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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: September 8, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 8, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Th. p.r..n (0 n.w of Averse .Net July Paid Circulation 8407 Member: Audit Bureau of Circulation 43rd 122 THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION Local School Doors Swing Open In Big Way Monday Morn College and Horace Mann Enroll, Ada Public Schools Plunge Into Year's Work With Enrollment Accomplished School doors have swinging open the last few days for enrollment. Monday they swing open for Ada public schools to hundreds of boys and girls ready to start classes and at East Central State College and Horace Mann Training School for enrollment activities. EastCentral will enroll freshmen on Monday and other classes Tuesday with the class schedule functioning begin- nina ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1946 ning Wednesday. Deep Test Of Bomb Is Off President Orders .Indefinite Postponement As New Data Not Necessary .WASHINGTON, Sept. 7, The deep underwater atomic oomb test tentatively set for next spring was indefinitely postpon- ed today by President Truman. Whether it ever will be held left indefinite, through the announcement laid stress on the idea that only considerations of the "near future" were involved ir the decision and the White House pointed out that the order not an actual cancellation. Mr. Truman's statement, as the reason for the decision, mention- ed only the fact that a great mass of information on the nature and effect of nuclear fission blasts already has been built up from the five previous atomic explos- ions. It said the president's mili- tary and civilian advisers have concluded that the data .the new test would produce is not neces- sary at this time. Officers connected with "op eraiion crossroads" which con nected two bomb tests at Bikin Lagoon in the Pacific this sum mer, however, have indicate that a major factor was cost. Generally, some of those offic ers told a reporter last weel they would have preferred to g ahead with the final cxperimen and see how results checked wit thpir calculations. They said they had a great deal of data fror earlier trials from whit As for how many students there will be in the college this year, the nearest to a definite statement from college officials many as can be provided with places to live. Two large dormitories, 20 vet units with more building and dozens of rooms -in private homes still haven't satisfied the demand College Adda Teachers A faculty with 24 new teach- ers added, facilities representing the largest increase in equipment of any year in the school's his- tory, a program for the postwar years that is appealing arid im- proving and East Central is ready to go. Information on faculties and on new and returning- teachers will be found on page 10. Horace Mann seniors, juniors and sophomores were enrolled last week. Freshmen and the. first eight grades will enroll Monday from 8 to 3 o'clock. Di- vider H. Hicks is director of the training school. In Public Schools Something like boys and girls are slated to start the school year in the public schools. At Ada high, all sophomores are to be in the auditorium by 9 o clock, Ada Junior high will- have an abbreviated schedule be- fore taking on the full hours schedule on Tuesday. The ward Schools will go right Meat Crisis Looms In Big City Centers Rush To Stock Up On Meats Follows 'Predictions Of Shortage Of Supplies Asiaclated Preis Butcher shops in many large cities reported record-breaking sales Saturday as housewives stormed retail counters in large lumbers to stock up on- meats n anticipation of a widely pre- dicted shortage. The heavy weekend .buying followed a week of the lowest ivestock receipts on record, and :he announcement, of reimposi- ion of OPA -sellings- oh retail meat prices next Tuesday; .Some >ackers said by next week there would not even be lunch: meats" available in retail channels. The national association of re- ail meat dealers said "we are going .to see the worst meat shortage we've ever1 had." Trickle of Stock Now Chicago stockyards reported ah all-time low in livestock receipts Saturday, with only 200 cattle 300 hogs and 800 sheep-delivered. This compared to a run of cattle alone at the huge yards 10 days ago, a 23-year record, as farmers rushed .stock to market for record-breaking prices.before re-imposition, of OPA controls. The Chicago situation was gen- eral throughout the nation. The big jam of livestock slowed down to a trickle last Traders said the- slirn receipts was due either to producers cleaning out their animals at the high prices' or else their refusal at the new livestock ceiling levels' Aug.; FIVE CENTS THE COPY Effects Of Maritime Strike Begin Spreading Inland From U. S. Ports _. OH Stockyard Warns J.ne American meat institute spokesman for the packers, 'said that with .the impending critical scarcity of meat there Would be a real famine" this winter and saw no prospects of relief as lone as. we have OPA Stock- yards already have laid off EYEFUL: Curious Greeks line the: 'harbor at Piraeus Greece' to look at the toUr.dS.ta5r' during Greek Leftist Violence Rises they could more or less gauge t: c tbe i- drf effects of an explosion under ferent conditions, but they ad dej that the actual trial woul( be "useful." Most of those officers alread; resigned lo the idea thn" ihe deep water explosion woulc not be set off on schedule. Vice-Admiral William H. P Blandy. commander of the task force which made the atomic bomb tests, said today all prep- arations for the third test at Bi- kir.i "would be cancelled" in ac- cordance with President Tru- man's action in Washington. "The president gave the whole story from Admiral Blandy said. "We'l! cancel all diately." preparations immc- RAF Pilot Breaks Air Speed Record Flics 616 Miles An Hour In Twin-Jet, Sister Plane Posses Old Mark LONDON. Sunday, Sept. E. M. Donaldson of the Royal Air Force established n new world air speed record yesterday by flying 616 miles an hour in a twin-jet cnginod Glos- ti-T- Meteor IV at Tangmere. Eng- land, it was announced officially bpre today. A sister plane piloted b- Squadron Leader William Water ion also broke the existing recori by flying 61-1 miles an hour a Tangmere after Donaldson estab lished the new mark. The previous record of 606 rr.-.les an hour, recognized by the federation Aeronautique Inter- nationale, was sn Nov. 7, 1945, in another meteor by Group Capt H J. Wilson of the RAF. Both Donaldson and Waterton's figurc-s were lh_- average for foui runs made over a course between Little Hamptnn and Worthing. Marshal 3ir James Robb ar.nounred that the new record had been established. Greater returns for amount in- Ady News Want Ads. into full class schedules tomor- workers.i. (Continued on Biige 6, Column 1) Hikes Announced On Pork Ceilings Effedive Tuesday DALLAS, Tex., Sept. Hikes of eight cents a pound for beef and seven to eight cents a pound for pork, effective with the re-establishment of retail price ceilings in the southwest Tuesday, were announced today by the regional OPA office here. Lamb prices will be raised an average of 10 cents a pound and mutton about four-, cents over June 30 levels. Veal cuts- and sausages go back to June 30 pri- ces but lard prices are increased 5 cents a pound. New prices on the two top grades of meat in the Dallas re- gion are (grade AA listed 'first grade A Beef Porterhouse' steak 56 and 52 cents; round steak 48 and 5 cents; rib roast (10-inch) 35 and 33 cents. chops 72 and 68 ents; shoulder chops 49 and 42 ents; leg of lamb 49 and 36 cents. Pork Canadian -bacon 82 ents; sliced baqon 43 cents. Not all cuts of beef were in- rcnsed in price and most of the ncrease was in the two top fades, AA and A. The new ceilings on fresh meat into effect Tuesday, in- tead of Monday as originally fanned, to give OPA another ay to distribute new price post- rs to butchers. However, the In Chicago, meat packing'.cen- ter- of .the country, the supply of meat in most shops was reported exhausted by early afternoon; Housewives carried out; armloads of steaks, and chops in? a buying splurge which retailers 'said ex-- ceeded any in the city's -history; Long lines of customers-' waited outside before butchers .opened their doors. One Hor In St. Louis the meat supply- was nearly exhausted after a day of heavy consumer buying and market operators predicted that by Tuesday no meat would be available. Most meat counters were stripped long before closing time Saturday. At the National stockyards, where Saturday's hoe receipts usually total in the hun- dreds, only a single hog was sold. Memphis, Tenn., meat counters were cleaned out by heavy week- Government jTakes Drastic Measures, Hints Others Have Part In Disorders By'- L. S. CHAKALES ATHENS, Sept; emergency measurers were re- imposed over a wide area of Greece today to. meet' what' act- ing Premier St'yliahos Gonatas said was a rising tide of leftist violence which 'was "not exclu- sively an Internal matter." Friction 'jbetween Greece and Yugoslavia intensified as 'the Government weighed a; j protest of> ai Greek military-plane, and Greek politi- cal declarations at the Paris Peace Conference donia. concerning M a c e- "P late deliveries from' "packers; Most stores had been virtually' bare for the last three or foiir days. Most Des Moines, stores reported meat runs heavier than usual, stocks' were generally lim- ited in selections Toy late after- noon. But a r supply" of JWEATHERJ OKLAHOMA Partly cloudy Sunday and Monday, scattered tnundfrshowers likely extreme north Sunday afternoon or night and in northwest and extreme north .Monday: little temperature rnanpe Sunday, hifih in upper 80's to lowf-r 90's; somewhat cooler Suno.iy night and north Monday. ew ceilings on canned meat, ard and shortening will become nective Monday as planned. >arenfs Worried As Boy Vanishes Kenneth Jackson Boarded Bus For Ada From Lindsay, Not Heard From Since Kenneth Jackson, 15, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Jackson, has been missing since last Sunday and his parents are much worriec about him. The lad, who has attended Glenwood school here and whose address is General Ada has been working recently at a restaurant in Lindsay. v He boarded a bus for Ada last Sunday and hasn't been seen since by the family. None of his has reported him, ei- ther. The boy has spent part of his iff in Arizona and California, in ciddition to residence in Oklaho- na. Any person knowing of his vhcrenbouts is asked to notify he sheriff's office here so that he parents can be informed. GORTziA, ITALY, Sept. ugoslav supporters, apparently ntimidated by American precau- inniiry countcA'-mensurers, failed o hold on expected illegal dem- nstration in Gorizia tonight, con- minfi themselves to Ughting nu- nerous bonfires on hill tops over- ooking Gorizia. J---tlJ_ fresh meats was still on hand. Smith Sentenced, It's Suspended Pleaded Guilty To Theft. Of Car Belonging To Ken Been, Rodeo Performer Russell Smith, (not C. Rus sell Smith of Smith Funer'a home) Saturday was given five-year suspended sentence af ter .entering a plea of guilty on a charge.of larceny of an automo bile. Smith arid 'another fellow were alleged to have stolen a car be Jongmg to Ken Boen, rodeo per former, sold a saddle and other articles in the car before aban- doning -it. After selling the articles, the RaVi a train enroute to Dallas, Tex., but the train was stopped at Madill where Police Chief Quinton Blake arrested the two men. They were returned to Ada where charges were filed. Smith appeared before District Judge Tal "who gave the sentence then suspended it on good behavior. The Yugoslav delegate at the peace conference yesterday said it was to. settle this ques- tion of the liberty of the Mace- donian people. The people until now have found.their liberty only: in the popular Republic of Mace- donia within, the M Macedonian Yugoslav federation." Greek leaders a preted this as; a__ to that part of Macedonia which was given to. Greece-after World Yugoslavia Won't Sign Treaty With Italy If Border Remains As Set By Ministers' Council By A. I. GOLDBERG s. PARIS, Sept. served notice on the peace she would refuse to sign a treaty with Italy if the-delegates approved the Italo-Yugoslavia boundary recommended by the foreign ministers council, and the conference, ehd'e'd its sixth week embroiled in bitter ter- Loaded Cars Piling Up at Seaports Now New York City Hit By Additional Walkouts; No. U. S. Action Planned; AFL Official Says No General Strike In Mind By The Associated Press A spokesman for the American Federation of Labor last (Sat) night termed an AFL maritime leader's threat to seek a general strike, as the greatest shipping shut- down in American history slowed the industrial pulse of the nation. The generarst'rike threat came from Paul Hall, New York port agent of the Seafarers International Union Hall declared that it the ernmeni? attempted lo move nny ritorial disputes. Enlislmenb Go On As Guard Looks To j apparently inter- a; Yugoslav claim Truman Reminds Qf Washington's (all WASHINGTON, Sept. President Truman called on the American people today to observe the isoth anniversary of George Washington's Farewell Address bept. 19 by applying "his wisdom to our times." "Above Mr. Truman said in a proclamation, "we should keep fresh in our memory his call to national unity and respon- sible citizenship, based on princi- ples of morality, and good faith and justice to all nations; for .hese remain the imperishable 'oundalions of our republic." Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. i War I. The Yugoslav declaration Doriatas said, was an "official manifestation substantiating bur suspicions that "trouble and dis- order in Greece are not exclusive- ly an internal- matter." .Gonatas made the statement as he cabinet's .de- cision, to reinvok'e drastic emer- gency measures, including the establishment of -military courts empowered to: impose thet death penalty, to'-meet violence which ne said had -Increased- since- last Sunday's plebiscite recalling King George XI to. the ;Greek throne. Rumors Persislenl Of Royal Romance Britons Sizing Up Greek Prince Whose Nome Linked With Princess Elizabeth By mors- between Prin- cess Elizabeth and Prince Philip of Greece spreadJacross the realm tonight, despite-, .official, denials, and Britons sizing up the handsome young Royal Naval of- ficer as a potential prince consort for Britain's next queen. Court circles said the prince was one of Elizabeth's "circle of and now a guest of the royal family" at Balmoral castle n Scotland. But they denied that he and the 20-year-old heiress Jresumptive were 'engaged to marry. A flood of rumors was started jy the London Star's report of an impending announcement of an engagement. But Sir Alan LaV 'elles, private secretary to the While -National Guard units :rp are looking to activation within a couple oi1 enlist- ment goes 'on and. during weelr representatives will. boN a'c .ivc places in the' county; These will have enlistment booths for 180th Infantry or'-Hea'dquarter.'i Battery, 171s{ Field Artillery .Battalion. 'f These booths will be set up in j.roht of the postoffices at the following places and times from to p, Lawrence Monday (school- postoffice: Stratford post- said- office. Stonewall Thursday, post- office. postoffice. Men in Ada who 'wish to en- list can-do so at the service of- fices of the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars, or contact Capt. John D. Lucas, 620 West Twenty-fourth, or p h o n e 1626. issued a statement declar- ng: "Princess Elizabeth is not en- 'aged to be married. The report Hiblished is The Star, .saying the engage- nent would be the ation at a "time considered suit- ible by the king and his ad- added that "until then Buckingham Palace will continue fficially to 'know nothing of the omance." Prince Philip, a cousin of Greek Cing George XI, is. 25 and a Brit--' Royal Navy lieutenant. California Miss Is'Miss America' Arkansas Beauty Is Second In 1946 Contest ATLANTIC CITY, N.J., Sept. 7 Mar- lyn Buferd, wearing the ribbon of "Miss tonight was chosen as "Miss America" of 1946. Rebecca Jane "Becky" McCall, 'Miss was second in competition for the beauty dia- dem, followed by other runners up in this order: Jcney Miller, "Miss. Marguerite f Eileen McClelland, "Miss and Armelia Carol .Ohmart, "Miss Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News. Want Ads. of the hundreds of strike-bound ships in U. S. ports "we will call on all organized labor to come out with us." Philip Pearl, director of the in- formation section of the AFL leadquarters in Washington, said ie had been assured the govern- nent did not contemplate using troops to man ships and declar- ed: "This scarehead of a general strike threat is ridiculous on its "ace and has no basis' in foci." Pearl pointed out that the gen- eral strike idea had been voiced only by a local union official. William Green, head of the AFL, who previously expressed upport of the seamen, was noi available for com'ment immedi- ately, but the CIO's Philpi Mur- ay told a reporter in Chicago "I wouldn't have any comment on a think like that." Third Walkout Hits N. Y. The industrial east doubly punished by a strike of more than AFL truck drivers in New York, New Jersey, Virginia was hit by a third walkout of workers par- ticularly'vital to 7 million New-Yorkers. T-, Union tugboat crews were or- with -Belgium to quit work in the vast New York harbor at 4 p. m (EOT) Saturday by Capt. Will- iam Bradley, president of Local 333, United Marine division, In- ternatoinal Longshoremen's asso- ciation (AFL) in sympathy with the AFL Seamen. The .walkout began precisely on schedule. The strike thus spread even beyond picket lines which the tugboat operators hnd refused to cross since their es- tablishment Friday. New York's Food Involved The tugs normally bring in an estimated 7.0 per cent of New York City's fuel and half of its food supplies. A walkout by the union s members last Feb- ruary forced Mayor William ODwyer to invoke the seldom- used disaster ;ontrol board to keep vital services functioning. In Washington an official in close touch with the situation said there had been discussions oi what steps the government could take to supply U. S. troops abroad, in-the event of a prolonc-" ed strike. No Government Plan Drawn .But he said'that up to now no specific plan had been drawn up nn thlrd-da.y of the strike of members of the SIU and :ne Sailors Union of the Pacific__ joined by an estimated allied shipworkers. dock hands and CIO confu- sion spreading inland from the nation s .hushed seaports. The" Association of "American The Italian political and terri- torial commission overwhelming- ly rejected 'a Brazilian proposal to defer decision on establishing the- Yugoslav-Italian frontier af- ter. Yugoslav Vice Premier.-Ed- vard-Kardelj denounced'the pro- all she wanted. .The Vote-was- 18 to only Brazil voting in favor. Slavic- Group Backs-' Yugoslavia The Soviet Ukranian Republic lined up with the other states of t h e Russian-influenced' 'Slavic group in supporting Yugoslavia's claims-to Venezia Giula before to- day's last word was spoken by Kardelj. The Yugoslav vice premier de- manded a major portion of the disputed area and an economic link between Yugoslavia and th projected free territory of Trieste Replying to U. S. Senator Toir Connally who hac warned that territorial dispute were the road to war, Kardel We agree with Senatpr Con nally that territorial claims lead to war but what were its impli- cations? To whom was his appea addressed? We think it was no necessary for him to address it to were the victims. We never waged a war of agression We. have a claim to our own'land wrenched from us by the invader Senator Connally; should have ad- dressed his appeal to Italy." Sets One Condition said Yugoslavia was willing to agree to the establish- ment of a free territory of Trieste only on condition that "from an economic point of.view Trieste is sufficiently linked to Yugoslavia and to other countries of her hin- terland which she serves as an international port." He said if the foreign minister's decision on the so-called French line, which gives Gorizia and sea- coast towns'to Italy, was changed Yugoslavia will not recognize any decision taken and will not -gn the :peace 'treaty with Italy." Brightest spot of the week of argument over territorial de- nands was th.e announcement by Italy and Austria of an accord on their differences over the South Tyrol. The accord was hail- ed by an American spokesman as a great 'thing" and "one of the most constructive things that has come out of this conference." Albania Draws Up Charges Hopes To Present litter Allegations Against Greece In Council Monday LAKE SUCCESS, N. Y.. Sept. Albania today drafted a series of bitter charges against Cireece which its representative hopes to present personally Mon- day when the security council again takes up the Soviet Ukraine's complaint against Greece and Great Britain. Col. Tuk Jakova, Albanian minister without portfolio, has demanded a seat at the table offer his side of the case, and this Soviet-supported move was ex- pected to touch off another sharp debate Persons close to Jakova said the charges would center around these points: A new list of Greek-Alben- lan border Jak- ova holds are being provoked by the Greeks. 2. Contentions that the Greeks are persecuting Albanian minori- ties in Chamuna in northern reece. 3. A detailed rebuttal to Creek cJaims on northern Epirus (southern It was understood that the Unl- ed .States would not oppose Jak- ova s bid for a scat, a precedent- setting request in that non- nember of the U. N. never before ias been granted a place at the council table. Andrei A. Gromyko, Russian delegate, has urged that Jakova >e heard. .'n Britain con- ends that there is no case and vas expected to question the re- quest m the light of s charter non it is a party to a dis- by the -AST OF PATIENTS TREATED BORDEN HOSPITAL LEAVES CHICKASHA, Okla., Sept. 7. 16'500 Railroads said between 5 000 oaded freight cars were tied up because of the strike. This added to the shortage of i" 5 desperately needed to move the grain har- vest, already piling up on Die ground in some mid western areas or want of freight cars. OKLAHOMA sTpt 7_ E. Battles, Henryetla, 'resident of the Oklahoma Edu- ation Association, notified the hamber of Commerce the an- ual OEA convention will bi> held n Oklahoma City Feb. 13-14 Plenty Of Spectator Interest In Model Plane Contests Today treated at Borden General hospi- tal during the past three and one-half years will be dismissed tomorrow, the hospital announc- ed today. He is Capt. Frank C. Car- michael, of Englewood, Teniu who will be on terminal leave. Only a small number of per- sonnel, including a WAC detach- ment, remain at the hospital. originally built for a capacity but later expanded to accomodate patients, ROOSEVELT SCHOOL OPENS AFTER BUILDING BURNS ROOSEVELT, OKLA., Sept. 7 Roosevelt children, who have hnd a week's vacation be- cause the school house burned down, are going back to classes Monday. Temporary classes are being set up at the Methodist and Baptist churches nnd a transplanted rural school building. Uncompahgre is'highest peak i San Juan Mountains, but it's asier to remember Ada's best Fifty men and boys flying about 65 model airplanes are ex- pected to take part in the first post-war model aviation contest held, in Ada today under the di- rection of the Ada Modelers As- entered, in the event" will be of original design. Over 100 MPH Speeds Second on the list, beginning about p.m., is'speed flying. Speeds of 100 miles per hour and KKS.S.2- ____j_ There is in cash prizes and worth of merchandise being this event. Following the speed contest, a f. LUC auecu t-UU tea L, a offered contestants. The contests i stunt" flying contest will begin are at the rodeo grounds and the This event, in most instances is _. interesting part of the to Sinnett-Meaders. Registration starts at 10 a.m. and continues until noon, when official flights will start. First on a long list of scheduled events will'be a beauty contest. All planes, in ,order to enter in this'event, must make an official flight- during' the time allotted. Officials of the contest said Sat- 9-8-lt, urday that most of the models afternoon because the stunts done with these planes are somewhat unusual. Team flying is also on the sche- dule for, the afternoon. The con- test requires two or more planes flying in the same circle. Sportsmanship Valued A prize will be given the best sport of the afternoon. There will be some who won't be able to get, their motors to run or other unforseen trouble may develop, but those contestants will be eli- gible to compete for sportsman- ship honors. The 'contestant collecting the most points during the day will receive a watch and the second place winner will receive an air- plane motor. Points ore secured by winning first or second in one or more event. Contestants from Oklahoma City, Ardmore, Shawnee, Tulsa, Ada, Falls, Tex., Sher- man, Denison and Dallas, Tex., are expected to participate in the various contests. In each event, cash prizes range from down ia each class and division. TH' f PESSIMIST Drat it, if a feller walks around In lh' house bnre- footed we don't think 'is wife ought t' fuss nt 'im because 'is feet git dirty. A, politician is a feller who profits but seldom, if ever. by experience.   

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