlee; said up; her United The Cards more voluble were about somewhat it. "Sure, they're the sort of team that might beat you on any.pitch of a assented Manager Dyer while discussing his ehnn- ces. "But, just the same, we can give them he'll of a rassle if we're 'right', the way we were in that second play-off game." Another Week For Blue (ross Signers Community Group" Signing Needs 75 More To Moke Individual Cases'Effective One more week has been ad- ded. Already 175 individuals have (Continued on Page 11 Column 4) WEATHER! Oklahoma: Partly cloudy Sun- day except scattered showers northwest and north central; somewhat cooler west; partly cloudy Sunday night, few scat- tered showers likely east; Mon- day partly cloudy, cooler east. signed up here for the Blue Cross hospital plan under the Community Group arrangement made available once each year. But 75 more arc necessary if the Group is to be accepted, and it is these 75 that are inviled to investigate during this week. The Women's Auxiliary of Ihe Ponloloc-Murray county associa- tion will 'man Ihe booth' Jn the First National bank this week and will also make personal contuels. Under the Community Group plan any person not employed ot who is employed where fewer lhan five persons are employed is eligible. Those who are hot informed on what benefits the Blue Cross hospital plan offers are invited to call at Ihe booth this week and find out what the advant- ages arc and how the plan functions. CHICAGO, Oct. 5 bership in the American Federa- tion of Labor has reached 808, passing the seven million mark, for the first time injiis- tory, secretary-treasurer George Meany reported today. Moccasin type shoes originated in Sinnctt-Meaders for best type of automobile re- pair. 10-6-lt Registration Under How (or That Election of Nov. 5 A lot of things'have been de- manding attention of folks lately nd all of a sudden here it is time o register for the general elec- tion of November S, Thut registration period begins October Ii and will continue until the night of October 25, according to. J. E, Boswcll, county registrar. A liot of registrars for Pon- totoo county will be found on page 2. People not already registered in the county but whose resi- dence qualifications have been completed since the last registra- tion period are invited to regis- ter so that they can take part in the Democratic-Republican ballot clash of. next month. Then there are those who have become 21 years of age and have not yet registered. Infantry Unit Of Guard Approved Regular Meeting at Ar- mory Each Wednesday, Places for Many Men Yet Lt. Col. Earl Fisher, .Fourth Army headquarters of Ft. Sam Houston, Thursday night in- spected Company C, 180th Infan- try, of the 45th National Guard Division and expressed approve: as the Ada unit received nation- al recognition, The company commander of the infantry' unit is Capt. John Lucas, Lt. Wm. Tribby is execu- tive officer, Lt. Bob Ball is line officer and Craig McBroom will receive his commission as a lieutenant in the near future at which time he will become the first platoon leader. Duard C. Willoughby is the first sergeant of the outfit. Lt. Tribby said that he Is working out a training schedul- ed for the remainder of this year and expects to put it into effect later this month. A requirement of the unit here s that 10 per cent of full streng- th, or 24 men, must be added every three months. The unit hopes to have 188 en- isted men and seven officers sometime next year. At the first official gathering at the Armory Thursday from to o'- clock, there were 25 men listed on the roster and 23 of that number were present. Col. James O. Smith, regimen- al commander, has his head- quarters in Okemah. He -will possibly visit the Ada unit lat- er this month. Regular meeting of Company C will be held each Wednesday Tom to p. m. at the Armory North of Ada, acc'ord- ng to Lucas. Capt. Lucas has 'reminded, in- that they can ioin he outfit any Wednesday night by just attending the meeting dissention over Palestine also was one of several 'matters on: which former Minister; of Philip Noel-Baker had' dis'agreedS'.witfi the government. Noel-Baker, was shifted to air of cabinet and ministerial- chantei announced last night. >vf Arab Criticizes Truman The foreign .office; President Truman1 was couched-1 in strong language. An Arab spokesman1 accused the president of playing politics. Dr. M. Fa'dhel. Jamuli, Iraq for- eign minister and leader of the Iraq delegation tp the London on in a for- mal statement declared thut "wo regret that the president's con- nection with'Zionist sources in America is never'counterbalanced by any standing connections with, or study of, the, Arab point of view. We also know, .to our re- gret, that elections in America, which should be purely internal matters, do take on a bargaining nature for Zionist votes and Zion- ist influence in, the U. S." RAC'S_CARRY with rifles like regular infantry, bobby-soxcd Chinese s parade in'Taipeh, Formosa, where they of the regular garrison. nd filling out the neceatary Four Main Fire Fife Chief Ed: Haley Saturday said that: four main structural fire hazards exist in many homes in Ada. His statement was made in connection with Fire Preven- tion Week, October 8-12, sponsor- ed by the National Fire Protec- tion Association. "Take, for example, the matter of worn, inflammable wood roofs responsible for fires every day in the United States, according to the NFPA, Such roofs arc tinder for wind-blown sparks and should be replaced with fire-re- sistant roofing nrmteriuJs, such as Chief Haley common structural de- fects responsible for home fires, the chief stated, are defective heating plants, faulty chimneys or flues and improper electrical systems. He urged all citizens to.- use Fire Prevention Week as.an op- portunity to "put their own house in and pledged codpera- tion of his deportment in mak- ing.the homes in Ada much safer from fire. Will Reopen First Concerted Move To Resume Normal Operations .Despite Power Shortage Oct. 5 Downtown department stores to- day planned to resume' normal operations-despite the crippling 12-day power strike. ;'The retail merchants asiocia- ion said the stores are installing imergency generators to, permit hem tp operate and end the itrike-made layoffs of more .than employes, As made plans to for-toiuiliiiuii toiprotest- ne strike of members of he Duquesne Light Co. Inde- pendent Federal conciliation efforts still ailed today to bring the union .lid -the company, together. The pmpany has insisted on arbitra- ion to settle, the wage dispute, "his, the.union flatly refuses. Meanwhile, the strike dragged n in the 8.17-nquare mile area erved by Duquesne Light. In some sections, residents had elec- tricity in their homes, but streets were pitch black and nocturnal travelers did well to carry flasn- lighta. Streetcars and busses princi- pal means 'of transportation for some still tied up -by refusal of motormen and drivers to cross picket lines set up by .the power strikers, The striking Duquesne Light employees seek a 20 per cent wage increase, raising base pay levels from to an hour. The company has offered five per cent. German Uproar Grows With Demand Three Nazis Be Turned to Them for Trial Schacht and Fritxscha at Liberty, Von Popen Still In Prison; May Yet Ba Tried for Crimes Against Own Paopla By TOM REEDY NUERNBERG, Oct. of the three acquit- ted top Nazi leaders were spirited out of jail and given final freedom today by United States military authorities amid growing uproar among Germans that the three be tried in German courts for crimes against their own people.! asphalt aaid. Other Cordell Hull Is Improving Now WASHINGTON, Oct. 5, Hull's, condition con- tinued to today, the Navy Modlcul Center reported, but Is still regarded as serious. The 7S-ycnr-old former secre- tary of state had been reported in grnvo condition earlier in tha week, after suffering a stroke at the Bethesda, Md., hospital. Slight, improvement of Hull's condition was noted by the'hos- pital in its early bulletins today. At 4 p. hi. E.S.T. the hospital re- ported: "Mr. Hull has continued to show some improvement during the day. However .his condition is tstill regarded- as serious." Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. .Hjalmar Schacht, banker, and Fritzsche, pro- pagandist, were released from prison and installed in down- town' apartments, Franz Von Rapen, the remained in. jail; word oh whether enter the Brit- ish-zone... ,A .British .spokesman in the. zone said entry was bar- red to. all three. 'The U. S. army clear that Schacht and Fritzsche were free to come and go as they xieast "pending trial" by Gcr man denazification courts, bi; reports from all over German Lold of demands that all three b brought before German tribun il on. charges of1 crimes agains their own people. Want Seven Others, Too In Berlin persons, jam ming a variety theater in th Soviet sector of the city, gav thunderous approval to a reso ution that not only the three ac quitted nazis, but also the seven vho received prison sentences )e delivered "to a German cour lere immediately." us .Von Papen to .try in :he shattered reichschanceliery Schacht in the battered reichs bank and Fritzsche under th Rains Fair Over Northwest Wheat Fields of Slate shouted one speak highest German radio er. In Bremen political officials of the Britist and American zones adopted un aniiiaously a formal resolulinr that the three nazis acquitted by the international military tri- bunal Tuesday be tried by r German court on a charge o: "crimes against the German peo- ple." In. Munich Dr. Anton Pfuiffer chief denazification officer foi Btivm-lii, appealed anew to i American military govcrmnen1 officials to turn over the three for trial by a denazification court. If convicted they couk be sentenced to hard labor. Meanwhile all but three of the high nazis convicted by the tri- bunal filed appeals for clemency with the allied control council before the p. m. deadline. Ernst Kaltenbrunner, Gestapo chief sentenced to liang; anna- Albert Soeer leader Baldur years ments producer and Hitler youth Von Schirach, given 20 disdained appeals. 'Home in Oklahoma1 to Have Its Premier Showing at Local Theater on October 30 Roy Rogers to Be Here for First Showing Of Movie Made ot Flying L Ranch Remember lasKsummer when Roy Rogers, Gabby Hayes and- Dale Evans were headlining a motion picture being, made on Bill Likins' Flying L Ranch- near Davis? Well, it's time now to get well in mind the date of the picture's "world scheduled for Ada on October 30. The release date for the movie "Home in Ok- lahoma" is-Nov.. 7. Roy Rogers will be' here for the now only a new radio so will the Flying L: ..Quartet which picture a royal, welcome, with the kleig lights in brilliant dis- play, with a stage show in which it y hoped Rogers can take a singing part. Republic Pictures sent the three western stars to Hereford Heaven last summer, along with cameramen and all the other personnel that is required to making a real western. Picture Here Three Days Hundreds of 'Oklahomans liv- ing in this area visitod the Fly- The Flan Bit-Occasion McSwairi theater is be- _____ ginning now its arrangements for giving the premier of the was filled for a personal ap- pearance program of Rogers, Evans and Hayes which was By The Auociited fntt Wheat- farmers in, Oklahoma's Panhandle Saturday reported whciit pnsUircn were improving following two-days rains which totaled inches at Guymon in Texas county. County Agent Clifford Hatch- er said thure was now more moisture in tho soil lhan at any time since 1944 and thut. as n result, some wheat would be ready for pasturing by next week. Lighter rains cased into the state from the northwest with Woodward reporting .75 inch of rain after 2 p: m. Saturday. Waynoka and Gage also report- ed light rainfall. The temperature dropped to 60 at Guymon Saturday after- noon and the weather bureau forecast a taste of similar weath- er for central Oklahoma Sunday. The forecast is for partly cloudy skies, light showers con- tinuning in the. northwest, with somewhat cooler weather in the wt-st.i.'1-n areas. HiKli murks will be in the lower (iO's over Ihe Panhandle- lo the lower 110'n in tho southeast. Signatures Gain On Road Sef-Up Hove OKLAHOMA CITY, Got lo Initiative S. pe- (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) titions proposing changes in the stole roiid set-up .ore rapidly in- creasing, and the petitions will >e put on file by Oct. 16, H. L. Sddy, manager of the Oklahoma lighway development associu- .ion, said today. The proposals would revamp he highway commission and jrescribe the manner of spend- ng road-user tax money. Petition circulations at Tulsa, diami, selling, Enid, Wewoka. Seminole -have exceeded their quotas of signatures, Eddy said, Eisenhower Visits With Royal Family LONDON, Oct. 3, e n. Dwight D. Eisenhower arrived t Balmoral Castle in the Scot- ish highlands this afternoon lor n overnight stay with King Jeorge, Queen Elizabeth and lie princesses. Eisenhower, his wife and his on. Capt. John Eisenhower, flew rom Prestwick, the huge Scot- ish ;air terminal, to Dyce air- rom'e outside Aberdeen in B Dakota plane operated by an American crew. The' king sent his secretary, ir Alan Lascelles, to meet them t the airport and accompany lem to Balmoral, 50 miles way, by automobile. For Sale: I have sold my ranch South Dakota and I have for ale 125 mules, 75 draft horses, 25 saddle horses. All above stock are fat. Will sell all, part, and delivery to railroad. O. R. Spence, Valentine, Nebraska. Ready Now For Full Peace Meet Action Reparations Set for Pfvt Farmer Satellites Of Hitlerian Germany Br LOUIS KEVIN PARIS. Oct. 5. tired, disheveled unshaven deletes cried today as the Biilknti economic commu- nion ended 28-hour session which completed the prelimin- ary drafting of the five peace treaties with the former satel- lites of nnzi Germany. When Commission Chairman Josef Korbcl banged gravel m adjournment it meant that the commission had completed share of the writing of repara- tions bill which, ilf approved, will cost Italy, Romania. Bul- gm-iu. Hungary and Finland SI.- for helping Adolf Hitler set the world on-fire. Reparations against Italy alone at one lime totaled Full Next Monday morning gates of Ihe 21 to the European peace conference will meet in plenary session to be- gin the final stage of treaty writing that is scheduled to end on Oct. 15. 'Then they will turn their treaty recommendations over to the Big Four foreign ministers, who will have Ihe fin- al say. A special plenary seuion will be held tomorrow to consider rules limiting debate and the schedule Inid down by the for- eign council. Official French said it would be' ncceisary to hold con- tinuous 24-hour in ord- er to adhere to the schedule and meet Oct. 15; DUpate'or Soviet indicated thtjr would bring up tomorrow the matter of non-belligerent states voting on forethad- owing a dispute on procedure even before the session gets down to Ihe matter of treaties. The Italian political commis- sion, scene of frequent between the Slav bloc and the western powers, concluded work on n note of harmony, Sen. Tom Connolly n U. S. delegate and an adviser to Sea-clary of praised the work of Ihe .si on, ii IK! urged the to remember that their task was to create and preserve world peace. "We must not have another Connally declared. "We cannot have another war! I can- not believe that mankind would be so insane as to lead the world into another war. That is what we always must have before us." This is how the reparations bill finally stacked up: to Yugoslavia, Greece and Ethio- pia. to Hui- sin, Yugoslavia jind Czechoslo- vakia. Bulgaria to Greece and Yugoslavia, to sia, Yugoslavia and Czechoilo- vakia. to Rus- sin. A totnl nf to the Soviet Union. to Czechoslovakia, to Ethiopia, to Yugo- slavia and to Greece. In addition the foreign minist- ers' council is to divide the to be paid by Bul- garia between Yugoslavia and Greece. Cookies are top favorites in school lunch desserts. Johnny may generously give his apple to the teacher, but chances arc that he will keep the for him- self. Greater for amount in- vested. Ada Want TH' PESSIMIST If th' boss had t' live a few years on whut he pays hired hands, they'd comprise th' biggest cheerin' section in th' annals o' history. These days you're a social shut-in if you don't drink.   

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