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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: September 13, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 13, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Food shortages exist in big cities of this country and in most of the countries around the globe but there is no lack of 'food for thoug ht' in what those conditions con mean for everyone of us. Avtme .Vet Aujuit Paid Circulation 8462 Mtmber: Audit Bureau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 127 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER FIVE CENTS THE COPY Entry List In Yanoss Fair Is Enlarged Dairy Cattle Feature of Dis- trict Fair, Judging Under Way There Today Residents of the Vanoss com- munity Friday were competing for S300 being offered in prize money at the third annual Vanoss Community Fair. H. H. Barsons, superintendent at the school, said that there is a sizeable increase in the number of entries t.'iis year. Practically all of the dairy ani- mzjs taking part in the fair were iurnished to 4-11 and FFA mem- bers of the community through the Chamber of Commerce dairy program. A brush arbor was constructed several days ago and all of the animals were placed under it Thursday night and Friday. There were two pens of sheep on display, 25 hogs of various types and ages. Heavy faille List The cattle entries far exceeded Incise of any previous year with 22 Shorthorns, 11 Holsleins, two Guernsey, four Jersey, three Herefords and two Angus. In the poultry department, there was a full house with no room available for additional birds. One of the judges said that the poultry exhibits are of much higher quality than had been ex- pscied. H. D. Work Praised Mr. Parsons said the livestock exhibit is the largest, the grain exhibit is about the same and work in the Home Demonstration department is the best ever ex- hibited there. Dr. Ed Granger was selected to judge all dairy animals. Gulon Shy of Stratford was elected to judge beef animals, hogs and sheep. J. C. Bull of Stratford judged poultry, and Lester Smith, assistant county agent, judged the crops. Mrs. Iva Jones judged most of the items exhibited by 4-H club girls and adults. It was reported that farm wo- men in the community have taken more interest in exhibits this year and at the present time exhibit more tiems than do farm Vocational agriculture students and 4-H club members still pace the field in exhibits made "by ir.en. To obtain the S300 offered for prizes, Vanoss school raised to match donated by the Pon'.otoc county fair. Some of the money was raised by a pie sup- per, other money was raised in a queen contest and the remainder war, raised by a carnival Thurs- day night. Surplus Cash Into Books Because many of the farm youth could not attend the nffair Thursday night, the carnival was continued all day Friday. Superintendent Parsons said that all money not used as prizes a: '.he fair will be used to pur- chase boohs for the school li- brary- Judging started at 11 a.m. Fri- day. In the Jersey division, Joha McDonald exhibited the only bull j-.nd won first place. Johnny Tucker won first with his Jersey cow and Paul Duncan was second. Thiee prizes arc given in each division with being given first place winners. to seconds and SI to third place winners. Warmer Weather h Weekend Forecast By Thr Asjoclalcd I'rm Poteau's 95 decrees was the highest temperature recorded in OWahoma in a 24-hour .period ending early Friday. Most of the state had top readings in the eighties. More than an inch of rain fell a: while other south- western Oklahoma cities reported lesser amounts. Rain may fall in the central Oklahoma area Fri- day nJsht or Saturday and high- er temperatures are forecast for western Oklahoma today and all the state by Saturday night. The long-range forecast indicates warmer weather all next week. The overnight low was 53 de- crees at Bartlcsville which re- ported a Friday maximum of 88. PnStau's low night reading 55. Read The News Classified Ads, WEATHE _ OKLAHOMA PnrlJv cloudy to cloudy loniijht imd Saturday; somewhat warmer Saturday; pariH- cloudy and somewhat warmer Sunday. Wealhrr Fort-cast for Sent. 13-17 Kansas, Oklahoma and change in Saturday through V.'c-dr.'.'sday with temperatures averaping 5-H) degrees above seasonal normal in Nebraska, west and central Kansas and northwest Oklahoma and 3-5 de- greer above normal elsewhere; only light precipitation over dis- trict: confined to mnstlv scatter- ed over Missouri Sunday o.- S-nday night. Wallace, in Truman-Okayed Speech, Calls for Foreign Policy Independent of British Says Will Lead to War Otherwise; Russia to Meet Us Halfway, Cooperate; Sen. Pepper Takes Other Side, Demandi End to "Our Blundering Foreign Policy" NEW YORK, Sept. of Commerce Henry A. Wallace was interrupted by booing and heckling in a White House approved speech at a Madison Square Gar- den rally last night where Senator Claude Pepper (D-Fla.) was applauded by attacking our "blundering foreign policy." The two men, who have been on the same side in many foreign and domestic issues, spoke before an audience of at a rally sponsored by the National Citi- zens Political Action Committee and the Independent Citizens Committee of the Arts, Sciences and Professions. Wallace, who said the United States must'adopt a clear and realistic policy of its "own to avoid another war, first was greeted Demo On Rally 18 Roy J. Turner to Head Democratic Big Party Get-Together Democrats of this area are be- ing invited to a big campaign- rally at Glenwood park on Sep- tember 18, -which is next Wed- nesday. The rally will begin at 11 9. m., the business meeting and speaking at 2 p A delegation m. of democratic nominees will be headed by, Roy J. Turner, democratic nominee for governor, and Glen D: John- son, party selection for Fourth District congressman. Nominees for district and coun- ty offices, all county and precinct chairmen and vice- chairwomen, county and local nominees, managers and ac- tive workers for any candidates in the recent primaries are to be there. The rally is one of a series in which party; leaders and nees are taking' to the people of the state their-positions on issues of the campaign and also getting in much widening of personal acquaintance. U. S.-Bfilijh War Collaboration SHU On, Says .Truman By ELTON C. FAY WASHINGTON, Sept: 13; President Truman's .offhand dis- closure that the wartime military, collaboration of the United States and Britain is to remain intact for a time produced little sur- prise in this capital today. But what significance, if -any, might be read into 'it by other world powers remained an open question. Monty's Visit Not Significant The chief executive "was asked at a news conference yesterday if it could be" assumed that the combined chiefs of group ot high military and naval commanders of the two nations who collaborated in planning and prosecuting World War would continue in existence un- til the war's end was proclaimed officially. Sure, answered the president. But he disagreed with the ques- tioner's phrasing whether the visit of Field Marshal Viscount Montgomery ''points out the fact" that the combined staff still ex; isls. There is, said the president, nothing significant in the visit of the British chief of staff to the United States except that it is a friendly gesture. Need Exchange of Ideas The field marshal had told another news conference some 24 hours earlier that whether the combined chiefs continued was "entirely a matter lor heads ot government." At the same con- ference, but in answer to another question, Montgomery had dis- cussed the need for an exchange stall set-ups, arms equipment amonR ot ideas on and other 'professional soldiers." He said that for example, Britain is es- tablishing the general staff sys- tem used by the Officials say that obviously the wartime functions of the com- bined staffs are not being carried on in the post-hostilities-era but only those applicable to peace- time conditions or necessary to close out the wartime activities. Only Federal Payroll Trimmed To That Figure WASHINGTON, Sept, ]3, The federal payroll was trimmed by employes during July, the Byrd economy committee re- ported today. Employment in that month totaled Tho war nnd nuvy departments rrlcnsed employes, the re- port staled. However, it added, reductions in the war agencies were offset by increases in some of the old-line departments, The labor department, for .example, took on new employes. FRANCES PERKINS BACK ON CIVIL SERVICE BOARD WASHINGTON. Sept. 13 Frances Perkins is bringing her three-cornered hats back to the Washington lime as a member of the Civil Service Commission. President Truman announced' at his news conference yesterday that the former Secretory of La- bor will succeed Mrs. Lucille Foster McMillin on the Commis- sion. by hisses and hoots when he said he was "neither anti-British nor pro-British, neither anti- Russian nor .and added: "Just two days Pres- ident Truman read these words, he said they represented the pol- icy of his Heckled Over Russian Reference Another round of heckling, broke out when Wallace, speak- ing of Russia, said "her type of: land reform, industrial expropria- tion and suppression of basic liberties offend the great major- ity of the people of the United States." At this point Wallace laid aside his text and declared: "Well, it's true outside New York City, as any Gallup poll will show." He resumed his speech and said, "the Russians have no more "business stirring up native communists to political activity in western Europe, Latin America and the United Loud hisses interrupted him and he shouted: "Get the whole sentence" adding to complete his remark, "than we have interfer- ing in the polities'of eastern Eu- rope and Lashes British Policy He. said policy" in. the Near East together with Soviet retaliation would lead the United States to war unless it set up an independent foreign policy. He urged that, we "look- abroad through pur .own American eyes." -Asked; .after the'speech for com- rnenl- on. _ Wallace was to be in explanation, "I was following a straight American line." Wallace was" greeted with .an ovation and cries of -for President'.', when he the garden. There was some scattered applause- during the speech and applause when he sat down. In his speech Wallace said: "But whether we like it or not the Russians will try to socialize their sphere of influence just as we try to democratize our sphere of influence. Two Ideas In Rivalry "Russian ideas of social-econ- omic justice are going to govern nearly a third of the world. Our ideas of free enterprise derhoc- rary will govern much of the rest. The two ideas 'will endeavor to prove which can deliver the most satisfaction to the common man in their respective areas of political dominance. "But by mutual agreement, this competition should be put on a fiendly basis and the Russian should stop conniving against us in certain areas of the world just as we should stop scheming against them in other-parts of the world." In contrast to the White House approval, Sen. Pepper in a-speech preceding Wallace's at the rally indicated disagree-' ment with the cabinet' member. Pepper called for; a "special session now" to consider "our blundering foreign arid in a'line apparently inserted into his prepared address at the last minute said: "We do not want .well-prepared official speeches 'explaining' our foreign policy." Wallace, in advocating the can- didacies of Sen.. James M. Mead and Herbert Lehman, New York's democratic nominee for Gover- nor and U. S. Senator, respective- ly, told his audience that Gov. Thomas E. Dewey, republican candidate for re-election; had ex- pressed himself as favoring an alliance of mutual defense with Great Britain as the key to our foreign policy. Like British As Individuals "Certainly, we like the British people as Wallace said. "But to make- Britain the key to our foreign policy would be, in my opinion the height of tolly. We must not let the reac- tionary leadership of the Repub- lican parly force us into the po- sition. We must not let British balance-oC-power manipulations determine whether and the United Slates gets into war." "We most earnestly want peace with Wallace added, "but we want to be met We want cooperation. And I believe that we can get that cooperation once- Russia understands that our primary objective is neither sav- ing the British Empire nor pur- chasing oil in the Near East with the lives of American soldiers. Rust on dark spots can be re- moved, on scissors by nibbing off roughness with fine sandpaper or steel wool and rubbing on a little oil. CIO Maritime Union Goes on Strike To Get Wage Benefits Won by AFL Aussie Hits Veto Powers Says Security Council, In Diireputc, Shouldn't Boss Trieste Territory By A. I. GOLDBERG PARIS, Sept. 13, Aus- tralian delegate to the peace-con- ference said today the United Na- tions security council was in dis- repute through arbitrary use of the veto power, and should not be permitted to govern the1 pro- posed free territory of Trieste. "The use of the in the security council has been ar- bitrary, irresponsible and torial and has brought the coun- cil into disrepute throughout the said R. Hodgson, who has served as- a delegate to tho council. "It. would make the Trieste: port Question a threat to world peace." Makes Definite Suf gestion To put the Trieste question in the hands of the security coun- cil, as suggested by the four-pow- er foreign ministers council, "would insure making the plan Hodgson argued. He said Trieste should be, gov- erned by a council representing the United States, Great Britain, Soviet Russia, France and three other nations. "This problem belongs for de- cision and approval in this 21- natiori conference here and the port-should be administered by a council of, the Big Four and .three other he.said in debate the Italian political and territorial commission. Soviet Attitude Involved His- outright attack held im- plications of support for the .op- ening question of Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov, who demanded .information as to how the United .States proposed, to guarantee the liberty i of the Trieste.- area.-under ;the- security c oil h c i 1 Underlying Hodgson's however, --was steady fight on Rus- use of the veto power, a 'fight Hodgson himself carried ,on before the security council against Andrei Gromyko of the S.. S. R. The American delegate on the commission said only that he was not prepared to give a precise answer to Molotov's question at this time. Time to Resume Letter Writing Postoffice Department Retires NLWW j 'WASHINGTON. The postoffice department is pretty enthusiastic about peace. For one thing, it is able to an- nounce the revival of National Letter Writing .Week. This year's theme is: '-'Some-, one feels better when you send a letter." the week begins Oct. 13, just a month from today. "The -postoffice department is planning again to participate in such observance as in former years until war conditions pre- vented doing the third assis- tant postmaster general announc- ed in the Postal Bulletin, the mailmen's official house organ. Postmaster 'General Hannegan's No. 3 man added that appropriate literature- boosting the enterprise is being .sent to postmasters. "Let. us all work together to make National Letter Writing Week, October 13 to 19, a great concluded tha offical. If you don't have anybody in particular to write to, but want to be -a good sport about it, the- third assistant postmaster gener- al's address is: Joseph J. 2480 Sixeenth Street Northwest, Washington, 9, D. C. Swimming Season Over for Ada Weather Changes to Fall, Ends Season Hera Not long -ago Luther Condren, superintendent of parks, an- nounced that the city's swim pools in Glenwood Park would be kept open "as long as the weather permits." The -weather, "doesn't permit" any longer, Condren reported Friday morning and so the sum- mer swimming season is over for Ada. A'pool was open last Saturday and Sunday; which was before the latest fall "weather descended on' the .city, but the change in weather since has been definitely away from temperatures that en- tice swim-loving folks into the cool waters. _, It is estimated 'that before the war, one-third of the U.S. fami- lies had incomes under' a year. 'And When She Got There, the Cupboard Was Bare' With truckmen on strike, New York City faces an acute food shortage, with chain stores, bakeries and other food dealers planning to close up shop because of inability 10 replenish stocks. Scene above Is typical as Edward Culhane, chain-store manager, shows his empty bins and tells a would-be shopper tbat he doesn't know when he'll have any fresh food. Meal Scarcest Of Food Items Major Cities, Plagued By Strikes, Critical Housing Shortages By The AMocUted Preu Meat is the .scarcest food item in the. nation's cupboard; hun- dreds thousands of workers are unernplpyed Jn -strike-hit ..the housing-' -shoi-tage liaa reached critical proportions in many communities. These .facts disclosed to- day in a nation-wide survey con- ducted by the Associated Press. Sampling of" conditions -in cities from coast to coast also showed that the family larder was short of sugar, soaps, fats and oils. Housing' Short In the housing field, public housing authorities said they had long waited lists from applicants for practically non-existing liv- ing quarters, and that apartments were "impossible to find" in some places. -New OPA'investi- gators found only about 55'per- cent of retailers had meat for sale. Housing: highly critical, according to local authorities. Strikes: .largest port at stand- still maritime strike. Truck strike cutting food sup- plies. Unemployment: state de- partment of placement and un- employment insurance said 000 workers out. 'Many Need D. C. Homes Washington; D. meat fast dwindling, with sugar and shortening equally scarce. Un- employment: estimated to jobless with available positions put at Housing: individuals needing adequate living quarters estimated "in ex- cess of San m e'a t scarcest. Strik'es five. on strike affecting 260 firms with an estimated IB4.000 laid off. Hous- ing: Chamber of Commerce es- timates housing is short family units. 12 Strikes in Chicago Chicago food: meat scarcest food in this important livestock center.. Strikes: 12; involving workers. Unemployment: unemployment; c o m p e n s a- tion commission reports compensation claimants. Housing: metropolitan home builders as- sociation said work started on ..homes, and priorities is- sued for Lack of materi- aln haa -brought work on uniti to. a standstill. MINNEAPOLIS food: meat scarcest food. Unemployment: USES said unemployed, including war vets. Re- ports it has only unfilled work orders. Housing: mayor's office said immediate need was for housing units. fats, oils, and pork listed on scarce list. Strikes: one department store walkout in- volving about 700 persons. Un- employment: USES estimated jobless with opening on file for only 500. Housing: City housing authority said situation "could not be more critical." Meat Scarce in K. C. Kansas City food: beef and pork scarcest. four, in- volving 825 employes: unemploy- ment: .USES says out of jobs in greater Kansas City and adjacent suburban areas. Hous- ing: city research department es- timates that 4.000 dwelling units needed immediately and in near future. Read The News Classified Ads. Plan Drive To Kill Off OPA Move Among Senator! Would End OPA Three Months Ahead of Next June By FRANCIS J. KELLY WASHINGTON, Sept. 13, A drive to kill OPA next April 1 months ahead its scheduled.death shaping up'among senators. some members'of both -parties, the pro- posal was brought into the open by Senator .Taft He told the Ohio republican state convention at Columbus Wednesday that price and wage controls should be "completely abolished" by April 1, with rent control for not to exceed one more year transferred to the na- tional housing administration. Expanding on the plan in an interview, Taft noted today lh.it under the current OPA act 'all food subsidies must come to an end by April. He said he saw no. reason why the price adminis- tration could not be liquidated at the same time. An influential democratic sen- ator, heretofore closely allied to the administration, told a report- er on the condition his name not be used that "the greatest mis- take" he had made in his long congressional careef was to vote for extension of the price con- trol law last July. He predicted a successful drive to abolish OPA as soon as con- gress reconvenes next January. Told of his statement, Taft said it seemed doubtful to him that the control agency could be cut off that quickly unless President Truman acquiesced. But Taft predicted such a drive would succeed by April, resentment against OPA continues to pile up." There is no indication that-'Mr. Truman would accede willingly to abolition of OPA ahead" of the present June 30, 1947. deadline. In vetoing the original OPA ex- tension bill and asking for a new one, the president's No. 1 rec- ommendation was for a full year's extension. Hurricane Moving Away from Florida Part of Movei Northeast MIAMI, Fla., Sept. 13 first major tropical storm of the year increased to hurricane force today, and moved northeastward through the'.Atlantic after kish- jrig a portion of the Bahamas with 65 to 85 mile winds. The present movement of the storm is Inking it away from the Florida mainland, the federal storm warning service advised. The disturbance, described us small but intense, was expected to grow in size and intensity. Its early morning position placed its center 275 miles north- 'east of Miami in latitude 27 de- grees 2 minutes north, longitude 76 degrees 2 minutes west. The village Hopelown, on Great Abaco island, the Bahamas, was raided with winds of 05-mile sustained velocity and guests of. 85 miles an hour. To remove mildew from a shower curtain, wash it in hot suds, then moisten the spots with lemon juice, salt and hang the curtain in the sun to dry. Read the News classified ads. Two Gunmen Slay Tulsan Kill One Detective, Criti- cally Wound Another Whan Approached for Queries TULSA, Okla., Sept. 13 Police detective Ben Johnson to- day was reported near death in a Tulsa hospital from bullet wounds received in u gun fight .last rijfiht with two Dayton. Ohio, suspects in which Detective S. R. Cai-mack was killed and one of the youthful gunmen wounded. Johnson was shot through the shoulder and hospital attendants said they feared he may have re- ceived a lung injury. He was given blood transfusions and his condition was termed "most criti- cal." Carmack was shot through the heart and died enroute to a hos- pitiil. One of the two suspects, who Detection Captain J, D. Bills said gave his name as James Neely, 17, was shot in the foot and sur- rendered to officers after the shooting. Believe Oilier Youth Wounded A second youth cscnpcd, but officers s.'iid they believed he too was wounded and a wide-spread search for him was .still being continued. Captainf Bills said Keely signed a confession before detectives A. M. Smith and Ike Fisher in which he admitted firing the shot thikt killed Carmack and confess- ed being present Wednesday night in a shooting at Seneca, Mo., when a liquor store night- watchman was slain. However, the youth denied fir ing tho shot that killed night- watchman J. E. Wallace, 55, in Seneca, and implicaated his com- panion, Bills stated. Heard Shot, Started Firinr "We got to Tulsa early Thurs- day morning and rode around much of the Bills quoted Neely ns saying in his. statement. "We spotted the Sophian Pla7.a apartments garage and decided to leave our car and take another one. When we stopped and got out of our car, the two cops pull- ed up behind us. One guy said he wanted to see some papers and my pal told him they were in the car. They went over to the car. "I was- nervous and when I heard a shot on the other side of the car, I pulled out my gun and fired. I then threw my gun away find the cop I shot, shot me in the Koblird As They Traveled The detective further quoted Neely: "I was discharged from the ma- rines July 27. About two weeks ago I started hitchhiking from Dayton to Texas nnd was picked upon the edpe of Dayton by my pal. 1-1 c asked if I'd like to mnlce some money. The he ox- plained it, it sounded pretty good. So I agreed. "We stopped ,it Richmond, Ind., and robbed a man a woman who were in n car. Then we drove to Indianapolis and held up an- other man. We pulled two jobs at Quincy, III., and got and then and also picked up an- other car. We took our time and finally got to Seneca, Mo." Three weeks ago another Tulsa detective, Jerry St. CJair, 35, was wounded fatally in a gun fight with a robbery suspect. There is a quick and easy des- sert! Peel whole peaches, stud lightly with two or three cloves and place in u sugar syrup with a stick of cinnamon and poach lightly covered until tender but not mushy. well chilled. Early Action Is Expected Shipping Tieup Con tin Despite Decision Gratttiftf AFL Seamen IncrMtaB By FrfM The CIO nulional union went on nt noon (edl) today to obtain the wage incrcnscs. striking AFL seamen won last night in a White Houso ruling as the nation's deep-water ports remained strike-bound. Despite the NMU tive at noon of settling the maritime crisis were high with indications .that the government was prepared to grant the NMU wage parity. However, the meeting of the Maritime commission in Wash- ington to consider giving the CIO an equal wage increase broke up today after more than an hour and a half of deliberations, and a spokesman for the commission told reporters that today's meet- ing was a "purely informative" one, that no action had been ta- ken and that no further session was scheduled during the after- noon. The'commission was represent- ed as taking the viewpoint that it should await developments be- tween the ship operators and unions. Charge "Inequities" The CIO men, members of the National Maritime Union, struck early today in New York and on the west coast because of "delib- erate creation of inequities which result in different rates of pay for men doing the same work on the same types of, the NMU council said in New York. Joseph Curran, president of the NMU, said the strike would not be effective in Gulf ports or in eastern ports outside of New York City until noon today. He said the strike would supported by of the six CIO and one independ- ent union comprising the' com- mittee -for maritime unity. The NMU has throughout the nation. Government For Wage While it appeared there would, be no lapse in what has been the nation's most costly shipping lie- up, beginning with the walkout a week ago of the AFL International Union and the Sail- ors Union of the Pacific, the gov- ernment appeared ready today to cut in the CIO men on the wage hikes a White House ruling open- ed for AFL maritime workers. J. Godfrey Butler, 'labor re- Jolfcrns director for the Maritime Commission told a reporter in Washington he though the com- mission "would seek lr> extend to the CIO the snme increases aj were given to the AFL." John H. Steclman, who U both reconversion director and econ- omic stabilizer, signalled tha end to the west coast AFL strike, by announcing an amendment to WSB regulations which would permit government agencies such as the U. S. Maritime Commission to pay the same wage scales as private operators in the field. The Steclman plan gives AFT. seamen in. the able-bodied class to ?JO a month more than the Wage Stabilization Board would approve, East Not Assured While the AFL west coast- group ended tbetr walkout, the east coast body voted to continue the strike until written assurance was received from government agencies, including the War Ship- ping Administration, that the full wage raises would be approved. In Washington, an aide to Steelman said that such written assurances could be given easily and that the matter would be taken up this morning. The U.S. date crop has grown from one to 18 million pounds an- nually in the past 20 years. The term collective b.irgaininK was first used in London in 1891 by Beatrice Webb. TH' PESSIMIST If you like home. Another sign o' th' times, th' doughnut gits smaller an' smaller while th' hole gits bigger an' bigger.   

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