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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 30, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 30, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Significant report council started its first session in a converted war factory with a call by its president for cooperation and with an immediately ensuing fight over the Ukraine A NX July I'lid (.Imitation 8407 MrmKrr. Audit Iturran of ('Imitation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION 43rd 116 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Prices To Go Up On Collon Clothing Soon Stabilising Of Textile Prices To Depend On What Happens To Raw Cotton Prices KV ii. DOIISON WASHINGTON. Aug. OI'A tagged cotton garments will Mvithor pnt-e boost, totlny jincl dolefullv ;if Itnowledged ii IM.! l..i- Ihe last. The new increase, about two .-ind one half per cent nl tex- tile mills, will mean another hike of or.c to two per cent on coLlon impure] sold iit retail, the agenc.s ;d Today's upward icvlslon, Hit fourth sint-o March, bronchi tin1 jump for basic fabrics U; more than 'M per cent. Men To Keep On Hunting Clothes For Another Year or Two WASHINGTON, AUK. HO, the moths out of that Mnl, gents. It may havu last two years. A civilian production ad- man told n re- porter today that those the b n r o facts on iiu-ii's (iolhes: Fifteen million men still will he hunting sails on Dec. MMB. Not until liMil will suits plentiful enough for men to tip choosey. The shirt se-ri.-c-itv will last for a year. There'll he n .shorts shortage for MX to 12 months. Yes. sighed the t'PA man. a trifle enviously, the girls arc bettor off. That's be- cause, so manufacturers say, there is more profit in turn- ins out women s garments. According to the CPA mnn, women now get almost nil lire slips nnrl underpreUien Kiev need. Moil of Hie city women are Well fixed for Although some rural (Iwt-ller.i still have ra.von and m Ion troubles, He said there are plenty of pn-tt.v women's suits but thai they cost a pretty penny, loo. Sports dollies have boon so some shops nre shipments hack to I'.ir manufncturprx. And an OPA pricing official told n reporter privately Unit liny jjttrmpts at cotton tex- tile price-s at the new level will depend almost entirely upon happens to the prices of cotton. Under the OPA extender net, he said, the agency is required to fix fabric prices at a level which reflect the current cost ol law cotton, or parity, whichevei ir the higher. Haw cotton prices to have followed a steadily upward trend. Monthly Krvlrw Saving OPA will review UK tfxtilr prices once a month, the Inly, members II S. ri.YKKS1 IIODIKS KECOVKKen: At an advanced American "post near Gorlxin, Un of the Dili Kegimenl., BIHh Jnfunlry. Division, escort Ihe 1'lag draped coffins of the five American flyers who wore shot clown over Yugoslavia. (NEA) RADIO TELEPHOTO) First Grader Totals Rising Friday Rounds Up School Starters' Enrollment, Others Enroll Next Week Friday was tho final scheduled lay lor enrollment of first firiicl- M-S fur the fill I school year that wgins Monday, September II, However, Supt. Hex O. Morris- >n announces Unit parents who ire lull' in rc'turning from vnca- iiin.s or who for any other reason vt'rik unabcl tu bring their young- tors for enrollment this week an do so next week. Other grades will be enrolling loxt week but any remaining irsl graders be taken care f also so Hint the schools can work the following' Monday with IIH Mem- completed enrollment as possible. Thursday the ,1 nam- ed hoys and girls were enrolled us follows: Glenwood Hayes 8, Irving lit, Washington 12 and Willard M. These, with Wednes- day's figures, bring the two-day total to 147, with Friday to add the S through 7, children, Other grade schools will enroll next beginning with sec- ond graders on Monday through slxlh. gradors on Fricln iday. r hig senior high school enrollments begin Tuesday. A Till! schedule of enrollment will hi; published in This Mows Sunday and will dally next week. be continued Opinion, Atmosphere Around Peace Conference Depressing, Foreboding Of World War EDITOR'S NOTE: The ing story is not a prediction of' war, but merely a picture and sampling of opinion and tilrnos- pheri; surrounding the Paris peace conference. It Js written by Hclinnn Morin, veteran cor- respondent and chief of the AP's Parifi bureau, who in recent months has traveled widely in western Europe. any longer among the conference itself when French iiris that it will come, j guns opened fire on the British. official ndded. "There will ho more increases if necessary to reflect thf mw cotton costs" A 16 per cent increase earlier monlh was Ihe firsl under the new OPA act. Prices pro- viou.My had been raised BVi per cent in to cover five per cent jn April 1o spur production. Tho OPA official emphnsined ..-it the last two hikes will not felt by consumers until the Roods make their way from mills tr, retail counters. This may lake much as three months. Sonw Hrmoveil On other OPA fronts the ngon- cy col rid of some mire of its VO.-ii. 1: removed price controls from s'.crlmz silver flatwork, including knives, forks and spoons; all rub- ber footwcnr. and front manufnc- sides of certain obsolete automotive replacement parts uscahle exclusively in 1 (WH or miller model veiir. imtomohiles. But more thnn counter hhmc- these labor saving moves win the urgent lajk of a huge slaf of Mulisticiiinx -who hopud l( complete hv tonight the joh o new price ceilings or livestock within the formula se by Secretary of Agriculture Clin ton P. Anderson. first hst of ceilings wil Jipulv al a. m. (KST) Sun ciflv on rattle, calves and hogs al botn producer and sUiughtei Labor Day Holiday To Be General Here Poitotfico, Mott Stores, Offices To Close on Monday Next Monday is the. first Mon- day in September and so is Labor Day. That ral holiday ...ni. ti KvrildHJ JlUlluuy for Ada, along with most of the nation, involving here the post- office, public offices, most pri- vate offices and most business firms. And it means thul Ihe two-day weekend will six; many Adun's 'leaving out' tomorrow or early Sunday for distant points' while others will be coining hero for u visit with relatives or friends. The poslol'fice will have only special delivery and handling of outgoing mail, A few businesses will be open groceries, some fill- ing stations, perhaps a drug slore or two but in general Ada will spend the clny in observance of Labor Day. Tho Labor gram will lake' place" Monday evening nt (I o'clock at the. arm'- nry annual Ada Trades and Council picnic and pro- RELMAN MORIN PARIS, AUK. 30, peace conference appears now to bo headed for failure and people in Paris, both foreigners and'French, both those who know and those who only feel, lire more pro- foundly depressed today than at any time since the lust gun fir- ed in .Europe, They fuel World War lit nl- roiirjy ifi ill sight, They .feel It may not ccunc thin year or next year but there hi little doubt t people in Pnri, That view is common to people in all quarters, A few clays ago I spoke with tho foreign minister OH one. coun- Iry he has now pone home. described hlmiic'lf as "o discourag- ed, optimist, worn out and hope- IOHH." Not king afterward I a cnnvnrnntlon between i 1'Yonoh pollcomim and a waiter n a cnf.e a short distance from Luxembourg palace, "Keep the moths out. of your uniform, old You are going lo need "If Wur-----" The- records of a French fact- finding organization, which at- tempts to test public opinion, show that the question being op- enly cliscuHstitl now Is: "If win1 breaks out, between Russia and the United .Stiilcx, The clashes between Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov and U. S. Secretary of State James F. Byrnes along with the completely outspoken statements of the Australians plus the startl- ing indictment of "British domi- nated Greece" by the Ukraine have removed all question. In the middle of this there came the sound of shots from Yugoslav fighter planes and the explosion of a falling American transport. Contrast With Contrast this with also a travesty and years ago. i At Versailles there were days when Georgcji Clomunccrm, fur- ious with the Brltllsh attitude to- ward Germany, retimed evon to spunk, lo David Lloyd George. But there ncvor was a day during boy. it." The situation 'has greatly since the dclRi-iornlcd pcucc con- ference opened and more partic- ularly within tho lost week, There no longer is any doubt here uboul the totally irrcvon- ciliablc policies of Russia and the bloc of Slavic nations which stand with her on the one hand and those of the west on the olh- cr. Nor was there ever a day when one "ally" described another "as a menace to peace." If Versailles bred World War II in 20 years, how long will it take the conference of Paris to start a third? DeGtiulle Agtiln Prophesied In this blenk pa Hern, adding lo the KCIIHC o( furboding that hangs honvily over Paris Indny, there has been the voice o( Gen. De- Gaulle, Fronchmnn and foreign- ers drive varying views of De- Gaulle as n politician and as n national leader but very few peo- ple question his vision, his feel- ing for the future. At Bar-le-duc recently he spoke ol! an inexorable collision of Rus- sia and the Uniled Stales. This week he criticized tho proposed now French constitution on the ground it gave Ihe president too lltllo power, Behind his words Frenchmen feel was this implication: France was in 1930. Anoth- er 1039 is close at hand and this time she should have a strong hand at the helm equipped with sufficient powers to hold the na- tion on one course whichever course that may be. Anderson Plan Would Mean Farmer Cash Hit Recommended Higher Livestock Ceilings Would Mean More By MORRIS CLEAVENGER A I- Service WASHINGTON, Aug. difference between Secre- tary of Agriculture Anderson's recommended maximum cattle and hog prices and the old OPA ceilings may mean as much as to farmers within the next year. This was indicated today on the basis of agriculture department estimates ot cattle and hog mur- ketiriRs before July 1, 1047. The bulk of the additional money will be poured into the agriculturally rich corn belt .states. Anderson's Price Proposals Anderson's recommendations to the OPA for price increases were as follows: Cattle: Chicago basis, from the old ceilings of to per hundred pounds. Hogs: Chicago basis, from the old ceiling of to per hundred pounds.. Agriculture department an- alysts explained that this would mean approximately a net in- crease of per hundred pounds in the "farm price" for hogs and per hundred pounds in the "farm price" for callle and calves. Average 340 Pounds winter and'early spring log markets are roughly' Torecasl 3.y vcpiirtment officials at animals, although the stimulus of higher prices might increase this figure. The assumed average weight of hogs to be sold is around 240 pounds. The total of cattle to be slaugh- tered during the i'iscal year end- ingnext July 1 is placed at about and calves at -The nvurnxo weifjhl of the untile is figured at IMO pounds, and Russia Accuses Britain, U. S. Of Interference With Sunday's Voting In Greece 11 von nl, pounds, On this marketing basis, the Jevt-U. The maximum price schedules will hegin to apply t what to do next. Accidents Fatal To Three Children Il.v Vrens Three children died .in acici- denls in Oklahoma Thursday. They were Walter Lee Worn, seven-year-old Choctaw Indian of Hugo, who was Ihe victim of a hunting trip accident; three- year-old Joe A. Snced of Warner, who died in a fire which destroy- ed his grand parents' home; and nine-year-old Martin, ne.- gro of near who died from injuries suffered when he was struck by u truck. MUSKOGJfiHi, Aug. LAWTON, Aug. committee! of 18 from tho Bacone college Alurnnl association will conduct a drive for funds lo buy 400 volumes for the college li- brary to bring it up to .standards of the national education associa- tion. Heud The News Classified Ads. Cecil J. of staff of the United Stales military ad- visory group in China, is n't Fort Sill La enlist the aid of the field artillery school in establishment of a similar institution in China. Eight Chinese officers, are being trained at Fort Sill to take as-- signments in the Chinese school. Better For One Truck1 Driver In Burning Truck Warns Would-Be Helpers To Stay Away DURHAM, N. C., Aug. big oil transport truck and an automobile crashed. The truck turned over and burst inlo flames. The driver, Johnnie R. John- son, 30, the truck driver, was pin- nod in the truck, smothered by u sea of burning oil. On-lookers came forward to try to save him. "Go he shouted. "It's better Tor one man to die than a lot of others. Get back There was no use, anyway. The flames blocked the way, engulfed him. The truck became a funeral pyre. Saved That Heifer COPJ-'E-YVILLE, Kus., Aug. HO. n yearling heifer crashed through a cistern plat- form and fell into the writer, John Bn.iwl.cy, Cofteyville farm- or, rushed .to. its aid. He sat ,on the .edge of Ihe cis- tern for two hours, holding the heifer's heart above water until Coffeyvillo firemen arrived and rescued 400-pound animal wilh n block and tackle. mentioned the aftermath of the. lust war and then said: "According to available infor- mation, allied troops still con- tinue to be situated on the ter- ritory of several member states of the United Nations, and other states not including former en- um.y territory." He said the information should describe the conditions us of Aug. 1, "The presence of allied troops for so long a time after the end ot tho war, a presence which is not called for by military neces- sity, must provoke natural un- easiness in the peoples of those countries in which foreign troops are still he said. Ahrends Improving Afler Accident Lr. and Mrs. Ahrend and Sons Injured Recently In Accident Near Tucton Mr. and Mrs T. S. Moore, 1003 custody, and probably will as part payment of reparations. It has directed Ihe removal o thousands of mines from coasta and inland hnzardou: has controlled shipping, in those waters. But tho navy's biggest job has been re.pah-iat.ion, a program un tier Rear Adm. C H. Mrnnseno i has diriH'li.Ml the repatriation o rnuri' than Japanese ti their homeland from China, For moKir, Hid Philippines, Korea Manchuria and the P.acific islands, and has hauled I.OOO.OOf. residents of those places back lo their homos from japan. .TL.-.-.UJJ _ Chickasaw-Choclaw Annual Sfate Meet Here Next Monday The Choctnw-Chickasaw Con federal ion hold its nnnu.'i stale meeting next Monday Ada. The meeting will be held in the district courtroom beginning at 10 a.m. Di-legatps from other units ol the confederation in the slain wil; be present, along wilh visitor, who tire, cordially invited to at- tend this business meeting. C. C Chastain of Chic-kasha, vice-pres- ident of the stale organisation, will preside. At the same time the meeting is in progress in Ada, tribal offi- cials will bo in Washington pre- paring for a conference with the secretary of the interior and oth- er interior department officials to discuss further the sale of the coul and asphalt deposits and lands belonging lo Ihe Choclaws and Chickiisaws. Floyd Maylubby, governor of the Chickasuws, and Bon Dwighl, tribal titlorney ol1 the Choctuws, are the officials-who will be in Washington. After the return of those men from the nation's capital, Ihe Ponlotoc county unit of the con- federation will ha from Tucson, Ariz., where they were called to the bedside of their daughter, Mrs. Virgil E. Ahrcncl, and her family. Lieut, Ahrend, Mrs. Ahrenrl arid- their two .sons were injured in an automobile accident about two weeks ago while e.ri route from San Diego to Oklahoma. All of the car were injured, with one passenger, VI. J. Holland Sun Diego, being kill- ed. Lieut. Ahrend suffered a severed artery, Mrs. Ahrend is recovering from concussion and the children received minor in- juries. Both Mr. and Mrs. Ahrend are former residents of Ada and at- tended East Central college, where he played basketball. She is the former Miss Mary Beth Moore. They ;ilnn to come to Ada ns soon as '.noy are released from the hospital in Tucson. meeting ington trip from one of them. CAIRO. Aug 30. Tho eader of the Moslem Brolher- iood associalion, Shiek Hasan A! 3ana, demands that Premier 'sinail Sidky Pasha immediately ircnk off .negotiations with Brit- lin for revision of the 393C al- iance or take effective steps lo win withdrawal of British troops "rom Egypt, within o year, with he iillcrnative of "bloody revolu- ion." Sheik Hasan, speaking lo thou- sands of Egyptian Moslems Just night, also called for un Arab state that in Palestine and free Arab and declared Moslem worlds would stand us a barrier lo Hussia. President Harrison established the Yellowstone Timber Land Re- serve in 1891. This was the first Read The News Classified Ads. such reserve in the S. Harper Sentenced To 10 Year Term R. L. Harper, a negro, was sentenced Friday morning lo serve .10 years in the state peni- tentiary lit McAleslor, by District Judge Tal Crawford. Harper entered a plea of guil- ty to a pair of charges of grand larceny second and subsequent offense. J-lc was sentenced lo serve 10 years on each of the Iwo counts willj the sesond to run concur- rently with the first, making a total of 20 years that, he sentenced to serve. Mololov Says Time To Put Stop To Outside Influences (mitts Paving Way for Return Of King; Byrnes Argues For Greek Hearing By ROBERT EUNSON PARIS, AUR. 30, accused the United Slates and Great Britain today of "interfer- ence" in next Sunday's Creek election and charged the little Balkan country was paving the way for the return of exiled George H with "a reign of ter- British troops arc there and American worships are on their Hussion Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov told the peace conference during consid- eration of a Greek request to consider the Greek-Albania bord- er dispute. Molotov asserted it was "high time we put n stop" lo what he called outside interference and "give the Greek people a chance lo select their own form of gov- ernment." He continded that "the present form of government in Greece is very unpopular mong Ihe Greek people. Greece is the only Balkan country not strongly under the influence of Russia. Will Debate Border Row Despite the bitter opposition of Russia and the Slav bloc, the peace conference voted 12 to 7 after four hours of blistering de- bate to discuss the Grcck-Albnn- inn border at its next meeting. The Greeks Insist that purl of northern Epiru.s (southern Alban- ia) now occupied bv Albania ac- tually is Greek territory. Secretary of State Byrnes dur- ing the debate declared: "It .seems incredible to me that we would deny one of the 31 governments that furnished troops to aid un in victory the opportunity to present its regardless as to our views on their claims. The United has no conviction on the territor- ial dispute but the United States would give the right to every member to bo With Mololov responded that Russia was not opposing a discussion of Ihe Greek-Albanian border by the council of foreign minislcn of the United Slales, Russia, Groat Britain and France. He said the "French delegate had. been right" in insisting that the matter did not come under the five draft treiilies prepared for peace conference consideration. On the vole, France sided with the Slav nations. Belgium and Norway abstained. Molotov, speaking from the 3ais without notes, criticized Greece for what he described as an atlempt "lo involve the for- eign ministers council in her claims" against Albania. "This is a very dangerous ques- tion because it is calculated to create trouble in the said Molotoy. The Russian minister asserted thai Greece was attempting to 'create nationalistic sentiment nsidu Greece xxxx on the of he plebiscite" scheduled for Sepl. 1 on 'the question of the of the king. "An attempl is being made to ulilitize this conference to make claims not on an enemy but on >ne's Molotov said. lit- declared that the Greek delegation was not waiting to )i-ing its claims before the con- ercncc in a "usual democratic and wax trying lo In- volve the council of foreign min- sters in "their inflamed calims of KKnindizemcnl." LAWTON. Aug. 30. h e -rfiwton division of the Public Service company will soon launch expansion program to loublc its oulput of electricity. Division Manager John S. Boyctt nnounced. The company ex- pects to complete the work in No Wailing Lisl At Talihlna Sanitarium OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. the first time in II) years there is nn wailing list at. the Eastern Oklahoma Tuberculosis sanitarium. Dr. F. P. Maker, su- 'rinl.i.-ndenl. reported yesterday. Here to confer with tho stale bonrd of affairs, Baker said Hie capacity of the sanitarium was about patients and that only 225 are now being treated. The superintendent said that health surveys and prevention campaigns probably have helped to reduce the patic-nl load. Greater rot-urns for nmounl in- veslcd. Ada News Want Ads. TH' PESSIMIST Listen whul others t' possible thnt you might not know it all. Anybody who watches 'em make a hamburger an' then eats it ia cither a hero er fool.   

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