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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: September 25, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 25, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             This 'iron curtain' business Russia up to information from outsiders isn't new, and it probably isn't as tight as the wall thrown up by a coach around practices before a 'crooshial' try. Avenge Nn A mint raid CircuUUon 8462 Member: Audit tMirem of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 137 ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPK Turner Opposed To Meat Price Control First Major Departure from National Administration Policy; Urges Action to Make Cattle Feeding Profitable OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept. stand against OPA meat price control has been taken by Roy J. Turner, democratic nominee for governor. ]n n telegram to President Tru- Moscow Radio Puts War Talk Blame On United Stales Iritish Press Front- Pages World Reaction, Welcoming Stalin's Words LONDON. Sept. 25. h e Moscow radio, commenting on Prime Minister Stalin's assertion that he could see no real danger of a new war. broadcast today a declaration that there were "few countries where so much clamor was beine raised" about a new war as in the United Stales. "American publications are trying to create the impression that war is inevitable, that it may break out at any moment and that preparations for this war are being speeded up." the commen- tator Analyzer said in an English language broadcast. He said Hep. Robert L. F. Sikcs (D-Fla) and flop. Dcwey Short (R-Mo) wore amoiiK the "public figures" whose "irresponsible statements xxxx play no small par1, in boosting this hullabaloo about n new war." Siltos, he as- serted, has stated that the seeds of a third world war have been sown while Short, the commenta- tor continued, quoted an Ameri- can admiral in Tokyo as saying the Japanese soon would be wearing American uniforms. i Such remarks. Analyzer said, "do not reflect the interests of the common people of the world, who long for real security and a just and lasting peace." The British press, meanwhile, front-paged world reaction to Stalin's statements and filled ed- itorial columns with expressions of welcome for the Soviet prime minister's wor.ds. The times urged the labor gov- ernment to revise its foreign policy to a "middle course" be- tween the "extreme positions" ot the United Stales, and Soviet Russia. 'The editorial implied strong criticism of the recent course followed by British For- eign Secretary Ernest Bevin. "II the issue which lies behind rnany of the debates in Paris is the issue between Adam Smith and Karl Marx, between an Am- erica leaning towards unregulat- ed private enterprise and a Soviet predilection for a fully regimented economy, Great Brit- ain is committed to neither ex- treme." the Times said. Britain, the paper continued, w a s committed economically even before the labor govern- ment came to power "to seek Fteo by step and stage by stage that habitable halfway house v.'hich a large part of the world is now seeking." Bids on Highway Work Well Below Engineer Estimates Klutti end Lueot Apparent Low Bidden on 7.7 Miles On SH 12 Near Ada OKLAHOMA CITY, Sepl. 25 received by the state highway commisison on 32 rnad projects fell nearly J200.000 bo- iaiv engineers' estimates. Apparent low bids, opened yes- terday, totaled Projects and apparent low bid- ders'. JOHNSTON and Marshall counties. US 70, 5.9 miles oi grad- ing, drainage and three bridges southeast of Mansville, Oklahoma Construction Co.. Muskogee, 5221.221: also five miles of pav- ing on the same stretch, Moran, Buckner and Lyles, Muskogee, Marshal] and Bryan counties, county road, 0.217 mile north and east of Cumberland, Stone and Falls. Ada, SI6.239. county, county road, miles beginning at SH 12, two miles southwest of Ada and ex- tending west, Klutts and Lucas, Carter and Murray counties, 3.4 miles on SH 18, Hunter Construc- tion Co., Ada, Marshall county, farm-to-mar- road, 3.8 miles, from junction SK 199. east, Oklahoma Construc- tion Cci.. Muskogee. also three bridges on section. Burton- Construction Co., Ardmore, man last night urging an "im- mediate investigation and correc- tive action" Turner told the na- tion's chief executive he spoke as a been consumer, producer and ns democratic nominee for gov- ernor. "Meat consumers are unable to obtain meat and meat dealers and beef producers face immediate financial Turner's telegram said. "Oklahoma has both demand for and supply of beef, but pres- ent regulations hamper commerce so as to create this problem." Scott Asks Readjustment Turner disclosed that president Joe C. Scolt, of the stale board of agriculture has also telegraph- ed Secretary of Agriculture An- derson urging an adjustment in price ceilings on meat. Scott told the secretary that in Oklahoma "BO per cent of the gro- cerymon today are without meat to sell to their customers. Cattle- men cannot afford to sell their ca.ttle at the present ceiling prices on meat." Turner said also Ihe carrying of Oklahoma's available beef cattle through the "on high- priced feeds will be ruinous to many n farmer and calUcmnn." Hereford Hrceder The democratic nominee, while his major business is oil, raises pure-bred Hereford caltle on his ranch near Sulphur. The Turner stand on meat ceil- ings was the first major depar- (Continucd on Page 2, Column 6) National Guard (an Use More Married Men in Units Here New. regulations affecting the enlistment of married men in the Oklahoma National Guard have been announced. Heretofore, they have been accepted up to 10.per cent of company strength, but under the new regulations can be enlisted up to 50 per cent of the normal complement; f This means that a number. of men who have been unable to join the local Guard organizations now have that opportunity. William J. Tribbey, executive officer of Co. C, 180th Inf., has announced that there is an urgent enlistments in that unit. The organization, which is to be activated October 2, has openings for almost any military skill ap- plicable to the Infantry. Lt. Tribbey points out that vet- erans oC the Army can be enlisted in the grade held at time of dis- charge, but that enlistments of men who were in the Navy, Ma- rines and Coast .Guard can also be accepted. Pay rates from per drill for a private to per drill lor master sergeant. Drills will be held each Wednesday night at the National Guard armory lo- cated on North Broadway. Men who are interested should contact Lt. Tribbey at 726 E. Sev- enteenth, or phone 2738-W. Violence In Greece Now WEATHER! tonight ajid Thursday, warmer lonieht cxctpt pan handli; continued warm ThursdJif. (hildren to 'Make' School and Circus Will Be Diimitsed in Plenty Of Time for Afternoon Performance Thursday is Circus Day in Ada and it is also School Day; Ada school cKildren figuring on Ihe first can figure on the second, too, for Supt. Rex O. Morrison says that classes will be dismiss- ed in plenty of time for the chil- dren to get out to the 'big top.' The Ringling Brothers and Barnum ami Bailey 'greatest of them all' opens its door ast 2 .o'clock for the afternoon per- formance, which begins at o'clock. So, says Morrison to the chil- dren, come on to school as usual for they will not have to miss a bit of the gigantic afternoon show, J. 0. Vernon fo Be C. oi Speaker J. O. Vernon, who is head of the People's Cooperative, will be the principal speaker on the Chamber of Commerce Thursday noon luncheon program. He will explain the cooperative movement of the organization, what has been done since the program started and the things Ihe firm has planned for the fu- ture. REA serves thousands of fam- ilies in Ponlotoc county and other counties served by the locul firm. Mr. Vernon will explain the possibilities of extending tele- phone service along with the reg- ular power service. H Seller results for amount in- vested. Ada Want Ads. Civil War' Government Starts' Stern to Cruih Rebel- lion in Northern Areas By ARTHUR GAVSHON LONDON, Sept. 25 and British government officials today labelled the mounting vio- lence in northern Greece outright civil war and disclosed that stern measures were under way to crush the rebellion. A British foreign office spokes- aii said the Greek government had given British representatives in Athens evidence indicating that leftist forces attacking the gerndarmerie .in the north were being armed from "Yugoslavia1 and Albania." He adriecl that British troops in Greece could be called upon to act only "in a last and would not be used unless the Greek government specifically requested such aid. Not Order But War Greek Premier Constantin Tsal- daris said in a Salonika speech that the disorders no longer posed a question of order but a. question of and declared "the tirute will emerge victorious by using all the means at its disposal and without any hesitancy in taking uny measurers." New outbreaks we're reported in dispatches from Macedonia, where, the Greek press ministry said, a strong band of leftists at- tacked the village Pendalophos and were repulsed in a sharp bat- tle in which 23 attackers died. Town Recaptured The ministry said it confirmed a report that the town 'of Deskate, captured three days ago by leftists, was recaptured by gov- ernment forces in a battle in which the leftists. lost 80 killed, 178 captured and many wounded. On the eve of King George II's return to his throne, the'Greek government presented evidence to the British that the forces now being opposed by Greek hoops were being armed "from the out- the spokesman said. Press- ed to identify the countries in- volved, the official said they were 'Yugoslavia and he added, however, that nofunits of foreign troops were involved, so Ear as he knew. "We have no reason to doubt trie Greek government's evi- -he said. He said that military measures being taken by Greek government forces were not the result of con- sultations with the British com- mander-in-chief in Greece. The foreign office spokesman explained that maintenance of law and order in Greece was first oi all the responsibility of the Greek gendarmerie. If the gen- darmerie is unable to cope with the situation, he said, the Greek army could intervene. He added that British troops could be used only if there was a request from the Greek .government. CITY HALL FURNISHES OWN POWER: The third power strike >in seven months to hit Penn., found the City Hall alert as they had a generator set up in front of the Municipal building to furnish power. The strike has closed several large factories and department stores, as well as crippled the transpor- tation Keep Dogs Out Of One Trapper to Use Cyanide Bombs to Eradicate Wolves Before Winter Dick Stroud, who operates a ranch west of Roff, says Jack federal trapper, is planning to put out traps loaded with cya- nide bombs to catch the wolves and coyotes in the area. The bombs are deadly for dogs as well as wolves, and all dog owners are urged to keep their dogs out of the area. The trapping will be on the Stroud, Circle E and Dennis ranches. Mr. Stroud explains that an enormous number of the beasts have bred in that area this year, and an intense effort is to.be made to eradicate them before cold weather. Read The News .Classified Ads. Bales' Angus Win Strongly Almost Sweep Oklahoma State Fair in Bull Division; Take Eight First Places Charles T. Bates and Sons, Pontotoc county Angus breeders, dominated the bull section of the Aberdeen-Angus competition at the Oklahoma, state fair and made an excellent showing in the female group. They took to the fair, and won eight first places, six seconds and four Blue Boy of Bates, already a noted champion, for the fifth time won the grand champion- ship -at the Oklahoma fair. Last .week'he was grand champion at Tulsa. -He has., never been'de- feated in the judging ring. Baten' stock won first in four bull classes. Tha Muskogee fair of next week .will be next for. the Bates show Angus. The Bates winnings at Oklaho- ma Tuesday were: Bulls calved 5-1-43 to Blue Boy of Bates, first. Bulls calved 1-1 to Juanerra Burgess of Bates, first. Bulls calved 1-1 to Juanerra Esdraelon of Bates, first. Bulls calved after Qualiteer of Bates, first; Ever- greens Everic of Bates, fourth. Grand champion bull Blue Boy ot Bates. Five balls, any age Bates, Three bulls, any age Bates, Two bulls, owned and bred by second. Heifers calved 5-1 to Juanerra Erica of Bates, first. Heifers calved 1-1 to Finn Treaty Approval Due First to Be Completed; Big Four to Decide Fate Of Italian Colonies By ROBERT EUNSON 'PARIS, Sept. 25, peace conference secretariat said today there would be a plenary peace session "probably Friday" to approve the" treaty .with Fin- land, first of Hhe ffive treaties Other conference sources _said with ex-enemy, states to be corn- it was possible that the plenary session also would be asked to discuss the recommendations of the four power foreign ministers council to impose a gag rule on commission meetings to speed up committee work during the last week before the Oct. 5 commis- sion deadline conference. Disposal of the Italian colonies of Libya, Eritrea and Somaliland was entrusted today .to the four major powers, the United Slates, Russia, Britain and France. Gladwyn Jebb of Great Britain, speaking for .the four-power foreign ministers council, assured the peace conference that the nations Which fought on the alli- ed side .in Africa would be "fully consulted." Britain to Speak First attended the foreign ministers' meeting yesterday with British- Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin, told the Italian po- litical .and territorial commission that Ethiopia, Egypt; and Austra- lia would be heard. However, he reserved Britain's right to speak before the United States and saying "we fought alone on the desert of Libya and stop- ped the Africa Kbrps at El Ala- mein." The commission adopted the article on the Italian colonies Blueblood Lady Ida 62 of Bates, which assigns the final decision second. [to the four powei's after hearing Heifers calved '5-1 to Blackcap Bessie of Ida 4, Bates, second. Heifers after of second. Get of second. Graded first. Pair of second. Pair, of third. Pair oi second. -------------K------------ Some species of butterflies 'sur- vive winter storms in the adult stage, deep in sheltering crevices. claims .from Egypt1 for Eritrea and Cirenaica and from Ethiopia Eritrea and Somaliland. IT. S. For Independence The United States favors "in- dependence as soon as possible" (or most of the Italian colonies. Bevin visited U. S. Secretary of State James F. Byrnes at the lat- ter's hotel at noon today, pre- sumably to clarify the positions of the two major western powers. (Continued on Page 2 Column 3) Strike Committee Tells Court It Favors End to Walkout In Pittsburgh, Strike Still On Quarantine 75 Of Atom Bomb Ships Until Safe Surprised to Find Radioactive Residue in Salt Water Lines, Condensers; Magnitude, Persistence Unexpected WASHINGTON, Sept. 25 Operation Crossroads today an- nounced that about 75 atom bomb test ships "suspected of being dangerous" have been quaran- tined until they are made "radio- logically safe." The ships, part of the joint army-navy task force that carried men through the Bikini tests, are berthed on the, west coast and at Pearl Harbor. the quarantined ships was in 'the target area when the test bombs exploded. The announcement said an un- expected ''radioactive residue" was found in the salt water lines and condensers of some of the returning, vessels when they un- derwent a. precautionary check. "We have not had any casual- ties from radioactivity during operation crossroads nnd'we most certainly are not going to tuke any chances said Capt. George M. Lyon, task force safe- ty officer. "This largely unforeseen result of the atomic bomb he added in a statement, "is another example of the great value of these tests to our country and to the armed forces. ''Without these tests much val- uable information of this type might, have gone undiscovered until actual casualties occurred, very possibly in some peacetime development in the use of atomic energy." No Danger to Workmen The announcement said there is no danger to anyone not working on the ships, nor are harbors or docking facilities affected. repair or maintenance work on the vessels has been suspend- ed until radiological experts can carry out decontamination work. To the surprise of test officials, radioactive residue was found in water pipes nnri conclcnfffers of ships arriving on the west coast. An immediate quarantine of all vessels affected was ordered and a special safety school has been set up in Washington to train 100 officers quickly for decontamina- tion duty. Ships affected are berthed nt Sun Diegn, Sun Frnncisco, Los Angeles, Scuttle and at Pearl Harbor. Some that had left Bi- kini for the Orient wore diverted to Guam when it WHS discovered (.hat radioactivity danger existed from every ship thai entered Bi- kini lagoon Lifter the second atom bomb explosion on July 215. The only .ship back from the atom bomb tests and now on the east coast is the Burleson, the animal ship that arrived Monday in Washington. (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) INVESTIGATED BV MARITIME COMMISSION: Aerial view; of the St. Joh's Shipbuilding Com- pany of Jacksonville, Florida, which was reported to have reaped a profit of on an origin- al investment of through wartime contracts. The company is one of 19 shipbuilding companies covered in the Maritime Commissions report to the House Merchant Marine Investigation Commit- tee in .investigating wartime shipbuilding Telephoto) Prices Go Up For Margarine, Cooking Oils, Shortening WASHINGTON, Sept. 25, Prices for margarine, shortening and salad and cooking oils head- ed upward today. An OPA official told a reporter ceilings for consumer packages of these items will have to be raised "at least two cents" as a result of a decision by Stabiliza- tion Director John, R. Steelman that higher prices are justified for oil ingredients. Steelman, called in to arbitrate a dispute between OPA and the agriculture sided with the latter agency in an- nouncing his decision last night. The agriculture department had contended that a price boost was necessary to assure adequate production of cottonseed oil. Un- der the new price control law the department has authority to order an increase on this ground. OPA took the stand that all that was needed to get produc- tion rolling was an announce- ment that 'the government con- templated no increase in ceilings for this.oil, or for oil made from soy beans, corn and peanuts. Three Enlist, Sent To Perrin Field Recruiter Reminds Former C. G., Navy, Marines Can Enlist, .Get Ratings B. M. recruit- ing officer, here, announces that three men just enlisted in the army were sent to Perrin Field, Texas, from this area Monday. They ai-e Billy Joe Boyd, 2004 North Broadway, Ada; Charles Weaver, son of Mrs. Marie Weav- er, McAlester; James R. Fred- erick, son of Mr. and Mrs. Athel Weaver of Allen. Howell also has information authorizing enlistment of former members of the Coast Guard, Navy and Marine Corps into the regular peace time army provided their technical training and skills are needed. Ratings for these are com- parable to those they held at time of discharge and the. length of time held. Men from other services al- ready enlisted will be given rat- ings in accordance with the re- vised program. Time spent in other services will still count'for longevity and retirement. Recruiting offices here are at the Ada posloffice building; the address is, U. S. Army Recruiting Sub Station, Box 44, Post Office, Ada, Okla. HIGHER TEMPERATURES TO REMAIN JN OKLAHOMA Oklahoma warmed up over- night and there is every prospect of n continuation of the higher temperatures. Most of the minimum tempera- tures were in the fifties, rather than the forties, although Shaw- nee and Vinita reported 47 de- grees and Bai'tlcsville and Guth- rie 49j> The only city to report temperature above the eighties yesterday was 91. Judgments on Nazi Leaders Will Be Given Nexl Monday NUERNBERG, Sepl. 25 An official announcement. to- day the judgments of the Inter- national Military tribunal against 22 Nazi leaders of Germany and seven German organizations on war crimes charges would be handed down on schedule begin- ning next Monday at 30 a.m. (3 a.m. 1 Tentative plans call for the four-nation court to spend the entire first day in n review of the entire case, which look pros- ecutors and defense attorneys al- most nine months to present. The verdicts and sentencing would follow on the second, and if nec- essary the third, day. Hundreds of news correspond- ents from all over the world have applied for places in the press box for the climax of this, the I world's first international war crimes trial, and many applica- tions have had to be rejected. Each news service has been al- loled three seats, while individual papers were limited to one seat each. The tribunal declined to auth- orize direct radio broadcasts from the courtroom and also rejected a request that the final proceed- ings be televised to other parts of the palace of justice. Mrs. Ethel Morris Dies in California Former Ado Resident To Be Buried in Ado Word was received in Ada this morning of the death in Califor- nia Tuesday of Mrs. Ethel Morris, resident of Pontoloc county for a number of years. A heart attack proved fatal. The body will be brought to Ada for burial, with Smith Fu- neral Home in charge of arrange- ments. Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Pansy Church, Wichita, Kan., nnd a son, Smokey Wilson, Oklahoma City; the husband, T. W. Morris, formerly of Ada. Mr. Wilson died several years The family had lived in rural sections and in Ada. After his death the widow moved lo Norman and later to Wichita, where her daughter was making her home. She and Mr, Morris were married there. City's Industrial. Business Life Down As Power Lacking Preliminary Injunction Unusual on Plea Walkout 'Strike Against the People' PITSBURGH, Sept. 25 nine-man strike committee an- ounccd in court today its recom- mendation that striking util- ity workers end a two-day-old power walkout which had be- numbed industry nnd business life in the steel capital. The committee men said through counsel that the union member- ship would vote tonight on a new company proposal to settle the dispute. IMails of the company's offer were unannounc.'d.'The com- mittee said it would urge that the members accept the offer. The unexpected offer came S3 reverberations of the strike piled up end on end. Many Couldn't Reach Many thousands of to KOI to their jobs be- cause, of curtailment of strove cur trnn.sporlalion, wurc idle. A further county court decision was nwnilecl on an nnli-strike in- junction unique in Pittsburgh la- bor circles. Unionists cluimed there is no law to make mvn work. The city had obtained tiie preliminary injunction on iLs plea the power walkout was a 'slrika against the people" and endan- gered public health nnd safety. The anti-strike injunction templed CIO and AFL. unions to join an unaffilinled union in the case, a? the issue has never been decided by the U. S. Supreme Court. Sympathy Strikes Crowinf A small strike-sympathy wavo was growing. Two thousand Pitts- burgh employes of the Jones 4e Laughlin Steel Corp. walked out in sympathy. CIO unionists talk- ed of a possible genera) strike call unless the leader of the striking power union is released from jail. At p.m. today, the court continued until tomorrow morn- ing contempt proceedings involv- ing the Union's nine-member strike committee. The committee meanwhile agreed to place before the union's members tonight a new company proposal to settle the contract dispute which prompted the strike. The court had thea toned to hold the nine men in contempt of court unless they called off the strike. The strike continued. The court yesterday sentenced George L. Mueller, president of the striking union, to one year in jail for contempt of court. Muel- ler had refused to end the power in a city of Pittsburgh's fur- ther curtailed business in steel capital today. Some Current Sifpplied The struck firm Duquesne Light not a single strik- ing worker appeared ut its four power stations on the night shift, and that "only a very few" re- ported the preceding afternoon. A company spokesman said about 45 per cent of the current ordinarily supplied was flowing today through lines in the 817- square mile area served in Alle- gheny and Beaver counties. Part of this electricity was boing made at the company's stations, manned by supervisory workers, and some of it was coming from out- side companies. There was enough current to furnish home and struct lightim; ,ind to permit necessary office ac- tivity, but not enough to keep all mills and coal mines operating normally. Save Electricity Is Plea A general appeal to the public "to save electricity" was issued through newspapers and over ra- dios, and the company went through the day's peak periods without being forced to cut a Two State Boys Get Scholarships WASHINGTON. Srjpl. (IP) Oklahoma boys have re- ceived American Legion national commimdcr scholarships for out- standing academic: ability. They sire Herman H. Simpson, Jr., of Lawton and Frank P. Williamson of Oklahoma City. Award of the scholar- ships to'the piclahonians, and 13 other boys in the nation, was made by the American Legion committee on education of or- Iphans ot veterans. (Continued on Page 2 Column 3) TH' Hush is jesL n fi'um beef mast, if you're among 111" moru for- tunate these clays. Th' difference between a hired hand nn' 'n a hired "hand takes a pill an' Ih' executive knocks it around a golf course.   

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