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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: September 4, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 4, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             One of good things about living in on apartment is that smell of delicious food cooking gives the other housewife a chance to figure out a better menu when the going is tough. At trait Net July Circulation 8407 MrmDft: Audit Huron ol Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER FIVE CENTS THE COPY Sen. (onnally Makes Appeal To Conference Senator Aiki Conference To Settle Stormy Trieste Dispute By ROBF.HT IIKWKTT PARIS. Sopt.   Sen. Tom Connolly (D-Tex) toltl the pence confrrence today thut llic Vone- ria Guilin area of lUily "was n fertile f.oil for war" nnil appcnled to the 21 nations to "forget hat- and prejudices." The democratic1 chnlrrnnn of tin- f.rnatf foreign affairs cnm- inii'.i-c .'.poke soon nflni1 Russian Fojrigri Minister V. M. Molotriv Viij. reported by H Krenrh foreign ministry offici.'il to have return- ed fiom four days of conference's jn Moscow. No confirmation of thr Molotov report wns imme- diately forlhcniniiii; from Kits- circles. 1 y'j Tnaidi-n spi't'fh at the1 riirifrrrncr. iiskinj; "lulcninrc, pn- mid tin in jii't- tiintf Mnrinv Tne.sti1 disputf, fame during .'.eHsicin of tin; llal- JBII political territorial com- was nuiilted by claims for territory in tiie Trieste nrea of Italy nt the ;op of the Adriatic sea. Yugo- slavia. with Russian and olhcr slav' backing, has been deman- ding the territory against an ada- mant United States nnd British opposition. Not A Struggle "This is a pence conference, not a struKRle to f.re which country get the grcnlcKl henefit for nii.v one group." Conniilly said. "Wo lire liere us ambassadors of th- people of the world to solve the problems of the world." "We are here to assi.it, wo hour, in helping Rive freedom to ihe peoples, not to enslave Connnlly declared. Renewing United Slates sup- port. of the foreign ministers council agreement to establish a Jrre territory of Trieste, the sen- ator said "the United States wants to sef such n territory and f.udi a government that will com innnd the respect of both Yugo- 5'nvia and Italy." Tlie only objective of tilt: American delegation is to find a solution which will contribute to the preservation of peace and that area and in the Connnlly said. Approve ArtlelM Xranwhile. without debate the military commission approved UUCP rnorp articles of the Italian t-t-.-i'.v which prohibit Italy from German or Japanese air- ciaft technicians, manufacturing aircraft of German or Japanese dc.-.isn or otherwise aiding the rearmament of the 'two defeated powers. The commission also approved bis four recommendations thai Italy should retain only two bat- tleships the Doria and the four cruisers, four des- troyers. 16 torpedo boats and 20 cr.rvetu-s and a small number of minor fleet auxiliary vessels. foreign minister, backed Yugo 5.1avia's claim to Trieste today as as'-rance of a "peaceful and stable Trieste" and infcronlially that internationalization oj ihe Adriatic port would cause iuture trouble. "Corridors can cause only trouble we have seen that in northern Masaryk said without mentioning specifically li.i- Inn four agreement to create tr-.r free territory of Trieste. The Yugoslav proposal would most of Vcnezia Giulia, in- cludjnc Trieste, to Yugoslavia. Brazil proposed pontponcmcnl of action on the Giulia frontier until the hig four for- IRII ministrrs study the matter Mul jilso urged that the four be empowered to cslnb- finally the border within a after the Italian peace treaty effective. The big four foreign ministers council agreed last July on the line" as the Yugoslav- Italian border and the Yugoslav proposal was the first amend- ment to be discussed by a peace conference commmission. K MIAMI, Sept. Carl C. Rigney. former Oklahoma A. M. grid star, will head the biolog- ical sciences department at Northeastern Oklahoma A. M. this fall. Rigney recently was discharged from the army. He holds bachelor and master tlc- Siees from Oklahoma A. M. college. Rigney also will assist Conch "Red" Robertson. S E N O L iTsept. Seventeen turtles will be entered from Sen-.inole in- n "Turtle Der- by" sponsored by the Variety club of Oklahoma City in the coliseum there Sept. 21. The en- try fees prize money is ap- plied to the club's charity fund, wit.'i the aid of which two health already have been estab- lished. IIIJILD 1IOUSK IN T1IHEE DAYS FOR BLIND VET: When blind war veteran Jim Sanders was threatened with eviction nnd told to eat in the back room 6f a restaurant in. Houston, Texas, out- raged Houstonians rallied to his side. In addition to n pool ol scarce materials and the ser- vices of union craftsmen were donated in order to build a home for Sandei's in record time. The partly constructed house, being painted as it is built, is shown above, four hours after construction boKJtn. .It is expected to be finished in three The diamond was used in ancient world as an antidote tho for JWEATHER fair and ttmiKht nnd Thursday; Thursdav middle Enrollment Continues Ruth to Get Started In School Will End Friday Afternoon Third grade students went to fivo grade schools in Ada Tues- day to enroll 212 strong with Irving lending the puradc of en- rollment in this class with 51 while .students were enrolling in various classes at Junior und Senior high. Following Irving in whrit np- penrcd to bo an enrollment race WIIH Willard with 40, Washington svith 43, Hayes with 38 nnd Glen- wood will) 34. A lolnl of 203 boys nnd girls just out of Ihe sixlh grade regis- tered for seventh grade studies at Junior High. Seniors in Ada High enrolled Tuesday nnd when the total was figured it was 120. Sophomores will enroll Thurs- day nl the High school, ninth ijnidur.i will enroll nl Junior High while fifth graders go to tho various grade en- roll. Junior and Senior High stu- dents, who for various reasons could not enroll on the scheduled days, will bo given a chance to enroll Friday, Teachers at the grade schools Friday will enroll sixth (jrndcrs, There Is no letup thus far this week ns one day Is just ns busy ns another and tho total that will be figured at the end of Ihe week will bo proof. Governor Plans Part in Campaign OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept, for active participa- tion in the Oklahoma democrat- ic parly's general election cnm- pnign were announced yesterday by Gov, Hobort S, Kcrr after o conference with stale party chair- man H. I. Hinds, As yet the governor has sche- duled no political speeches. He snid a scheduled address at Eu- fuln lomorrow night would deal with the newly-authorized Eufaln diim reservoir. Korr also snid on his return from u Minnesota vacation that Dr. Dim Proctor, president of Ok- lahoma College for Women, will direct- this fall nnd winter's state tree planting campaign, plans for which call for the planting of Kl.OOO.IKIO seedlings. Commenting- on the return of the Grand River dnm authority to stale conli'ol, the governor told newsmen that he believed tho power revenue from the pro- ject would be high enough to pay mninlonnnce costs and permit the stalu to make substantial pay- ments on n indebted- ness. Quintuplets Have Hew Baby Brother NORTH BAY, Ont., Sept. 4 Dionno quintuplets are trying to pick a name for .their iii-w baby brother, born lasl night. The 12-ynar-old quintuplets were excited by the described by doctors as "a beau- tiful weighing about eight pounds. He was the 14th child born to, Mr. and Mrs. Oliva Dionne. Thir-' teen, Including four other boys, arc living. Mrs. Dionne is 87, he; husband '13. VANOKKUILT AND FOURTH Will] HOMCYlYinONING HKNO, Nov., Sept. 4. Comelous Vnndorbilt, Jr., '18- year-old society columnist and ,on of tho wealthy New York family, was honeymooning today with his fourth wife, Maria Fel- iv.ii Pnblos, heiress to n Mex- ican cattle fortune, They "were married yesterday nt Ihe homo of Samuel Plait, HOMO attorney, with the Rev. Brcw.iter Adams, Baptist minis- ter ufficiuling. It wns the third trip lo Ihe altar for the dark-eyed Miss Pub- los, n firnndniccc of former Pres- lidcnl Porfirio Diaz of Mexico. Housing Goal for '46 Not Likely to Be Met Housing Expediter Wyatt Last Week Launched Big-Scale Drive to Feed Material Into Homei-for-Veterani Campaign WASHINGTON, Sept. 'Expediter Wilson W. Wyatt took a dim view today of prospects for meeting this year's homes-for-veterans goal. while some dwellings were started during the first seven months of 1946, Wyutt's monthly report said the number of priorities issued in July was too small to assure hitting the tar.get of new homes under construction by year's end. In addition, home construction is running into a labor shortage. Furthermore, Wyatt reiterated thut even full attainment of this year's goal still would leave the nation "with a greater shortage Seamen Ask For More Pay Pressure Mounts on Wage Stabilization Board to Re- rerse Pay Out Decision By HAROLD WARD WASHINGTON, .Sept, The threat of a shipping tieup ,pn all coasts tomorrow" built' up pressure on the wage stabilization board today to alter its 12-day-old "pay cut" decision affecting AFL sailors. From within the board and out- side, members were being urged to review their August 23 ruling denying AFL seagoing unionists wage boosts in excess- of the a month granted ri- val C.1O unions last June 15. John Hawk, vice president of the AFL Seafarers International union, Kaid in New York ycster- of housing, compared with 'de- mand, than existed at the begin- ning of the Not All Permanent The-report placed the number of new dwellings completed through July at But of these only were perman- ent houses .and apartment units. The rest were trailers, conver- sions of existing buildings, or surplus war housing put to re- use. Only: about of the indi- vidual permanent1 homes started in 1946 have been finished, which means that a.. majority of the dwellings begun under the veter- ans' housing priority are standing in various stages of completion. Wyatt last week launched a day that from to big-scale drive to feed materials AFL seamen on the Atlantic, Pu-i into the housing, campaign by cific and Gulf coasts were ready I cutting down the flow of building to walk off then-ships Thursday, supplies going into other types He did not set an hour. The issue took -on aspects of a test of the government's wage stabilization program, because of this background: In July the AFL-Sailors Union of the Pacific negotiated a con- tract with the Pacific American Shipowners association calling for a monthly increase, for able-bodied seamen.1- Ltitcr tho AFL-Senfaroi's; In- ternational Union won n a month hike from the East and Gulf Atlantic coast general agents. Although the war shipping ad- ministration approved the higher rates for AFL seamen, the wage board held that any raise over would be inflationary. That touched ofl the new strike threat. Opens Fall Series of Meetings Dr. A. Linscheid, president of East Central- college, will be the principal speaker at the Thurs- day noon luncheon of the Cham- ber of Commerce, according to Elmer Kenison, secretary. For a number of years, the col- lege official has addressed the group at the opening of the fall scries of meetings. He has been allowed 'the first 1.0 minutes of the program. Following the talk by Dr. Lin- scheid, a group of C'AA officials, who will be meeting in Ada, will be given a chance to take part in the program. Airport officials from Okla- homa City, Ft. Worth, Tex., and Washington are scheduled to ap- pear on the program, according to Secretary Elmer Kenison. MIAMI, Sept, B, Wilson, widely recognized Mi- ami artist, has completed 58 drawings which will be used to illustrate n new novel about the Hudson Bay company entitled "Company of Adveniarers" by Louise Hall Thnrp. Wilson has won notice with his Indian sketches. PONCA CITY, Sept. I of construction. This effort to get homes finished by winter in- volves a 27 per cent cut in the approval of new factory, store, public works and institutional construction. Labor Problem The labor problem showed up in "a large number of communi- Wyatt said, especially in such skilled trades, as bricklaying arid carpentering. Instead of a movement- o.f labor into residen- tial work, the, trend has been the other new workers went into non-housing construc- tion in July, against into home building, the NHA chief said. This trend, he added, "re- flects the high, level of commer- cial nnd industrial Production of. Hcurcc building materials has been rising steadily, but not rapidly enough to meet demand. Current shortages, however, tend to center in plumbing, hard- ware and other finishing items which ore needed in the latter stages of home construction. Output of -prefabricated homes continued .to lag. Only fac- tory-built houses were shipped in July, about the same number as in June. Wyatt already has cut back this year's pre-fab program from units to Materials shortages have af- flicted the prc-fab industry per- haps more severely than conven- tional home construction, Wyatt said, because 'assembly-line pro- duction is utterly dependent upon a smooth flow of materials. Two Oklahomans Burn to Death By Aflnoclaled Two Oklahomans burned to death yesterday one in a fire which destroyed her home, Mrs. Thcda Hudson perished when flames enveloped, a struc- ture housing a grocery.in which she also made her home at Inola, Okla. At Bartlesville, four-year-old Marilyn Chichester, daughter of F. H. Chichester, died from burns suffered when U. S. Expects Payment For Damage Done by Yugoslavia Gov. Andrew F. Schoeppel of i a grass skirt she was wearing was Kansas will deliver the commem- ignited, orative address at a pioneer wo- men ceremony during the Cher- okee strip celebration beginning Sept. JO. Read The News Classified Ads. Luther Burbank developed the world-famous Burbank potato after accidental discovery of a potato seed ball growing on a vine. U. N. Hearings Are Underway Security Council to Hear Ukraine Charges Against Greece; Certified For Debate By CHARLES A. GRUMICH LAKE SUCCESS, N. Y., Sept. Soviet Ukraine's charges in behali of Albania against Greece were set .down for hearing today in the United Nations security council ns the result of firm American insist- ence; that the. 'council must exam- inn the merits of any cnno sub- mitted to it under the U. N. char- tor provisions, The case was certified for offi- cial debate starting at p.m. (cst) after the United States last night joined Soviet Russiu in a bare seven-vote affirmative ma- jority to place it on the agenda over the bitter opposition of .Great Britain and the Nether- lands. U. S. Delegate Herschel V. Johnson, in voting for immediate discussion of the case, made it clear that the United Statci was making no commitment on the merits the charges, which had been assailed by Britain as "wild accusations." After a hoi four-hour debate yesterday the United States, Rus- sia, Poland, China, France, Egypt and Mexico gave the minimum majority vote of seven out of the eleven for hearing the case. Great Britain and the Netherlands voted against it. Australia and Brazil abstained ..Among the items first up for consideration today was a Greek memorandum filed last week re- questing a, ten-day postponement and advising the council that Greece intended to' file a reply to the Ukraine in the interim. Soviet Delegate Andrei A, Gromyko told the cpiuric.il, last night -that" the presence of British troops in Greece had deprived the Greek people of the oppor- tunity deciding freely on their form of government and demand- ed to know why it was necessary to have foreign armies in-the country of a U. N. member at election time. Henryetla Police Force Strikes For Boost in Salaries HENRYETTA, Okla., Sept. entire police force of this city of except the chief, who is on strike for more money at 4 a.m. today and the mayor promptly took over as desk sergeant. The seven striking officers said they were not unhappy over their 84-hour they did believe they should be raised from to monthly. The mayor, Wilson Fisher, 60, decided he would be desk ser- geant during the strike after the city council, turned down the raise request at a special meeting last night and set his alarm clock so he could be on duty at 4 a.m. Chief of police Tom Liddell also was at work as usual. His salary us an elected official is set by law nnd there Is nothing he could do about it, anyway. Also on hand to raise the emergency law enforcement force to Deputy Sheriff Don Stormont, who was directed by Sheriff Jim Kirby at Okmulgee to lend a hand. The seven striking officers stuck to their policy of issuing joint communiques and were not talking separately. Neither did they have a communique ready this morning. They have emphasized they belong to no labor are n'ot affiliated with any organized group. The city council, at its meeting last night, carefully looked around for money to pay the in- creased wage demands of the of- ficers but found; none, the mayor said. The council members, he add- ed, said they would like to .pay the amount asked but where could they get the funds? Jaycees to Resume Regular Meetings The Junior Chamber of Com- merce resumes meetings tonight (Wednesday) at 8 o'clock and of- ficials of the organization said Wednesday morning that an un- usual program is planned. It will be the first meeting in several weeks for-the group. The meeting tonight will be similar to the last regular meet- ing before the vacation period started. Some of the coal deposits of Arkansas measure feet in depth. Heirens Enters Plea of Guilty Uni- vetiity Sophomore Pleads Guilty to Murder Charges CHICAGO, Sept. Seventeen year old William Hcircns, Juicy 11-Hyde personality with u rooted" sexual per- version, today pleaded guilty to the murders of Suzanne Dcgniin, Mrs. Josephine Ross and Miss Francos Brown. The swarthy, bushy-haired uni- versity sophomore stood quietly, showncd no emotion as the clerk read thn long Jial of 20 burglary aH.'Uiult and robbery charges against him, To each he pleaded Kiillly. When tin; dork announced the indictment accusing him of the brutal murder of Suzanne Dcg- nan, 0, Heirens wrung liin hand's, his lips quivered and he respond- ed haltingly: Chief Justice Harold G. Ward of the Cook county (Chicago) criminal court then interrupted the proceeding to warn Heirens of his constitutional rights and the jeopardy into which such a plea placed him. "You understand, Heirons, that in pleading guilty you are waiv- ing a trial by jury nnd that hav- ing waived that trial the court may sentence you to or natural Jife imprisonment, or for any number of years not less than the judge told the youth. "Having been informed of this do you still persist.in pleading Judge Ward asked. Heirens replied. VFW Group Ready For Biggest Parade Delegates Put Aside Busi- ness for Public Demon- stration BOSTON, Sept. With clear weather forecast, the veter- ans of foreign wars were ready today for their biggest parade in history and their first full-dress march in four years. Delegates to the 47th national encampment put aside business temporarily for a public demon- stration, expected by police to at- tract close to a million spectators, Halt-holidays were declared for state employes and for workers in many private businesses, to allow them to watch the parade starting at p.m. (C.S.T.) Approximately veterans of three major wars all of them with overseas service will be in the line of march. For thousands of the younger VFW members some only a few months out of the armed forces it will be their first show. The crack 82nd airborne divi- sion one of the spearhead Units in Normandy will Jead off the seven marching divisions. WOODWARD, Sept, The city of Woodward has added two new wells to its water sys- tem. One of the wells already has been connected to the distribu- tion system. Connection of the second has been delayed ponding receipts of fittings. LAWTON, Sept. The seventh in a series of short cours- es for bookkeepers and managers of cotton gin cooperative associa- tions began this wock at Cameron college. This Country Stands Ready To Write End to Incidents By GRAHAM HOVEY WASHINGTON, Sept. United handed Yugoslavia a blank bill for damages today with a shnrp notice that it expects Marsha] Tito's government to pay the full amount when it is written in. If Tito agrees, this country stands ready to write "fin- ished" to the incidents in which two unarmed American transport planes were forced down by Yugoslav fighters at a cost of five American lives. Should Tito refuse, the United Stales might have to dust off lH-dny-old threat to the before the United secur- ity council, Most American officials con- cerned with the mailer appeared to believe Tito would agree to indemnity terms, following Ills recent expression of regret over the incidents nnd assurances that they would not recur. But no one was willing to pre- dict for the record the Yugoslav premier's reaction. Notice Given The notice that the United States expects damages for loss of life and properly was con- tained in a 3100-word note de- livered by Undersecretary of State William L. Clayton to Dr. Sorgije Makiedo, Yugoslav chiirgt; d'affaires, last night. The note, in fact, expressed surprisn that Yugoslavia had not volun- Bombay Area Much Quieter Casualties Resulting From Bitter Hindu-Moslem Clashes Soar to 146 Dead By G. MILTON KELLY BOMBAY, India, Sept. 4.- -Hiot-weary Bombay was ported officially lo have quieted tonight after a tumiillous day in which between Hindus Mid Moslems rai.sud Die casualties since Sunday to HO dead and <11M wounded. A communique from the infor- mation director said peace settled on the city, for the moment at least, ut p.m. "apparently as a result of extension of tho 7 p.m. to n. m, curfew to include about BO per cent of the city." Sporadic violence occurred last night nnd police had to fire sev- eral times crowds. to disperse rioting The disorders occurred mostly in the northern section of the city, but extended to., .the main business section, where mobs tried to break into stores and attempted to burn a house of worship. Streets in curfew areas were littered with rocks hurled at police patrols. Under the threat of further (rouble many places of business closed their doors, while markets began to feel the pinch of a food shortage as deliveries fell off. A health menace developed in one troubled section where sew- rs became clogged and workers refused to clean them in fear of their lives. Acting Governor Sir Alexander Clow and Morarjai Dcsai, minis- tor for law and order, returned from Poona and lured (he troub- le ureas in Bombay preliminary to taking charge of control mea- sures. Additional troops were poured into the city to assist po- lice. One of the first control mea- sures adopted was extension of the curfew, effective from 7 p.m. until a.m., to approximately BO per cent of the city, Hereto- fore the curfew had been invoked in sections which had been scone of disorders. the KOUIt TEAR G1ICL IS FATALLY IHJKNKO BARTLESV1LLK, Okla. Sept. 4. Marilyn Chichester, year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P, H. Chichester of Bartles- ville was burned fatally yester- day when a gniss skirt she was fire.- The girl's mother received burns about her hands and arms 'when she rolled the child in a blanket in an effort to extinguish the flames. Read The News Classified Ads. A Hero at Four leered in advance to pay. Beyond that, Clayton, pains- takingly citing numbers, dates, places and types of aircraft, de- nied a scries of Tito claims that American planes were flying vir- tually ut will over Yugoslavia without permission, nnd thus vio- lating thai country's sovereignty. After' answering each point of the Tito indictment, the Ameri- can undersecretary declared that tho alleged violations of Yugo- slav territory "must Ijavi: been made by pinned other t h n United States planes." Me did not elaborate on that point. Tito Makes Claim Tito had claimed 278 unauthor- ized American flights over Yugo- slavia, since July IB. Clayton, basing on a check into "Ihe whereabouts of American military plane in Europe during the said there were only 47 flights any- where near Yugoslav territory. And he could deny categorically, he said, that some of those crossed the Yugoslav frontier. "No American planes have flown over Yugoslavia intention- ally without advance approval of Yugoslav authorities unless forced to do so in an he assorted. Off Course In thai conncclion, Clayton de- nied Tilo's contention that neith- er of the American transports forced down was over Yugoslav territory because of bad weather. The pilot of the plane which crashed August 9 got off course, the American note said, because of "heavy clouds, icing and high winds." But ns for the August If) crash, Clayton snid it was impossible to get. complete information for a grim reason: "The pilot nnd crew of this unarmed American Irans- port are dead, shot down by Yugoslav armed aircraft." There was no indication what yardstick the United Stales was using1 in totaling its bill or when il. would be ready for delivery to Yugoslavia. MUSKOGEE, Sept. William Durant flying school operator, has established what loan guaranty officer Ira T. Goddard of the Muskogee veter- ans administration center beJiev- e- is a national record for speed in obtaining a GI loan. Goddard said he flew Leroy R. Brant, loan officer assigned to as- sist the flying school operator to Durant the loan was ne- gotiated in one and a half hours. Goddard added that Keo was the first Oklahomnn to obtain a loan for buying an airplane. Proud youngster Is four-yedr-old Dennis'Aguilern, of Manly, la., pictured as Gov. Robert Blue pins on him Hie slate's ofllcial gold medal for hferoism. Dennis, the youngest person ever lo win the award, carried his three-year-old sister to safety when their horn? caught lire last January. TH' PESSIMIST Br Hlnkt, Th' most out-moded feller in th' world 1'icse days is th' one who's still bothered with consciencious scruples. You can say one thing ter a takes o' interest in 'is work.   

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