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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: September 15, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 15, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Avrrajf AtiRn.it r.ild Circulation 8462 Mtmbtr: Audit llurrou of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1946 Democrots to Hold Big Pow-Wow Hera Turner Principal Speaker At Big Rally Wednesday Dt-mocrats of the five southern counties of the Fourth Congres- sional district will assemble in Ada Wednesday of this week at Glenwood Park for a sure-enough pow-wow. with Roy J. Turner, ing as a special attraction for them. The speaking part of the pro- gram will begin at 2 o'clock and will give the voters of the area n, i in rvuv j. j. urncr 4 nominee for governor, scheduled to see ?nd ,heai' their as principal speaker of the day. "nd The big campaign party leaders of this area will not be satisfied unless it is the largest of the series being held over the at 11 a.m. at the park. There will be lunch served, too. Bud Rich, who is in charge of preparing enough fare to satisfy democratic appetites, reports that tne menu calls for enough soup and barbecued beef to serve at Jeast persons. Pashofa Promised Indians of the area are pro- mised plentiful portions of pash- ofa, prepared by Mrs. Joe Rush- Ada's Guard Unils lo Be Activated congressional nominees who ore carrying the party's ban- ners in the campaign leading to the general election of November Lunch will also bo served for the colored people of Ada at a place yet to be announced, be- ginning at 11 a.m. Turner will speak lo them and also invite them to attend the major speak- ing program at the park. Plan for Big Gathering Democratic leaders in Pontotoc county have been spending many hours of late getting ready for the affair and expect it to be one of the largest in the state Most of the rallies that have been held in other parts of the state thave been well and it the intention of leaders around here to have the Ada rally the stand-out welcome to the car- avaners for the entire campaign. Party leaders will consult with i m. the nominees while in Ada and' hundreds of people who Jay plans for intensive 'get- out Ssually Pontotoc county i the vote' while in Ada anrt I .r_ee' Fair will find something in the fair here this County Fair [Opens Monday 'To Be Larger Additional Fields of Com- petition Added to Lirt; En- Mel Heavier Than Usual FIVE CENTS THE COPY Senators at Peace Meet Ask in Support for Byrnes While in Ada and lay Fa the vote' efforts in Johnston 'dlfferent I11-11 I CIO Maritime Goes On Coal, Pontotoc, Hughes and Sem- .quality of exhibits will i mole counties. above average and ati-least This area is usually heavily .ft ?evf of competition'1 democratic in its election tastes and the democratic forces in the an e democratic forces in the Me alL WI e in Pr southern part of the state are be- Tuesday and W ing rallied to assure the election of their candidates in November prize money. fair will be in progress I and Wednes- of this week, with 4-H and club youths vieing with Some Indication! Agree- ment Near; AFL Sea- men ro Return to Shipi By AsioeUted fren nees for offices present ers, and also give an opportunity for improving mutual acquaint- ance of candidate and voter. Public Invited to Armory For Federal Inspection Of Wednesday Night Ada's post-war National Guard organization swings into official being Wednesday night of this week and the public is invited to come out to the big armory north of the city to see the inspection activation. Allen's inspection for Hq. and Hq. Co. 1 Bn. 180 Inf. is sche- duled for 7 o'clock of the same nieht, September 18, at Allen. _For Ada it is Hq. and Hq. Btry, 111 F.A. Bn, Announcement will be made later of program plans for Wed- nesday night. The military part wnl be brief, including review of the guardsmen and inspection of tne armory and its facilities. Uniform Later On The men will not be in uniform, as tnese can not be requisitioned until after the unit has been acti- vated, but their 'drill pay' starts that night. Kerr Headed 1921 Unit was 25 years ago that Robert S. Kerr, not many months out of .service as an artillery officer overseas experience in College Enrollment Reaches Mark Freemen, With 650, Sat All Time'High for School Here; Student Body Numbers 600 Veterans Enrollment figures are how available at East Central According to Harvey Faust, registrar, there are stu- dents enrolled in school. Deputies to Take Detailed Reports On All Buildings a nn union leaders and in New York City ad- -sra. -.feWVa with France, headed the first National Guard unit formed in Ada, Bat- tery F, 1st Regiment, Oklahoma National Guard. As Capt. Kerr he was first Beginning Monday, six. men employed by Charles Rushing county tax assessor, will 'fan out over Ada and other Pontotoc county cities to get detailed in- formation on every commercial, industrial and home. So when they start calling a- round, just realize that it-is in- formation the office'must 'haveT And SUCH information. It will really be complete, from top to bottom, inside and out, more information than the average householder ever dreamed could be thought up about his dwell- ing. 1941 Law Requires It commander here, being succeeded by T. W. Fentcrn. Eph Reed jmd Joe Catney, the lust named head- ing ;he battery when it was called ir.-.o service in 1941. That first inspection in 1921 came in July. 1: was quite an occasion, too. Major Earl Whitney represented the state. Col. Patsy O'Neal spoke lor tr.e United States (he had been Gen. O'Neal and command- ed the 90th Division in War I) and Tom D. McKeown, then -Fourth District congressman, spoke for the city. The first drill was held July 26 arid in August the new outfit went over to Ft. Sill for the first guard encampment. Some Sailors Can Ask, Get Discharge WASHINGTON, Sept. me navy announced today that certain regular navy enlisted men may be discharged this month at their own request. Rushing asks that Pontoto county people cooperate in wha will be, at the very best, a te dious and gigantic job. He explains that a law passed by the state legislature in 194 makes this mandatory. The six men who will be as sifting arc J. L. McFarland, J. D Willoughby, W. H. Phillips T T Goodman, Dotson Lillie and T W. Taylor. Can You Answer These? What kind of base does your house frame, hollow tile or common brick? And is your roofing wood, composition or slate? And the exterior walls they ordinary siding, good siding, shingle, stucco, common or face brick? And the inside board, rough plaster or white plaster? And is the inside and out good or ordinary? And the flooring ordinary pine (the draf- ters of the sheet don't seem to Men outnumber women, there being 700 men and 500 women. i Averse is usually the rule at .East Central, but large num- ber of returning veterans have caused the boys to outnumber the Record Freshman Class fl'eshman enrollment of 6aO established an all-time high at East Central. Many sections of required freshman courses had fo be closed by 10 o'clock the first morning of enrollment. This ne- cessitated opening of over-flow sections in English, history, and math courses. There are 600 rolled. This number would" have been even larger if the veterans' housing units were completed. The veterans .are, naturally, old- er than the usual run: of college students, and they seemed to be >nmarily interested in courses of vocational and professional char- acter. There is a big demand for ndustnal arts, mechanical draw- ng and math and science courses 'their vessels, but CIO Sailors nued, the prolonged strike. Picket on Three Coasts The CIO men, demanding the wages granted' to AFL tVanoss Fair Results of the Vanoss Com- munity Fair of Friday had not been completely tabulated in time for publication in The Marltmn> workers, picketed har- News today. The entry list was the'nations-three coai'ts. TniHtK Ali'i_ _ I t no t in act iirniin ___'J i- -i same much larger tHis year than it was a year ago.. me announcement applies in general to: said this 1. Draitees who voluntarily enlisted in the regulars after in- 3uction. unless they are elec- tronics technicians, 'arc training Ji radio schools or are hospital rorps personnel. 2. Regulars who have comple- .ed four years of their six-year r-itjal enlistments provided they lold_.any of 66 rates. Com- P officers have been auth- to withhold these dis- nowcver. if the men are in instruction, mainton- mce. or operation of electronic The rates arc distributed nrough most of the regular ship ind armaments operating jobs in he service. The navy took this action, it rpiainc-d. De-cause of budget lim- and excess of men with- 3 specific rating groups think much of a'ny of the 'ordin- ary good pine ordinary or good oak? And the trim softwood, average or hard- wood? Your basement doesn't escape, nor do the porches, the garage or garage apartment. Even the use the building is included. Good Plumbing- Scarce? What kind of healing do you air piped, steam, hot water or stoves? And is your plumbing good or just average (that indicates that good plumb- ing isn't very There is information, too, on paving, curbing, sewer, electric, water and gas service, if its a corner lot, near transportation near school, near street lights. Perhaps the oddest question of needed for pre-professional X" f training in engineering and medi- cine. 30 New Faculty Members President Linscheid introduced Kw Acuity members at the first faculty meeting of the year Wednesday. Since that time, three more full-time faculty members nave been added to the staff The enlarged staff has made it pos- sible for the college to offer mdre courses than ever before. There are twice as many courses being designed that upland and bot- tomland farmers will compete basis. For instance, a bottomland farmer raises corn on his best land while the upland farmer plants small grainj A fariner has a wide selection; Th WiU Products from the garden in addition to items from the row-crop second Set Phases of th Student activities will be in full swing before the end of this week. Friday night the Tri Sig an all-school dance held in the gym. The Vet: erans club will hold its first weiet Mg 5f year in Fentem Hall Monday night. There will be at Norris Field Wednesday night. Thursday afternoon there'll be a football parade. Thursday night, the Ti- ers play the first game of the thorns' AggieS iuperinlendenl Of Blind School Quits Sept 14 principal of th all your electric wiring "cheap or average." rincp the Oklahoma School for Blind, Muskogee, today was an pointed superintendent of the in stitution, succeeding Mrs. O. W who resigned after hold mg the post for 21 years. Carter, 35, a graduate of th University of Oklahoma, was cho sen by the state board of educa saving equip mentrdepartment, all devices o equipment entered in the contes must have been made by a farm fh closely related to the field of agriculture and mus not have been made for commer cial purposes. New Devices Interesting County Agent C. H. Hailey said ,he -new department should be interesting because number of new devices constructed during the war when shop made equipment was not available. Prizes ranges from for first Place to for fifth place and there is no extra work because the equipment is already on the 13 rm. Mrs. Jessie Morgan, county home demonstration agent has requested that .exhibitors read !he and ..M- The lines were crossed in at' least two instances by AFL men. About 30 AFL Longshoremen walked through a CIO line' at a New Yorlrpier to unload'passen- ger hand luggage from the liner Washington. NMU headquarters, said the strike was 100 per cent effective, declaring they had received reports of complete tie-ups "in all ports." In Norfolk, Va., AFL Interna- tional Longshoremen's Associa- tion members returned to their jobs; crossing CIO barriers. Of- ficials of the AFL Sailor unions had said their men would' re- spect the agent'for the AFL Seafarers International union in Baltimore, said AFL members would' respect the CIO pickets "for thV Malone Delays Settlement Paul Hall, New York port a- gent of the AFL Sailors union of the Pacific and: the SIU, said as the AFL groups ended their strike Friday night that SUP-SIU men would honor the CIO lines. In Washington, government o: Eicials said they were ihforme :hat the CIO unions were askin lor the same wage scales-grant ed AFL men but final settlemen was delayed by an attempt by Vincent J. Malone of the Wes Coast Firemen's union (indepen lent) to reduce the spread be ween the east and west coas cales. The firemen's union is associated with six CIO unions n the committee for maritime unity. Reply Sharply To Wallace Connolly, Vandenberg In Hea for End to ticketing, Say Doubt Catt on U. S. Stand By RELMAN MORIN PARIS, Sept. 14. The two senate advisers of the U S peace conference delegation" Pleaded today for United Amer" ican support of the foreign pol- Byrnes "ed by State In formal statements obvious- ly directed at the New York speech which Secretary of Commerce Henry Wallace advo- cated spheres of influence Sen Tom Connally (D.-Tex.) ed there should be no bickering GUN police offi- Charges Filed On Tulsa U. Student Highway Death Blamed On Car Driven by Him TULSA, Okla., Sept. 14 justant county attorniey Mar- on S. Blake today filed a charge t AII "manslaughter against Allen Jerry Bowman, 19- year-old University of Tulsa stu- ent, following the highway William E Jruman Says Wasn't Putting Approval on Wallace Speech, on Right to Deliver It Connally's statement was is- Washington news conference of Highly Byrnes Chairman of the sen- f resident in Formal Statement Asterrs There's Bean No Change in U.S. Foreign Pajicy, Still Look, to Byrne. Coody a Tulsa. T-'rr.i] 1750. sugar was considor- u a medicine, The opossum measures about inch at birth. WEATH E_RJ OKLAHOMA: Generally fair unaay_and Monday; not much lange in temperature. FATHER-IN-LAW TAKES SUSPECT Arrests One of fair Wanted For Walters Bank Robbery OKLAHO'MA CITY, Sept 14 Oklahoman says in a copyright story that Joe L. HixcS 32, Electra, charged with the robbery of a Walters, Okla bank, was captured at pistol point by his 55-year old father- in-law, R. E. Dunham, at Electra last night. In a long distance telephone interview with Dunham, the Ok- lahoman quotes him as saying his son-in-law threatened that his brother, James Hixon, 27, also charged with the bank robbery would get" him for the capture James is still at large. Dunham, describing the cap- u ctiuua tion, which said it accepted Mrs btewarts resignation reluctantly Mrs. Stewart had headed the school since 1925. From 1.911 to 192.J her husband waf superin tendent. Mrs. Stewart's letter of resig- nation said that since the schoo was destroyed by a tornado in 1945 she had "worked incessant- ly for its restoration. She added that since the institution's future is now assured, she- felt it a "logi- cal time to change superintend- ents. The board of education passed a resolution commending her long coTMrtsxt service. With the exception of served in the army aerhas time r cqrps, since -n 1939. He will assume the supe'r- intendency Oct. 1. V. (Continued on Page 7 Column 4) Tibetans drink an average' of 30 to 50 cups of tea a day. Congress moved the govern- ment to Washington first Monday in December, 1800; Monday's a good day to take your ear to ._ Sinnett-Meaders. 8-15-lt i" a usa. wholesale firm, was struck and' fatally injured by .a car which highway, patrolman H. J. The accident occurred near the south city limits, as Coody. -appar- :rancis Man Shot n Family Fuss Not Seriouily Injured By Lead Pellets Keith Jones of Francis Satur- day was suffering from two bul- let wounds on his forehead re- ceived Friday afternoon. The in- cident occurred about p.m.- He told the attending physician that there was some family trouble and a member of the family fired a .410 gauge shotgun in his direction. The doctor took two small lead pellets out. of his face. One pel-' let, lodged on the right forehead and the other stopped above the left eye. When Jones arrived at the'-doc- tor ice, 'he was bleeding pro- fusely arfd was in considerable pam. Jones was in the county attor- ney s office Saturday morning, u late Saturday afternoon no charges had been filed in con- Meat Disappearing From Markets Here, Outlook Uncertain Fresh meat may be plentiful at your favorite grocery, but at the majority of the meat markets in Ada there is a definite shortagd America's favorite disn that Americans spend about 60 money for. per cent of their grocery By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER WASHINGTON, Sept. Truman today dis- avowed any endorsement of the substance of Secretary Wallace's controversial foreign policy speech, explaining in a formal statement that when he said he had approved the speech he had meant to say only that he ap- proved Wallace's right to de- "There has been no change in the established foreign policy of our the president .oJd a world which had been de- bating whether his stated ap- proval meant drastic revision of American policy toward Russia and Britain. Misunderstanding Natural Mr. Truman issued today's brief comment through the un- usual procedure of summoning reporters to his White House of- fice at 2 p.m. E. E. T. He read the statement and said "that's all mere were no questions. The statement said: "There has been a natural mis- understanding regarding the an- swer I made to a question asked at the press conference on Thurs- reference to s to speak with DPI- and influential voice the peace conference, there must be no d.vision behind the lirfcs A few hours before this Van denberg had issued a statement which said "we can only cocSe? ate with one secretary o? teXt Ot state- Deserves United States I'ves and should support of the united the United States. the ill ternntionaJ relations in ----c "t tJl j t JUJi Cl JUtl LO ne speech of the secretary of o nection with the- shooting. No Ada market is boasting an over-supply of any cuts ofl pork and the majority of the butchers in- town see no bright spot in the pork situation in the future. A few markets have a few slices of bacon and a smattering >f ham on hand now, but when that pork is gone'there will pos-1 sibly be no" more for several weeks because they cannot obtain t from the packer. One butcher said that no time during rationing was his shop so nearly''out of meat. He said-all, f the meat obtained in two m weeks could be sold on a Satur- commerce delivered in New York 'ay later day- The question was Will Stay That Way A woman approached a down- town butcher and was about to order some meat when she hap- pened to glance at the meat box She saw no meat of any descrip tion. She wanted to know if there was ANY kind of fresh meat she could purchase. The butcher told her that the box looked as i would for some time because of the shortage of meat. "Some Sea Foods Here While most cuts of fresh meats are scarce, butchers are display- ing more dairy products and sea food in their meat counters. The selection is not wide, but at least Recklesj Driving Charged fo Jones vey. (Continued on Page 7 Column 5) One of. the most interesting war souvenirs seen here has been the :Nazi membership book 's Nazi Party Book ing Memento of 1927 Rosenberg who rose to office in Adolf Hitler's in- of publica- ner circle ions. is .small but elaborately printed, red of back and with an ssortrnent of information and uggestions that to even the ama- eur readers gives much.under- tandmg of Nazi 'slants' on hings. The took is the more valuable ecause Rosenberg's was No. 18, lacing him among the early nar- y affiliates. Brought By James O. Braly James O. Braly, with the AMG n Germany for some months, has had the Rosenberg book since returning to America. Braly week to the VA Office at Oklahoma- City with which he is employed as an attorney. r- Linscheid, president of East Central college, obligingly translated the Contents of the book, which ran to 19 typewrit- ten pages. Issued In Rosenberg was issued the book July 29, 1927. It has Hitler's name and those of various other officials. The book lists the central or- gan of the party and a picture newspaper and says 'it is a duty to become a subscriber' The preface is a rousing and doings a National Socialist" an example of boldness, willing- ness to sacrifice and discipline -zealous m work and thriftiness Equality In that earlier period of Hit- lers influence party members were directed to treat those un- der them as people, not beasts, as fellow warriors, to subordinate answered extemporaneously and my answer did not convey the thought that I intended it to con- y. "It was my intention to ex- the that I approv ed the right of the secretary o commerce to deliver the speech I did not intend to indicate tha I approved the speech as con stituting a statement of the for C1fn Policy-of .this country ?as Been No Change" ihere has been no change in the established foreign policy o" our government. There will be no significant change in that pol- icy without discussion and con- ference among the president, 0 court. peace still is that which is aeing applied by Secretary of State Byrnes at Paris. His clar- fication of that point, however eft in existence the fact that he ippnrently has on -his bunds a cabinet split between his secre- ary of commerce and his secre- state over relations with BONNEB NAMED to be in all your dealings, words (Continued on Page 6 Column 1) Bonner, Marietta, to- ay was appointed a state high chool inspector by the Oklahoma Joard of education, succeeding "w i George Young, Wninwricht, who their ego to the common' need and I has joined the fuculty -of South- the common good, to "see in thn eastern State college, Durant" First Harbor Day J. Sterling Morton first intro- iced a resolution setting aside a day for tree-planting in the Ne- braska State Board of Agricul- ture on Jan. 4, 1872. Arbor Day first was observed there on April 10, 1872. signod Campbell, highway patrol- man, who said that from an un- known point to a poin fourth miles north of Ada County Attorney Tom D. Mc- Keown filed the complaint: in addition to the officer Glenn Clark was listed as wit- ness. The University of Paris was the model for Oxford and Cam- bridge. TH' PESSIMIST good, to "see in the dear one of the people of your wood a bearer of your blood, ir- revocably united by fate with you; and value in your people the least street sweeper higher than the king of an alien land." The liberty of a people is Mrs. "Dude" Lark snys one-finned ptiporhnnger ,-iin't got nothin' on lh' woman chain-smoker who's ti-yin' t' whip up a meal an' hang out th' wash. Too many -folks seem f think that th' human ma- chine has t' be "oiled" Saturday night   

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