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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: September 1, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - September 1, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             President Truman, regarding strength of this nation in a troubled world, sums it up neatly by saying, "We can look into future today with confidence, but not witK tronquility." Nrl July I'ald Circulation 8407 Mfinbff, Audit Ilijifiiu of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd ]I7 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COM Ada Schools To Be Busy All of Week Grade Enrollment to Take Five Days, Junior and Senior High School Three Ada schools this work wil complete Uvir pre-classwork en- rollment nnd hi- ready to start st'tu-duli's tlic following work, Two through Six will this 'Wcf-h, slnrlilig Mon- uitli senior and .junior high M-iioi.ls enrolling T LI e s (1 n j- tn.-c.-jc.'i Friday. Thr Schedule graders on- idll :it their rcspeclive sclinol.i. TrKSDAV--Third graders en roll; .Junior high -Seventh grad- t-rs. Ada high Fotirlh grnd-   I he system arc urged to bring their n-port curds when they eunie to enroll. Offices (ire open from 0 to J2 jin'.l 1 i" 4 o'clock dnily. K: :da ciirolhnent of First Krinlris S through nd M! inn! c- to tin- lolnl here. lly hiiols l-'i iduy Hayes n. Irving IB, iWii.OnnKton Will.-ird 12. Thr three-day total hy school.s Is: Glenwood 37, Hayes Ml, Irv- ine Washington '12, Willnrd Parents who could not for nny reason lirine their first grade bo> s and girls last week tire ask- rd to bring them to the school? fluiing this week KO that the younRptrrs ran be em lieforr Mails on Monday, Sept. Truman in Praise Of Labor's Part Still Have Big Job to Do, Long Way to Go But "We Can Do It" Labor Day Is Providing Long Weekend General Holiday Here Monday; Trades and Labor Council Picnic Feature Day in Ada is a general holiday. Thnt mcnns that few offices and business firms will be open. Banks, postofficc (except for special delivery and outgoing city and county offices will not open business. NO rAI'KH MONDAY uf WASHINGTON, AUK. 31. Pwfldent Truman, taking the in praising Inbor's role, in the first 12 months of peace, said tonight in a Labor statement Ihnt 'the largest part" of recon- version has lieen iiecomplished. 'We can look into the future todav witii confidence, hut not v.-it'i trantiuility." the president in n mcssngc issued from the White House. "Much of the credit for the Job done." the president sflid, to the workers df this great of slates nnd free people." "We still have n big job to do, and a long way to 140, to assure doinc-Mic prosperity and interna- understanding necessary to prevent depressions and war, Hut can do it if we keep in our minds constantly Hint people an our iriost important Fix-set. Wi inuM them and conserve them." I'ayina tribute lo labor for Its in mining out a record flooc of eoods and upholding anti-in flu', on controls, the presiden "Labor. management nnd farm with the help of govcrnmen rcei or it could l.ir useful have marie this great start towarc ppficetime readjustment. If w< continue to cooperate, to work and to produce, can attain s richness of life that will ho i credit and n benefit to all of us living, and a real hope and pro- irnse to those who come after us 3CXXX. "I salute the hosts of labor for magnificient job in wartime and in the beginning of peace and x.rce them on lo further ef fcirtj. in behalf of the rights and of mankind." Sl'PERFORT TO FLY 10.300 MILT HOP HITKAM KIKLD, Hawaii, Aug. 81. '-I'1 The army's .superfortress "Piicuwin DriMiiibonl. landed here at p. in. (H p. m. EST) lodav on the first ot its eon- lenuilated mile nonstop flight to Cairn. F.f-ypt. Comtnanrled by Col. C. S. lr- viiv of St. Neb., the plane vith a 12-niiin crew made the mile trip in II hours 30 min- utes. nearly an hour and n half faster than anticipated. Tne plane was tested during the flieiit in preparation for the lone C'airo a ex- periment to determine the fcasa- bilitv  f ago before November I. Dr. Victor H, Hicks, director of Horace Mann School, is in his office Monday through Friday of each week and will welcome slu- lents and parents who wish to confer with him about school problems for I lit coming year. Musk Director 01 Stephens Is Dead COLUMBIA, Mo., Aug. D. Gauntlclt, 01, director xif the conservatory of music at Stephens college Tor more than :t.r> yen I'M, died today al his home following a brief iilnesH. lie was a native of London and studied music- in Knglnnd, Franco, Germany and Italy before com- ing to the United Slates in 1009 as a concert pianist. Survivors include his widow and three children, five brothers and sisters who live in London, and another sister, Miss Lillian Gauntletl ot Columbia. department lias been Htrcnglhun cd by Iho addition of new an- slructors. Those instructors are full time, experienced, well trained in their President TJiiH- cheid has been careful to avoid building a makeshift or ternpo- :-ary sort of faculty during tho present nation wide educational boom. Dr. Llnscheid snys, "I am not so much interested in sheer num- bers of students ns I once was. I am much more inlcrt'sled in see- ing that we give Ihe sludents wo here-something worthwhile to lake with them when they, leave school, Now, more Ibari ever before, it Is important that education be sound and thor- ough." Those 24 new teachers make il possible for tho college to offer more courses in more different fields thnn ever before in the school's history. New Equipment Dr. Linscheid says, "More in- structional equipment has been added in the last .12 months thnn Greater returns for amount in- vested. Ada News Wnnt Ads, m any year since the college was founded in 1000. The laboratories in physicH and chemistry have' been greatly enlarged; the bio- logy laboratory has been pro- vided with new equipment throughout; the industrial arts or vocational education department has had its equipment more than doubled; the home economics de- Dartmont has. new sewing ma- chines, furniture, and other equipment; and the -library hns added more than eleven thousand dollars worth of new books. Band Pnul Enix, new band director, las been working toward build- ,mg nn flO-plocc band. New instru- ments ana music have been pur- chased and Knix has been work- ing through the summer months gelling ready for his ambitious band nnd orchestra program. "We can make East Central the lending school in Oklahoma for training music directors nnd or- chestra says Enix. And that is the goal he nnd other members of t h e music depart- ment have begun working to- ward. Paint And Repairs A large crew of men has been BIG FOUR IN SECRET MEETING: The Big Four foreign ministers are shown meeting in n re- Mtricted session at the French Foreign MinluU-y in Paris in an attempt to quell the differences which threaten the Peace Conference. In the foreground, heads logtther, are Soviet. Minister Molo- lov wilh Andrei Vyshinsky, vice commissar for foreign affairs of Russia. At the far side of the table, facing the camera, from left to right, are British Foreign Secretary Ernest Bc-vin; unidentified man; Sen. Tom Connully; U. S. Secretary ol! State James F. Byrnes; Charles BohJen Byrnes' as- sislanl; and Sen, Arthur H. VnndenbergT Al the George Radio extreme right, .face hidden, is French Premier Dr. Linscheid Will Speak Opens Fall C. of C. Meet- ing Schedule; Aviation Of- ficials .Also on Program Dr. A, Linschoid, president ol! East Central. State college, will fulfill an annual engagement Thursday at noon when ho speaks lo Chamber of-Commerce mem- bers at the first meeting of the organisation following a period during the summer months when no muulingH wen; The college officials will speak ibout. .10 minutuii at the 1'lrnl; purl, >.C the program and the remaind- er of. Iho program will be devot- ed to talks by Civil Aeronautics Administration officials. A meeting oC city officials in District No. 7, composed of seven counties in this aviation, district, .vill be in progress and the visi- ;ors will be special guests nt the 'uncheon. H. J. Skipwilh, connected with -AA 'In Washington; Ed Travis, district CAA..-, engineer of .Et. Tex., nnd W.. O. Knr- )onko, appointed'' state IJAA'directo'v with offices in Ok- rihoma City, wil I. bo present nl :he meeting, along with Kiich local ivlntipn men ust Guy Thrash, "Since the nirport is a major question in Ada at the present, his meeting should be ol! parti- cular interest to many Ada citl- Elmer Keni.son, secretary if the Chamber ol Commerce aid Saturday afternoon. 'Shooting' At Lazy D Ranch Some DuPont Men Coming To Take Pictures of Spray- ing Demonstration Jack Smith, munugor of Laity D ranch, is RoinR lo have company Tuesday morning and. he is won- derinji who and how muny to ox- peel; os he has been informed that some men want lo take n movie or at least some pictures at the ranch. He said that he had boon told that sonio men from the DuPont company are arriving in Adi.i TiiCHday inoriiliiK U> do .some 'HhootiriR1 at. the ranch. Thu only thlriK that Smith could figure out by Snturcjay nlKlit that the man are planning to take some pictures Hpray demonstration. "After all, it is another put on the back lor Hereford Smith commented us he tried to figure out Ihe situation. Smith was told about the Du- Pont men coming to Ada only last week and County Agont C. H. was the bearer, ot the lid- Mololov Is Oh Way Home May Have to Explain Fail- ure of Vetoes, Motions; More Reparations Agreed On (Continued on Page B Column 8) Pvl. (par Cleared In Pass Tangle FORT LEWIS, Aug. 31.. AH M. Ipar's com- manding Kenernl .said today ho was "innocent of any wronu-do- n.g" in obtaining three three-day nsses. for his honeymoon with film' actress Virginia Bruce. Maj.' Gnn. Paul. W. Kendall made the announcemnet to news- men after the Turkish-born, film producer returned to his army post from California in onswcr to. a telegraphic summons from the jgonoi'Ml. "There is nothing to indicate the necessity of any disciplinary action" against. I p a r, General Kendall smid, but ho lidded that an unidentified non-commission- ed officer who .signed the three passes "apparently was guilty of a gross error or gross negligence." Some -disciplinary action against the nop-com is probable, the gen- eral' said. Private Ipar. got back to the fort nbout 32. hours, before expir- ation of-the'combined pass per- iod. ,He traveled by bus from Portland after his plane was grounded, Weather to Decide Swim Pool (losing Will Be Kept Open Until Sept. 9, Maybe an Week- ends Rest of Month Price Ceilings Off Group Of Farm Commodities for Month Luther Condron, .superinten- dent of parks, Saturday announc- ed that. Glenwood .swimming pool will, bu kept open until. Septem- ber I) and possibly longer if the weather is favorable. The paries superintendent said that the weather will determine the number ot days tho swimming pools will remain operation. If tho weather pormlls, the pools will be kept open the re- mainder of September, bul only on weekends. Mr. Condron Kfiid that the story about cleaning out the City Lake s a short one because the project couldn't be completed. The lake was partially drained in. nn effort to gRt the writer low enough lo drug the moss out, but ictore the dragging process could So started a .five inch rain filled the lake back as high us it was Seforc. During the period the water was down, somo moss dried up and the .lake is in much better condition than it was before. Name Three State Farm Youth Leaders By STERLING F. GREEN WASHINGTON, Aug. ceilings will be dropped it midnight tonight from more than 20 farm commodities. These tilings remain off throughout September. The list includes fresh apples, reaches, all frozen fruits, sweet potatoes jyid canned peas, limn jeans and apricots. The action was taken by Sccre- ary of Agriculture Anderson us monthly under the new OPA law. At Ihe same lime, he Issued n ong list of other commoditicm vhich he" found to bo in "short upply" and limn eligible lo re- nnin tinder price control or be ulderi to the controlled list. Livestock, Fills, Jellies "Short" Anderson so listed hogs and attle, most fals, and oils, jams ind jellies, fish and many other itc-ms. The announcement was Ander- son's first listing of "agricultural commodities in short re- quired monthly by the new OPA act. This law provides that any ag- ricultural product not listed is automatically out from under the price lid. ThewB are Ceiling Free His statement placed in the coiling-Ci-ce category the follow- ing items: Fresh I e m o n H, grapefruit, peaches, apples and' tangerines. Fresh imap beans, cantaloupes, carrots, Icttuc6, onions, spinach, sweet potatoes nnd tornalociH, Canned peas, limn beans, as- paragus, nnd mixed vegetables, Frox.cn lima beans, corn, green beans and asparagus. Canned apricots, plums, and prunes. Frozen fruits. Dried apples, nnd other apple products, except canned apples, apple butter and upple sauce. Cranberries, Concord grape tobacco, wool., ed- ible tree nuts, hops, popcorn, broom corn, gum rosin, beeswax, peppermint and spearmint oil, peanuts and peanut products ex- cept oil and meal. No decontrol action by OPA .is required, but that agency went to work at once deciding which pro- cessed items and by-products made from the decontrolled crjin- modities shall also go ceiling free. It expected to announce its de- cisions quickly. Wliiui a 1'riHliiut l.s Short Tho agriculture department gflvo this ru.lo lo guide OPA cle- conlrol decisions: A production made from n "short supply" commodity is held to be also in short supply jf it contains 20 per cent or more of the "short" material. Wheat and corn are on the "short supply" list. A product mnde in part from whwat flour OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. 31, outstanding Oklaho- ma farm, youth leaders today were selected In a contest spon- sored by radio station WKY to receive scholarships lo Ok- lahoma A, and M. colleRo. Tho 'winners were Hnxcl Mae Rhodes, ]fi, 4-H club girl; Oliver Kcnzie, 21, dishing, Future Farmer of .America, and Gerald Honick, 10, BlackwelJ, 4- H club boy. (Continued on Page 7 Column ;i) Warren Oil Takes In Han Ion Firm TULSA, Okla., Aug. 31. AH oil. operations of Honnghan Huiilon-, Inc., will be absorbed to- morrow by the Warren O.il Corp., subsidiary of the Warren Petrol- eum of Tulsit, .it wan noimced today. l At the Name time, Hanlon-Bu- eluinun, Inc., whose properties had ;pi.insed to Honaghnn Hri'n- lon, also will be dissolved. Properties of the Hanlon com- panies were acquired by Warren Oil last May 1, Their dissolution means that all their 1'ormer oil operations will be owned by the Warren corporation, with, head- quarters here. Read Tho Classified Ads, By ROBERT HEWETT PARIS. Aug. Foreign Minister V. M. Mololov left the pence conference today by plane for Moscow, French foreign ministry circles said to- night. It, was believed the lUi.ssian leader would upend a few days at a Kremlin meeting Before re- turning to (he conference, which of n DDT loclav approved Bij? Four vecom- inundations on Soviet reparations from Rom.ima .and cession of Franco-Italian border areas to France. The Russian embassy, where Molotov been staying, could not be contacted late tonight for confirmation o.C the foreign min- ister's departure. Mimicd Saturday Molotov failed to'appear nt any commission meetings today and Tans news agency representa- tives said they believed ho had left .for in tho Kremlin. British and American sources said Deputy Minister An- drei. Vishinsky would represent Russia at the council of foreign ministers Monday if Molotov is not in Paris. One report published in Lon- don said I.hiit there wan some talk Ihal: Mololov would be re- placed at tlvi conference. H .said that some delegation sources, in- cluding American, speculated that Molotov's failure to win Russian successes in voting and debutes had prompted the Krem- lin to recall him. Two Claims Approved Tn the most harmonious .ses- sions of the .'21-nation conference, the economic commission for the Balkans endorsed Russia's claim for in reparations from Romania and the Italian political commission approved award of the Mont Cenis and Brign-Tenda regions lo Other developments today in- cluded n proposal from '.Paul Auer, Hungarian minister to Paris, thai Hungary be permit- led to keep square miles in the border area of Transylvania, which the Big Four'has'recom- mended be returned lo Komania. The military affairs committee adopted six articles of the Italian treaty dealing with Italian dis- armament and adopted a Soviet amendment to another of the treaty articles forbidding Italy to make any atomic weapons.. The Romanian reparations claim was Ihe second by Russia to be approved in Italian political commission yes- terday endorsed the Russian's ro- clucnt for from Italy delegates speculated that Thursday's .session of the Big Four may have brought more amiable atmosphere to Ihe con- ference. Helghim Under the treaty terms draft- ed by the Four Romania would have eight years from Sepl. 12, 1944, lo pay in such commodities as oil, grain, limber and machinery. Belgium's delegation, it was disclosed meanwhile, h a s pre- sented claims totalling more than Italy. Halo-French border rectifica- tions approved by the Italian pol- itical and territorial commisKinn give France the big hydro-elec- tric plants of Gran Kcaln, Masce, Confine and San Dalmuz- xo. IIH well ;IM a new and more easily-defended frontier in the Alpii. Fifteen members of Ihe Kalian commission voted in fnviir of the French territorial, claims. Aus- tralia, India, South Africa, (lie Netherlands and New Zealand abstained from voting as a pro- test against rejection of a pro- posal to have Iho claim investiga- ted by a subcommittee. Greek And Royalists Clash On Eve Of Voting Death Toll Above 30 Greeks Prepare far Plebiscite, That U Expected to Return Exiled King George III By L. S. CHAKALES ATHENS, Aug. Communist-Royalist clashes killed 31 persons in the last 47 hours, the govern- ment finnouncod tonight on the eve of the plebiscite on re- turning exiled King George 111 to his throne. The ministry of public order charged that Communist bands in the latest two ntlacks killed 10 soldiers and .Hundreds oJ persons have died in recent months in Com- munist-Royalist disorders. The royalist-dominnlod govern- ment, confident that Soviet blasts loosed against it bnd only assurod the king's victory tomor- row, to wel- come the monarch, whose arrival has been set tentatively for Sept. M. Royalist circles said the June would fly lo Alexandria from London, and come home aboard Greek warship cscorled by Brit- ish and American Fighting In TnexMljr The government declared that in the latest violence a commun- isl band attacked n gendarmerie station at Platycambo in Thes- saly, using machincgunii nnd mor- tars. Tho stntion was set ablnze nnd three soldiers, one gcndnrme iind two civilians killed, the re- ports said. Liiler troops dlspiilclied lo the spot and fighting continued until nightfall with major Nazi Leaders Weep, Rant Or Plead Some Frightened, Some Defiant in Final Excuses For What They Did My TOM HEKOY NUKIINUEHG. AUK. Twi'iily-oni.! henchmen of Adol HI Her will lenrn their fall- Sep :'.H, the inlrriuil.ional military l.ri buiiiil nnnounced today nftc hearing tbem rant, defiantly o plead for mercy in (heir lust ges tures to ese.'ipe the gallows. Defense attorneys miid 12 o the defendants expected to b hanged, thret; Ihoughl they wouli escape, and six still "have hopes. Some in Ihoir final statement turned snvagely on Hitler, brand ing him tho only real eriminal others renffirmed belief in 111 fuehrer. One wept. Some wil.] bravado dt-clarcd they were no iifrniil to ilic. Others professcc ignorance of excesses, o pleaded "duly" lo Ihe stnti1. Some asked that even if l.ho> wen; not spared, the Germni people hi; acquitled so Hint Ger many might rise again as a nn lion. The .'21 lirccl nnd mostly fright ened men used words in fi iiiil excuses for executing orders that brought misery and death to (Continued on .Pago 0 Column 4) Weekend Starts Violenf Deaths Nation Had 37 Fatalities Before Saturday Night lly 'I'll'1 AflKiirliilri! The Lnbor D.'iy weekend began with 37 violent deaths including din; to Inil'fic accidents report- ed for Iho nation by Saturday night. The national safely council had 3redicted Ihnt 110 persons would meL't with violent deaths on Sat- urday. The safely council estimated thai, n tola! of H50 persons would die in public nccidcnls during the throe-day holiday. Jt predicted that on Saturday (55 persons would die in traffic accidents and in non-motor vehicle accidents: on Sunday. 70 in traffic and 50 in non-motor vehicle accidents, or a total of 120. and on Monday, 75 in traffic and 45 in non-motor vehicle accidents, a total of ]20. We Admitted Many 'Alien' Families U. S. Allowed Wivei And Children to Come In During Year WASHINGTON, Aug. Tho justice department said to- day that alien spouses and children of members of the arm- ed forces were admitted to the United States during the year ended Juni: .'in, figure includes wivos of Ol's, 01 husbands of Gl Jane's and 7iiJ. chJldrcn. They came in under special legislation exempting n I i u n spouses or alien children of members of the services from im- migration quotaK and cm-lain oth- er immigration requirements. No breakdown was given on the countries represented by the But the immigration service in May quoted army esti- mates of (iO.OOO G. I. brides and children in England, Scotland and Wales; in Ireland, in France, Belgium and Holland. 000 in Italy and a much smaller number in Norway and North Africa. Greater returns for amount in- vented, Ada News Want Ada, MKAIOIUAL SKItVICKS TOR ARTIST CHIKRY SATURDAY MAOISO.V, Aug. si-rvici.'.i for John Steu.'irt Curry. -Ill, University of Wisconsin arti.sl.-in-r e s i d c n c e who died Thursday, were con- ducted at Grace Episcopal church lociay. Indians believed mountains were pillars holding up the sky, but good repair really does hold up your to .SinneH- Meadcr.'i. It-l-H two soldiers wounded. Five sol- diers were wounded alto when their truck was blown up by communist mine, the ed. Near K a 1 a m seaport in southern Greece, an- other communist band was re- ported to have killed four civil- ians, No Slaughter of Comnmnlili Minister of public order Sniroi Thcntokm personally denied to- nifdil a report published abroad thai 200 communists were killed in n clash yesterday in northern Greece. He said the report wm "fantastic." British troops, -whose presence in Greece has evoked bitter com- pluints from Russia and Slay slates, were confined to their bar- racks at p.m., until pattern followed the March, 1946 (T h communist' ncwipcpvr Pravria in Moscow declared plebisictc would take place "un- dor the dictation of the British minister of foreign It asserted the Greek government has "completely lost its indepen- dence" and Greece was lurninf quickly "into a British colony." Carrier riaiicn Over A (Rend Admiral John H. sady said in Naples that at "request of the Greek govern- nent" the U. S. carrier Franklin D. Roosevelt would lend 123 jJiines over Athens in an air dil- ilay when it reaches Greek ;rs four days afler the plebiscite, -Ic added Ihal there was "no con- nection" between the plebiscite Jnd the visit to Greece, (The newspaper Izvcstia icof- fed at previous American an- louncumenls that the carrier jcing sent into the Mediterranean is part of a "good will" cruise, quoted Turkish bat the appearance had of warning" behind it) 5unman Who Shof Tulsans Escapes TULSA, Okla.. Aujf, A. youthful gunman who shot and ritically wounded Detective erry St. CJair in a gunbatlle >ver Tulsa's eastsidc streets last light appeared to have eluded police today despite an intensive 'rngnot set by scores of officers. Shot above the right eye, St. Ciair is given only a meager banco by doctors to live. A ompanion officer, Harold Hard- ng, was shot in the Juice during lie furious gunbnllle which lally started when police sought o question man in connection vilh a grocery store hijacking nd car theft. The gunman led Tulsa police in hectic 30-minulc chatie and gun before he eluded them near lie University of Tulsa campus. TH' PESSIMIST Economically speakin', in th' future it looks like a Jot o' wives may starve fer more than affection. If you .'uid t' write two these ever' dny tttff wouldn't M funny   

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