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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: September 24, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 24, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Th. n...t might b. .un.m.d up by thotth.r. i, th.n b..f th. m..t ,f H.. n4ti.n, and m.r. on ,h. open rang. Net Auiuit circulation 8462 Member: Audit nureau of Circulation THE EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 136 ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1946 Turner Tells Of Attitude Toward 0. U. 'Constructive and Progres- sive', Hepts Also for Aid To State Mental Institu- tions By The Associated J'riss Roy J. Turner, democratic nominee for governor, Monday night promised the University of Oklahoma that his attitude to- ward that institution would be constructive and progressive. Turner, opening a statewide stump lour with a speech at Nor- man, also expressed hone that a means could bo found for easing the overcrowded condition of Central State hospital. That might be done, he said, by ef- fecting economics in state gov- ernment to permit expenditure of more money for the Norman hos- pital. Germans Help Blast Siegfried Line FIVE CENTS THE At the rate of 40 a day, block houses and bunkers on the Sieg- fried "impreg nable" being blown to smithereens by demolition French army engineers, aided by German prisoners. These photos show one of the block-houses being destroyed. At left, the initial dynamite charge goes off and, below, the massive concrete block-house rises into the-air as the full force of the explosion hits it. Turner At Tish Thursday Turner will be guest and make a brief speech at the county club near Tishomingo Thursday at 3 o'clock follow- ing a county-wide fish-fry and barbecue of Johnston county democrats. Turner will make his first radio address of the general elec- tion campaign over a statewide network at p. m. tonight. Wednesday he will resume his stump tour. FJynn Into Southeast Olney F. Flynn, the republican nominee, is on a handshaking tour and today is calling at Coal- gate. Atoka. Antlers and Hugo. f Carmon C. Harris, republican nominee for fifth district con- gressman, opened his campaign, with a radio address last night in which he called for the com- plete elimination of the OPA. He also declared the housing problem could be solved by private industry loose" and leaving it free to build new homes. The state election board an- nounced certification of new re- publican nominees for attorney general and third district con- gressmen, replacing withdrawn candidates. McArthur Replaced Walter Hubbcll, Walters a Bulgar-Greek Border to Be Demilitarized Near-Record Number of Cattle Wettorn llninn n wi i If vjlvlll Ulllwll Roaming Ranges While Nation Going Hungry for That Beef tomey, was named by the stat republican central committee, replace C. L. McArthur, Ada, a nominee for attorney genera Eleanor Lilley Watson, Ardmor was named candidate for con gress in the third district to sue ceed John L. Fuller, McAlester J. William Cordell, electio board secretary, said new with drawals include two candidate for the state legislature. The are J. A. Wheatloy, Yukon, Can adian county republican, an Harold P. Laird, Pawnee. Paw nee county democrat. Successor have not been named. Slate VFW Council Meets Here Sunday Generol Rally of Surround- ing Posts With Adminisra- tion Council Set A state Veterans of Foreign Wars council of administration meeting and general rally of sur- rounding posts will be held at the county courthouse here Sun- day. September 29, William F Carter, department commander nas announced. Department officers and chair- men will submit written reports at the 9 a. m. council meeting to expedite business prior to the p. m. rally ;il which Scout Wallace Blair will be presented the Veterans of Foreign Wars Medal and general organizational problems will be discussed. This is the first such meeting following the recent national en- campment at Boston, and is in advance of the national council of administration meeting at Kansas City October 12-13. to be attended by Lewis J. Bicking, Tulsa. newly elected councilman for OIL COMPANY SUIT MAY BLOCK HIGHWAY PROJECT OKLAHOMA CITY. Sept. 24. J- Dcwcy Clements, state hiehway commission member, said a suit of Continental Oil Co. enjoining the commission from rerou'Jnfi U. S. highway 60 through its Ponca City refinery may stop a proposed highway and bridge construction Gross-Fed Cottle Not Moving Off Ranges to Slaughter Pens in Numbers Government Had Expected This Falj By OVID A. MARTIN WASHINGTON, Sept. meat-hungry na- tion is witnessing the paradox of near-record numbers of cat-j tie roaming the ranges while dinner platters are empty of beef. Agriculture department officials said today the number of cattle on the nation's farms is not far'below the 1944 peak and that the number on western ranges may be the largest of record. September Seems Bent on Keeping Fall (hill Here The weather apparently 'has made up its mind to stay by a decision to furnish an early fall for this area. Remember August with its su- perheated temperatures? September, often a hot month n Oklahoma, is the reverse this Take Monday and Monday night, for instance. Monday was cool, with the highest reading for the warmest moment 73 degrees lower than the minimum night readings of a few weeks ago. And then the night produced a of 47 degrees, lowes since last spring. The Associated Press report hat only two of the 34 cities re porting to the Oklahoma Citj vcather bureau Tuesday had wornight temperatures above 4i legrees. All the others were in he forties. The forecast called for a sligh. vanning up Tuesday afternoon nd night with maximum read- ranging- from 75 to 85 de- 'rees. Fair weather was predict- d to continue through Wednes- ay. Guthrie and Okmulgee with 40 cgrces were the coldest spots uring the night. A low reading f 41 degrees was recorded ai arnegie, Boise City, Clinton handler eporled and Pryor. Woodward 51 and Durant 53. handler's 86 degrees was >r the state Monday. top: proiect. Tiie commission was served yesterday with notice of the suit in district court here last Friday. Hearing was set for Oct. 25. Better results for amodnt in- vested. Ada News Ads. WEATHER! Oklahoma Fair tonight and Wednesday: warmer tonight and east and south Wednesday. HOPE TO PROTECT VETS OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept. 2-day conference of FSA land appraisers is being held in Oklahoma City by State FSA Di- rector who snys he wishes to keep returned veterans who .gel secu- rity loans for farm purchases from being plunged too deeply into debt for the land. Said Hayes today: "We are reviewing our appraisal procedure in this state and trying to get current on pres- ent land values to make sure we do riot sleep into an inflationary buying spree. .In making loans to retu.-ned veterans for t h c purchase of farms. "There is little sense in loaning a veteran money for farm pur- chase if the price he has to pay for the land is so high he cannot hope to pay off the loan and make a living from the earnings of the farm." -But grass-fed cattle are not I moving off ranges to slaughter pens in numbers the government i had expected. Department ex- perts said uncertainty over fu- ture prices tends to .delay mar- ketings. This picture of the beef situa- tion was depicted as Secretary of Agriculture Clinton P. Anderson prepared to make a radio talk at tonight oh gov- ernment price policies on farm products. Aides said the secre- tary was expected to discuss the livestock situation. Movement Off Ranges Slow This is the season when cattle normally start.moving off ranges in large numbers. But the move- ment has been slow since live- stock price controls were re-es- tablished Sept. I: Hence, beef supplies in butcher shops are meager. Cattle fed on southern and western ranges usually start mar- ketward as soon as pastures begin drying up, which sometimes is as early as July. The movement usually reaches its peak in Oc- tober. Two Range Cattle Markets Range cattle have two markets (A) Slaughterers and' Mid- western corn belt- feeders Slaughterers bid for the fatter, grass-fed stock, -while feeders buy lean and moderately-fattened animals. These are put on grain feed for severakmonths to fatten them to heavier'weights and bet- ter quality. In discussing the smaller num- ber of- range cattle reaching slaughterers this, month officials cited several reasons, among them: 3. Some western cattlemen are holding back in the-hope of high- er prices, either through a hike in OPA Ceilings or possible removal of price controls. Feeders Bidding Strongly 2. Corn-belt feeders have been bidding heavily against slaughter- ers for cattle which might go ;ilher to the slaughter pens or to teed lots. With a record corn crop n prospect and with feed prices expected to decline, feeders see a chance of making money by pro- ducing heavier weight cattle. 3. Some cattlemen, are waiting until after January 1 for income- ax purposes. Cattle sold after hat ,date would idainst income in Faces Strike AFL Moves for Nation- wide Strike, CIO Talks Double Wage Demands By HAROLD W. WARD- WASHINGTON, Sept, 24 The threat' of a double-barreled CIO wage increase demand arose against the Western Union Tele- graph company today as the firm's AFL employes moveVl for a nationwide strike. The showdown with both unions appeared to be shaping t. Three major developments in the company's wage struggles came rapidly: 1. 'The AFL's national cooi-di- nating for the AFL unions which represent 000 workers throughout the na- except those in metro- politan New a strike notice .yesterday under the Smith-Cohally War Labor Dis- putes act; This ma 30 days. -i i i I le.gal brd snt Australian Sharply Assails Big Four for 'Agreeing. Among Themselves' On Colonies By ROBERT EUNSON PARIS, rSept. 24 Peace onference Military commission voted today to defortify the southeastern border': of Slav Eu- rope, adopting a Greek amend- ment to the Bulgarian treaty which would, shear Bulgaria of frontier fortifications. -The vote was 11 to seven, with :hree abstentions. It came as the four-power for- iign ministers council was ar- to discuss Italian colonies and other up the progress; of the conference. The proposition is to demili- tarize Bulgaria's 180-mile frontier with Greece "to the same extent" as Italy's frontier with Yugoslav- ia. Only Brazil and the Slav dele- gates opposed the move. W. R. Hodgsdon of Aus- tralia scathingly criticised the foreign ministers of the Big Four today, four hours before the min- isters were to convene to discuss disposal of the Italian colonies and weed out other treaty amend- ments to of the peace conference. Attacks Major Powers Hodgson, always .the leader o the small powers in Internationa affaiys, attacked the ministers o Russia, the United States, Grea Britain and: France for "agreeing among themselves" that final dis posal of Libya, Eritrea, and Ital lan Somaliland would be deter- mined jointly by the Big Four Gladwyn Jebb, British membei of the Italian political and terri- torialcommission, replying to this criticism, announced that the For- eign Ministers council was going to discuss. afternoon." infornfed sources saic today's big four session, intended to aid ...the 21-nation parley in meeting the Oct. 5. deadline for reopening plenary sessions, would have on the agenda! only; those oJ 4-Wn tnn __.i i. j Stalin Says Danger of New War Doesn't Exist, He Isn't Worried of Being Encircled By REMBERT JAMES MOSCOW, Sept. 24, Minister Stalin said today he could see no real .danger 'of a new war and expressed his un- qualified belief in the possibility of long and friendly collabora- tion between the Soviet Union and the western democracies, de- spite ideological differences. At the same time he said the United States now held a threat to peace in "monopolist posses- sion" of atomic weapons, but that such monopolist possession could not long be maintained. In any event, he said, wars could not be won with atomic bombs. He also charged that ing place now and the real dan- ger of a 'new which does not exist at Stalin said. Stalin's replies to Worth were his first answers to any foreign correspondent's letter since March 22, when he told Associat- ed Press Correspondent Eddy Gilmore he believed in the Unit- ed Nations as an instrument of peace. At that time he told Gil- more he believed "neither the nations nor their armies are seeking another and he urged a campaign to expose "war-mongers." In today's responses, as transa- cted by the Soviet Monitor in be charged 1947, which armors expected -to be- smaller han this year. Hence, they .vould pay less taxes than if -they old 'this year. In eating, the human jaws gen- rate1 an electric current of .005- fOlt. London has-few buildings of more than 100 feet in height, but new law permits construction of 150 feet. x ment and to President Truman. The AFL unions want, without any strings attached, the cent hourly increase recommend- ed by a iederal fact-finding board. A ten-cent increase was proposed for messengers. 2. The CIO-American. Commun- ications association, whifh repre- sents the New York em- ployes, notified the labor depart- ment that its negotiations for the same wage increase the .AFL seeks had broken down. A strike notice may .follow. 3. The company disclosed tha the CIO-AC A had stated it in tends to -make still another wage 30 cents an hour more across the Octo her. 23, when the present conti-ac expires. The .AFL's contract runs until next April 1. Luther Edge Heads Civic Commiflee Organized to Advise And Cooperate with City Coun- cil on Improvements Luther Edge, East Central pro- fessor, will head the group ox, ganized Monday night to" advise and cooperate with the city coun- cil in city i improvements. Mr. Edge said he would head the.or- ganization if interest was main- tained and attendance is kept up Mrs. E. M. Guallatt, president of the Ada Parents-Teachers as- sociation, was selected as .vice president, and-Roy Young was secretary-treasurer. The :groujp is formed of repre- of all civic clubs, union and individuals who want to attend. The organization is non-politi- cal, non-factional, and has for its main objective the betterment of the city from every point of view. the 300 original: treaty amend- ments upon which: there was bui slight divergence of views. i Big Fear Seen Friendly Outwardly, the Big nest Bevin of Great Britain Georges Bidault of France,  eatedly told committee counsel le was unable to answer some of he questions about his financial tructure at the moment. The tommittee excused him until to- lay. In his statement prepared for oday's session Kaiser said: "We want this committee to understand that there isn't a sin- 'le thing we aren't happy to dis- lose that is in our books and cor- >orate records." But "as a practical he dded, "No one man in our or- anization could testify as to all f these complicated corporate fi- ancial and business transactions ver a five-year period. I can not do it. No one can do it." He reiterated that combined net profits afteY taxes of the four Kaiser shipbuilding companies were less than of one per- cent of the total volume of work done for the maritime commission "after deducting all losses." "Even if the losses on other op- erations ai-e not he said, "the combined profits are less than 1 per cent." 'Guess Who' Game Is On Truman's Surprise Appoint- ments Widen Field For Ambassadors to Britain By ALEX H. SINGLETON WASHINGTON, Sept. 24 President Truman's freshly stressed emphasis on surprise ap- pointments served to widen the field today in the "guess who" contest over a new ambassador to Great Britain. The chief executive's complete unheralded selection of W. Aver- ell Harriman to step into Henry A. Wallace's post as secretary of commerce recalled at least two other instances in which Mr. Tru- man caught even some of his closest friends way off base. One was his pick of J. A. Krug to succeed Harold L. Ickes as sec- retary of the interior; the other his appointments of Fred M. Vin- son, then secretary of the treas- ury, to be chief justice. Could Name Missourian Barring the selection of a Mis- sourian and officials wouldn't discount a choice from the presi- dent's home dominant factors figured in the speculation over a successor to Harriman in the prized post. London diplomatic These' factors are the possible candidate's pocket book, political stature, personal health and past record. Alphubetically, they stack up: here is how Salvation Army's First Day Brings In Good Response Civic minded workers left kick-off breakfast Monday morn- ing with the thought of complet- ing the Salvation Army drive in one week and the of the first day was even better than expected, with turned in to drive authorities. Adjutant Henry VanDce, held of Salvation Army work in Ada. said Tuesday morning that drive usually takes about 30 days to complete, but expects the 000 asked for to be raised within 10 days this year. Individuals were contacted 1. Gov. Ellis Arnall of Georgia, soon to be out of a job due to the state law which prevents an incumbent from succeeding him- self. Because of his political phil- osophy, ArnalPs choice might help woo some members of that demo c r a t i c faction .left dis- gruntled by Wallace's dismissal from the cabinet. Clayton Rig 2. Undersecretary of State Will a successful businessman with persona] assets equn) to'the financial and sociul obligations involved. Clayton, however, now holds down a post of such fnr- reacbinfi economic responsibility that it is unlikely he would be sidetracked to Britain. 3. General Mark W. Blue Cross Signing Individuals How Thirty-Four Signed Mon- day; This Week Last Chance Until Next Year Thirty-four persons were sign- T. ed up Monday by the Blue Cross i dor. to Wealthy in the first day of a drive that is maintain the post, he aimed principally at individuals who are being given a chance to obtain the benefits of the hospital plan. Bob Sievert, who is.heading the drive in Ada this week, points but that individuals will not be given a chance to take advontage of the plan.a'gain until next year. This type of enrollment is of- 'ered to individuals only one each year and Blue Cross officials are loping that everyone wantii.g to oin will do so this week. Last year, there were a num- aer of persons wanting to partici- >ate after the drive was over, but t was the same situation as no applications are accepted after he drive. Clark. Greater returns for amount in- ested. Ada News Want Ads. Speculation here has centered chiefly around the fact that a number of Mr. Truman's recent diplomatic appointments have been from military ranks. But Clark's tasks in Austria remain of such magnitude that there is doubt he would be transferred to even as important a post as am- bassador to Britain. 4. James Dunn, now ambassa- enough to _ has been mentioned chiefly been use of his stand in fiivor of close Anglo- American cooperation. Justice Jackson, 5. Supreme Court Justice Rob- ert Jackson. His choice could serve the double purpose of fill- ing the post with a democrat who has gone along with new deal policies, and at the .same time case ;.i strained siluiition on the na- tion's high tribunal where he and Justice Hugo Black are at odds. 6. Joseph P. Kennedy. Here the speculation stems chiefly from the fact thnt Kennedy's choice might prove welcome in the polit- ical seesaw territory of the north- east However, Kennedy, a former ambassador to London, incurred the wrath of many Britons by his early pessimism over their wartime chance of victory. Monday morning and most of the money was collected through the contacts made by men with the drive. The business district of Ada. will- be covered this week, but industries that usually make large donations will not make do- nations before next week because officials of those companies have to be contacted before the dona- tions are made. It was explained thnt the city can be covered much quicker than the industrial fitms because donations from businesses have to come through a channel while private citizens can just; reach back on the hip and chip in to the cause. Because of the amount of work done by the organization last year, the goal is expected to be reached easier this year than in previous years; however, it was explained that the goal has not been reached. A number of men were still working Tuesday morning and some will continue the remainder of the week. NEW WILCOX POOL IS FOUND IN NOBLE COCNTT PERRY. Okln., Sept. 23, Another Wilcox snnd oil pool was found in Noble county when the Big Bear Oil Co. brought in a producer in 23-24N-2W, east of Billings. The well was brought in at 4.- 862-fect. It was estimated that it would produce from 200 to 400 barrels a day. The Bfc Bear Oil Co. was formed by George Halas.-owner of the Chicago Bears pro football team. Read The News Classified Ads. TH' PESSIMIST llr Jr. Ain't love grand 'til your wife comes home with a hat? Another trouble with this country, we've got too danK manv "exoerts."   

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