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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 4, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 4, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             How that Harry Brechetn and the St. Louis Cords finally taken core of the Dodgers, it's up to the Sooners and Aggies to uphold Oklahoma prestige against Texas teams this weekend. eraje Net August Paid Circulation 8462 Mtmbtr: Audit Uiirtau of. Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 145 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY 39 KILLED IN AIRLINER CRASH: Early inorninK haze near Stcplu-nville, Newfoundland, ptirllnlly obscures tho smoku blllow- up from tho blazing trnnstiUnnlic airliner which crushed a few iivinu-nts after the takeoff from Hnrmon Field, The entire 30 por- board arc believed to hnve perished. Hobert tor of Air Korea plane which passed over the scene an hour after the crash, made this County Road Work Highlight Of C of C Committee Reports Dreamboat Starts Top-of-World Hop HONOLULU. Oct. 4, army's B-29 Pacusan Drcnmboat look off this morning on its pro- jected mile flight from Honolulu to Cairo over the top of the world. The huge plane got into the air at EST. a. m. a. m.) To carry the greatest possible Amount of gasoline, the ship was overloaded pounds nt the takeoff. Of its total weight nf pmindx. Approximately half, 77, 352 pounds was gasoline. The heavy plane sped down Ihe army air forces' foo Hirkahm field runway nnd ont ihe navy's adjoining .Tunn Ilnfi rir. field's equally long strip Itc Join it was nii'horne. i The As.sui'uitecl Tress listen ing post in Sun Francisco hcurc the Dreamboat report by raclic ht a. n. m., KST it was "proceeding nor mnllv ht 1.400 feet Col. Beverly Warren, Omaha co- PI lot anrl an expert nt getting heavily-londcd planes into thi air. was at the controls as the B-29 headed toward Dutch Har- bor in the Aleutians, the firs: check point. There is no expectation thn the Drc-amboat will set n worlr nonstop flight record, ns Col. C S. Irvine, the flight commander had hoped, until the navy's- Truculent Turtle flew from Per- th. Australia, to Columbus, Ohio early this week. Tulsan Convicted 01 Manslaughter TfLSA. Okla., Oct. 4, Mack C. Combs, 37, west Tulsa mechanic and landlord, yester- day was convicted of first de- cree manslaughter for the slay- me of his neighbor and tenant Thomas Major, 35, in a dispute over a S28.re.rvi hill. Tne district court jury left punishment to a decision of Judge Harry L. S. Halley, who jet Oct. 32 as date for sentenc- ing. iWEATHER cloudy to- night and Saturday: local showers northwest and extreme west, continued warm; Sunday local showers and cooler western two-thirds: partly cloudy warmer eastern third. and WEATHER FORECAST FOR OCT. DISTRICT 16 Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Nebraska Scattered show-  okesman said investigation isclosed he slipped, into the elaware river while boarding ship and drowned. The spokes- ian discounted first reports-that .of. The a navj captain, and major Itstenet unblinking.'' -as-- a-- U.. S. -militarj commission ordered'-' them "to dii for .eating'.1 the roasted' livefsVo two "U. S, 'airmen "downed on Chichi ;Jima 'in-.'.th'e They were Li, Gen. i Yoshic Tac'hibana; the.arjriy commander Navy Capt. Shizuo -Yoshio, anc Major Sueo Matoba, who also was accused -of terrorizing his own men with drunken brutalities, Rear Adm. Arthur C. Robin son, president of the commission announced that two-thirds of. the commission of seven concurred In of the hanging 'sentences which now will be reviewed by the secretary 'of the navy; The charge of which they were convicted was violating the laws nnd customs of war. There is no charge to fit the crime of can- nibalism. Vice Adm; Kunzio Mori, the top-ranking navy commander on Chichi Jima, was" sentenced to life imprisonment. -He was ac- quitted of any part in the canni- balistic orgy, but was convicted of neglect of duty in failing to protect the executed airmen. The prosecution had demanded deaHJi also for Mori and Army Capt. Kesakick'i Sato as respon- sible commanders. Sato, who re- layed orders for the executions, also was given life. Eight other defendants, con- victed of taking part in the ex- ecutions, we're given sentences Truman Urges Moving Jews To Palestine Fa von Immediate Immi- gration of Displaced Jews, Views Sent to Attlee Oct. 4, President. Truman culled .on Prime Minister Attlee of 'Britain today to open Palestine imme- diately .to Jewish immigrants from, without waiting any longer for a- British-Jewish Arab settlement- of Palestine's future... In a. public Yom -Kippu day statement released here, the text of which .was, cabled -to- Attlee; Mr. Truman also endorsed- the Jewish agency" plan for'fcreation of a- .Jewish state in an "adequ- ate area" of Palestine re- jected outright the plan for an Arab- Jewish divisionVof the Holy Land which Britain and many 6f: Mr. .Truman's own .advisees have been supporting. i He reaffirmed his support -tor the earliest possible immigra- tion of Jews- into Pales- tine, -but urged that "substantial immigration" should begin at one before winder brings new suffering to the masses of -Jew- ish homeless in. Europe. In this projected endeavor, he promisee American assistance in the form of 'shipping arid, economic aids.'. divided the Palestine problem into two parts: immediate and Ipng range. He evidently abandoned the British' thesis that some overall settlement must worked oxJt before any substantial number of Jewish immigrants could be permitted. Wants Congress To Act In: addition? to-promising aid in getting'. Jews from '-Europe- to Mr J .'Truman alw" ire- affirmed s k British Won't Let Schacht And Fritsche Come to Their Zone, And French Refuse Von Papen By THOMAS R. REEDY Appeals were filed for Hit- NUERNBERG, Oct.' 4, I ler's erratic deputy, Rudolf Hess, jiouncement: hose helping make reports. with the drive The drive hns been in progress 'or almost two weeks and Ada. has been covtred from stem to item. s) OKLAHOMA CITY, Oct. 4, republican central, com- nittee hns certified Lloyd H, VTcGuii-c, Guthric attorney, as louse nominee from Logan coun- McGuire is thus fissured a in the _state legislature ince he has no democratic op- >onent. He succea'ds C. E. Bar- nes, Guthrie, nominee for the >ost who moved to Monroe, La. Wyoming mines more iron ore ban all the other Rocky Moun- ain states together. ailey had been blown over- ranging to 20 years; oard by the blast which oc- One- defendant was acquitted, urred a half-mile from the ves- Nineteen of the fire victims ere reported in critical condi- on and hospital authorities said several were not expected to live. In addition. Joseph Risso, 52, a Marcus Hook policeman, was reported in critical condi- tion after he was struck by an automobile while directing traf- fic after the fire. Draft Board Needs This Information Whereabouts of Four Registrants Unknown Draft Board No. 2 of Pontotoc county has four registrants it has been unable to locate. The board is asking that any- one knowing the whereabouts of any of these four- inform the board, for the selective service officials are, now that they are 'scraping the barrel' for manpow- er, anxious to keefa addresses of men under 30 regardless of their classification. The four men and their last known addresses are': Bonnie 'Ramsey; Route 4, Ada. Lee Roy Price, care M; E. Rog- ers, Route 4, Ada. Thomas Doyle Choate, Route 2, Ada. Arlis Robert Ring, Route 5, Norman. No :real moonstones are found in America. Most of them come from Europe. Mrs. Laura Auten, Pioneer, Is Dead Funeral at Chickosho Sat- urday; Family to Thit County in 1893 Mrs. Laura Jane Auten, 84, who moved to this area in 1893, and lived in the, county until 1928, died Thursday at .the home of a daughter, Mrs. Virgil Lynni; in Cfiiekasha.'. Funeral services jvill be held Saturday at 2 p.m. from the Brown Funeral Home in Chick-1 asha, burial at Chickasha. Mrs. Auten was born in 1802 in Corio county, Texas. She- was married to John A. Auten in 1883. their ten children were born in Texas. In 1893 they moved to Midland, near present Vanoss in then In- dian Territory, living there until 1928. The family was living near Enid when Mr. Auten died in 1941. Since that time she has been making her 'home with the dren, Surviving are five daughters, Mrs. Edna 'Mitchell and Mrs. George Ada, Mrs. Laura Mullins' of Chowchilla, Calif., Mrs. Ada Mullins of Den- and Mrs. Lynn., at Chickasha; three sons, E.. E. of Arlington, Calif., Carl of- Still- water and Ray Auten of Chow- chilla; a sister, Mrs. Harriet Tex.; 30 grand- children and 27 great-grand- children. im- migrations- to 'allow, entrance of thousands of .Additional displac- ed. -he s: a i d, "should a workable' solution for Palestine be would be .willingvto recommend to' the congress a plan for econpmic as- sistance. for the: development of that Mr. :Trumait set forth his own views as follows: In view of tlm fact that win- ter will come on before the' con fbr'en'ce conference in Loildon) can be resumed, I be- lieve and urge- that substantial immigration into Palestine can- not1 await a solution to the Pales- tine problem and that it should begin at once. Preparations for this movement have already been made by this government and it is ready to lend its immediate as- sistance.. .1 "2, I state again, as I have stated on previous occasions, that the immigration laws of other countries, including the United the aliz States, should be liberalized with a. view to the "admission of dis- placed Taersons. I am prepared to make such a recommendation'to the congress-, and to continue as energetically as possible-collabor- ation with-other countries on the whole problem of displaced per- ons. f-: "3. 'Furthermore, should a workable1 solution for Palestine be I. would be to recommend to .the congress a plan for economic assistance for the development, of that country." The president's statement, 're- leased by Prels Secretary Chr.rles 3. Ross with the announcement ;hat its contents'were cabled to Attlee, expressed Mri Truman's 'deep regret" that the meetings of the London Palestine confer- ence are not to be resumed until December 16. ,r v1 The president said 'that in the ight of the "terrible'ordeal which :he Jewish people of Europe en- dured during the recent- dnd the crisis now I cannot, believe that a program of immediate action along the lines suggested, could not be worked out with the cooperation of all people He added that '-the administra- ion will continue to do-every- hing it can to this H. M. Supervisors Al Garvin Meeting Two supervisors, of' Horace Mann.school were, in Pauls Valley Friday afternoon attending the Garvin county teachers meeting, Victor; H.> Hicks, di- rector at Horace Mann. Mrs. Mildred grade supervisor, and Mrs. Mary Wasson, first grade supervisor, ..are attending. .The two'Ada .teachers are con- ducting'clinics'in lower and high- er education and visual educa- tion. S. army authorities said- today the British had declined to per- mit H.jnlmar Schacht and Huns Fritsche. acquitted of war crimes by the International military tribunal, to enter the British occupation zone' of Lt, Gen. Lucius Clay, deputy American military governor, an- nounced that the French had re- jected the plea; of nazi diplomat Franz Von Papen, the third of the acquitted German war lead- ers, to settle in the French zone. They Fear Bavarians The three acquitted men still were in the Nuernberg palace of justice jail, hopefully awaiting safe conduct out of the Ameri- can zone. They told attorneys and army officers they feared the treatment they might re- ceive at the hands of the Bavar- ians around Nuernberg, who want to try them under denazi- fication Col, B.' C. Andrus, security of- ficer, said he was, anxious to get rid of his "star bul who was sentenced to life im- prisonment; for Hans Frank, Hit- ler's gauleiter in Poland, a .n d Jew baiter Julius Streicher, both condemned to hang. Already on file were appeals for Wllhelm Frick, "protector" of Bohemia and Moravia, philosopher Alfred Rosenberg and Deputy Fuehrer Martin Bor- mann, all sentenced to hung. Bormann was tried in absenti'j. "All appeals must be before the council by p. m. tomorrow. May Provide Safe Conduct In Berlin U. S. army head- quarters said the three acquit- ted men would be given time to mull over their dilemma and make new requests. It was ad- ded that if the requests were ac- ceptable, the men would be given safe conduct to the bord- ers of the occupation zone in- volved, to protect them from violence1. The announcement said it the throe elected the U. S. zone they would be given safe con- would keep them in his custody i duct lo' the community involved pending a decision at a higher level. _ Meanwhile, attorneys for three additional nazi war leaders and for'the SS (elite guard) filed ap- peals from their convictions with the allied control council. Ap- peals on behalf: of six of the 19 men convicted Tuesday now :were before the council.' and police would be irftlructcd to protect them from violence. Headquarters said it remained for the German courts to decide whether any of the three would, be tried for crimes within Ger- many, and that conduct from the prison in no' way would interfere with any official German action. Say U. 5, Britain Broke Big Four Agreement In Vole Their Spokesmen Reply That Reparation! ftoeetei Entirely New Article Saturday Midnight Deadline on Full 61 Bill Benefits Final -date of., the. GI bill for full' benefits comes Saturday and Sgts..Howell and Gray of the Ada recruiting: offices make who, .wish to take the educational advantages of the bilfniust be enlisted'on or before midnight of'Oct. Sat- urday. _. Thereafter, there will be strict limitations on length of service required before termination of the emergency is declared by con- gress. Afler Saturday any man enlist- ing- must have ierved for three months before he is eligible for any. of the GI bill .benefits. So, young man gerves less than days when congress declares the emergency over, he will not be eligible for any benefits under present Inw, If when that termination comes he has been in the army 90 days, he will receive one year of bene- fits and no more, but if he is signed up before Saturday at midnight he will receive nil of the .allowances provided by the bill. The Ada office, Room 304, Post Office building, will remain open until tonight and Saturday night to accommodate applicants who are late getting in. B E K L I N, Oct. 4, Richard Howe, Miami, Okla., was one of 14 enlisted men from the U. S. army's Berlin district forces .awarded the armyy com- mendation ribbon. The award was made by Berlin' Comman- dant" Maj.-Gen. Frank'A. Keat- ing (for outstanding service since V-E day. Some Indications Of Breaks in Big Labor Disputes By AlMcUUd PI-HI There were- indications today of possible progress in efforts ,to settle the 'nation's -major labor -disputes, Government officials in Wash- ington planned a new attempt to end the four-day old shipping strike which has tied up 543 ships in Atlantic, Pacific and gulf ports. In strike-bound Pittsburgh where an 11-day strike of power workers has curtailed general business, some AFL streetcar motormen planned to vote on whether to cross picket lines set up by the independent power union. Their return lo work would end one of the most severe transportation llctips in Pittsburgh's history and alleviate I ho effects of the work stoppage by the Duquesne Light Co. em- ployes. In Washington, the maritime commission arranged to invite west coast shipping officials to meet with east coast operators and commission members over the week end and seek to end Ihe maritime walkout. The. main obstacle to a settle- ment of the strike by CIO marine engineers and the.AFL masters, mates.and pilots was considered to be the west. coast deadlock over demands for more'union se- curity. The maritime commission wants a uniform settlement on both coasts and the labor depart- ment's compromise plan has been accepted by east coast shipown- ers and the unions. Rust, it is estimated, has claim- ed 40 per cent of all the tons of pig iron produced in the last one-half century. PARIS, Oct. 4 in angry words today accused United States and Britain of vio- lating their Big Four agreements by voting for nn Australian amendment to set up on interna- tional commission for supervision of Italian reparations The Italian economic commU- sion of the peace conference, which still must fix the amount Italy is to pay neighboring Allied steles, passed the amendment, 12 to 8, with France, China and the Slavic stales opposed. Under the amendment, an in- ternational consisting of the Big Four and countries receiving reparations would supervise pay- ments other than those to sia. These would go to Yugo- slavia, Albania, Greece, Ethiopia and Poltind. Soviet Speaker ABrered A, .A, Arutiuniun of the Soviet Union, visably angered, declared that the United Slates und Brit- ain had violated an agreement to a section of the Big Four For- eign Minister' treaty draft. American delegate W i 11 a r d Thorp and British Glenvil Hal! both protested that' the amendment was a new article and not a change in -en agreed upon portion of the draft. At one point, Australia removed the name of the Soviet Union from the list of members of proposed body after Russia pro- tested that she was not concern- ed with non-Russian reparations. When this led to further protests. A us t r.a 1 i a re-inserted Russia's name, whereupon Ai utiunian branded this an "electoral maneu- ver." Charges Prearranfement The Australian amendment, originally worded, would have given the chairmanship of the' commission to the United States on the ground that the 'United States as a non-claimant of repar- ations and a non-European power had a better "perspective." Arutiunian, terming this con- trary to the interests of the So-" viet .Union and oilier countries concerned, Australia of acting by prearrungement with other powers. "The Australian he said, "is undoubtedly counting on the voting machinery to pans its propos.il, especially since other delegations do not hesitate about violating the foreign ministers' agreement." American liecnmes Angry, TIM South Africa offered a sub- amendment to let the proposed commission choose its own chair- man. This cvcnlually can-led. Be- fore I he vole, however, Thorp said angrily: "Mr. Chairman, the United States delegation had the inten- tion of asking that the chairman- ship of this commission en- trusted lo some olher eounlry, but in view of the lotally unwarrant- ed atlack upon our motives we shall abstain from taking part in Ihe voting and will abide by the decision of the commission." Arutiunian countered with the assertion Ihut he would refuse to take part in the vote even to the extenl of abstaining. The sub- amendment was passed, 7 to 3, with five abstentions and five states listed as not voting. Jim Lester Gin, Mill .Creek, Oklahoma running every day. Bring us your cotton. ABOARD CRASHED AIRLINER: Mrs. Virginia Edwards Bellan- boarded the transatlantic plane at La Guardia field to visit -her husband in Germany, who is a civilian attorney in Berlin. She vis from Kingston, New Jersey. At right, Horace Eastburn Thomp- son, Jr., 38, from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was also aboard the plane- when it crashed shortly after takeoff at Harmon Field, Stephenville, LAWTON, Oct. 4, Joseph Zipen family fears if its bad luck continues its won't have a leg to stand on. It all begaiv when Mr. and Mrs. Zipen were called home from California by the injury of their son, whose right liip wax fractured last week. By the time Mrs. Zipen reached the she (oo was wearing a cast. Failing to see box on their sidewalk, she fell 'fractur- ng her left ankle in two places. OKMULGEE, Oct. 4', first annual Okmulgee county negro 4-H club junior livestock show will be held here Oct. 9 and 10. TH' 'PESSIMIST nr link Jr. Whut country drivin'. we need in this is more wreckless Unfortunately, we're rated among th' expe- rience.   

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