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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: October 1, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - October 1, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             f. f It moy be that Nazi leaders condemned to die arc about as well off at the) others.permitted to livo, in prison and disgrace, a far cry from days when they were enjoying power and glory Avtrift Xtl Aucuit Circulation 8462 Mrnikcr: Audit JHittnu at Circulation FINAL EDITION 43rd 142 OKLAHOMA, .TUEJSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1948 FIVE CENTS THE COPT William E. Hansen By City Council to Become City Manager on Oct. 15 City Council Votes More Policemen And Firemen; Will Codify Ordinances Tentative Reviiions in Salary Schedules Made; Va- cation! Provided for City in Now Ordinance In addition to election of a new city manager, the Ada city coun- cil Monday night took up several proposed ordinances, th.o major one being a tentative revision of salary scales and providing for addition of men to the police and tire departments. That major ordinance will, be in effect until the incoming city manager can make additional study of t h e financial situation and the needs of the department and submit further suggested re- visions. Another ordinance provides for codifying of the city's almost 800 ordinances, something that has never been done before and a move that will sort out the or- dinances still in effect, assemble them without the cluttering ef- fect of having also the numerous ordinances that have been super- seded or amended out of their original application. Salaries, Personal Provision The ordinance for salary and personnel revision, adopted by unanimous vote, of t h e council, provides: City manager, per month; acting city manager per month: secretary to manager, also available for help in other offices, ?150 per month. Finance department: City treasurer, chief clerk assistant city treasurer, two clerks in water officg each. More Folicenen, firemen Police department: Chief, assistant, chief, three desk sergeants each; meter man.- patrolman. 10 'patrolman (three more than now employed and making possible an approach to standard- negro patrolman, Tire department: Chief. assistant chief, firemen (four more than employed- at present) each; mechanic, Fire insurance rates are in- volved in the addition of em- ployes. Street department: Superin- tendent, mechanic (now paid out of 'extra help' fund, being transferred to regular sal- ary) seven employes, each. Water department: Superinten- dent. plumbing inspector, S175; nine employes (adding one to take over part of pump station operation) each; pump Na- tion operator already on job, and house. Cemetery superintendent, Park dent. and living quarters; summer season park and swim- ming pool attendants, heretofore on salary of and per month, transferred from regular to extra fund pay. Airport department: Superin- tendent, and house. Sanitation department: Super- visor incinerator and .disposal plant three disposal plant employes, each; 1 disposal plant employe (negro) helper, part time) (from extra help fund to salary Janitor hall, City attorney, Librarian, two assistants, each (part-time janitor, The ordinance provides that except lor city manager and act- ing city manager these are to be considered maximum salaries. The city manager can' set 'other salaries at lower levels, as, for instance, for a beginner who is not fully qualified by training and experience but who "can be raised as he develops: efficicnty. However, even a can not receive less than below the maximum. More personnel ordinances will be decided on later. Paid Vacations Provided The council agreed that offi- cers and regular employes of .the city are to be entitled to 15 days vacation with pay (not tive from one-year time to be worked out when most convenient for each in his depart- ment. A sick leave policy will be worked out later. An employe becomes entitled to the vacation provision after a year of con- tinuous service (those who have had a year or more of such serv- ice are already qualified lor va- cation No vacation provilege has been made, in the past here. In lieu of furnishing the city manager, a car for use, .in his he is on the go much of ithe council voted to provide per month as soon as an appropriation exists. The ordinance' providing 'for! codifying-of. has-been pending or more and was taken up lor .final dis- position. Roberta To Codify Ordinances Vernon 'attorney and a member of the council; was'des- ignated as code commissioner, to serve without (fcmpensation, with provision lor clerical help; and supplies and the city attorney available lor assistance when called on. As he works through the or-, dinances of past is to revise the codified copies to.bring titles of officers under thei'new designations established change to council-manager form >f government-j-as, lor instance, From commissioner of finance as under the commission to :ity treasurer. The codifying is to completed by July i; This ordinance, incidentally, is No. 788. H. J. Huddleston and Roberts; as members of the city council, resigned as members planning and zoning board and their resignations were .accepted. All decisions ,ol Monday j night were unanimous. All were J. Huddles- ton, Joe "Red" Walker; Vernon Roberts and Mayor Frank Spencer. E. Diwson Dies In San Diego Sunday Farmer Resident of Allan And Ada Had loan In Ce liternia far Year Word has been received here of the death in San Diego, Calif., Sunday of C. E. Dawson, former resident of Allen and Ada, who moved to California about a year ago. He had been in poor health for some years and only a few days ago -was taken to a hospital for treatment following a severe heart attack. The body is to arrive in Gran- ite. OJa., Thursday: word of funeral arrangements has not yet jeached frfends here. Dawson up in 'that community and most of his relatives live in'and around Granite. The widow was him in California at the time of his death. Dawson was for years with the Homaokla Oil company when it was active in the Allen area; La- ter he lived for a time in Ada. He was in the leasing end of the oil business and has many friends in this county. OKLAHOMA CITY, Oct. 1 will.furnish at least 800 men for the October draft more than in September induction officer Tom B. .Porter announced'yestcrday. WEATHER! OKLAHOMA Generally lair, ivarmer except in panhandle to- night and Wednesday. Seven More Enlist In Regular, Army Those Interested Reminded Full lenefiti of Gl lill Available Unril Oct. 3 Seven piore men enlisted in the Regular Army here Monday, ac- cording to B. M. Howelf, recruiter. They are Emmitt W. McHyrd, 412% West Twelfth, three years, AAF; PaufW. Gamill, 2002 North Broadway, three years, AAF; D. Howell, 520 East Sixth, three years, AAF; Guy W. Headers, school, 18 months, unassighed; J. C. France, 215 East Ninth, 18 months, unassigned; Joseph Ho- mer, Atoka, three years, AAF; Hershel J. Winsters, Boehler Route, Boswell, 18 un- assigned. All' men interested :in the GI Bill of Rights are asked to con- tact the U. S. Army recruiting sergeants, Room 304, Post Office building, this week; for the dead- line is October 5. Anyone enlist-, ing before that date is assured full benefits of .the bill. SHAWNEE, Oct. 1, nee is now a "two-horse town" and if City Manager Robert Hut- chison has his way the city will be a "no horse town" as soon as a new tractor is available. Buck and Shorty, horses use'd to pull the .street cleaner wagon in the early morn- ing hours, "haven't earned 'their oats since I've been the city manager said. Furthermore, said Hutchison, the horses are "something more than high-spritied" and ought to be working on a farm -where they can work in peace and quiet; Has Cify Managership In His Background Comet frdhi Monterrey, Calif.; Hat Unusually Varied! Ixperience, Training Ada city council, :by.unaaimous vote, Monday at- a called meeting, voted- to "employ Wil- liam E. Hansen, 'Monterrey, Calif, as city manager, succeeding Luke B.. Dodds, who has been -acting since iiger system of city government was established, here in July of this year. N Mr. Hansen was present. and accepted the action of the coun- cil, announcing that he. Will be in Ada with his family on'Oet. 13. 'He- is scheduled to take over the, managership on: or !about October 15 and Mr. Dodds will continue until that -time. Dodds Work Appreciated' The council members also'ex- pressed appreciation'lor the-work of Mr, Dodds, a local business lor. 'his .untiring ..work and cooperation as a civil employe of the city and directed that a res- olution be. drafted expressing of- ficially'that appreciation. They also mentioned1: the' ob- jective-analysis- of Ada's .situation that' led to selection of Hansen out of a number 61 men viewed for; the managership, be- lieving, that a man with, engi- neering: background and expe- rience a city: manager would prove. most efficient here.: The council checked, on records in allparts, ol'lthe, United States and; over-.Oklatioma, Con- cluding ground and experience require- ments Ada'ifpr'iye'KSv1ahiMd. Sourht some time he been seeking west favorable1'climatic of age. Hansen is a'gradiiiteffrom United nology with: a degree engineer- ing. Additi9nal :e c-aitro'-ri a 1 courses Unir versity of California, one in elec- trical engineering arid one'ih'geo- togy.-, ;His experiences, ried and are admirably adapted to the work, of a ;.city; manager. From 1924 ;tq 1928 he was con- struction arid office manager for the California, Pot- tery company. .His duties consist- ed of the mariufacture'iol'.cer'amic, pro- ducts, plant purchas- ing, personnel, checking and "su- pervision of the installation -of- large boiler '.set- tings and -roof structures tu'.be covered; Road Work Experience From 1928 ployed by the Union Oil company of California where- he .had many and varied duties. In connection with those duties, he: worked'very close to and consulted', with county and state officials on road and highway paving worked with contractors engaged in and using large quan- tities of asphalt -and road oils. From 1934 worked as construction arid maintenance engineer for the: Mapaso Gold-'. company, in PI i e Mindanao, -Philippine Islands. of. first clearing the -then1 building. necessary. roads and 1 ol-: lowing up. with the construction of required such mill, power quartets, and the installation of water and, sewer systems. Back To Philippines In 193S He returned tor. the-' U nit e di States in 1934 and received a tem- porary apppiritment; from thei Civil Service Examination .Board', of the City of. ifornia, as ah 'associate engineer; In 1935 he returned to the Phil- ippine Islands- under contract. to Atkins Kroll arid Company as their consulting .engirieer, where, principally laying out and sugar cane mills, one gallon distillery, one small! glass two. sewer ont, small; hydro-electric -power1 project on the Ipo River, one mile load- ing dock in: the China Sea, and numerous smaller' projects. "This work required travel to China, Japan, Celebes, Java and India. Upon his return to the United States in 1938 he was employed by McMillan Petroleum .company as lubricating engineer and then promoted to assistant, sales man- ager lor the midcontinents section ol the United States. V Drafted' By Engineers in 1940 In 1940 He iwas'drafted by the United States War "'Department Corps of Engineers in a civilian status as principal- engineer -for the construction and mainten- ance of .Fort !Ordj- the second (Continued 2 Column 3) "SIT iix s aepuuea.. .yrruupBj two -aozitxt' entrance in an attempt other pickeU sat in the iemptied As deputies arreited the (NEA Ocean to Strike Paralyzes Government at to: New World WfiHii..... Au i The baby B7O-- InspetHon Is Set Inspecrod Lt. Col; Ross ive -officer. :.in. .geri; eral's oJfice said: today inspection: of 71 iinits of the..'45th .piVisiori, Oklahqma.r- National Guardj: will, be 'completedfl-'Dy' Week: -XS-.--. V .The headquartet- f of. medical battalion will; be inspect- ed .toiiigh't' Oklahoma: Cityia ,On Wednesday viiiili' headlimafcters- 'company, 43th: in Com-, wny" .H; ilrilaritry Aird- n'ore, nf antry, 45th Mechanize'd'Recbriaissance ops.i'.. ...i; Company.; in Jurant.v- K, Three Years Given asy, iShields; 462 using with cartridges7 po jvder 'bieeiV.r em'oired? e'cted federal-.probation of Dicers: ;6 a Shields. frpm': the" opt- after; several-blocks .was, "Lj-- 'Leases Sold MarlmV.secretarjfJqfJ.the. in 68: tracts in': Cimarrqnf c'puntyl' '6 JrirCottpn county, andv-fpufriri' Noble i Read The News ClaMifiedAds.; -The -labor department -schedul- eds new; this afternoon, already quitting second month last'- night, when' Pacific shipowners re derharids the CK) Mates Si: Pilots. Their as .midnight '-f eU ,f time zone. -iq prepar- ed to the -CIO long- expired a t planned -to hold mass meetings instead of reporting'. for work.. V" -.-'While ;west; conciliation sesiions.th e: govern- ment appeared- 'toi-be? pinning its main .hopes on an' Atlantic set- tlement: that .would: nip i.-ttje- walk- out- there-Vin-, its early stages and west coast :the- 'vand Hepreseri'tatiyes.uof 'American 'Shipowners Ji Associa- tion repeateSly said 'yto de- mands'. of" w b. -f or'' a to: east. .arid Wallace; Brown-, secretary, of the throughout '.session with the. maritime commission aria Schwel- !v Plant arid Brown: went'ffity their, hotels_and coart 6perators-'jstlllV talkiriff.: t'eyeri thpught. about Said -he. ''li'as- I-as'r siiiriie; arijr, .-'.lurther. negotiations -willr.ibe' home "-where they in first College Vets Name OHIcers for Club lob Ball President, Hook Calei and Dorothy Olten of.'-'- East. met M6nday evening in auditorium- tp; io-.oth-'; r fbusiriessf -new--' y was. elected president; 5-. received? 'the'- a n d sec-. .VieteranVAdrniri-- repreaetitativesx-, talk at representatiyejblthevyA with of- f in 'the principal speaker." .Music was 'furnished by a trio. .-u 'next: regular. of- the cluhii. scheduled for Monday; ot Portuguese briainjA Chough -first: .the: Dutch-des- cended Boers. -C Death On Gallows Is Fate For 12, Seven Prison, 3 Cleared Meat Remains on Scarce Items i Blow to Stock Industry Hopes for End of OPA Control WASHINGTON, Oct. 1' The worsening meat, shoi-tage brought an official threat today of government seizure of all mar- ket-bound: livestock. That unprecedented step was described by secertary of agricul- ture Clinton P. Anderson as "a very-real danger that day by day becomes more a possibility." assertion to a; group of New Mexico cattlemen' coin- cided with his .formal, announce- ment through the agriculture de- partment here that meat must re- main on the government's of scarce farm products. Canned Fruits Off List At the same time Anderson erased from the from price canned fruits, juices, nectars and corn, alone, with fresh and frozen salmon, oat cereals: arid r.uni.; What lingering" hopes the meat industry .might stilt have had that the way might be-cleared for lift- ing OPA.' in to farmers to speed: their'stock to market apparently were dashed by the announcement here. i And: Anderson, made the point more emphatic in his Albuquer- que address yesterday by declar- ing that any hew decontrol period would- simply lead to "feast and then famine. Pleading for "cooperation in trying to bring meat' back to the American people at., legitimate The secretary nuked Ihe executive board of the New Mex- ico Cattle Growers association "What do you have to It wax not immediately clear here whether the requisitioning step' Anderson-! mentioned as "a very re'al danger." would be de- signed to channel more meat into regular channels or -merely to assure the armed services and hospitals of a greater supply. The army currently is laying claim to pounds a week by means 'fo'f priority-orders served on federally inspected packers, but many slaughterers under that category. Warning to Stockmen Anderson held out siill another warning to the the Ipng-Btanding light against importing. Argentine beet into this country, might be reopened by public demand. Asserting that receipts are down and black markets arc scheduled to the secre- Russia Disserts 0> AcquHbl of TrU 01 Nazi Leiden Goerinfl and Van Head Liit Thaw Par Wham Death Dacrood By GALLAOBEB {Continued on Page 6 Column 7) One Car and Four Trucks Entangled In Highway Wreck curre4 about 8 p.m. Monday near the underpass south of Ada and damage estimated by ;HtfKway O. Garripbell; who investigated the The accident a car driven by .Walter T.: Green- of Tupelo and driven by Roy Nelson of; Ada. Gordon W. kew of Hugo, Norbert Smith of Konawa and Marvin A; Bryant of' Semiriole. Nelson was' traveling .south on Highway No. .09; when he stopped on: the roadway .waiting for traf- fic to clear in order to make a left .turn. Green, stopped behind Nelson waiting-for him to majtevhis turn. ,.f Askew, also traveling south in a truck loaded with four-yards of dirt and gravel, noticed the cars stopped in front of him. He ap- plied his swerving his truck to the left, striking the. front of' a. truck, traveling, north Smith. The Askew truck continued south, where it struck another truck driven by Bryant. The As- Icew truck'was out of control by this time and swung back to the right, hitting-the Green car from behind and knocking it into the rear of the Nelson truck. Patrolman; Campbell' said that one of the passengers of the auto- mobile- received minor; injuries; It estimated' that damage was done as. Smith, Green, and to the Nelson Mrs. George Erwin, Pioneer Here, Dies Hot j.rvtd in Mercedes, Latr Few Yeort Mrs. George Erwin, until a few ,'ears ago'a resident of Ada, died Monday at Mercedes, Tex. The jody is. being brought to Ada' lor jurial.. Funeral services will be icld p.m. from he Criswell Funeral Chapel. Other ...arrangements will be announced lajter by Criswell's. Mr: Erwin came to this country n 1892 and in 190S: was; married to Miss 'Ethel Gibson: They lived in; Ada for- most- pi "the fears since, moving "to Mercedes Erwin is survived by' the lusband; two daughters, Mrs. th Halm and Mary Kate Erwin of ryler, three Bob and Voodrow, Erwin of Houston and" eorge Mercedes. State's Drys Will Reorganiie OKLAHOMA -CITY, Oct. 1 a mo.ve to reorganize the Dklahoma chapter of the Anti- Saloon League; W. J. Herwig, Vfashington, national associate luperihtendant of the organiza- tion, is'establishing offices here. The Oklahoma unit, would be reorganized under BV program calling, for. '.'scientific' temperence education'.' ol' the, youth of the state and: a strong fight against 'any, and every attempt to repeal he Herwig said. Two Killed When Car Bounced Info Pain of BK miniiUrs pf-.tht: Awembly of Qbd- church in Okrriulgee were kUled almost instantly near We- tunika about. p.m. Monday when' ah automobile, which was driven by one of the, two persons killed, 'collided with- a Union Transportation company bus that was enroute from Ada to Tulsa, B. D. Denton, secretary-treasurer of the company, reported Tues- day, morning. Rev. Robert "Jennings, .27, and his wife, Mrs'.: Hattie Lee Cof- fey, 33, -were fatally injured. One! passenger of the suf- fered minor bruises, but there were- no passengers of the bus seriously injured; Rev. Jennings was driving the automobile' that collided with the bus on a bridge one and a- half miles north; of Wetumka. A highway patrolman inves- tigating, the accident reported to Union 'Transportation Co. offi- cials that Jennings was driving south' on the highway and struck a- (railing on the' bridge throwing his automobile crut of control and into the path' of the bus. Nick W. Meaders, 33, of Ada was the operator of the bus. He was connected, with the company as a driver before his entry into the service' and' when he returned about eight months ago he re- sumed hiS'-job: Mr. Denton said 'that as far as he knew Tuesday morning no charges, had been filed. He said that the automobile is reported to -have- been carried more than 100 feet and was almost com- pletely destroyed. The passengers of the automo- bile were dead when they were removed from the smashed up ear, Reckless Driving (barged lo Mole Lonie Harve Mode was charg- ed with reckless driving Monday by Highway Patrolman. Glenn Clark and the case was filed in the Percy Armstrong justice of the peace court. Trooper Clark made the arrest Sunday and filed charges Mon- day morning. It is alleged that Mode operat- ed -a two-ton truck from an un- known point to a point on West Main; without due regard to traf- fic then and there existing. It was further alleged that the truck was traveling at a speed greater than- would' permit the driver to stop within the assur- ed clear distance ahead. Fined In Violation Of Rules of Road James. E." Anderson paid a fine and costs in the Armstrong justice court after entering a plea of guilty to charges of violation of the rules of the- road. The hearing was held Saturday morn- ing, Charges ..were by O. O- .Campbell, highway, patrolman, who reported: thlf Anderson was released after paying the fine. NUERNBERG. Oct. 1. OVX-Th. international war tribunal- today decreed death on the lows for }f leaders ol the Adolf Hitler gang, sentenced seven to, prison, and with Russia diseon- acquitted three The court, alter sentencing to death Hermann Goering. Joachim Von Ribbentrop and 10 other nazi henchmen, announced that Russia had protested against the. tribunal's acquittal of Franz Von Papen. Hjalmar Schacht Hans Fritsche. The Soviet judce, Maj. Gen. I. T. Nikitchenko. oleo protested that Rudolf Hew should have been haneed instead of. re- ceiving the life imprisonment sentence the court handed and objected to ee-. ouittal of the general staff and hip'i command. Judges of Britain, the United Slates and France- joined in the oninion, which now will carried out by the allied control council, representing all alltat. Three Vat. Entirely to Clew Legal official! of the American military government said thaf If any of the three nazl leaden ac- ouitted were returned to the U. S. zone of occupation they prob- ably would be tried by Germane under the zone's denazification law. The officials said becauite Sch- acht and Von Papen' owned pro- perty in wis conjectural- to which they nifht be returned. Legal ex-' nerts in Berlin- expressed belief tlio Russians, might get custodv of FriUchc. whom they arrested Im Berlin and delivered to Nuern- berg for trial. pthers sentenced to death were Field Mondial Wllhelm Keltel. Ernst Kaltenbriinner, Alfred Hans Frank, Wilhetm Frick, Julius Strsicher. Sonckel. Col. Gen. Alfred Jodl. Arthur Seyfts-Irxiuart and Martin (in Life Rudolf third ranking firman until his strange wartime flipM to Scotland, was sentenced to "fe imprisonment. AUo sentenced to 'lh> Woithpr Funk and Grand Adra. Erinh Raeder. acquitted were: Von Panpn. nJd grav diolo- mat who led intrlmies In' both WorH Wars: Htalmar Schacht. the German finnnce wizard: and Hans FritKche, deputy nronaffan- rta minister for Paul Joseph H Grand Karl who Germany anH fuehrer in the Jast few days of the war; received a ten years seh- tenoe. Von Srhimch. Hitler" vouth lender, and Albert Soeer. German munitions minister, both wore sentenced to 20 years. in prison. Cnnstantin Von .Neuratb. form- er German foreign minister and later "protector of Bohemia and Moravia." was itiven IS years. Rwwia Analaet Aeewttak The Russians- did not sunooft the three acquittals, it was an- nounced. Lord Justice Geoffrey Lawrence, presiding iustice. nounced that the Soviet member of thn tribunal "desires to record his dissent" from the decinions hi the cases of Schacht. Fritsche and Von Papan. "He of the opinion that they should have been convicted and not Lawrence said. "He also dissents from the deci- sion in respect to the reich's cab- inet and general staff and (Continued on Page 2 TH' PESSIMIST Mr. an' Mrs. Newt Lark 're meltin' up candles these days fer butter. You may be a mental giant t' your business but you're jest 'n adolescent jerk t' your wife.   

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