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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 27, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 27, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             agriculture department and the OPA are disagreeing on what ceilings meat is to have effective Thursday what con the public expect if government agencies disagree? A v f rujce Nrt Jtilv I'Hid Circulation 8407 Mrmbtr; Audit Ilurrau of Circulation THE ADA EVENING NEWS FINAL EDITION ll.'i ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1S46 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Americans On Move Once More Setting Peace-Time Record For Travel And Vacationing This Year By MAKUMV WASHINGTON. Aug. 27, L-l'i..... ArnericHin this year tire, setting record for travel and vacationing. Fired from war mid wartime restrictions, they're doing these l.-iingi: Hollmc ninny the highwnyti in thru- rarv loading Ihe railroads, swarming into Canada and Mexi- co, touring tin: National parks, and packing holds and summer ;esortj from const to const. Here are a lew quick glances a! what's happening. llotrl.s The Amn Iran hotel association says holels and r e o r t s (his summer- -with .smiii! few excep- have ln-i-n packed from til The year ck-mobl- MTviiTini'ii swiirmrd honn was the penk year for hotel occupancies. Mill HMO is running nerk and neck with it. In some sections .summer re- sorts which would havo closed down on Labor Day, Sept. 2, arc i-err.aining open through Septem- ber to handle the vacation flood. The hotel association says the r.tuation may ease up a bit but warns: don't sot out for it hotel unless you'ie sure you have reservation. The heavy business of the hotels isn't due to vacationers fclonr. Uusincssmcn are traveling ;n huge numbers. The association of Amrrlcaii expects HMO to be the KM-ati-M peacetime travel year in The association estimates: (10.- passenger mile.i will be travele! in HMO, compared with in tho previous record peacetime year. Railroad travel i.s below 11M5 v iien servicemen were returning RUSSIA ACCUSED OF INTIMIDATION Eat It Whil. You Can National Turks The interior department reporU lhat travel in the national parky is surpassing 1SH1, the previous record year for visitors. The department says t Ivn 1 through July 1340. more thai people visited the na- tional parks. In the siime period r.! 1941 only went inrrc. Auto Travel This in what the American association figures: Of the ears able to roll. will lie taken 01 kind of vacation trip each tar rariyini; average of Hirer p-'oplr. in- a total people taking some kind of holi- day. of those people will spend an average of or a total of or vacations, In the six months ended Jun Sf'. the number o( Ameri- <-nn ra.'i going mtLi Mexico was Ji.Ofl'5. the highest (or liny siml- penoil in history. The previous peak wa.-i 1041 v. hen crossed Into Mexico in the first six months. In the six ended Juno 3r. about cars cross- ed the-border intn Canada for n S'.ay of more than 24 hours, an inn case o( 12'1 per cent over Ihe jsmc period in ID-IS, a war year, i Comparative figures for a peacetime year were not nvnil- aolc here.) Turner Will Speak At Chickasha Meet OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. principal speaker nl the Sixth district league of young democrats convention at Cliicka- sna Sept. 2 will be Hoy J. Turner democratic nominee for gover- nor, district chairman W. S. Kiest of Comanche announced. Other speakers include Judge Toby Morris, Lawton, the Sixth district congressional nominee congressman Jed Johnson, and Frank Grayson, a member of the state inri.ustrial commission. The Chickashn convention is the first of a series of eight. Better results for amount in- vested. Ada News Want Ads. Says Meat Industry Of Livestock Rush Cattle, Hogi Hurried To Market Ta Escape New OPA Price Ceilings Real Famine On Meat May Remit During Winter By WILLIAM FERRIS CHICAGO, Aug. "Eat it while you. can" was the advice of tho meat industry today as packers worked at turning the largest cattle run since 1934 into steaks, rib rotists find other cuts ol! beef. I'lickers predicted frotsly that by Thursday, when .the new OPA price ceilings on live stock are scheduled to become ef- fective, the currently jam-packed livestock markets would resemble the great open spaces. "Cntllo nre coming to market which should never be slaughter- Normon Draper of the Amer- ican meal institute said. He add- ed that this winter there would be "a real famine." Send Lightweight Animals In their rush to get in under OPA ceiling deadlines, producers were sending to market light- weight hogs and crillle which nor- mally would remain on for months contentedly munching grain, livestock observers snid. Twenty of tho nation's largest stockyards handled n tolnl of cattle yesterday, Including First Graders Will Enroll Namei A To J Start It 'Wednesday Of This Week; Higher Grades Enroll Next Week of first graders will en roll here til their respeclive grade lehools Wednesday. August They will launch the enrollment leduli! which for Ada schools will end Thursday of next week. Wednesday enrollment for first graders whose names starl with letters from A lo J. Those with names slnrling with (.-tter.'i K In H will eni'Qll Thur.t- lii.v of Ihis week and those with etler.'i S Ihrough Z will enroll Friday. Remember Birth Certlfloitea Parenls of first graclcr.i are re- minded again by Supt. Rex Mor- rison that they must bring birth of the boys nnd girls, mid also thnt children will not be accepted _ (or enrollment whose sixth birlhdnys a m u nfter November I, The remaining grades nnd thii senior and junior high school .students will enroll next week. Complete schedules for o a u h group will bo published nhctici of lime in The News. (irnilf! school principals met wilh Supt. Morrison Monday uf- ternoon and talked over the, situ- ation and plans for enrollment nnd getting classwork begun on Monday, Sept. 9. One In Principal One change in principals goes into Rice, Glen- woocl. has resigned to take n placi! with the Veterans Admin- istration, and Mrs. Niccy Vick- er.i, who was nctlna principnl during five years Hice was in army service, lin.s been named Cilenwiiud principal. Offices nl all of the public schools an? open dully this week ncxl from I) lo 12 nnd from 1 to -I o'clock. 'iO.OOO nt the huge Chicago yards. The InrgcHl run for any one day hero since Sept. 24, 1023, and the largesl one day total on record for August.. In 12 major mnrkels recelpls were calves, 000 sheep and lambs, nnd including n run of ut Chicago, Pi-icon of almost till classes of hogs and cittllo dropped sharply Council, Airport Group To Meet Seek To Agree On What Is Essential To Project Because of unavoidable circum- stances, Ihe joinl meeling of the :ily council and aviation commit- tee of the of Commerce was postponed from Monday light to Tuesday night. One councilman reported thai .lit; aviation committee was not nit- wo WEATHER Oklahoma Showers western two thirds tonight and Wednes- day and beginning eastern third late tonight or Wednesday; cool- er panhandle late tonight'; cooler west and north Wednesday. Weather Forecast for AUK. 27-.10 Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri. Kansas. Oklahoma and eastern Nebraska Wednesday and gener- al showers again about Sunday; kMiount light Nebraska, western Kansas nnd wrslr-rn Oklahoma fcnd moderate lo heavy else- temperatures generally t-ooler Wednesday; warming Fri- dav Satuiday and cooler a- gam Sunday: temperatures will average nearly 5 degrees nbove normal Oklahoma and southern Kansa- and S degrees below nor- mal Missouri, Nebraska and norUiein Kansas. to report Monday night, ould be ready by Tuesday Mayor Frank Spencer was out of town, making it necessary for hi; meeting to be postponed. The purpose of the meeting lo- lighl (Tuesday) is lo determine he needs for specific improvc- ncnts nl the Chnunccy Airport. The council is expecting a report outlining a program thai will be of the greatest benefit lo Ihe City of Ada. The council is eager to learn jusl what improvnmciils are necessary as the nirporl ranks high among proposed projects of the city. (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) Vanoss Community Fair Plans Ready. September 13 Date Plans arc being completed for a community .fair nl V'nnww Sept. 13, wilh 4-H club and FFA mem- bers compulitliiK for honors along wilh other participants, There will be open classes In almost every division, according to Cal- vin Pennington, FFA ruporler ul Vanoss. A brush arbor is being con- structed for the purpose of fur- nishing shade for livestock en- tered in the various divisions. Dairy heifers distribuled in the Vanoss community as a part of the Ada Chamber of Commerce dairy heifer program will be on display al the community fair. Thu public i.s invilcd to attend the fair Friday, Sept, 13, in ad- dition to events scheduled for the evening following Ihe fnir. Oakman, Worstell Schools To Begin Oakman nnd Worslcll schools begin Monday, September 2. M. Nance, Onkman principal, announces thai enrollmenl will take place Friday morning, Aug- ust HO, beginning nl 9 o'clock and that classwork starts next Mon- day on a full nine-months term, Mrs. Willie F. Simpson, princi- pal nl Worslell, calls for n hnlf- duy session on Monday lo gel enrollmenl accomplished. The school building has been redeco- rated for the- new scliool' year. Read TliH News Classified Ads. Soviet Move Aids WP Wives, Widows Savings Accounts in Ruts Zone Unfrozen BERLIN, Aug. 27. (fP) The Russian military government lo- day ordered parlial unfreezing of savings bank accounts in the So- vicl of Germany to permit war widows nnd wives of win' prisoners still in detention to tlrnw up to Ihrce hundred murks by tho military rale o! ex- from Ihcir husbands' ac- counts. In cases where the woman is incapable of work or destitute she will be allowed to draw 400 murks. The Russian-licensed Berliner Zeitung called Ihis "another in a series of benefits" given by the Soviet administration, which in- cluded raising of food rations for sick people, granting women equal pay with men for equal work and unfreezing of life in- surance accounts. All these benefits have been announced in the last few weeks preceding tho first, postwar tlec- lions in Iho Soviet zone and the Soviet-sponsored socialist unily party has claimed credit for most of them. Split Over Meat Ceilings Agriculture Department, OPA Disagree On Whaf't To Go Into Effect Thursday WASHINGTON, Aug. 27, The administration's economic high command sought today lb reconcile differences between the agriculture department and the office of price administration on the level al ceilings to be re- established on meat animals Thursdtiy. The OPA lias taken the, position thai; which Iho price decontrol board last week order- ed yet at tho June 30 levels of per.'hun- ilred pounds Tor hogn and .for cattle, Chicago basis, together- subsidies in effect ut thiit time, Those were the ceilings n effect when the old price con- trol law expired. Anderson For Raise At the agriculture department, ndes told reporters Secretary Anderson believes ceilings on eattlo and hogs, should be increas- ed upwards of per hundred sounds to encourage greater pro- duction. These aides said Reconversion Director John Slcolman was tnk- ng part in n three-way telephone discussion with Anderson, who in vacationing ol his homo In Albu- ucrcme, New Mexico, and Price tdminislralor Paul Porter in an effort to get the .issue settled. Confidence was expressed nt the agriculture' department thnt un agreement wilj be reached in time .for the eeilings to become effective date set last week. OPA officials snid, sonic "hon- est differences of opinion" have developed on some phases of the rccontrol program, but they, too, expressed confidence a full agree- ment would bo reached before Thursday. Reflect Different Viewpoint At both agencies, the differen- ces were said to be those which normally develop in discussions over eeilings on agriculture com- modities, because of a tendency of the OPA reflect the consum- er viewpoint and the agriculture department to reflect produc- ers' viewpoint. Department officials said Hint under the new price Anderson linn, in effect, authority to determine the final ceilings. They told reporters, however, that there "is no truth whatso- ever" to published reports that the, secreary. had threatened to resign if the OPA did not accept his recommendations. Five Men Announced As Believed Dead War Department Formally Notifies Next of Kin Of Men On Plane THEY'RE BITING FOR TUB PRESIDENT: President Truman him] in a 4-pound schoolmaster, his second catch during a fishing near u U, S. Ntivnl Operating Buue in Bermuda. The Military Aide, Mnj. Gen. Harry H, Vtuglin, urged the President to keep trying nnd "come up with the superintendent of education.' Rain Was Real Droughl-Ender Sunday-Monday Total 5.01 Inches; Lightning Severely Damages Sugg Home Three Negroes Die In Road Collision iy AnocioUd Oklahoma's highway falalilies for the year stood at 326 Tues- more Ihun last; after three negroes were'killed in a collision near Apache. Tho dead, the highway patrol cportcd, were A. John Jones, Mrs. Angelina Wells nnd Lua Wright, all of Altus. The patrol said the cur in which they were ridirig Monday skidded and turn- ed and turned sideways in tho road nnrl was struck in the side jy another machine. WASHINGTON, Aug. war department formally notified next of kin today thn't five American army officers nnd men were killed or were "believ- ed lo have been killed" in the Aug. 19 crash of an nrmy trans- port plane shot down by Yugo- slav fighters. (Dispatches from Belgrade said hope thnt any of the five might still be found alive was abandon- ed lodny when U. S. graves regis- tration commission officers said sufficient evidence had been found, to indicate that all five crewmen hud died in the crash.) The war department listed def- initely us killed, Cupt. Harold .Farnsley Schreiber, New Albany, Tnd. His wife wns listed us Mrs. Marcia Schrieber. nnd his father us Ralph H, Schreiber, Cherry street, New Albany. Those listed as believed'to have been killed were: Capt. Richard H. Claeys, whose sister, Mary Clayes lives at St. Charles, 111. Capt. Blen H. Freestone; moth- er, Mrs. Harvey S. Freestone, Hurley, Idaho. Corp, .Matthew M. Comko; mother, Mrs. Tilley Comko, Mon- cssen, Pa. j Corp. Chbsler J, Lower; par- ents, Mr. and Mrs; Chester Lower, Lake street, Enfield, N. H. The war department sent out the notification telegrams utter being advised of the casualties irom army headquarters in Italy, ME TEST SAYS EMPLOYE TOLD TRUTH TULSA, Okla., Aug. 27, A lie-detector test given an em- ploye of Mike Stakis, wealthy lulsii cafe operator, has .Indicated thai he told the truth in denying any knowledge of his poison death, Police Captain Hurry Siege said. The employe had been ques- tioned wilh others nfler a post- mortem test revealed traces of: arsenic in Stakis' liver. She was released after questioning. Theodore Drnkos, named guar- dian for George Stakis, son of the dead man, snid an inventory of the estate indicated it would amount to i Most estimates of Ihe Sunday night-Monday morning ruinfiill fell well below the figures indi- cated by the rningnuge. Added lo Ihu nights downpour's T.IH inches 1.20 inches beton: Ihu rainfall censed well in Wondny morning. That meant n 0.01 inch fall in slightly less than 15 hours. This, wilh the 1.64 that fell the 3receding Sunday night it n d VIonduy morning, brought the drought-breaking rains to fl.fiH, restored walur lo streams and re- filled, stock ponds. Cooler temperautres were one nflermnlh of Ihe rainfall. Mon- day's high was 84 degrees and the night's low of 07 wan the low- est for many weeks. Worst damage, reported from Sunday night's electrical storm was that done to Ihc homo of! have been marked by uppnrenl Mr. nnd Mrs. H, P. Sugg, 119 East, defense efforts to stall for time, in Nazis' Trial Hearing End May Close On Weekend, Dramatic Scene Expected As Defendants Speak NUERNBERG. Aug. Lord Juslice Sir Geoffrey Law rente announced loday Ihe in lernntionnl military tribunal's in lenllon of concluding by till: weekend the nine-months-ok lrli.il of 22 German war lenders and seven nazi organizations ac- cused of crimes against humanity The president of the tribunal made the announcement after de- fense counsel for the German high command had requested per- mission to bring another wiliiem from the Dachau war prisoner cnmp in nil effort lo refute testi- mony given yesterday by Maj Gen. Walter Schrelber, a German staff officer who said the Ger- mans were planning bacteriologi- cal warfare. The closing phases of tho trial slnrlecl Nov. 20, Seventeenth. Lightning ripped off Ihe roof and smashed the ceiling of u summer sleeping porch which Ihc Suggs had left u few minutes be- fore. It damaged wiring, knock- ed switches off the walls, lore two holes in the walls, broke a half dozen or more windows. Water damage lo turnilure on thi porch exposed to Ihc heaviest part of the rain was considerable. Mr. nnd Mrs. Sugg and Iheir daughter Marjoric wore slightly shocked for a Jew moments. Sugg had just closed tho door lo the. sleeping porch and taken a few steps across u room when the crash came. Mrs. Sugg and Marjoric had just retired and Marjoric was tossed lo the floor by the blast. Sugg, describing the damage, remarks that he has more re- spect for lightning than he had n couple of days ago and doesn't want any ever to come any clos- er. The Associated Press reports that more showers fell in scat- tered portions of Oklahoma over- night, wntli Ardmore recording the heaviest downpour oC 2.3ti inches. Temperatures, toppling from the century murk wllcn the first rains came Sunday, remained in the BO's in most sections of the state enrly Tuesday. The high for the slate was only at Frederick, while the low was 02 at Woodward. PRETTY ENOUGH, TOO YOUNG FOR MISS AMERICA CONTEST LOUISVILLE, Ky., Aug. 27, I.'P) -Miss Emma Lee Bluckf'ord is pretty enough to compete for the title "Miss but she isn't old enough. Tho 17-yetir-oJd Paduciih boun- ty won the title T'Miss Kentucky" nt the state .fnir here, and was tn compete for he national crown at Atlantic City next month. However, she had to relinquish the slate title today because rules require that contestants be 18 years old. Miss Mpdonna Smith, 10, of Jenkins, will be "Miss Kentucky." reflected in requests J'or permis- sion to ciucstirjn new witnesses and submit affidavits some of which, in the words of the tri- bunal, "have lillle or no bearing on the case." Still on schedule for Ihe Iri- bunnl are defense summations for the high command and general sUiff, which are expected lo be completed today, and for the reich cabinet and S. A. 
                            

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