Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: September 20, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 20, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             The Washington situation is becoming more like a football game every day with first one side fumbling and then the least the unsavory situation cannot be predicted in advance. Avcrict Net AHCIIIL raid Circulation 8462 Mrmbrr: Audit Bureau of ClrcuUlion THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 133 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Tigers Grid Opener Big Crowd Watches Fint Game of Season, Sees Hard Battle with Murray Murray Aggies of Tishomingo loulplayod and outhustled the [East Centra] Tigers but the (Bengals successfully annexed the (opening football game of the 1946 (season by a C-0 score at Norris [stadium Thursday night. I .A light drizzle in the first half linade handling a slippery ball la task for both teams and both Iteams fumbled often during that The cast stands were jammed fans and a large delegation Ifrom Tishomingo almost filled Ithe stands for the opener, lit looked and sounded good to lhave the East Central band func- Itioning again and Paul Enix and Ihis musicians played with skill land poise as if they had been (working together much longer a couple of weeks. Murray had a heavier line, a clever passer in Ayers, tricky Irunner in Walker, power plung- ler in Kimbrough and Bois d'Arc IBeames showed that his team is to be hard to handle in hr junior college loop this year. Elmer Massey, former Ada ligh player, gave u fine demon- stration of pass catching in the first half, and Bully Norman, bulky tackle from Ada, was also starter and played most of the game. Coach Frank Crider of East "enlral by now knows more of [what his various charges can do jnder game conditions. The Tig- er line stiffened after the first quarter and played sturdy defen- football with McKoy of Stonewall turning in the most Spectacular tackling. First Period Murray's The first quarter could easily be termed a Murray period be Eause East Central had posses- kion of the ball only twice during TRUMAN ASKS WALLACE TO RESIGN U. S. Slern In Yugoslav Note Long Menage Goes Into Detail on Seriet Of'Inci- dents and Charges time. Carl Smith. Tiger lineman ktarted the game by booting the ball 53 yards down the field on- ly to have it returned 32 yards Lo the 35. Murray gained a first lost five for offsides, threw a pass for four, ran the ball for nore then a pass from Fullback yrcs to End McClellan was good for 25 yards and a first flown. Murray worked the ball dowr lo the East Central seven yarc line before losing it on downs [Toe Selenia punted out 32 yards Aggie Passing Clicks Again, Murray started a pass- Ing attack that took the ball down to the 12 before East Cen- tral got possession of the ball pirn Shipmnn, halfback, gnincc eight yards on the ground nnti [Tack Fontem. starting quarter- back, went for two-for the first only first down gained by ne Tigers in the period. The quarter ended with Murray in possession of the ball on the Tig- 38 yard line. Ayres punted 18 yards foi Murray and East Central took possession of the ball. The Tig- on Page 2 Column Now 18-Year Olds Gel in Guard Copt. Lucat Starting Drive For Enlittmenti in Infantry Company Here Capt. John Lucas, company commander of Co. C of the 180th Infantry group, has announced .hai he has received a notice that IB year olds can now join the National Guard and he is slart- ng an extensive drive to obtain iddiliona] enlistments in his jnit. Reactivation of the famous (5th Division is now in progress ind it is being staffed by young jfficers who have had battle ex- perience in the European and 'acific theaters over a long per od of time. All enlistments will be made n the grade of private, except hat those with prior service may be reenlisted in a grade not high- er than the grade they held on tJischarge. Capt. Lucas said that there are plenty of ratings left in the in- 'antry group and has requested nterested persons to contact of- "icers by tolephoning 2136-W or working with 626. Other officers .he organization include Lt. Bob Sail, Lt. William Tribby and Lt. ?raig McBroom. Platings open in the organiza- ion at the present time includes ill from a master sergeant down 0 private. The pay schedule for wo hours training, one night week, ranges from S2.50 for 1 private to for a master .ergeant. Read The News Classified Ads. 'WEATHER Oklahoma Fair west and lorth, clearing and cooler south- ;ast; not so cool northwest half oriight; Saturday fair and warm- highest near 90 Panhandle; lo- ver to middle 80's remainder of late: Sunday fair and warmer; ughest lower 90's northwest to icar 90 east and south. WASHINGTON, Sept. 20 The United States today 'denoun- ced as "false and exaggerated" charges of improper treatment of: Yugoslav officers. Simultaneously this country demanded coopera- tion from Marshal Tito's govern- ment in efforts to halt "obstruc- tive and terroristic activities of pro-Slav elements" in the Anglo- American zone of disputed Ze- nezia Giulia, In a note made public three days after it was handed to the Yugoslav Ministry of Foreign Af- fairs by American Ambassador Patterson, the United States em- phasized lhat it "will not be de- flected from its course" of main- taining a "fair and impartial ad- ministration" in the zone under its control. "At the same the state- ment said, however, "it must once against deplore in the strongest terms the failure of the Yugoslav Lhe cooperation to which the government to accord in this task United States government be- lieves itself entitled." Answers Two Notes The 1700- word statement con- stituted the American .answer to two notes of protest from Tito's jovcrnment one dated July 26 ho other Aug. 14 which spelled out accusations of "improper trualment" of Yugoslav officers and jnen in the Anglo-American zone. The United States note went on to say that "the obstructive and terroristic activities of pro- Slav elements" in the disputed zone "consliute in themselves a reply to many of the complaints leveled by the Yugoslav govern- ment." Although firm in tone, the note reflected improvement in diplo- matic relations between the two countries since the release of American airmen who were held after Yugoslav fighters forced down their plane. Five other Americans died in a second Yugo- slav fighter attack. The ultimatum demanding re- lease of the imprisoned men was stripped of police diplomatic par- lance. This time, however, the note opened with "compliments" to the foreign ministry, and ended with renewed "assurance of its high consideration." Britain's ambassador to Bel- grade delivered an almost iden- tical note, London dispatches said Prelude lo Winter Arrives In Mild Temperature Drop A prelude to winter cold waves blew into Ada late Thursday and whipped the temperature down to 58 degrees during the night. Showers fell over part of Okla- homa and enough came down here to register .03 of an inch. This, combined wit, 0.7 for September 11, makes the month's total an unimpressive .10 of an inch. A cloudy Thursday afternoon held the temperature maximum to 82 degrees. Then a chill wind began blow- ing strongly out of the north, in early night started the mercury downward to its night minimum. Schools Receiving Some Equipment From Tinker Field OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept. state public schools and colleges are receiving 57 tons of miscellaneous equip-1 merit from Tinker army air field valued at The. shipments are being don ated under army regulations per mitting the release of equipmen to schools for training purposes Included are airplane engines machine tools and a wide assort ment of other surplus and salvage property. Cities in which the public schools will receive equipmen include: Muskogee, Stilwell, Mountain View, Healdton, Snyder, Midwes City, Davis, Harrah, Lawton, Ok mulfe'ee, Ardmore, Miami, Ponca City, Mangum, Shawnee, Semin- ole, Duncan, Enid, Ada, Tulsa Wewoka, and Claremore (Okla- homa Military Academy.) Colleges on the list are south- western Institute of Technology Weatherford; Northern Oklahom: Junior college, Tonkawa; North- eastern State college, Miami; Ok- lahoma Baptist University, Shaw- nee; Oklahoma A. M. college extension, Okmulgee. Cameron State Agricultural col- lege, Lawton; East Central col- lege, Ada; Panhandle A. M college, Goodwell; St. Gregory college, Shawnee; Eastern Okla- ioma A. M. college, Wilburton Langs ton university; Langston Phillips university, Enid. Catholic college, Guthrie; Mur- :ay State School of Agriculture, Tishomingo; Southeastern State college, Durant; .University of Tulsa; Northwestern State col- ege, Talequah; University of Ok- lahoma, Norman; Connors State Agricultural college, Warner; Ok- lahoma A. M. college, Still- water, and Oklahoma City uni- versity. Take Individuals Will Set Up Next Week to Accept Applica- Cross officials have been in Ada this week and will be here all next week enrolling in- dividuals in the hospital plan, which is being extended to in- clude physician services. Any individual under 65 years of age can make request for the hospital service plan. Next week, two booths, one at the First National Bank and the other at the Chamber of Com- merce office, will be set up lo ac- cept applications. The Blue Cross plan was put nto operation in Ada about two ,'eays and the number of persons .aking advantage of the plan has ncreased steadily. It was first used by groups of employees, but now it is being offered to indi- viduals. Slate Draft Call; For October May Double September OKLAHOMA CITY, Sep't. 24 State Selective Service leadquarters. indicated yesterday Oklahoma's, draft call next month would be September's juota, making approximately )00 men ready for induction in October. State Director of Selective service Lt. Col. Wendell Johnson ;aid prospection inductees will ;tart arriving here for the second month's quota after the sum- ner "draft holiday" on Oct. 7. ''ormal induction is scheduled Oct. 8. A new regulation regarding ormer servicemen with short ervice in the armed forces will lelp fill quotas, Johnson said. ?he ruling makes all men who lave not served overseas and lad less than six months active duty exclusive of attendance at olleges and universities in this ountry subject to additional ser- vice. Another new directive requires a man to have a pre-induction physical examination within a 90-day period before he is induc- ted. Johnson said that confusion on this point had provided a headache in the September calls, as a number of men were sent for induction who had riot un- dergone pre-induction physicals for several months. Also a prospective inductee may not be inducted soon than 21 days after his pre-inductiori physical. BARTLESV1LLE, Sept 20 Clymer, Boy Scout filed executive for the Cherokee area council has resigned to accept a similar position 'with the East Texas council at Tyler, Tex. Americans are the largest own- ers of crude oil reserves outside he United States, with the Brit- sh and Dutch second. Read The News Classified Ads. Young Men of Area Enlisting in Army Young men of this area con- tinue to enlist in the army, ac- cording to B. M. Howell, sub-station commander in charge of the regular army recruiting office, Room 304, Post Office buil- ding, Ada. Recent enlistments include: Thomas O. Hunt, Vanoss, Vernoh L. Holland of Route 5, Ada, and Robert E.- Hammond of Vanoss, 18 months, unass'igned. 'Gaines W. 'White, Sulphur, three years, AAF, Alaska, goes in as staff sergeant, has six air me- dnls, Purple Heart, Distinguished Unit Citation. Al Smith Davis, Ada, three years, AAF. William Dean Herley, Ada, three years, unassigned an en- listee has a choice of branch he wants to serve in and Herley chose Air Corps, South Pacific. Jessie E. Trotter, Bromide, 18 months, unassigned; .Robert E. Hnmmond, Vanoss, 18 months. Italian-Yugoslavian Border Deal Stands Peace Conference Big Four Agreement! on That Boundary and Those of Future Free State of Trieste By JOSEPH DYAN PARIS, Sept. Paris peace conference up- held today the Big Four agreements on the Italian-Yugoslav boundary and the borders of the future Free State of Trieste, as the Italian political and territorial commission beat down in vote after vote every effort to revise the proposed fron- tiers. 1 Faithful to her Big Four com- mitments, Russia cast her ballot against the boundary revisions, even though some of them were proposed by the Slav bloc, which she frequently has backed. Edvard Kardelj. deputy pre- mier of Yugoslavia, declared af- ter the voting that he "regretted the commission preferred the method of the vote instead of o H. SINGLETON conciliation" and insisted that his WASHINGTON, Sept. earlier remarks, in which he de- Will Speed Return 01 Japs Slill In Southeastern Asia Anglo-American decision to speed the return home from southeast Asia of more than 000 Japanese reportedly in in the making today. Its objective obviously is to pull the rug from under any possible the use of. dared Yugoslavia would not sign a treaty which she considered "unfair." be entered in the com- mission's records., Ballots 11 Times The commission balloted 11 try has, sanctioned "slave labor." Officials familiar with the dis- cussions now going on told a re- porter than an announcement pro- bably will be issued in a week or ten days, depending on the shipping situation in the far Pac- ific. These officials said it was the shipping situation, now improv- the task of corraling the scattered Japanese that has been responsible for the delays: They added that they expect the task to be completed by year's end. Is Consilient Policy. In line with the. Potsdam big three declaration calling upon Al- lied governments to permit pris- oners ofTwar'tb return stand has been taken in the face of a strong de- sire by some former occupied countries to use prisoners for re- construction work. While sympathetic over the plight of these countries, the state department nevertheless has tak- en the position that American en- dorsement would be inconsistent with current United States de- mands for the repatriation of about Japanese troops cap- tured by the fed army in .Man- churia and northern Korea. Tommies Round 'Em Up The task of rounding up the Japanese in southeast "Asia fell :o the British Tommies in that area the southeast Asia com- nand with- General MacAr- ;hur's headquarters responsible 'or providing the shipping for re- jatriation. Bearing directly on the reported speed-up decision is the break- lown in negotiations between lusia and MacArthur representa- tives earlier this year over the limits 'joined of the internationalized, area of the port of Tj.ieste fixed by the Big Four along the so-called French line and bound- ed on the north by a line drawn from Duino to the French line, voting down all of them, except one, by a 13 to 5 count. White Russia. Poland, Czecho- slovakia, .the Ukraine and Yugo- slavia voted for the proposed changes in most cases and Bel- gium and "Ethiopia abstained. On the other proposal, one by South Africa to enlarge the area so as to include Pola and other Italian Cities down the Istrian peninsu- la, the vote was 12 to 6, with Australia, Brazil, Canada New Zealand and the Netherlands supporting 'South Africa. 'Bel- gium-and Chin? abstained. In- that vote it was the other three Big Four members who remained faithful to their com- mitments, since the South Afri- can proposal embodied the ori- ginal ideas of Britain, France and the United States on the border estimated Japanese troops leld by Soviet forces. Ambassador George Atcheson, Tr., chief of Mac'Arthur's diploma- :ic section, told newsmen several days ago that he had informed General Kuzma Derevyanko, So- viet member of the allied coun- cil, that shipping was available for repatriation of all Japanese from he Asiatic continent. Derevyanko was reported to have taken the position that he was authorized to discuss the re- >atriation of only Japanese civ- lians from north Korea, and "cer- ain Japanese civilians from south Manchuria." question. Check Move Loses Czechoslocakia earlier had sought to avoid a showdown on the border issues by prouosing establishment of a special siib- cominission composed of White Russia. Canada, China, Ethiopia arid Yugoslavia to work out a "stable solution" satisfactory to all. but that was beaten 10 to 7, with Belgium, France and Ethio- abstaining, and India and the Slay, countries, including Russia, voting for it. The other amendments, prooos- ed by Yugoslavia and Rus- sia, would have moved the Ita- lian-Yugoslav border westward at Italy's expense and trimmed the free state area to the city of Trieste. Yugoslavia Belgium in abstaining REUNITED AFTER 60 YEARS: Mrs. May Gregory GC, of Oklahoma City, and Mrs. C. C. Joseph, 65, Tampa, Fla., re-read a letter written by Mrs. Joseph which brought them together after tip years of separation. The reunion took place at Oklahoma City. Orphaned when children, they were adopted by separate families but later corresponded. Frequent changes of address and remarriages by both caused them lo lose touch with each Leaders Now Hopeful of Early End to CIO Strike of Seamen in a newspaper here: "Wanted: Another from the vote on the second idea after the first voting in favor. Ethiopia voted for the charge. OKLAHOMA CITY. Sept. 20 following ad appeared waitress who knows the war is over (it is, isn't Must be courteous fast, courteous, neat, courteous. DURANT. Sept. 20 ing is booming in Durant. In Au- gust and September to datei building permits totaling have been issued, Mrs. Jessie Duncan, city clerk, said. Line Across Europe Separates Slavs, Westerners and Makes Federated Europe Idea Fade By J. M. ROBERTS, Jr. AP Farclin Ncwi Winston Churchill's Zurich peech calling for a United States f Europe is likely to revive Mos- ow's contention that he is cam- aigning for a western bloc to ffset Russia. It probably will be taken, al- o, as a second to the recent Stut- jart speech by Secretary of Byrnes in cheering up the Ger- mans and promising them a lace in the western democratic un. Since Churchill lists Soviet GUTHRIE, Sept. are being made to complete pre- liminary details to permit calling of a special bond elec- tion by Sept. 30, city councilmen said. Proposed projects include provisions for a new water sup- ply, extension of water mains, two swimming pools and cleaning and extension of sewer maina. .ussia with the United States nd the British Commonwealth s those who should sponsor the federation idea, and thereby ex- cludes any of them from partici- pation, he also is making an ob- vious bid for- the smaller Euro- pean nations to pull away from Russia and orient themselves a- roundihis proposed Franco-Ger- man partnership, This might prove to be a pro- ject challenging even the utmost Churchillian effort. No "Walkout" On Russia When you try to conjure UD a vision of Poland, Hungary, Ru- mania and Yugoslavia, for in- stance, picking up their beds and walking out of the .Russian sphere to help Prance, Germany. Franco Spain and the others to form 'on Russia's border a new power which might be the strongest in the world, the lighl begins to dim. A United States of Europe has been an objective of some of the world's best since World minds, War I. especially Briand of France was one of its prime ad- vocates, and it was accepted in principle by the league of na- tions. It was conceived as a fed- eration of autonomous states- with an over-all parliament of some sort to handle inter-state relations and a joint armed force for defense, like the original ideas for the federal government in the United States. Although in times past the dream had envisaged a unified Europe from the Urals to the Atlantic and there were will those who did not the en- tity into which Russia would develop, the federation was gen- erally considered principally for the area west of a i rough line from the Baltic to th'e mouth of tha Danube. LD Phone Service Hay Be Tied Up In Sympathy Strike .OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept. 20, decision on whether to take action in sympathy with striking Houston, Tex., telephone workers which, if taken would tie up long distance exchanges in Oklahoma, will be made at an executive meeting of union of- ficials here tonight, it was learn- ed today. A usually reliable source said the action, if it is decided upon at tonight's meeting, might start tomorrow. The source added that action, if approved at the meeting, might take the form of a "continuous meeting" which would keep un- ion members away from their jobs, or might be an out and out sympathy strike, complete with pickets. Heads seven branches of the Telephone Workers union (IND) in Oklahoma City will at- tend the meeting tonight, it was learned. Telephone workers were out on "continuous meetings" lor a day and a half last March, in sympathy with striking electrical repare workers. During that time long distance calls were- limited to death mes- sages and exchanges through Ihe slate were tied up, Radio chain broadcasts and news wires went through the period without interruption, how- vcr. Just what form present action in sympathy with the striking Houston workers might lake and how far service might be tied up was pure speculation. The "continuous meetings" In March were decided upon. after a district court injunction forced electrical workers union mem- bers to pull picket lines %away from the telephone company in- stallations here. H. W- Marcum Is Critically III Head of fatty Oil Company Suffers Heart Attack H. W. Marcum, president of the Patsy Oil company, is critically ill at his home, 900 East Seven- teenth, following a heart attack which developed Wednesday morning as he was on his way way to his office. Friday morning he wns report- ed to have rested somewhat bet- ter during Ihe preceding night put his condition was still called critical. Mr, Marcum organized the Pat- sy Oil company 29 years ago and movedjits offices andvhis family to Ada some years ago. Freighter Goes Aground NEW Sept. 20 freighter Half Hitch, with a crew of 35 aboard, ran aground on a reef in the Pacific 20 miles off the coast of El Sal- vador today and radioed he was in "immediate danger of the Coast Guard reported. The ship, carrying general car- go, sailed from Cristobal, Canal Zone, on Aug. 28 bound for var- ious Central American ports. Operators Agree to Federal Arbitrator's Award In Maritime Walkout By Tlie AnocUled Prcli Leaders of striking CIO marin- ers raised hopes today for an early end of the ship strike as operators agreed to a federal ar- ibitralion's award in the National Maritime Union walkout on the east and Gulf ports. Joseph Curran, president of the NMU, said after a meeting of the CIO committee for mari- time unity, that he believed that a membership meeting of the un- ion today could "result in the men's going back to and lhat he would recommend such a things being equal." He defined to elaborate fur- ther on the phrase "all things be ing equal." Curran also announced that the union was in receipt of a tele- gram from J. Gorfrey Butler, labor director of the U. S. Mari- time Commission, to Frank J. Taylor, chairman of the American Merchant Marine Institute, which represents the East and Gulf Coast operators, advising him that the commission had accepted the arbitration award. The award, made yesterday by James L. Fly. federal arbitrator, granted NMU seamen salary in- creases of to monthly, bringing them to wage parity with AFL seamen. The NMU and the CIO Marine Cooks and Stewards Union and the Independent Marine Firemen, Oilers, Wipers and Walertenders, west coast unions, struck to en- force demands .for such parity. In San Francisco the CMU said in a statement last night af- ter a prolonged session dealing with the Fly award that it hoped that by noon today "the U. S. Maritime or the shipowners would give assurance that Ihe Fly Award, calling for cqu.'il pay for equal work throughout the maritime industry, would be ap- plied." "It was slated following a meeting of the west coast sec- tion of CMU that if such assur- ance was given the current mar- itime strike would be the statement said. Paul Pnlazzi, chairman o-' the NMU strike committee, was quoted as saying after Fly's de- cision was announced lhat "the arbitrator's award is not a con- tract and until we have a signed contract the (Irikc will continue." Vanoss FFA Team Fourth At Tulsa Livestock Judging Trio Only 15 Points Bock Of Winning Team Vanoss FFA club can take out a bit of time now to be proud. Not only did the club win some places in livestock exhibited at the Tulsa State Fnir and nt the recent state dairy show at Enid, but Thursday morning the club's livestock judging team won fourth place in the Tulsa compe- tition. The team, was only 15 points behind the first place team. Members of the judging team re Thurman Holland, Wesley Blair and Horace Cochran. Shakespeare had a vocabulary as compared with the average man's 2000. In England, peanuts are called "earthnuts." Firmly Backs Sec. Byrnes Declares Ht Can't Permit Split Ovar Policy to Endan- ger Foreign Relationt By JOHN M. HIGHTOWEE WASHINGTON, Sept. 20. President Truman today fired Henry Wallace as secretary of commerce in a dramatic reaf- firmation of this country's stand at the Paris peace conference. Wallace bowed out of cab- inet with the terse announcement that "I shall continue to fight for peace." His aides told re- porters, however, that he "will make no campaign speeches this fall." Mr. Truman gnvc his "full en- dorsement" to the policies being pursued nt the Paris pence con- ference by Secretary of State By- rnes and the American delega- tion. "Our foreign policy as estab- lished by the congress, the presi- dent and the secretary of stale remains in full force and effect without the president declared. Party Split rouiblc While: solidifying American foreign policy abroad, the cab- inet upheave) was viewed as pre- saging a possible split fn the democratic parly's fight for con- gressional seats this November. Mr. Truman said his removal of the last of the late President Roosevelt's "new deal" secre- taries was done in friendly fash- ion. After a telephone conversation with the president. Wallace ad- dressed a letter to him as "Dear Harry" saying simply: "As you requested, here is my resignation. I shall continue to fight for peace. I am sure th.it you will approve and will join me in that great endeavor. "Respectfully" This turn of events caught capital by such surprise that no one would venture a guess im- mediately as to Wallace's succes- sor. Until, one is chosen, the depart- ment will bo in charge of Under- secretary Alfred Schindlcr, who is now on the west coast. No Immediate Bruce Cation, Wallace's direc- tor of information, told a news conference Dial his chief will not participate in the congressional campaign but has not decided whether he will take to the radio in furtherance of his for American foreign policy changes. Catton said that so far as he knows Wallace has no immediate plans. He said he did not know whether Wallace will remain in Washington or go to his farm in Dutchess county, N. Y. The resignation. Gallon said, it effective immediately. At a news conference which broke up as soon as the president finished reading' his terse formal statement, Mr. Truman also laid down a flat rule lhat no member of the executive branch of the government may hereafter make any statement in conflict "with, our established foreign policy." The president s.viid that there was a "fundamental conflict" be- tween Wallace's "views on foreign policy and 'those of the adminis- tration." "We could he said, "per- mit this conflict to jeopardize our position in relation to other coun- tries." Standing before a jammed news conference, Mi1. Truman read his statement slowly. It climaxed a week of furore over foreign pol- icy which began when Wallace proposed some changes. The pres- ident said first he had approved what Wallace said. Then he de- clared Saturday that he meant only that he approved Wallace's right lo speak. Our Most Important Problem Here is Mr. Truman's statement: "The foreign policy of this country is the most important question confronting us today. Our responsibility for obtaining a just and lasting peace extends not (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) TH' PESSIMIST HT niMlu, tm. About th' only things husbands let vhe'r wives run around th' house 're th' washin' machine an' th' fur- nace. durn it, even if it a lie.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication