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Ada Evening News: Sunday, September 15, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - September 15, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                                 How is it going to help the housing situation at Dayton where    •    ■  ---—-  1     ’     500    l8y     "" t     bousing    projects    os.    „.«« led     , 0   A\er» r e Net August Paid Circulation  8462  Member; Audit liureau of Circulation  move beep use their wages are now above maximum allowed?  43rd Year—No. 128  THE ADA EVENING NEWS  FINAL edition  Democrats to Hold Big Pow-Wow Her*  Turner Principal Speaker At Big Rally Wednesday  Democrats of the five southern I in^ ac a  cnA  • . unties of the Fourth Coneres- them. *  peual  attraction for  c  Eional  district will  ongres assemble in  Wednesday of thic     Ahe     speaking    part    of    the    nm.  been held in other parts of the  ald it^^  een weli att ended, and it# the intention of leaders  around here to have the Ada rally  ^e_stand r °ut welcome to the car-  ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1946  County Fair Opens Monday To Be Larger  UVE cents the copy   --    «i»i.    mrt  Senators at Peace Meet Ask  for governor, scheduled et*# i  e and hear  their avaners for the entire eamnai™  pal speaker of the day. * u^o are c a ?rvfn» S ?L°i'l^T i " ees  I ,v,? a J;] y  ! eaders  will consult wfth  not be  largest  CVC  and Hers I™     ban '    I    in'K    "and  /ote’  vote efforts in Johnston,   W1 „,”-V n th f ^ am P ai 8n leading to lay plans for intensive ‘cot nut will the general election of November I the vote’ while in Ada and fay  pi  The big campaign rally. arty leaders of this area  satisfied unless it is the 2 ;  of  the series being held * r    •»    ,  he si ate begins at ll a.in I #*,„ S j  also bc  served for a* the park.    J lPe  colored people of Ada at a  There will be lunch served too emlj' E ‘, *°, , be ann ,2 u "red, be-Bud Rich, who is in charlie of S21L . .J  am ’  Tuiner  will preparing enough fare to satisfy thlm to attend th" d a - ,s0 invite  democratic appetites, reports that inc pro-ram a1 th! iTT r Speak ‘  the menu calls for enough soup'  P o at the  P ark -  and barbecued beef to serve at least 5.000 persons.  Pashofa Promised  Indians of the area are pro-rr..>ed plentiful portions of pashes. prepared by Mrs. Joe Hush-  the  Ada's Guard Units lo Be Activated  Public Invited to Armory For Federal Inspection Of Wednesday Night  Adas post-war National Guard organization swings into official being Wednesday night of this week and the public is invited to c^rne out to the big armory north c. tr.e city to see the inspection ann activation.  Allens inspection for Hq. and ~t’ Go. I Bn. 180 Inf. is sche-culed for 7 o’clock of the same mgnt, September 18. at Allen   11  Hq. and Hq. Btry, I - t A. Bn.  -Announcement will be made *ater c. program plans for Wednesday night The military part win oe brief, including review of the guardsmen and inspection of the armory and its facilities.  * I mform Later On Tr.e men will not be in uniform as these can not be requisitioned until atter the unit has been acti-j-itec. but their ‘drill pav’ starts mat night   t  Kerr Headed 1921 Unit  It w as  2d years ago that Robert  to. fverr, not many months out C; service as an artillery officer v .th overseas experience in France headed the first National ♦ ir ar r  u P :t  t f >rmed in Ada. Bat- T *u.t H^S^ent, Oklahoma i'ct.-ma. Guard.  As Capt. Kerr he was first  commander here, being succeeded  Coal, Pontotoc, Hughes and Sem mole counties.  This area is usually heavily  fh 1 at i C m lts -  electi °n tastes and the democratic forces in the southern part of the state are being rallied to assure the election of their candidates in November . meeting is one of a series in which party leaders and nominees for state, district and county offices present issues to the vot-one ers, and also give an opportune I for improving mutual acqua--‘ a nee of candidate and voter.  Plan for Big Gathering  r‘nnn#^°K iatiC J eadCrS in P °btotOC county have been spending many  hours of late getting ready for '5 e aff f and expect it to be  ° Most o r f g ?he“aluts St thli have I    “ utua ‘.    acquatat-  College Enrollment Reaches 1,200 Mark  Aceo E rZlr^ en H figUreS r, are now  Pliable at East Central, j ,    Haney    Faust,    registrar,    there    are    1200    students enrolled in school.     u   Deputies lo Take Detailed Reports On All Buildings  tea  county tax assessor, will ‘fan  co..n? Ver  t Ada and other  Pontotoc ?° unty Cltles  to get detailed in-  foimation on every building_  commercial, industrial and home bo when they start calling a-round. just realize that it is in-  ZTlrru ° mc f  must have -  n u information. It tV  r f alIy bf?  complete, from top to bottom, inside and out. more information than the avenage Householder ever dreamed could be thought up about his dwell-  1941 Law Requires It  Rushing asks that Pontotoc  SM cooperate in what  viJl be, at the very best a dious and gigantic job ’  hv fh! XP ] a . ins . th ? t ,  a law  passed ! i A. legislature in 1941 tii es tbls  mandatory.  The six men who will be  Men outnumber women, there being i OO men and 500 women.  It P a ?t V r  1S i  U u UalIy the ride  at East Central, but large num-  °i #£ et u rning vetera ns have  girls     yS    t0 outnumber  the  Record Freshman Class  r J he  * uT s t m ? n  enrollment of 650 established an all-time high  at East Central Mon,, ___“    -  Additional Fields of Competition Added to List; Entries Heavier Than Usual  The hundreds of people who usually visit the Pontotoc county Free Fair will find something  voir 1  Th  ln  } ] e f ? lr he| * this  ll J he quallty  of exhibits will be above average and at least  A ew fo - ms of  competition ii draw prize money.  at j    be in progress  div nd o a f y ;h TueSda , y and Wed nes-day of this week, with 4-H and   < iL ub yo . u tbs vieing with  oxolTn  ,ders . with  abundance and  garden nC l ? K eXhibitS *  With farm * garden, kitchen, sewing room  livestock products.    '  Almost every type of farm work will be on display at the  report  I that ear u and f ? ir of «'ia]s ,  a11 a vailable space . be psed  because of the usually heavy exhibits.  t .j? 0  New Contests  in addition to the various  Unity in Support for Byrnes  un-  CIO Maritime Strike Goes On  Somo Indications Agreement Near; AFL Seamen to Return to Ships  By Th* Associated Press  Ma1itre fere u n „?o„ 0, ^? er ^ tiona J  shipowners in New Yolk City ad journed last night ?SaTurday)  agreemenTh^'/ 1 ^  a  , wa *e-work gi cement, but a spokesman for  the owners said “some progress and maritime  has been made”  Ste rtf    ‘“‘^us    con-  farm °L past fa m s »  a n individual .?.^P la y 'n classification has  f S - making an out-  farm^iaK  r  ™  the c °unty, and midli fe saving equipment pre-miums have been added.  the individual farm disolav requires work from almost eveS member of the family. It is so  Vanoss Fair  Results of the Vanoss Community Fair of Friday had n^t {?*“ completely tabulated in time for publication in The  m?.e£  t i° day -  T i e entr y  Iist  WM  wa. .  ger thls  >' ear  than it was a year ago.  shinn?nL ndl # Ca {? d the nati on s vast  en J^P ln g strike was nearing  an  Talhfr K k 5 Sma . n wa * Frank J. Merehi-*    S?  of the  American  led lh!    Marine institute,    who  mfttee    ThT  ncg . otiatin K    com-  mmee.    The conference    was  IO a. rn.  and T.  \ Tem em. Eph Reidland I    are J. ll McFarland,° J D  ^    v. tne u t named head-  ; I,!ou fihby. W. H. Phillips T T  mg me c ttery when it was called j goodman. Dotson Lillie  #  lr,     Serv: ce in    1941.    W. Taylor.   Tna: fl  T  rst  inspection in 1921     You  Answer These 9    ca r.     ;r ‘  Jui - V -    ,  Uha t kind of base does your  I 5 qsn  occasion,    too.    house have—wood frame, hollow  . A    y    represented    j     0r     common brick? And is  * e s^ate. C Patsy O'Neal spoke  you r roofing wood, composition r - ' united States (he hadi orsIate;  And the exterior walls  en ; .     anc l    command-! ~ are  they ordinary siding, good  ed .he 90th Division in War I)  Slf ling, shingle, stucco, common a rom D. McKeown, then! or  , f . ace  brick? And the inside District congressman, p valls  l ~: wa11  board, rough plaster  iembrpH f 1?  y secti ons of iequned freshman courses had to  be closed by IO o’clock the first morning of enrollment. This necessitated opening of over-flow  ma#h° ns in En Shsh, history, and math courses.  n h 5 r< L are 600  veterans enrolled. This number would have  h^inT” . rger if the  veterans’ Tho ♦  Un were  completed.  lr ihL     118 are i  natura Ry, old-  tu i ? usual run of college students, and they seemed to be primarily interested in courses of  arter Th  and pr ? fessional  char-fnH? r '#  h , ere a ls 3 bl * demand for industrial arts, mechanical draw-  n ep S H o h 13  ?  and science  courses train?naf« Pre-professional cine    engineering and medi  co New Faculty Members  SSG? farmenT^wni "SL  a n b^Uomland  T o a r t spoke * The  or the cliv  er white piaster?  first drill was held July 26 ^ nd ls th e painting inside and  a August the new outfit J, 111 Rood or  ordinary? And the  wen. ever to Ft. Sill for the first L fIoonn / ordinary pine (the draf-  guard encampment.  Some Sailors Can Ask, Get Discharge  tors of the sheet don’t seem to -link much of any of the ‘ordin ary classifications), good pine ordinary or good oak? And the trim softwood, average or hard wood?  \our basement doesn’t escape nor do the porches, the garage or garage apartment. Even the use of the building is included. Good Plumbing Scarce?  What kind of heating do you have—hot air piped, steam, hot water or stoves? And    is your  ai    to-     ?n 5-  Rood or  J ust     average  who volante J 2: at ,adlcates tha ‘ good plumb-rn®    ■     y    in £  3Sn x  very general)?  ruction,    unless    thev^are    eW*     Tbere is  information,    too, on  Tonics    technicians    arc    trammel     C j r  ^’ sewer,    electric,  n rad.o schools or fro    I  water and  8 as  service, if its a  O ps personnel     1  -Pital (corner lot. near transportation  2 Pf.p-iare    v.    ,    near school, near street lights  Sd fouf1-e?rs of them Sll L PC,haps thc oddest  question of  WASHINGTON. Sept 14 I ne navy announced todav that certain regula 'n en may be nth at their  he announcement said this applies in genera] to Draftees enlisted in tf-  -(/P)  navy enlisted discharged this own request.  President Linscheid introduced  fire# f W f , aculty  members at the Sr j  acuIty  meeting of the year  mo dne f Sd n y #*  Slnc f  that time ’ ^ree moi e full-time faculty members  have been added to the staff Th” -  a /f ed  ® uff  bas made it pos-  cm rir.l  6 co,lege t0 offer  more  courses than ever before. There axe twice as many courses being offered now' as were on the schedule in 1944.  Student activities will be in full swing before the end of this Friday night the Tri Sigs ^ere hostesses at an all-school  dance ,  heId  in the gym. The Vet-eians club will hold its first  Haf/lSr 8  H f th ^  year in Fent ®m Hall Monday night. There will be  Fi?M P u? i y aT \ d bonfi re at Norris Field Wednesday night. Thursday  Dar Jhp ° Th the !r e11 be 3 fo °tba ll parade. Thursday night, the Tigers play the first game of the year against the Murray Aggies at Norris Field.    ^kgies  fa n rm iS  ^ ‘«f*^hSte fll?“p£S farmer plants small grains  but     s    a    wide  Section  The cir hi hi? 3 v , arlous  restrictions. from the I. I require products  items ref  g f[ den m ad dUion to items from the row-crop depart-  th^U^?  is W0 - second $25 iirt ^ 20 * fourth $15 and fifth  contJTf lere . are 11  Phases of the stiles IOO points.^ 60 ^  Score con '  meV d efelnt r .n V fe U t  equipment entered in the contest must have been made by a farm-  fhrt £ ?2 m « one  . clos ely related to the field of agriculture and mus*  cTal  h p a  u  V  r  e pore e s n made f ° r  — New Devices Interesting  County Agent C. H. Hailey said  1hn„?r°£ d n f w d e  P  a  r t rn e n t numi^r^he interesting because a number of new devices wer^  shnn  Ct ?*  durin ^  the  war when shop made equipment was not  available.  placebo ranges from $5 for first Place to $1 for frfth place and  there is no extra work because farm eqUlPment  “  already on  <he  home* d«n<fnstraUon* a agent° U has  requested that exhibitors ’ read her column on the farm page and  £ a ?ab!S. Vari0US itema  Should  enlistments prov ided th" I     your     electric    wiring  any one of 66 rates  „    ,    -----— Com-  officers have been auth- I Mi to withhold these dis-! ce? however, if the men are igea in instruction, mainten- I Ot operation of electronic pment.  ie rates are distributed! ug- moss of the regular ship I ** n.ciments operating jobs in I  ne service  rho navy took this action, it f i^mea because of budget lim- i ^r;?and excess of mm with-I * penile rating groups.  “cheap or average.  FATHER-IN-LAW TAKES SUSPECT  Arrests One of Pair Wanted For Walters Bank Robbery  OKLAHOMA dTY. Sept. 14. •I he Oklahoman says in a copyright story that Joe L. Hix<\  b meSk/ Uiar W3S  — id - thetey^N Oklt  • bank, was captured  4r  -I    *-«*piurea    at    pistol  possum measures about in law R F S    old     father-  -r.cn at birth.    Im! right  Dunham -  at  Electra  —---——    I In a    long distance telephone  --------------- interview with Dunham, the Ok  W-.     4     _    ♦    I a heman    quotes him as saving  FATU    ED!    bM° n ,n ; law thre «tened that his  LM I n    C    Kl    pother.    James Hixon. 27, also  charged with the bank robbery would get him for the capture* James is still at large.  Dunham, describing the  OKLAHOMA:    Generally    fair  -nasy and M nday; not' much ^ange in temperature.  cap-  (Continued on Page 7 Column 4)  Superintendent Of  Blind School Quits  ,' city '  sept 14  the nirToK    o r V     princi pal of  Blfnd ai i ma Sch ° o1  for the Blind, Muskogee, today was ap-  . P U ut?on SU c Permt S nden f ° f the in -stitution, succeeding Mrs. O. W  PTO who resigned after hold-mg the post for 21 years.  tv , arte r. 35, a graduate of the tm versify of Oklahoma, was cho-  ihSi  y  K- u  Sta - te board of  education, which said it accepted Mrs  Mrf‘4  rcsigna » ion  reluctantly! Mis. Stewart had headed the  ?9« h« sm l e  I 925 -  Fro r ISH to tendcnt  husband wa * superin-  Mrs. Stewart’s letter of resig-  was 0 rie«?i d lbat ,  Since the sch <>ol 1945 she h° ft  y H d by a to ™ a do in Iv'* frt -4    a  Worke d mcessant-  y for its restoration. She added that since the institution’s future is now assured, she felt it a “logi-  ents  t0 change su Perintend-The board of education passed service?  n commendin g her long With the exception of time i m army air  corps,  mo er u    n 8en princf P aI  since  1939. He will assume the superintendency Oct. J.  ™*tans drink an average of 30 to 50 cups of tea a day.  Congress moved the government to Washington first Monday in December, 1800; Monday’s a take your car to  (barges Filed On Tulsa U. Student  Highway Death Blamed On Car Driven by Him  TULSA, Okla., Sept. 14 bpi_  Assistant county attorniey Mar-  of firer H  t0day flled a  charge  against Allen"erry Bowmaif"l"  dent" 1on"* VerSit of  Tulsa stu!  fo l lowm g the highway  Goody, e 3 3   y today of Willi am E  who1e1ale a ?irT Pl0yee  ° f a Tulsa  wnoiesale firm, was struck and  atally injured by a car which  highway patrolman H. J Har-  Bownlan  W3S driven  ** W  resume at  tEbr) today.  in^,^„ Seame , n ’  who be (?an the mdustry-crippling walkout Sept.  brtrt  aban d°ncd their picket thl^ were preparing to man their vessels, but CIO Sailors continued the prolonged strike. Picket on Three Coasts The CIO men. demanding the wages granted to AFL Maritime workers, picketed har-bors on the nations three coasts. me lines were crossed in at least two instances by AFL men.  AFL Longshoremen walked through a CIO line at a New.York pier to unload passenger hand luggage from the liner Washington. NMU headquarters however, said the strike was IOO per cent effective, declaring they had received reports of complete tie-ups “in all ports.”  In Norfolk, Va., AFL International Longshoremen’s Associa-tion members returned to their jobs. crossing CIO barriers. Officials of the AFL Sailor unions had said their men would respect the CIO lines.  4u  Wl il!5 m rt Re P t2 ’  port a * ent  f°r the AFL Seafarers International  union in Baltimore, said AFL  members would respect the CIO  pickets “for the time being”  Malone Delays Settlement  Paul Hall, New York port a- tbe  AFL Sailors union of the Pacific and the SIU, said as the AFL groups ended their strike Friday night that SUP-SIU men would honor the CIO lines.  In Washington, government of-ficials said they were informed .hat the CIO unions were asking 2or the same wage scales granted AFL men but final settlement was delayed by an attempt by Vincent J. Malone of the West Coast Firemen's union (independent) to reduce the spread between the east and west coast scales. The firemen’s union is associated with six CIO unions in the committee for maritime unity.  POLICE OFFICER SLAIN IN GIN RI TTI r un  cere Los Carmack and Ben lnk„!i„ “ATTLE. When police offi-  two youthful suspects in connection J, ;*    *? 3 ’    9    ”     a PP r °a^hed  chant policeman In SoiiV, M n     .    Hi?  slaying of a  '"cr-  Carmack was killed and Johnson    i    ensued in w hich  shown lying on the ground    ♦ho?*?    wounded. Carmack is  the suspects, James Neah? IwL^lr*, fata footing, while one of lice.—(NEA Photo).    (background)    is    being    held    by    po-  Truman Says Wasn't Putting Approval on Wallace Speech, Only on Right to Deliver It  Na Ch!.!,  iBF ?. m c a, r  ,afCmen ’  A, “ rn Thcre '» ■«•»  on 9 e  •» U S. Foreign Policy. Still Look* ta Byrnes  Reply Sharply To Wallace  Connolly, Vandenberg In Flea for End to Bickering, Say Doubt Cost on U. S. Stand  By REI MAN MORIN  PARTS. Sept. 14. —. Mp) __Th# two senate advisers of the I' <5 peace conference delegation Pleaded today for United W? J  n  support of the foreicn t»‘i. Byrnre     by Secre,ary o!  State  orients obvious, ly directed at the New V 0 --speech in which Secretary- of Commerce Henrv Wallace ad’-T  Tom r Pher f?  of infl uence. Sen’ Tom Comely (D.-Tex I decla-  at horn  shoi i ld  b° no bickering stroveT    ' V    e  ‘b* 1     delegates  H. Vandenberg’  and bt auth d  'T’ " 'I 15 ' " n  *•>« unity eign    'policy° f Amer ' can  ^r-  ,uL° n ®.  stilter "ent watt is-  that Pre fd h ent' V Tr, OUt kn °*‘ ad « a    ‘     Truman     had told  t he re was ho    XZ*    e  ashed AmerLn f nge -  ,n e5!ab -  and that hi.  a u,nH° reign p ° ; * cv  w a ii, A  .     nis     endorsement'* of  rn;. f s sp€ech  resulted from I  misunderstanding.  Highly Praise, Byrne,  formally, chairman of thA  drelired e,gn th]   Stat - » "■ ‘peak w^th , Ln p^ d   suasive and influential voice' •,  the peace conference, there mal?  a *,t‘ v hoo n b r b ; nd ,h * i*ne,-  denh..rl I. J before this Van-„ u     had  issued a  'uhich said "we can onlv  statement  late uitW'rtv,  v- "  on] >’ cooper-a time  b src retary of state at  I The text  I ment:   of c °nna!!y’s state-  ■rnes  Meal Disappearing From Markets Here, Outlook Uncertain  J™ 11 mcat m ay be plentiful at >oui favorite grocery, but at the majority of the meat markets  u^a    h*-    H'GHTOWER  JV ASH1NGTON, Sept. 14 <  President Truman * *  !i*X h BcuU k .t° , m^ tary By   I with  e reaT  andI remarkable patience  d  tected  Ada there is a definite shortage Americas favorite dish -tho  of  The accident occurred near  S °Vi f lty     as    Coody    appar  en ly tried to flag    down    an    atto-    j bul  5 | at °" 1 | e ,     S 2‘ urda y morning  mobile for help with    his    stalled    L h-ri    u !i    u day afte » noon no  car, Harmon said.     d     I charges    had    been filed in con-   0    _ j  nec tion    with    the shooting.  Francis Man Shot In Family Fuss  Not Seriously Injured By Lead Pallets  Keith Jones of Francis Saturday was suffering from two bullet wounds on his forehead received Friday afternoon. The incident occurred about 4:30 p.m.  ♦hi# **t! d tbe attend mg physician that there was some family trouble and a member of the amil y  fired a .410 gaugfe shotgun in his direction.  The doctor took two small lead Pellets out of his face. One pel-  inV?? g  4L° n the right  forehead and the other stopped above the eft eye.  trtJA e , n ,  Jon ? S arrived a t the doctor s office, he was bleeding pro-  fusely and was in censorable  Jones was in the county attorney s office Saturday  dish that Americans spend about  monger 1  ° f  * hl '"  grocery   No Ada market is boasting an   a °nH r ;l UPPly . ° f an * V CUtS  O f  Pork and the majority of the butchers  DorW^i#  S0 4°  no bright  ^Pot in the polk situation in the future.  A few markets have a few  slices of bacon and a smattering  i° n hand now *  but  when that pork is gone there will possibly be no more for several weeks because they cannot obtain it from the packer.  One butcher said that no time during rationing was his shop so "? aidy out  of meat. He said all the meat obtained in tw'o  day 0  afternoon^ ^ ° n 3 Satur ’ Will Stay That Hay  trt^rt W K n * a u  a PP loacb cd a down-town butcher and was about to  ZtZ     me3t    when    sh o    hap  pened to glance at the meat box  i;??  sa ^  no meat of a ny descrip.  .... i    today dis - I -md has sought a  t » a Lu -    .  avowed any endorsement of the I Peace    *    able    and    just  substance of Secretary Wallace’ controversial foreign police speech, explaining in a forma  m^aiE^Proycd^the^spee!-ii heVad Prewien^ T^d^greem^ wuh  S/wSL.Tril.V " p - -  Trumaa *  There has been no change  Deserve, l  ni , fd Su , M   formal I stood that  ee  t  nera,, y ur.der- dt no  "me ha, there  in  *s.  , deserves and"’shoulH P °i} 1Cy -  H<  de- !suDDor# rif ti * ? u Id have th**   1  the United sLtT™  PCOplea  *» “There  °nal r-iauons either f<  established foreign policy of term#    I 3 n °  pIac<?     in our it  our government,’’ the president n/rt    ,     rf *b»tions  told a world which had been dc     Itts ‘ ,n  P°bti(  bating whether bis stated ap- J -Wha ° r personaI   Ame?ieiH eant i  draStlC rcv,s,on  of (ately fnr^n ‘ s?rivin « desp^r-Ameritan Dollcv     Russia     ^     f ^ Pcace in the w£l d   ...    _     or     ^     no     controve'-q    *  Misunderetanding Natural iJfeO' strife at horn Mr. Truman issued todnv‘«    _     n,t *‘d    States  and Britain  usual  C ±S]L th i U “ gb     J*”™-voice 9 ST  e.  u.sual procedure of summoning reporters to his White House of flee at 2 p.m. E. E. T. He read the statement and said “that s all ” I here were no questions. The statement said:  “There has been a natural mis-  swe , r r i land ! ng  regarding the an-,  1 made to  a question asked  dav °sSnT SS i? >n  I nCe on Thurs *  U*  pt -  12 *  w, th reference tr» the speech of the secretary of commerce delivered in New York  answer'd*  da r  Tho  q“ a tion wa,  - extemporaneously and my answer did not convey the vey Ug that 1 inten ded it to con-  rt,  11  4^ as  , my  intention to ex-Jd #L 5; J5? U ? h x t . that 1  approv-  in the  there I  y  ' >  conr *‘re the finest”  n °  dlvlSi °n beh  pqace conference iud.  Reckless Driving Charged lo Jones  Tanzie  cd the right of the secretary of conferee to deliver the speech I did not intend to indicate that  Rosenberg's Nazi Party Book interesting Memento of 1927  ilSDfc? sSlSft^bH 1     5! n A™*‘    $: 0k     Bialy    [  tion. She wanted to know if there was ANY kind of fresh meat she  could purchase. The butcher told i    -    __  her that the box looked as it f»i., P .? r0Ved ,he  speech ^ con! would for some time because of    ?     a  statement of the for  the shortage of meat.    °*     e,ga     of    this country  «ru^ omc Sea Foods  iicrc    ‘-TU*     Been    So  Change”  While most cuts of fresh meat* ti  Im ‘ r c  ha s been no change in are scarce, butchers are display :     cstabli shed    foreign policy of  mg more dairy products and sea 121  c sf°^ ernment Ther « will he food m their meat counters. The icy S withoift lt H' hang *  m that po1 ' selection is not wide, but at least I tere^e am*  dlS ?u Usslon and  « ■■"-~      IHC    among the president th.  (Continued on Page 7 Column 5) ismna^teadm,** 3 *'  iln<1 C(m ««'- s:   111     tbe     president’s state-  tiMlay was that the Ameri I'’!" P° l,r -V' 111  is that which i,  Stab? „ apph, ' d bv  Secretary of .State Byrnes at Paris. His clar  eft n" " r , " ,a * P”""- however ft in existence the fact that he Apparently has on Ins hand*  y       «    .lets  FVrrv^V * bt? Cast w **®  court  tron B justice of  mgr    i (mes     Saturday    rrorr   ch ^ged with  was filed in the peace  The complaint was signM bv °’ ° < amp!,ell. highway- Mtrol Plan. who said that from an or known point tr, «    **  fourth miles north of Ada drove without due regard to t-a» fie existing there.    °  , ‘ < “'  County Attorney Tom D Mc-Keown filed the complaint- in addition to the arresting officer Glenn Clark was listed a,  a  wft-  .tJ he    of    p *<    *    »a  brTdge *  0xf ° rd and Cam   was  is a  hfaK  lfl S d  Rosenberg who'rose to high office in Adolf Hitler’s in  as chief of publica-  good day to  Sinnett-Meaders.  9-15-lt  Her circle tions.  rtriii lf    hut    elaborately  assortment '  ba,k and with  an  assortment of information and   that to even th © ama-  stanHifTa .  g ‘V es .  n,,lrh  ""Jo, -things °    ‘slants’    on  The book is the more valuable because Rosenberg’s was No. 18  P  aci i] g b,m  among the early party affiliates.  Brough! By James O. Braly  * ^ mes  O. Braly, with the AMG in Germany for some months, has  2*i ne *  sp,lt  between his secre-aS Sr     and hls  reeve  ~    . { *     state  over relations with  I  TH' PESSIMIST  mf fink It Inn It*. J,.  Russia.  ??« ‘ h if week to m the Ca VA offlines, to fa mninvIS 8 y U ith which he  zealous  is emplojed ss sn sttornov    ~—— *•*« **m  Dr. A. Linscheid, president of  T  Jr qUallty Urgcd ~ T hen | OKLAHOMA -  CITY , ♦ ii East Central college rthitoir.«i« . *. n  earlier period of Hit W*— nK  *  p  ^  example of boldness, willing, j   5  sacrifice and discipline : VIRGIL BDVAFp v»«r,y in work and thriftiness.    NAMED  translated the contends 1  of "file lllL     party     members,    day    was    appointed    a    state    high  HIGH SC HOOL INSPECTOR  '^LAHOMA CItT sTp, R  V irgil Bonner, Marietta. t<>-  book. which ran to 19 typewrit- n  d,rerl(>d to trra t those un- school inspector by the Oklah ten page.,.    I    fellow*"    -**    ■ P *° Ple ’     n,,t     hea,.,.    as    I    Wd    JTI-duLfinn'  »ma  Issued In 1927  o     Y ?u1rWainwni|hT     <1,tlK   ge, Durant.  name and those of various other ° a  n ?  (>r the  people of your ilF ia,s *    blood a bearer of your blood, ir-    First Harbor Dav  The book lists the central or-    v®y? C ? b ^,  u , mte . d by fi *te with! ,     J  Sterling Morton first intro-  gan of the party and    a    picture    11®“;  a JI?J? Iue m  your people the;  du< e d * resolution setting aside  newspaper and says ‘it    is    a duty    thlfLirt 1 / sweeper higher than  a    d *iy for tree-planting in the Ne-  to become a subscriber’.    the kine of  ;m  alien land ’’    braska    State Board of Aeneid  The preface is a rousing call'    liberty    of a people is call- Jure on Jan. 4. 1872. Arbor Dav  to be in all your dealings, words (Continued on Page 6 Column I) *1(^1874  obacrved therc on A P“‘  Mrs. ‘ Dude" I.ark s.iys «  one armed paperhanger .an’t g<»t nothin’ on th’ woman chain-smoker who’s try in’ t’ whip up a meal an’ hang out th wash.  —OO—  Too many folks seem t* think that th’ human machine has t b<> “oiled” ever* Saturday night.   

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