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Ada Evening News: Sunday, September 8, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - September 8, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                                 Th. person who is trying to got through th. discomforts of  o new Mf of .tortbought t.,Hi look. Hi* lim. wh.» h. will f**l    „     h j,     fri . n<| ,  A\tr*gt Set July Paid Circulation  8407  Member; Audit Bureau of Circulation  43rd Year—No. 122  THE ADA EVENING NEWS  ossur. him the new crockery looks.  FINAL EDITION  Local School Doors Swing Open In Big Way Monday Morn  College and Horace Mona Enroll, Ada Public Schools Plunge Int. Ye,,', Work With Enrollment Accomplished  :or  Schoo. doors have been swinging open the last few days ,    •    * onday lhe - v swin 8 open for Ada public  ir d  1-% t r n  ' , S c° f b ° yS and girIs ready to start clai »es.  c- ,    •     1  ; ‘  State  College and Horace Mann Training  Sc..ooi for enrollment activities.  East£entral will enroll freshfnen on Monday and other  n^TwednS a av. With  ^ ^     functionin « begin-  Meal Crisis Looms In Big City Centers.  Rush To Stock Up On Moots Follows Predictions Of Shortage Of Supplies  Deep Test Of Bomb Is Off  President Orders Indefinite Postponement As New Doto Not Necessary  WASHINGTON, Sept. 7, .v -- e deep underwater atomic! homo test tentatively set for next  sp nng was indefinitely postpon-ed today bv President Truman Whether it ever will be held left indefinite, through the announcement laid stress on the idet^ that only considerations of ‘ne near future” were involved ir the decision and tho White House pointed out that the order v os not sn actual cancellation.  Mr. Truman's statement, as the reason for the decision, mention-ej oiily the fact that a great mass cu information on the nature and effect of nuclear fission blasts already has been built up from! the five previous atomic explos- i ions. It said the president's mili- j .ary and civilian advisers have concluded that the data the new test would produce is not necessary at this time.  As for how many students there will be in the college this 2“ r -  th ? yarest to a definite statement from college officials  | 1S Tu S  ™ any as ca n be provided with places to live. Two large dormitories. 20 vet units with more building and dozens of rooms m private homes still haven t satisfied the demand. a , Coll f* e  Adds Teachers A faculty with 24 new teach-1th S  , added : facilities representing the largest increase in equipment of any year in the school’s history, a program for the postwar years that is appealing and impi oving — and East Central is ready to go.  Information on faculties and  and  returning teachers urn be found on page IO.  Horace  oru  Mann  seniors, juniors and sophomores were enrolled last week. Freshmen and first eight grades will  Officers connected with **<  the  w .    -r--........  enroll  Monday from 8 to 3 o’clock. Dr. v ictor IT. Hicks is director of the  training school.  2,400 In Public Schools  Something like 2,400 boys and girls are slated to start the school year in the public schools.  At Ada high, all sophomores are to be in the auditorium by 9 o clock. Ada Junior high will have an abbreviated schedule be-fore taking on the full hours schedule on Tuesday.  The^ ward Schools will go right into full class schedules tomor-  (Continued on Bjge 6. Column I)  Hikes Announced On Pork Ceilings Effective Tuesday  DALLAS. Tex.. Sept. 8.—(Ab —  op*  era lion crossroads” which connected two bomb tests at Bikini Lagoon in the Pacific this summer. however,    have indicated  that a major factor was cost.  Generally, some of those officers told ^ a reporter last week, they would have preferred to go ahead with the final experiment and see how results checked with their calculations. They said they had a great deal    of data from  tne earlier trials    from which I    J?  trey could rn ore or less gauge tile ,    °*.     0, 8ht cents a pound for  effects of an explosion under drtL P  . an ?  seven  to eight cents a ferent conditions,    but they ad- Pi? U     pork.    effective    with  der that the actual trial would J e re ' e ; sta bushment of retail be useful”    {price    ceilings in the southwest  .    ..    I    lUeSdaV. Wr»r*» annmm.  o  w ere rf  the deep water explosion would I average of in mn«e „    ,  no, be set off on schedule. | S a'bLVfour*  .ce-Adm:rat \\ lham H. P. June 30 levels. Veal cuts and Bi anay commander of the task j sausages go back to June 30 Dri-. rec whicn ma ae the atomic ces but lard prices are increased C H D tests, said today all prep-j 5 1/2 cents a pound  increased   * I  n , ?     1%  t  K  he tnird  n  t ^     at Bi *l  N f w     Prices on the two    top  .    “  d Dp  cancelled    in ac- grades    of meat in the Dallas    re  co; dance w.’n    P-esident Tru- gion are (grade AA listed first  acton n Washington.    i grade A last)-  * pre,idem gave the    whole] Beef    — Porterhouse'steak    56  *......,  f V m  V. ae-n.mtton and 52    rents; round steak 48 and  We ll 145 cents; rib roast (10-inch) 35 and 33 cents  f those officers already bvThe^rVgTonli OPa"!!^ ^  igned to the ,dea that limb „ r ^hon r ‘ Ce  5 ere '  i.amo prices will be raised an  rr a s  v ;. ie  A amir cancel c-ateh  Blandy said. ail preparat.or.s imme-  tr.e  p  Lamb—Loin chops 72 and 68  cents; .shoulder chops 49 and 42 cents: leg of lamb 49 and 36 cents.  °    — Canadian bacon 82  cents; sliced bacon 43 cents Not all cuts of beef were increased in price and most of the increase was in the two top grades, AA and A.  w,m e " ew . ceiI ‘?« s on fresh  meat will.go into effect Tuesday, in-  stead of Monday as originally  planned to Ri Ve  OPA another  Us to t'tchUf ” Ho we vct, **t h*e  Cap:    E    M    Donaldson    of    "ard and''shortenV"wnf^ome  Force established j effective Monday as planned '  RAF Pilot Breaks Air Speed Record  Flies 616 Miles An Hour In Twin-Jet, Sister Plane Fosses Old Mark  LONDON Sunday, Sept. 8.  d ® y The  Associated Press  Butcher shops in many large cities reported record-breaking sales Saturday as housewives stormed retail counters in large numbers to stock up on meats  *"  a " tlc iP at i or > of a widely pre-dieted shortage.  , The heavy weekend buying ©Mowed a week of the lowest livestock receipts on record and the announcement of reimposition of OPA sellings on retail meat prices next Tuesday. Some packers said by next week there would not even be lunch meats”  aV £L - n retaiI  channels.  The national association of retail meat dealers said “we are going to see the worst meat shortage we’ve ever had.”  Trickle of Stock Now  Chicago stockyards reported an all-time low in livestock receipts  7no U i!  y ’     only 200  cattle,  300 hogs and 800 sheep delivered.  -iii?  CO ? lpared to a ru n of 40,000 cattle alone at the huge yards IO  days ago, a 23-year record, as  farmers rushed stock to market  for record-breaking prices before   re 5F p S5V on of .  OPA  controls.  I ne Chicago situation was general throughout the nation. The big jam of livestock slowed down  IU th ?  ,ast v/eek * Traders said the slim receipts was due  th^ir r a^im P  a  r i? , i!f e 4 r u  c L eaninR out  tni ir animals at the high prices  or else their refusal to market at  the new livestock ceiling levels  which went into effect Aug 29  Th ay  A ° ff Stockyard  Warns   Arne I lcan  meat institute,  that dSh n #K 0r - P a ckers, said mat with the impending critical  scarcity of meat there Would be  a real famine” this winter and  saw no prospects of relief as long  vata« IT 8  °a PA c ° ntrols ” Stockyards already have laid off  thousands of workers.  In Chicago, meat packing center of the country, the supply of meat in most shops was reported exhausted by early afternoon. Housewives carried out armloads of steaks and chops in a buying splurge w'hich retailers said exceeded a ny  in the city’s history. Long lines of curtomers waited  “doc/s  6 bUtCherS  V° Pened  One Stockyard—One Hog  in bt. Louis the meat supply was^nearly exhausted after a day of heavy consumer buying and  hl^T 81  ° perators  Predicted that T^sday^ no meat would be available. Most meat counters were stripped long before closing time Saturday. At the National stockyards, where Saturday’s hog receipts usually total in the hundred* only a single hog was sold.  Memphis, Tenn., meat counters were cleaned out bv heavy weekend purchasing which ‘brought up late deliveries from packers Most stores had been virtually  dayl     St    three    or four   Most Des Moines. la store*  ~^T at runs  ****** thS  usual, stocks were generally lim.  FIVE CENTS THE COPY  Effects Of Maritime Strike Begin Spreading Inland From U. S. Ports  P* •    *    —“-—-------  Loaded Cars Piling Up at Seaports Now  Greek Leftist Violence Rises  Government Tokes Drastic Measures, Hints Others Hove Fort In Disorders  Franklin D.^oo^lSf^^tly 1 ^}^ 5     J?     Piraeus     Greece,    to    look at the USS  tour of Mediterranean ports. (NEA Radiophoto)     dro PPed    anchor    for a four-day stay during a  Yugoslavia Won't Sign Treaty” With Italy lf Border Remains As Set By Ministers' Council  By A. I. GOLDBERG   PARI f'     7 ~( AP )—Yugoslavia served notice on the   t ^ ight She WOU,d refuse t0 si « n a tre atv  h Italy if the delegates approved the halo-Yugoslavia boundary recommended by the foreign ministers council, and  chorial dTspuhs    “ S    S ‘ Xth    Week    embroiled in     tw  * Th e  Italian political and territorial commission overwhelming-y rejected a Brazilian proposal to defer decision on establishing the \. ugoslav-Italian frontier after Yugoslav Vice Premier Edvard Kardelj denounced the pro-posal as one aimed at giving Italy all she wanted. The vote was 18 to I, with Belgium abstaining and only Brazil voting in favor.  Thi C  <? irOUp  ,? acka  Yugoslavia  linTw  Sovi .*! Ukraman Republic hntd up w-ith the other states of t n e Russian-influenced Slavic group m supporting Yugoslavia’s *. .    *    claims    to Venezia Giula before to-  enlistment day s^last word was spoken by  The \ ugosla.v vice premier demanded a major portion of the  area  /md an economic link between \ ugoslavia and the projected free territory of Trieste  r££n g  *°  U » S  Senator Tom Con na I ly (D-Tex), who had warned that territorial disputes were the road to war, Kardelj  By L. s. CHAKALES  ATHENS, Sept. 7—(ZP)—Drastic emergency measurers were reimposed over a wide area of Greece today to meet what acting Premier Stvlianos Gonatas said was a rising tide of leftist violence wrhich was “not exclusively an internal matter.”  Fi iction between Greece and Yugoslavia intensified as the Government weighed a protest against the downing of a Greek military plane, and Greek political leaders protested Yugoslav declarations at the Paris Peace Conference concerning Macedonia.  The Yugoslav delegate at the peace conference yesterday said it was ‘ time to settle this question of the liberty of the Macedonian people. The people until now'have found their liberty only rn the popular Republic of Macedonia within the Macedonian Yugoslav federation.”  Greek leaders apparently inter-preted this as a Yugoslav claim to that part of Macedonia which was given to Greece after World War I. The Yugoslav declaration, Donatas said, was an “official manifestation substantiating our suspicions that trouble and disorder in Greece are not exclusively an internal matter.”  Gonatas made the statement as ne announced the cabinet's de-  Enlistments Go On As Guard Looks To Activation Soon  While National Guard unit-,  within ^  lo ? kin f  to ac tivation within a couple o.’ weeks, enlistment goes on and during thi-week representatives will bo a1 rive placer, in tho county.  •     w jJ I have enlistment booths for Co. C. 180th Infantry  £ w ea A °!'n rter ; .  Batter >'- Hist F!cld Artillery Battalion   #  These booths will be set up in *ront of the postoffices at the tallowing places and times from 6:30 to 7:30 p. m.:  Lawrence house).  Haw York City Hit By Additional Walkouts; No. U. S. Action Planned; AFL Official Says No General Strike In Mind  By The Associated Press  A spokesman for the American Federation of Labor last  .at) night termed ridiculous’ an AKL maritime leader's  threat to seek a general strike, a* the greatest shipping shut-  oun in American history slowed the industrial pulse of the nation.  The general strike threat came from Paul Hall, New  York port agent of the Seafarers International Union (AFI I  Hall declared that if the gov-#— — - ........ *  ernmenf attempted to move anv of the hundreds of strik.* bound ships in U. S. ports “we will call on all organized labor to come out with us.”  Philip Pearl, director of the information section of the AFL headquarters in Washington, said he had been assured the government did not contemplate using troops to man ships and declared:  This sea rehead of a general Strike threat is ridiculous on its face and has no basis in fact ” j Pearl pointed out that the gen- ' era! strike idea had been voiced  OI Vy by a local union official William Green, head of the i ArL, who previously expressed support of the seamen, w'as not available for comment immediately but the CIO’s Philpi Murray told a reporter in Chicago j Ukraine’s complaint against  on aNhi„ d k !,ke a , V h e  a ^ y  “     U     A, b aru»  seat at the table to  Albania Draws Up Charges  Hopes Ta Feasant Bitter Allegations Against Greece In Council Mondoy  LAKE SUCCESS, N. Y, Sent /.—(Ah—Albania today drafted  a series of bitter charges against Greece which its representative hopes to present personally Monday when the  again takes  security council up the Soviet  fhaIi“l?ooo b AFi , Str, b e  I ° f     Sd    Via  man J a, DIK) AFL truck drivers in Soviet-supported move  was hit by 7 I STblt* 0 t0 “ Ch  ° tt an0th '“^  ticula. lv vit»i ,°/ T W °, r , k / rs  ,? ar ‘ ' , h  Pc 7 on "  clos<? to J *kova said New Yorkers     1/2    m,11 ‘° n     l^J h ^J, :  WOUld   Union tugboat crews were or- LA new list of Greek-Alban-  New York, New Jersey, Virgin and Maryland third walkout  Np r X d  v° 9 U1 1  W u rk ln thc vast Ian  ! >order  incidents which *JakI fmr/St, 5 arbf r f- 1 4  P rn. I °va holds are being provoked by (EDT) Saturday by (’apt Will I tile Greeks     7   . Bpad, P y ’ bident of Local I 2. Contentions that the Greeks  teirnatam I r * n ? , ‘  dlvls,on * ? re per *^uting Albanian minor-ei nattfinal Longshoremen’s asso-i bes in Charnu ria in northern  a 1 !-!    ^  in  sympathy with Greece.  the AFL Seamen    ITA detailed rebuttal to Greek  claims on northern Epirus  The  Monday (school-  he  I A  new world air speed record t- aa by living 616 miles an -* -h a tw.n-jet engined Glos-Meteoi IV at Tangmere, Eng-d ii was annfiunccd officially  Parents Worried As Boy Vanishes  Kenneth Jackson Boarded Bus For Ado From Lindsay, Not Heard From Since  * sister plane piloted by Squadron Leader William Waterier. also broke the existing record h\ flying 614 miles an hour at Tangmere after Donaldson estab-Iisned fhe new’ mark.  The previous record of 606  it es an hour, recognized bv the I  • V f 'i :    ,945‘Tn b!' - and M " ~ T *****  h « I A W a° "reVum7d“to  r bv Group Cap!.    _    _      ^  'J jd * c Tal ' "Crawford! who gave !.  c  J it T t V nc< '  then  suspended it on  ?r°e°s n h    -  Smith Sentenced,  It's Suspended  Flooded Guilty To Theft Of Cor Belonging To Ken ®®ee #  Rodeo Performer  Tuesday, postoffice. — Wednesday, post-  — Thursday, post-  ,    . mu- i S!?i 0n lo leinVok e .drastic emerged in selections by late after-    /measures, including the  .-a    ....    establishment    of military courts  empowered to impose the* death penalty, to meet violence which he said had increased since last Sunday s plebiscite recalling King George XI to the Greek throne.  Fitzhugh-Stratford office.  Stonewall office.  Fittstow’n—Friday, postoffice Men in Ada who wish to enlist can do so at the service offices of the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars, or contact Capt. John D. Lucas, 620  said;  ‘‘. We agree  with Senator Convally that territorial claims lead to war but what were its impli-cations. To whom was his appeal addressed? We think it was not necessary for him to address it to us—we were the victims We never waged a war of agression. We have a claim to our  (southern Albania).   under * tood  that the Uni. o^l*R h,r# WOU d not  °PP I>JW * Jak-  sett.L r    * P rpr,k dent-  s# tting request in that a non-  member of ,h, V N nevrr b..fo?. has been granted a place at the council table.  Andrei A Gromyko. Russian  C. Rus-Funeral a  »n  H J W Ison of the RAF.    about him.  »  n  * n  Donaldson and Waterton’s I ’Lhe lad. w'ho has attended average for four Glenwood school here and whose a course between iaddress is General Delivery, Ada 4    has been working recently at a  restaurant in Lindsay.  He boarded a bus for Ada last Sunday and hasn’t been seen since by the family. None of his relatives has reported him, either.  Russell Smith, (not sell Smith of Smith home) Saturday was given a five-year suspended sentence af-  ih r  a , C a nter f n f  a P,ea  ° f gUilty  ™  a  bde    larceny    of    an automo-  Smith and another fellow were alleged to have stolen a car belonging to Ken Boon, rodeo per-  i 0 ™?*' ?° Id a sadd lc and other articles in the car before abandoning it.    /     1   After selling the articles, the  nan  rai i? ht a  Lain enroute to Dallas Tex., but the train was  ??uF p at  Madill where Police Kenneth Jackson, 15. son of ♦  lef  Quinton Blake arrested the r. and Mrs. J. H. Jackson, has &  nK ‘ n "  They w ^re returned •en missing since last Sunday c    charges    were filed,  fu . l Parents are much w ? orried I t Vt. a PP° ared  before District  ngures were ; runs made ov Little Hampt  Air Marshs a nn o u r red t h had been es ta  nd Worthing. Sir James Robb »t the new record  dished.  \ r  A  ft*: amount in News Want Ads.  good behavior.  Truman Reminds Of Washington's (all  C/P)-  The boy has spent part of his Present' T^urn.^n oXdVn tho   ft in Arizona and California, in American people today if. h «  —* :' d . d,tlon Io  residence in Oklaho- tho I50th anmvoi Vv ,?f r-lZ  WEATHER  OKLAHOMA  SundL> and 7  ma  P<‘ rR on knowing of his whereabouts is asked to notify the sheriffs office here so that he parents can be informed.  Partly cloudy no a v, scattered likely extreme ternoon or night th west and extreme sy. little temperature  ors  v a f  90*f  GORIZIA, ITALY, Sept 7—(JP) Yugoslav supporters, apparently intimidated by American precau-tIonary counter-measurers, failed to hold an expected illegal dem-  rugh in uuDer 80 s     in     Y orizia     tonight,    con-  .4ppi r m) s | fining themselves to kehtinv nu  ^ eV iw a i/r  co ? ler  nrerous bonfires on hill tops over  ncrth  Monday, j looking Gorizia.     P   jne inurn anniversary of George Washington s Farewell Address ^ept. 191 by applying “his wisdom to our times.”  Above all. Mr. Truman said «n a proclamation, “we should Keep fresh in our memory his  cal  to national unity and responsible citizenship, based on principles of morality, and good faith and justice to all nations; for these remain the imperishable foundations of our republic.”  Greater returns for amount invested. Ada News Want Ads.  Rumors Peisistent Of Royal Romance  Britons Sixing Up Greek Prince Whose Nome Linked With Princess ilixobeth  By TOM WILLIAMS  LONDON, Sept. 7—(A*)—Rumors of a romance between Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip of Greece spread across the realm tonight despite official, denials and Britons began' sizing up the handsome young Royal Naval of-Ileer as a potential prince consort for Britain’s next queen.  Court circles said the prince was one of Elizabeth’s “circle of friends,” and now a guest of the royal family at Balmoral castle in Scotland. But they denied that he and the 20-year-old heiress presumptive were engaged to marry.  A flood of rumors was started by the London Star’s report of an impending announcement of an engagement. But Sir Alan Lassies, private secretary to thc king, issued a statement declaring:    ^  “Princess Elizabeth is not gaged to be married. The report published is incorrect.”  The Star, saying the engagement would be announced to the  a t,rm * considered suit-dble by the king and his advisers," added that "until then Buckingham Palace will continue officially to ‘know' nothing of the romance.”  Prince Philip, a cousin of Greek King George XI, is,25 and a British Royal Navy lieutenant.  West Twenty-fourth, or p h o n e Z“uLVL* 1 ™  to  k  our own Ia "d, is™    Wrenched from us by the invader  Senator Connally should have ad-dressed his appeal to Italy.”  __ S, ets  One Condition  u/inf«« e *  said Yu « osl avio vw,  r^V°, agre *  to the  establishment of a free territory of Trieste only on condition that “from an economic point of view Trieste  sufficiently linked to Yugoslav  California Miss Is 'Miss America'  o  Arkonsos Beauty Is Second In 1946 Contest  ATLANTIC CITY. N J.. Sept. 7 —^^—Twenty-one-year-old Marilyn Buford, wearing the ribbon I of "Miss California,” tonight was chosen as "Miss America” of 1946   Jan ,e/ Becky” McCall’ i  an >' decision taken and will not Miss Arkansas,” was second in  SIfin  peace treaty with Italv ”  walkout began precisely on schedule. The strike thus spread even beyond picket Iin* s which the tugboat operators had  ZISS* ^ eross since their establishment Friday.  New fork’s Food Involved  eJrir.t T%o 0, ,nally bnn K  ,n a "  YnH? • r  P V r (< ‘ nt  ° f NV ’ v  York C ity s fuel and half of its  .T 1  WIT A walkout bv the I debate, ha, urged" ?hat JakoL unions 3,500 members last Fob- ** heard.     3   ruary forced Mayor William However, Great Britain O Dwyer to invoke the seldom- I tends that there is no case  keen $£***    '»**« to    «*pectrd to quesTk,iX re  in Wa I  5er . vicea  functioning. Huest in the light of « charter In Washington an official in Provision that a non  ‘he . situation I "»T if ' it i. a ^arty of wh iV’.t    r , n  discussions : P u,, ‘ under    consideration bv    the  1,1“ ‘htp*    the government I council."     n    tr -“  could take to supply U. S. troon* .    * ______________  abroad, in the event of a prolong-    PATIENTS TREATFI1  cd strike     P  ° IOng  BORDEN HOSPITAL LF4Vr|  No Government Plan Drawn CHICK \cua  r , ;    _______But    he    said    that    up    to    now    no    - fvLrh i } . 0k1,1 ^-  S ^ pt - 7,  said Yugoslavia was  s P£ P1 f , c pl anhad been drawn up treated* pu! j° i?’ 500  P atJp n^ uzree to thn aoakis.i. I The third-day    of the strike    , Borden    General hosni-  90,000 members    of S,U  a „d ‘n, h'i/*     th °    >»d  ! a 1  ? rs Union of the  Pacific - tumil'    u’ in hr d tsmissed  inTed h y an  . esttmatp d 400.000 od todav’    Spital announc-  ! j r.*« ipw orkers, dock hands    wl  and CIO seamen- found conf ti    „ iT    , ls     , Capt     Frank    C  sion spreading inland from the Uh ii ? Englewood nations hushed seaports.    who will ne on terminal  The Association of American    .     a     number of per-   Bai ]™ ad * . said between 5 OOO    T    ’  includ,n l?    a    WAC detaK’h-  loaded freight cars were tied un     ent>    at     fhe    hospital.  because of the strike.     P    ori *taally built for a I.OOO-bed  is  and to other countries ofheThin* terland whtch she serves as an international port.”  He said if the foreign minister’s decision on the so-called French line, which gives Gorizia and sea-eoast towns to Italy, was changed, ugoslavia will not recognize  Car-  Tenn.*  competition for the beauty dia-dem, followed by other runners up in this order:  J liney Miller. “Miss Atlanta;” Marguerite Eileen McClelland, Miss Louisiana;” and Armelia Carol Ohmart, “Miss Utah.”  Greater returns tar amount invested. Ada News Want Ads.  Brightest spot of the week of argument over territorial demands was the announcement by Italy and Austria of an accord on their differences over the South Tyrol. The accord was hail ed by an American spokesman as a great thing ’ and “one of the most constructive things that has come out of this conference.”  Plenty Of Spectator Interest  In Model Plane Contests Today  jpsiiaa ta —• «•—  rp. .    ,    —    strike.  mn,na  d< ‘ d to the  Portage of rolling equipment desperately needed to move the grain har-  KroiinH in  P,hng Up on thp   for want TT e m / dwestp rn areas tar want of freight cars.   Af L OMA  CITvT Sept. 7-'*■ .    . Bottles, Henryetta.  raus, ‘  th »* school hou^e burned  piesident of the Oklahoma Edu-  d f )Wn  1 *  are  « oln K back to classes rn? w  Assoclati «n, notified the  M,,nda >'-  iLv^ r o{  Commerce the an- Temporary classes are being set nual OEA convention will be held  ,Jp at thf ‘ Methodist and Baptist rn Oklahoma City Feb. 13-14 churches and a transplanted rural  —-- 'school building.  capacity but tater expanded to accomodate 1.600 patients  ROOSEVELT SCHOOL OPENS AFTER Kl II.DING BI RNS  ROOSEVELT, OK LA , Sept 7  i/P} Roosevelt children, who have had a weeks vacation be-  l  •  I  I  9  9  A.  TH' PESSIMIST  n* mask*, iv.  en. i  P<>C .  to take  P arl  * n  the first post-war model aviation contest held in Ada today under the di-!ection of the Ada Modelers Association and sponsored bv the Ada Veterans of Foreign Wars.  tnJi 1 * 11  * s . * n cas h prizes and worth of merchandise being offered contestants  Over IOO MPH Speeds  Second on the list, beginning about 12:30 p.m., is speed flying. Speeds of IOO miles per hour and over are expected. It will require  who won t be able to get then motors to run or other unforseen trouble may develop but those contestants will be ell gible to compete for sportsmanship honors.  sr et’n h , e a,ternoon to WpTete   ■  tvtm -    'receive    a    watch    and    th*  Following the speed contest, a  are at the rode,,  R ,„un,Ts ancUhe ! Thi"* J 1 — 8 C ' ,nll ' st ''‘ 11  public is invited.    ; t h e ‘  Registration starts at IO  event, in most instances, is most interesting part of the  and continues until nWwhen wdh XL^Vare^ewH  a.m.  actual official flights will start. I unusual first on a long list of scheduled events will be a beauty contest.  AM planes, in order to enter  Lncompahgre is highest nef<k  -go to Sinnett-Moaders  1    llmt    al totted. I Soortsma  T**am flying is also on the schedule for the afternoon. The  con-  easier  garage  test requires two or more planes same circle.  Sportsmanship Valued  Officials of the contest said    a    -us-  9-8-1, : urday that most of the models I sports the afte™<Sr^ere wdl  the will  .    .    ..---- —    second    ,  place winner will receive an air- f plane motor. Points are secured I by winning first or second in one or more event.  Contestants from Oklahoma  a  y ’  Ardmoie - Shawnee, Tulsa. Ada, Wichita Falls, Tex , Sherman. Denison and Dallas. Tex are expected to participate in the various contests.  In each event, cash prizes range from $10 down ai each class and i division.     (   Drat it, if a feller walks around in th house bare* footed we don’t think ’is wife ought t fuss at ’im because is feet git dirty.  —-OO—-*  A politician is a feller who p of its but seldom, if ever. by experience.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

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Unlimited 6 Month

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Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

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Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

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(1607 to today!)

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