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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: September 26, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 26, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             This reveals a real shortage: series for gam., of F clwoy Park go into the moils tonight along with terse notes of regret to a half-million unlucky admission seekers. rrM.it Nn Auiuit 8462 Member: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA E N FINAL EDITION 43rd 138 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1946 Army Claims Fourth Of Meat Supply From Federally Inspected Political Storm Grows Over Meat Control By Tlir AsiorUttd WASHINGTON. Sept. 26 The Army slapped a claim toddy on a fourth of all meat turned out by federally- inspected slaughterers as the pre-election storm over bare butcher counters mounted in intensity. With the administration already split over the issue of keeping price lids on the rapidly vanish- ing commodity, top democratic party chiefs assembled here for a huddle that appeared certain to take note of the whole situation. The congressional elections are just 40 days off. Army Won't Wait But the army showed no dis- position to await possible action by any other branch of the gov- ernment. Reporting thai its ''visible sup- ply of meat is less thnn a month's lequirement." the army last last served priority papers on all packers operating under federal inspection ordering them to set aside 25 per cent of their total output for the armed services, the war shipping administration and veterans hospitals. While reminding that "puni- tive fiction" awaits those who vio- late the set-aside orders, the army announcement left unanswered whether its goal of pounds of meat a month could be achieved. "Moat slaughter is descending to the vanishing it de- clared. Political Storm Breaks The political storm broke in earnest yesterday after house leader McCormack of Massachusetts demanded in a telegram to price chief Paul Por- ter that OPA suspend control over meat and other scarce food products so "our hospitals and our Circus Gives Early 'Show' Hundreds Waiting When Firit Train Rolls In, See Unloading, Setting Up It might have been six long years since Ringling Brothers and Barnutn and Bailey Circus has been in Ada, but Adans haven t forgotten how to see the. circus because hundreds of per- sons were at Twelfth and John- ston about 4 a.m. Thursday wait- ing for the train arrival. It got in about an hour later, but those who were there early were not disappointed because the unloading progress still had plenty of spectacles for young and old alike. Long before the sun started breaking through a heavy fog, police were hard at work keep- ing traffic out of the way of the arriving circus. "Have you ever seen a circus unload asked a six-year- old of a companion, who replied that she had seen it once before but couldn't remember much about it. The two youngsters kept each other busy looking at the things that fascinated them. Parents accompanied young- sters to the unloading places where they were kept busy an- swering hundreds of questions asked by enthusiastic young cir- ll_' f Pill's Labor Leaders Win On Injunction Court Dissolves Anti-Strike Injunction, Drops Con- tempt Charges on Defiant Ten Men PITTSBURGH, Sept. .26 The Allegheny county common pleas court today dissolved its stern anti-strike injunction crux of .the city's three-day-old power dropped con- tempt charges against 10 union leaders who had defied the in- junction. Dissolution of the injunction was requested by the city in an attempt to settle the industry- stifling walkout, which had caused a virutal ''business holi- day" in the steel capital. In dissolving the injunction, the FIVE CENTS THE COPY hanger and plane was completely Peace Conference In Full Session Talks Speed-Up Proposals Hopes to Break Deadlock Over Agenda for Approving Finn Treaty; Bulgaria Mutt Limit Army to Men court's order said: and all citizens" can have enough to eat. Republican national chairman Carroll Reece, branding McCor- ir.ack's action as "cheap noted in a statement that.the 60- day period proposed would carry the suspension just past the No- vember 5 elections. Declaring the Massachusetts democrat is trying "to kid the o'.ers." Recce added that if the administration "had listened to Republican advice during the last of congress such chicanery as Mr. MeCormack now proposes would be unnecessary." Reece called the control tern "unworkable." MeCormack was a prime battler 'or the administration during the sys- cus fans. Tickets for reserved seats were placed on sale at the Corner Drug about 8 a.m. and soon there was a long line of persons waiting, Local REA Becomes Big Industry During Past Few Years The brain of Harvey Couch, a provision to lend RFC funds, and the resourcefulness of a handful of Ppntotoc County farmers made possible the growth of a million and a half dollar industry here. J. O. Vernon told the Ada: Cham- ber of Commerce Thursday noon Vernon, who manages Peoples electric Cooperative, Inc., REA member, praised the initiative of the small group of farmers'who foresaw the advantages of elec- trified farming, and formed 'here the Peoples Electric Cooperative on May 24, 3937. The rural power authority de- clared that they could not mere- y U. S. government to supply electricity, but 'Jiad to incorporate, under Oklahoma laws, pay a gross receipts tax an- nually, borrow for 150 miles of line, and within six months begin repaying with" in- terest the debt owed the Recon- struction Finance Corporation Farmers Go Ahead But, there remained some far- mers who wanted electricity in proceeding thereunder are hereby dissolved." one of the judges said later this included the one-year .iail term imposed on George L. Mueller, president of the striking union, for contempt of court through refusal to end the strike. Meanwhile the power strike Four Die In Wreck un, DUiiiiJtj.-Mi uuiiiiv Lilt; 4 u j Jong house fight over extending, Jh-e despair of others, and and then reviving, OPA. Vi cooperative organiz- Anderson Ready to Act Since then administration em- pr.asis has been on the necessity of keeping controls over food and other scarce items. Secretary of Agriculture Clin- ton P. who in a radio speech from Albuquerque Tues- day night, said he considered present price ceilings high enough to give farmers a fair re- turn on their meat, promised in Zi statement last night that he yould art promptly on any for- mal petition to remove controls. "But." he added, "if one of the for decontrol is a snowing that the commodity is not in short supply, such a find- in? might be difficult to justify, r-.s '.he present outcry for more meat would indicate." Under the price control law, OPA advisory committees rnay petition for decontrol a j-ti-p now being arranged by chair-man RUKCU I. Haynie of the beef industry committee. Taking note of McCorrnack's ca'.l for a 60-day suspension of ceilings, Haynie told a reporter suc-h action "would not bring or- derly marketing or production." "The only solution to the pres- complete and trol." T >0 -i eci. loday U has mushroomed, extending lines into Coal, Atoka, Johnson, Garvin, Murray, Mc- C 1 a i n, Cleveland, Seminole, Hughes, and Pittsburgh counties. To 000. than have In negotiation a half million and spent are more -----.vil dollars in exlend service lines to double the present number of consumers, farm homes Demanding More Service A tremendous demand today keeps building up pressure for more and farther 'service, but Vernon lamented, the warehouse holds not a single pound of any kind of wire necessary to extend nh-A. power. snP6 histo'7 of the more than suit cooperatives in the U. S. ea back to the -Hoover administra- lon when Harvey Couch, presi- dent of the Arkansas Power and Ugh t Co., railroad magnate, and continued. Mueller announced would remain on until satisfac tory contract -negotiations ar concluded with the Duqu'esn Light company. The negotia tions resumed this afternoon. City Asked Move City solicitor Anne X. Alperi petitioned the three-judge cour to dissolve the preliminary in immediately wa granted on behalf of the cour by judge Walter P. Smart, whc had issued the restraining orde against striking Duquesne Ligh company employes. Court convened at (East ern daytight time) and the pro ceedings required only about five minutes. Smart, in dissolving the injunction, said the.' court after "due deliberation and considera- tion the welfare. of the city hereby grants the -motion of the plaintiff and the restraining or- der is dismissed." Community Welfare Involved In making the surprise motion the city solicitor commended thai the injunction had been ordered "to protect the--welfare of. th? industry and transportation have been stymied by the hectic, three-day-old strike. "No person has suffered physi- cal injury, no' lives have been declared Miss Alpern. The dramatic request to lift the court had aroused widespread concern among un- after three hours of conferences among federal, state and city conciliators and union leaders. Last night the Independent As- sociation of Duquesne Light com- pany employes voted four-to-ohe not to end the strike until the injunction was lifted. What the union's next proce- dure will be was not disclosed in te courtroom, but it was reported the full membership now will be asked to reconsider the latest company that possibly a return to work would be recom- mended. M New York financier (though office RFC. his remained in Pine- Bluff) called to Washington for the Couch Pioneers permanent dccon- Boy Stratford FFA High in Judging OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept. 26 17-year-old FFA youths look lop honors yesterday in dairy and livestock judging at the Oklahoma state fair, 7'ay Winn. Hmton. won first in riin.-y judging ;ind Edward Smith, Stratford, placed high in livestock judging. The Freedom team took team honors in livestock judging and the A.-apaho trio took the team championship in dairy judging. BARTLESVILLE, Sept. 26 Iff) Osage Hills Wolf Hunters association's annual bench show, field trials and hunt begins to- day at the Spurgin ranch south- -.ve-5t of here. The affair will con- through Sunday Sept. 29. WEATHER] Oklahoma Faii- northwest, considerable cloudiness east and soutn tonight nnd Friday; scat- tered showers southeast; contin- ued warm. ,Jn first-days, of the Roose- of Oil LO InG larms, but very few considered any plan feasible. But, Couch had toyed with the idea before and he thought it not only prac- tical, but electrified the "most backwoodsey" county in Arkan- sas to prove it. To do so, he invented a new method and equipment for power transmission over long distances a.t cheaper cost than hitherto pos- sible. He encouraged the forma- tion of the Rural Electrification It wns formed REA Approves Loans Today, the REA must approve all loan applications of mem- bers. Accompanying the appli- cation are maps and surveys snowing the need and exact places where lines are to be built. When loans are finally d from the RFC the HFC the money must be spent exactly as planned in the appli- cation. The loans are amortized, repay- ment planned to retire each loan in 35 years, giving the local co- operative full title to the lines and equipment at the end of that tune. Vernon explained. Only the finest equipment is used, poles for instance, are guaranteed to last for 50 years. The amortization schedule in- cludes depreciation, so 'that a well-functioning system is sup- ported to be what the coopera- '-ive finally acquires. Salvation Army's Total Rises Slowly Drive Begun Monday To Continue Until Budget Raised A drive to raise budget set by the local Salvation Army- group is in progress this week and more than had been raised by Wednesday afternoon with the goal expected to be met about the middle of next week Because of a decrease in the buying power of a dollar, the Sal- vation Army budget was increas- ed slightly th.is year over last, but the goal is expected to be met Adjutant Henry Van Dee, head of the local Salvation Army' or- ganization, reports that the drive this year is meeting favorable re- sults of the work done.by the or- "amzaUon during -the past 12 lonths.. It has been reported that the drive will continue until the bud- get has been raised. Believe 50 or More Injured When Potienger Train Into California Ditch VICTORVILLE, Calif., Sept. 26 persons were believed to be dead and 50 to 75 injured when the locomotive and the first five cars of Union Pacific passen- ger train No. 3, the westbound Transcontinental Limited from Chicago, went into the ditch two and a half miles cast of here this morning. California highway patrolman Walter. Terry, at the scene of the wreck, said the derailed cars were telescoped. Six other cars of the 11-car train remained .on the track. He said stretcher cases would number between 50 and 75, and at that time 30 to 40 had been placed on flat cars and removed to the Victorville railroad sta- tion. From, there they were being taken in ambulances to the Vic- torville. army air field. Terry said bodies of two dead had been removed wrecked cars, and from the two more bodies could be seen in the wreckage.' All the wreckage had not yet been explored. The offi- cer added-the dead-did not in- clude the. engineer and fireman, pinned in their cab but later re- moved. At the Victorville army air ield, a Col. Moody asked the San 3ernardino army air field to-send. mmediately three doctors and as many nurses as were available. Terry said the cause of the wreck had not been determined, jut that it might have been a :plit rail. He-'said there are no witches in the vicinity of the wreck. Amateur Rodeo On Sunday Promises Competition, Fun Search Team Nears Fliers Plunges Into China's Wild Far West Seeking Reported Slaves of Fierce Lolos CHENGTU, Sept. 20, U. S. army search team plunged deeper into China's wild and mountainous far west today seeking long-lost American air- men feared captives of the fierce slaveholding Lolos. On the second day of their mission .into the land of cloud- capped mountains. Half-savage. Mongolian-featured warriors, and Pandas, the soldiers were' believ. ed to be from live to 11 days march goal. That goal'is the valley of the Chinkiang, which carves its course from headwaters in the orld's highest mountains in ibet. Missionaries have" reported at least eight enslaved whites were seen grinding corn or tending flocks in that region, where few white men save the missionaries have ever ventured. His party, flew down to Sich- ang, about 300 miles southwest of Chengtu. The mission is an esti- mated four days march west of Sichang. The region where the white men were seen is from two to eight days march farther west- Relief Job Is Far From Over Truman Indicates Interna- tional Mercy Need to Con- tinue Into Next Year WASHINGTON, Sept. 26, President Truman told congress today the job of providing relief to war-ravaged lands will not end Sept. Secretary of State Byrnes rapped a gavel made of Utah copper tonight and summoned the peace conference into full dress session in an effort to "facilitate the work" of drafting five peace treaties. The secretariat general called the session on a notice of less than five hours, apparently be- cause of a over the proposed agenda for the treaty draft with Finland, first of the five European peace treaty drafts to be comoleted af- ter two months of conference. The original agenda of the 21- nation secretariat called for a Greeks to Welcome Returning King Despite Civil War ;'th is apparent indication .ward.: Wurtzler those who hoped to talk- saw the white Then he will- try -to locate the captives through friendly Lolo chieftains. Dr. David Crockett Graham of West China university, whp en- tered .the Lolo country 20 years ago. here that .the Lolos probably would demand blankets and salt for ransom because their economy was based on the prac- tice of slavery; Wurtzler was accompanied by a French priest, who .knows the fringes of Lololand. So primi- tive are communications that no developments were expected to that additional appropriations may be asked for (.he internation- al mercy mission. In a message accompanying the administration's eighth quarterly report _ on UNRRA's operations, the chief executive said it is "essential that we look ahead- to the relief requirements which will confront war devastated areas in the coming year." To the people of 'the United States he declared that "we must continue our endeavors to con- serve our food and reported here inside weeks. of two added the success thus far in averting world trage- would be' doubly, tragic if we1 were not prepared to meet the less difficult task ahead." Mr. Truman's message left un- certain the way in which relief work beyond that for. which funds already have been provid- ed would be cSrried whether through an extension of UNRRA. through the United Nations, or independently. Present plans of the United Nations relief and rehabilitation administration call fov termina- tion of its activities in Em-one by year's end. and in Asia at the end of March, except for ship- ment of goods out of available re- sources. Any additional and the United States now pro- vides more than 70 percent of the require con- gressional action. The report addecl that uu to Reports reaching here said that an intertribal war was in pro- gress somewhere ahead of Wur- itzler's party; and this might There is going ..to be plenty of further delay negotiations for the un at the fairgrounds Sunday af- release of any airmen found, ernoon when the Ada Round-up lubs puts on a 16-event amateur odeo. The whole thing will be ver in less than three hours, ac- ording to Jack Ritchel, president f the club. Only'members of the club are ligible to participate in the ama- eur professionals will e given a chance to -perform in matched events following the erformance of club members. There will, be as many as 15 nen participating-in one event July 1. 3046, UNRRA shipped 12.- long tons- of relief suo- nlies, with a value of 149 000. Of this. long tons or 71.6 percent of the supplies came from the United Stales. The value of .the United States ship- ments was set.at or 68 percent. ATHENS, Sept. 26, h e. Greek government completed to- day its plans for welcoming King George II back to his throne de spite fierce border fighting an civil strife in northern Greec which Premier Constnnlin Tsalc aris says has reached the magn tude of war. Athens will close d o w completely Saturday morning fo the king's reception and polic announced that nil permits fo carrying arms had been suspend eel. Police said persons lining th route of the ptirade marking th monarch's return to Greece afte five years of exile would not b permitted to circulate and tha any person was liuble to search. No Rooftop Watchers All persons were forbidden t watch the parade from rooftop or terraces for a depth of abou 100 yards from the route o march, which will begin at Fale roil Bay and continue to th Greek Cathedral in the heart' o Athens. The king was to arrive at an airport on the Peloponnesus anc then board a destroyer for th journey to Piraeus, the port o Athens. British Out of Fighting Greek army corps, meanwhile .were conducting virtual, military operations to put down the re bellious opposition in Thessalj and Macedonia, the major trou ble spots, but although an esti mated 30.000 British troops were dispersed in those areas there was no indication that they were involved in'the fighting. Informed Athens said British sources in the British forces were being reorganized, and that one of the two divisions in the was being withdrawn from Greece. The headquarters of Maj. Gen. Kenneth Noe! Craw- ford, commander of British troops 'n Greece, declined comment on a statement by a British foreign s that the British Llklns Outdoes Turner Herefords OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept. 26, IL Likins' -herefords from the Flying L ranch near Sulohur won over animals exhibited by Roy J. Turner, democratic guber- natorial nominee, at the state fair today. Likins won the grand chamo- ipnship bull class with F. L. 5, and -the grand champ- cow division with Miss F. L. Tone 74. The Turner ranch had the reserves in both classifi- cations on T. Royal Rupert 188 and Delsona T-207. The Turner ranch had the prize winning group in get-pf-sire on ;ne progeny of Hazeford Rupert the 81st. The Lazy D. ranch of Ada was second .with the sire Delzonto the 54th. fhile nine girls have entered the vents set aside for them. Those who have entered the alt-roping contest- include Bill ean, Jim Ross, Leo Robbins, M a r v i nxBarnes, E. Manuel, narnlp and Ernie Kniffin! i P pe, An entry fee is being charged each contestant, with the winners taking all. In other words, the Legion Has Paid For New Building, Plans Celebration Howard-Maxey post of the American Legion has accomplish- ed one of its major undertakings off the large building and acreage purchased some ...._, ..-r.. months ago north of Ada Recommendations for par- Highway 09. dons for 11 long-time parolees The post now were sent Gov. S. Kerr..... today by the state pardon and Favor Pardons For Eleven Parolees Members of State Board Include Ben Young, Pon- totoc County, in Recom- mendations OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept. 26 forces would be used "in the last resort." (In London, the Laborite Daily Herald said today forces would leave most persons entering a contest the more prize money the win- ners will receive. Contests include calf roping, girls' bending races, men's bend- ing races, boot races, girls' flag races, relay races, musical chair race, wild cow milking, pony men's flag garment race, and matched calf roping. The admission will be 50 cents for every one and the public is invited to attend. Bob Minton has been named as arena director andFrosty Atche- son. will be the field judge. It all adds up to plenty of fun for those who are present at the fairgrounds Sunday afternoon. FDR LEAVES NET REAL ESTATE OF POUGHKEEPSIE, Y., Sept late President Franklin D. Roosevelt left a net estate-before taxes of according to a tax appraisal filed lere today with Dutchess County, surrogate Frederick Quinteri-o by Read The News, Classified Ads. an executor of the estate. The appraisal indicated Roose- velt s gross estate was and was subject.to deductions of for funeral expenses, debts, and other costs. MUSKOGEE, Sept. 26 annual bench show and field trials of the Cookson Hills Fox and Wolf Hunters association will be held Nov. 6, 7 and 8 at the John Ragsby farm south of Tahle- quah. They were: John Roberts, life for murder, Grady county. Alfred Nowabbi, 30 years for manslaughter, Choclaw county. Robert T. Hankins, four years for second degree burglary. Bryan county. Buddy Mayabb, life for murder, McCurtain county. Joe Flippin, 25, years for first robbery, Leflbre county Ben years for first degree manslaughter, Pontotoc county. Jim Buster, 20 years for rape, Wagoner county. Iva Rhodes, 35 years for man- slaughter, Oklahoma county. Virgil Durham, two years for burglary, Jefferson- county. Claude W.- Brown, five years each for larceny of automobile, second-degree burglary and rob- bery with firearms, to run con- currently, Oklahoma county. Also recommended today was a parole for Ada Penvod Johnson, one year for manslaughter, Ok- mulgee county and a reinstate- ment of the parole bf Ed Vann sentenced to life in Creek county. two-story brick veneered struc- ture, which is 70 feet wide and 140 feet long, and the acre plot on which the building stands. Plans are now being considered .for .developing the plot into a park area which will.serve both Legior.nairels and the public. Celebration of the paying-off of the debt -incurred when the purchase was made will come in November as the culmination of the new membership drive. This drive opened earlier this week and will come to a close on Armistice Day, November 11. The losing team will serve the winning team at a barbecue, par- ty and dance on that date. Dis- tinguished speakers will be here for the occasion. The teams are headed'by Mrs. Mildred Roff Smith, Army nurse in World War I, and Miss'Fannie Belle Waren, nurse in World Wai- Retired Railroader Killed TUL-SA, Okla., Sept. Injuries received when struck by a car at a street intersection proved fatal last night to G u y Boulton- Gordon. 74, retired em- ploye of the Rock Island railroad. Policeman Bill Craig said the driver told him Gordon stepped from the curb into the path of the car before he could brake it. Read The. News Classified Ads. HOSPITALS TO BE ASSESSED OF SUPPLIES OF MEAT SANTA FE, N. M., Sept. Porter, national direct- or of OPA, said today that an order is being prepared in Wash- ington to make more meat avail- able to hospitals and'similar in- stitutions throughout the country. Porter, here to attend a region- al conference of OPA officials, said packers would be directed to set aside the same amount of meat for hospitals that' they der livered during the base period in 1944. He declined to elaborate on the plan, saying details would-be an- nounced in Washington, perhaps today. that British Greece "as soon as the necessary transporta- tion can be provided." and add- ed: "the British government has it plnin that British trooos cannot be used for denling with the present internal troubles in Chinese Would Cut Communist Retreat Government Forces Strike Westward as Others In on Kalgan By TOM MASTERSON PEIPING, Sept. ernment troops, struck westwarc from Jehol province today to cu ofi! the communists' northwarc retreat routes from Kalgan as three other forces moved closei in their maneuver to encircle thi city. The independent newspapei Hsin Min Pat said Chiang Kai- Shek's forces approached both Kuyuan, 90 miles north of Kal- gan, and 183 miles north of the Reds' military base. Gen. Fu Tso-Yi's troops, ap- proaching Kalgan from East Sui- yuan province, captured Hsinho. 60 miles northwest of Kalgan, and continued eastward, the paper said. Thi.s was the first report on Fit's troops since the Kalgan op- eration opened. Jt also carrier! an unconfirmed report that the com- Tiunists had moved their Kalgan government to Tolun. Military sources here asserted government forces would con- verge on Kalgan along eight and said that would close all escape routes. Without explanation, the gov- ernment said Gen. Tu .Li-Ming, commander in Manchuria, would his headquarters next from Mukden to Chang- chun. plenary session tomorrow to dis- cuss approval of the Finnish, treaty text, but the American. Russian, British a n d French members were reported to have pressed for convening the den- ary session as soon ns possible Time Limit On Speeches The foreign ministers council program to speed the conferenca. has been drafted for presentation by the foreign ministers' depu- ties, an informed source said. J he major point in this program would be n time limit on in commissions to cn.'ible tin- con- fcrence 16 moot on Oct. J5 dead- line for completing its delibera- tions. In the military commission, meanwhile, the delegates decided to order Bulgaria to disband her armed forces with the exception, or a -land army" including fron- ps in a tolal of men. The commission adopted articles 10 and 11 of the Bulgarian treatv former satellite's ordering armed -forces Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. LAWTON, Sept. 26 irst of 500 surplus buildings at Fot Sill, recently purchased by Oklahoma A. M. college, have been moved to Stillwaler. Special trailers were purchased by the college from a Wichita, Kansas, firm to haul the buildings. Each of the five trailers will handle four of the 16 by 16 huts. Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. Ul HJViVJ rl tC5 disbanded with six months from the date the treaty becomes ef- fective. Bulgaria will be forbid- den to train any personnel not included in the army of 55.000 .1 navy of and an air force of r 200 mon. Trieste Still Unsettled In the Italian' economic com- nission delegates agreed' on a principle of 75 per cent refund on war damage done to proper- y owned by nationals of the United Nations, but the British -csorved the right to continue tn urge 100 per cent payment. Other commissions now arc in he final stages of their work. rat the ticklish problem of Tries- e still confronts the conferees. he commission studying Trieste till was stalled, as it has been or weeks, on questions of boun- dary (lmes and gubernatorial sowers. But the Italian political and errilonaj commission has been nablc to reach any final agree, nent on the boundaries for the internationalized port area ot riestc and Yugoslavia has an- ounced she will accept none of rie present boundary proposals. efforts to revise'the borders ecoirmiended by the Big Four ere beaten down last week. The military commission un- nimously adopted n clause in the treaty prohibiting Bul- uria from experimenting with tomic energy. Guided missiles n d self-prooelled projectile'? included in the prohibi- ons. Tha Italian political and terri- iria! commission adopted artic- 21 through of the Italian only, dealing with establish- ment of peacetime relation.1) with Albania. Article 2] was carried by n single vote. 30 to 9. with ono abstention. The article states that "Italy recognizes and under- takes to respect the sovereignty and indeuendence of the state of Albania." TCLSA DRUGGIST. RAXCIIER DIES OF HEART ATTACK TULSA, Okln.. Sept. A heart attack yesterday took the1 life of Robert Ware McRobcrts, 55, prominent Tulsa wholesale druggist, who was active in civic affairs and well-known as a breeder of fine saddle horses on his Rogers county ranch. TH' Nothin' brings power pol- itics home like th' missus tellin' you that she either gits that new coat er you start eatin" out. Lem Wheeler says whut puzzles stores have twice as many clothes fer women as they do fer men an' th' women wear jost half as many.   

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